History Main / FlowerMotifs

28th Jan '16 5:34:33 PM toongrrl1990
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* Used in MadMen as a nod to womens' lives. Whether if it's about romance, the traditional roles of wife and mother, marriage, sadness, or [[spoiler: in the case of Stan and Peggy, a blossoming relationship]].
24th Jan '16 2:51:06 AM Chabal2
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* A ''Literature/MissMarple'' short story relies on this. A letter from an unknown person called Georgine was sent to an ex-ReverseMole who'd taken out a German secret society that would inform the society's mole in his household to kill him. This was done by spelling out "DEATH" with the names of varieties of dahlia. At the end, Miss Marple comments that Georgine is German for Dahlia, which in the language of flowers stands for deceit and treachery (the killer was [[spoiler:the agent's niece]]).
16th Jan '16 4:05:35 PM karstovich2
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** UsefulNotes/{{Japan}} has all manner of traditional floral symbols, but in a nutshell, the chrysanthemum (''kiku'') is associated with the Emperor and the monarchy in general, the paluownia (''kiri'') is associated with the [[UsefulNotes/JapanesePoliticalSystem Prime Minister and the Government]], and the {{cherry blossom|s}} (''sakura'') is associated with the Japanese as a people or nation.
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** UsefulNotes/{{Japan}} has all manner of traditional floral symbols, but in a nutshell, the chrysanthemum (''kiku'') is associated with the Emperor and the monarchy in general, general (and thus, metonymically, with the Japanese state), the paluownia (''kiri'') is associated with the [[UsefulNotes/JapanesePoliticalSystem Prime Minister and the Government]], and the {{cherry blossom|s}} (''sakura'') is associated with the Japanese as a people or nation.
16th Jan '16 4:01:40 PM karstovich2
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*** Using the four symbols--Rose, Thistle, Leek, and Flax--together symbolises British unity in diversity. Historically--and sometimes today--it was the Shamrock rather than Flax, as all of Ireland was part of the UK and not just the northern bit.
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*** Using the four symbols--Rose, Thistle, Leek, and Flax--together (usually twisted in a wreath or improbably growing out of a single stem/root system) symbolises British unity in diversity. Historically--and sometimes today--it was the Shamrock rather than Flax, as all of Ireland was part of the UK and not just the northern bit.
10th Jan '16 11:02:19 PM DrFraud
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* In ''Plantasia'' a trainee fairy named Holly tends a recluse's neglected garden in response to a flippantly-made wish. As the garden is gradually restored, so is his spirit.
10th Jan '16 10:50:48 PM DrFraud
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A character's garden will also give the audience an impression of their personality, usually in conjunction with the state of their house or personal appearance. A garden that is extremely well kept, but with little or no flowers in it, suggests an orderly but clinical personality; a garden overgrown with weeds might suggest a cynic who doesn't see the beauty in life any more, while a disorganized but thriving garden full of flowers probably belongs to a cheerful and badly-organized owner.
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A character's garden will also give the audience an impression of their personality, usually in conjunction with the state of their house or personal appearance. A garden that is extremely well kept, but with little few or no flowers in it, suggests an orderly but clinical personality; a garden overgrown with weeds might suggest a cynic who doesn't see the beauty in life any more, while a disorganized but thriving garden full of flowers probably belongs to a cheerful and badly-organized owner.
28th Dec '15 4:36:33 AM Minni128
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*In the ''Literature/MadgieWhatDidYouDo'', the symbolism of flowers is usually there, often in the form of lilies, the which are mostly associated with innocence and death (like most portrayals). In the 56th story, we get lycoris flowers, the which are often associated with death (said flowers being planted in and around graveyards), at the same time, they are also associated with not seeing someone again or lost memories.
25th Dec '15 8:22:15 PM karstovich2
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** UsefulNotes/{{Japan}} has all manner of traditional floral symbols, but in a nutshell, the chrysanthemum is associated with the Emperor and the monarchy in general, the paluownia is associated with the [[UsefulNotes/JapanesePoliticalSystem Prime Minister and the Government]], and the {{cherry blossom|s}} is associated with the Japanese as a people or nation.
to:
** UsefulNotes/{{Japan}} has all manner of traditional floral symbols, but in a nutshell, the chrysanthemum (''kiku'') is associated with the Emperor and the monarchy in general, the paluownia (''kiri'') is associated with the [[UsefulNotes/JapanesePoliticalSystem Prime Minister and the Government]], and the {{cherry blossom|s}} (''sakura'') is associated with the Japanese as a people or nation.
25th Dec '15 8:08:24 PM karstovich2
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** France has long been associated with the fleur-de-lis (a stylized lily or iris bloom) from the days of the French monarchy; an old symbol, it gradually collected Christian overtones that matched the particular theology of the French monarchy, particularly connected to the Virgin Mary (to whom the French monarchs traditionally offered especial devotion). This is unofficial--the Republic generally wants nothing to do with monarchist symbolism--but it persists in the popular imagination.
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** France has long been associated with the fleur-de-lis [[FleurDeLis fleur-de-lis]] (a stylized lily or iris bloom) from the days of the French monarchy; an old symbol, it gradually collected Christian overtones that matched the particular theology of the French monarchy, particularly connected to the Virgin Mary (to whom the French monarchs traditionally offered especial devotion). This is unofficial--the Republic generally wants nothing to do with monarchist symbolism--but it persists in the popular imagination.
22nd Dec '15 8:17:26 PM karstovich2
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*** Ohio's state flower is the Ohio buckeye (what else?), a species of horse chestnut, hence Ohio State's oddly-named sports teams. Yes, their seeds do in fact look like OSU mascot Brutus Buckeye's head; don't try to eat them, as they're poisonous (unlike the chocolate-dipped peanut butter balls made to ''look'' like buckeye nuts endemic in Ohio, which even Michiganders are willing to admit are delicious).
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*** Ohio's state flower tree is the Ohio buckeye (what else?), a species of horse chestnut, hence Ohio State's oddly-named sports teams. Yes, their seeds do in fact look like OSU mascot Brutus Buckeye's head; don't try to eat them, as they're poisonous (unlike the chocolate-dipped peanut butter balls made to ''look'' like buckeye nuts endemic in Ohio, which even Michiganders are willing to admit are delicious).
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