History Main / FictionNeverLies

11th Jun '15 8:46:48 PM Folamh3
Is there an issue? Send a Message


This is an OmnipresentTrope. VillainsNeverLie would be a subtrope and is both when other characters trust obviously untrustworthy characters, as well as the tendency for villains to lie less often then we would expect of them.

to:

This is an OmnipresentTrope. VillainsNeverLie would be a subtrope and is both when other characters trust obviously untrustworthy characters, as well as the tendency for villains to lie less often then we would expect of them.
them. Video games are noted for being more "trustworthy" than other media, so the trope PlayingThePlayer exists to describe games in which the player is actively deceived in a particularly surprising way.
8th May '12 10:52:08 PM Abodos
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* UnreliableExpositor: The words are put in the mouth of people who has a very vague idea of what's going on and/or reasons to misguide even if they do. Characters don't even have to ''intentionally'' make up anything. Like most people, they tend to justify their actions. Not being omniscient, they may close gaps by jumping to conclusions.

to:

* UnreliableExpositor: The words are put in the mouth mouths of people who has have a very vague idea of what's going on and/or reasons to misguide even if they do. Characters don't even have to ''intentionally'' make up anything. Like most people, they tend to justify their actions. Not being omniscient, they may close gaps by jumping to conclusions.
27th Mar '12 4:05:42 PM johnnye
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The act of reading a book, or watching a movie, or playing a game, is a bond of trust between the audience and the creator. The audience is ''trusting'' that the creator isn't going to waste their time and will provide a satisfactory experience. For the audiences part, the first step in that relationship is participating in said media (reading the book, watching the movie, etc.) The second step is buying into it, in other words, WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief, but it's not only that. You see, when it comes to stories, the audience is intended to believe everything a character says is the truth, unless given a reason to believe otherwise.

How exhausting would it be to watch a relatively straight forward RomanticComedy and have to wonder if when every time a character said they were doing something without a scene to prove it, they weren't cutting up grandmas, robbing banks or killing vampires? Second guessing everything a character says when it's not necessary only takes away from the enjoyment of the work. It either turns your mind into a snarl, or your brain comes up with a scenario that is so much cooler than what actually happens that you are disappointed.

But even more than characters, a reader is expected to trust the narrative, especially if it's in the Third Person PointOfView. How can a reader know or even guess what's going on if they can't trust what the narrator is telling them? If the narrator is lying, the story could change at any moment, anything could happen. That thing we were told isn't possible? It could happen. That guy we are told is dead? He could come back. Everything we were lead to believe is important could be shoved aside and a whole new plot could start up. Seriously, if you can't trust anything the narrator says, then why bother reading or watching the story in the first place?

to:

The act of reading a book, or watching a movie, or playing a game, is a bond of trust between the audience and the creator. The audience is ''trusting'' that the creator isn't going to waste their time and will provide a satisfactory experience. For the audiences audience's part, the first step in that relationship is participating in said media (reading the book, watching the movie, etc.) The second step is buying into it, in other words, WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief, but it's not only that. You see, when it comes to stories, the audience is intended to believe everything a character says is the truth, unless given a reason to believe otherwise.

How exhausting would it be to watch a relatively straight forward RomanticComedy and have to wonder if when every time a character said they were doing something without a scene to prove it, they weren't cutting up grandmas, robbing banks or killing vampires? Second guessing everything a character says when it's not necessary only takes away from the enjoyment of the work. It either [[MindScrew turns your mind into a snarl, snarl]], or your brain comes up with a scenario that is so much cooler than what actually happens [[TheUntwist that you are disappointed.

disappointed]].

But even more than characters, a reader is expected to trust the narrative, especially if it's in the Third Person PointOfView. How can a reader know or even guess what's going on if they can't trust what the narrator is telling them? If the narrator is lying, the story could change at any moment, anything could happen. That thing we were told isn't possible? It could happen. That guy we are told is dead? He could come back. Everything we were lead led to believe is important could be shoved aside and a whole new plot could start up. Seriously, if you can't trust anything the narrator says, then why bother reading or watching the story in the first place?



* PlotTwist: When, after having lead you into believing one thing about what is happening, something happens which radically changes this perception. When this doesn't happen until the end, it's a TwistEnding.

to:

* PlotTwist: When, after having lead led you into believing one thing about what is happening, something happens which radically changes this perception. When this doesn't happen until the end, it's a TwistEnding.
This list shows the last 3 events of 3. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.FictionNeverLies