History Main / FeministFantasy

14th Jan '17 2:55:17 AM Morgenthaler
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* Another film by Creator/GuillermoDelToro is ''Film/PansLabyrinth'', a haunting [[Literature/AlicesAdventuresInWonderland Alice In Wonderland]]-ish fairy tale set against the harsh reality of the SpanishCivilWar. Ofelia, a girl with a vivid imagination and great curiosity, has moved into the countryside with her widowed mother and new [[WickedStepmother step-father]], the brutal Captain Vidal. There, she discovers a mysterious old labyrinth and encounters a Faun, who reveals to her that she is a lost princess from the Underworld. She is faced with three tests, meant to show whether her time in the human world has diminished her true self or not. Meanwhile, the family's maid, Mercedes, attempts to help the rebels against her employer and protect Ofelia. Melding a dark and nightmarish fantasy world with very real human cruelty, it deals directly with themes of misogyny, marriages of convenience, and societies that value male children over everything else. Ofelia is a brave, intelligent, and strong-willed heroine unwilling to be bound by her cruel step-father, while Mercedes is a woman of incredible courage and conviction who famously gives Captain Vidal a half GlasgowGrin when he threatens to torture her and makes it clear, before [[spoiler: the rebels gun him down, that his son will ''never'' know a thing about him]]. While ambiguous in the film itself, WordOfGod confirms that the supernatural elements of Ofelia's journey are real.

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* Another film by Creator/GuillermoDelToro is ''Film/PansLabyrinth'', a haunting [[Literature/AlicesAdventuresInWonderland Alice In Wonderland]]-ish fairy tale set against the harsh reality of the SpanishCivilWar.UsefulNotes/SpanishCivilWar. Ofelia, a girl with a vivid imagination and great curiosity, has moved into the countryside with her widowed mother and new [[WickedStepmother step-father]], the brutal Captain Vidal. There, she discovers a mysterious old labyrinth and encounters a Faun, who reveals to her that she is a lost princess from the Underworld. She is faced with three tests, meant to show whether her time in the human world has diminished her true self or not. Meanwhile, the family's maid, Mercedes, attempts to help the rebels against her employer and protect Ofelia. Melding a dark and nightmarish fantasy world with very real human cruelty, it deals directly with themes of misogyny, marriages of convenience, and societies that value male children over everything else. Ofelia is a brave, intelligent, and strong-willed heroine unwilling to be bound by her cruel step-father, while Mercedes is a woman of incredible courage and conviction who famously gives Captain Vidal a half GlasgowGrin when he threatens to torture her and makes it clear, before [[spoiler: the rebels gun him down, that his son will ''never'' know a thing about him]]. While ambiguous in the film itself, WordOfGod confirms that the supernatural elements of Ofelia's journey are real.
5th Jan '17 12:24:54 PM SeptimusHeap
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* The ''[[Franchise/{{Alien}} Alien]]'' series is legendary for both its [[FreudWasRight Freudian]] monsters and female protagonist, Lt. Ellen Ripley. The original film was written as a Gender Equality Fantasy, with characters only referred to in the script by their last name or rank so that each role could be cast without preconceptions and thus avoid the standard Horror Movie gender dynamics. This resulted in a male DecoyProtagonist killed early in the film, and allowed the creation of one of the most iconic female characters in Science Fiction history. Ripley would go from an ActionSurvivor taking charge in order to escape the titular alien, to a full-blown GenreSavvy MamaBear that blasted her way through an alien hive and battles the enormous Alien Queen in PowerArmor.

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* The ''[[Franchise/{{Alien}} Alien]]'' series is legendary for both its [[FreudWasRight Freudian]] Freudian monsters and female protagonist, Lt. Ellen Ripley. The original film was written as a Gender Equality Fantasy, with characters only referred to in the script by their last name or rank so that each role could be cast without preconceptions and thus avoid the standard Horror Movie gender dynamics. This resulted in a male DecoyProtagonist killed early in the film, and allowed the creation of one of the most iconic female characters in Science Fiction history. Ripley would go from an ActionSurvivor taking charge in order to escape the titular alien, to a full-blown GenreSavvy MamaBear that blasted her way through an alien hive and battles the enormous Alien Queen in PowerArmor.
30th Dec '16 11:42:28 AM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* Lara Croft from ''Franchise/TombRaider'' was always divisive when it came to whether she was a positive female character or not. She's a kick-ass ActionGirl, is independent and wealthy, and an intelligent AdventurerArchaeologist, but she was also ''very'' sexualized and served as MaleGaze eye candy for her earlier games. Far less contentious however is the rebooted ''Tomb Raider'' franchise produced by Crystal Dynamics, which thus far includes ''VideoGame/TombRaider2013'' and ''VideoGame/RiseOfTheTombRaider'', which toned Lara's sexualization way down to the point of being basically non-existent and focused on her growth and CharacterDevelopment from a timid college student to a tough but traumatized survivor and BadAss. The first game in particular focused on her relationship with another woman, Sam, and how their friendship helped Lara grow as a person. The scripts for the rebooted series were also written by a woman, Creator/RhiannaPratchett.

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* Lara Croft from ''Franchise/TombRaider'' was always divisive when it came to whether she was a positive female character or not. She's a kick-ass ActionGirl, is independent and wealthy, and an intelligent AdventurerArchaeologist, but she was also ''very'' sexualized and served as MaleGaze eye candy for her earlier games. Far less contentious however is the rebooted ''Tomb Raider'' franchise produced by Crystal Dynamics, which thus far includes ''VideoGame/TombRaider2013'' and ''VideoGame/RiseOfTheTombRaider'', which toned Lara's sexualization way down to the point of being basically non-existent and focused on her growth and CharacterDevelopment from a timid college student to a tough but traumatized survivor and BadAss.badass. The first game in particular focused on her relationship with another woman, Sam, and how their friendship helped Lara grow as a person. The scripts for the rebooted series were also written by a woman, Creator/RhiannaPratchett.
24th Dec '16 3:07:40 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''Series/TerminatorTheSarahConnorChronicles'', the SpinOff of the ''Franchise/{{Terminator}}'' films. Picking up after the second film, it stars LenaHeadey as [[MamaBear Sarah]] and introduces Creator/SummerGlau as Cameron, a Terminator in the form of a young woman who has been sent back to protect [[TheChosenOne John]] Connor. Much of the series revolves around the two women fighting to protect John from killer cyborgs, ensuring that he'll grow up to follow in his mother's footsteps as leader of the human resistance.

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* ''Series/TerminatorTheSarahConnorChronicles'', the SpinOff of the ''Franchise/{{Terminator}}'' films. Picking up after the second film, it stars LenaHeadey Creator/LenaHeadey as [[MamaBear Sarah]] and introduces Creator/SummerGlau as Cameron, a Terminator in the form of a young woman who has been sent back to protect [[TheChosenOne John]] Connor. Much of the series revolves around the two women fighting to protect John from killer cyborgs, ensuring that he'll grow up to follow in his mother's footsteps as leader of the human resistance.
23rd Dec '16 10:50:30 PM Xtifr
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* ''Literature/{{Dreamsnake}}'' (a post-apocalyptic story in which the protagonist's talent is healing, not fighting, but she's definitely active center of the story), and other books by Vonda N. [=McIntyre=].

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* ''Literature/{{Dreamsnake}}'' (a post-apocalyptic story in which the protagonist's talent is healing, not fighting, but she's definitely active center of the story), and other books by Vonda N. [=McIntyre=].Creator/VondaNMcIntyre.
20th Dec '16 7:22:44 AM DarkPhoenix94
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* ComicBook/MsMarvel is explicitly Feminist, starring a highly decorated Officer turned superheroine. Carol has seen many ugly incidents, but even when stripped of her powers she still kicks much ass alongside her male peers and has even in more recent times dropped the "Ms" in favor of taking up the mantle of Captain Marvel.
* Comicbook/MsMarvel2014 sees a new generation taking up the mantle, focusing on Pakistani-American teenager Kamala Khan. A long-time fan of Carol Danvers, she is inspired to take up the mantle of Ms. Marvel after gaining superpowers. The series has been an unexpected hit, with critics even calling her "the new Spiderman".

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* ComicBook/MsMarvel [[ComicBook/MsMarvel Captain Marvel]], [[IHaveManyNames formerly Ms Marvel, Warbird and Binary,]] is explicitly Feminist, starring a highly decorated Officer turned superheroine. Carol has seen many ugly incidents, but even when stripped of her powers she still kicks much ass alongside her male peers and has even in more recent times dropped peers, ultimately dropping the "Ms" in favor of taking up the mantle of Captain Marvel.
* Comicbook/MsMarvel2014 sees a new generation taking up the mantle, focusing on Pakistani-American teenager Kamala Khan. A long-time fan of Carol Danvers, she is inspired to take up the mantle of Ms. Marvel after gaining superpowers. The series has been an unexpected hit, with critics even calling her "the new Spiderman".Spider-Man".



* ''ComicBook/XMen'', beginning with the famous run of Creator/ChrisClaremont from 1975 to 1991. His run saw Jean Grey grow from TheChick to one of the most powerful mutants known and established Storm firmly as the team leader. Fans invented the term [[FanNickName "Claremazon"]] to describe his focus on powerful, intelligent, skilled, independent, ''and'' glamorous women. Even with his departure from the X-books, the franchise continues this tradition of portraying varied women -- often the most popular characters in the book(s) at any given time.

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* ''ComicBook/XMen'', beginning with the famous run of Creator/ChrisClaremont from 1975 to 1991. His run saw Jean Grey grow from TheChick to one of the most powerful mutants known beings in the entire Marvel Universe, Phoenix Force notwithstanding, and established Storm firmly as the team leader. Fans invented the term [[FanNickName "Claremazon"]] to describe his focus on powerful, intelligent, skilled, independent, ''and'' glamorous women. Even with his departure from the X-books, the franchise continues this tradition of portraying varied women -- often the most popular characters in the book(s) at any given time.



* The ''ComicBook/SpiderGwen'' mini-series takes perhaps the [[ILetGwenStacyDie most famous]] [[ComicBook/TheNightGwenStacyDied dead girlfriend]] in all of comic books, and offers an alternate take on things. Gwen becomes the super-hero with spider powers, while Peter is the ill-fated love of her life. The series ran for five issues, and became so popular that an on-going series has been planned.

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* The ''ComicBook/SpiderGwen'' mini-series takes perhaps the [[ILetGwenStacyDie most famous]] [[ComicBook/TheNightGwenStacyDied dead girlfriend]] in all of comic books, and offers an alternate take on things. Gwen becomes the super-hero with spider powers, while Peter is the ill-fated love of her life. The series ran for five issues, and became so popular that an on-going series was begun, and Spider-Gwen has been planned.- via reality-hopping bracelets - frequently popped up in the 616 universe, with Jessica Drew as her .



[[Franchise/DisneyAnimatedCanon Disney]] animated films have been more proactive with their female characters starting with ''Disney/TheLittleMermaid'', but the most extensive example of this trope is undoubtedly ''Disney/ThePrincessAndTheFrog''. The princess movies seem to be getting less and less sexist, as well as more self-aware, with every passing year. Whether they count as ''feminist'' depends on where you draw the line; they're definitely not groundbreaking in any way.

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[[Franchise/DisneyAnimatedCanon Disney]] animated films have been more proactive with their female characters starting with ''Disney/TheLittleMermaid'', but the most extensive example of this trope is undoubtedly ''Disney/ThePrincessAndTheFrog''. The princess movies seem to be getting less and less sexist, as well as more self-aware, with every passing year. Whether they count as ''feminist'' depends on where you draw the line; for the most part, they're definitely not groundbreaking in any way.
16th Dec '16 3:17:25 AM Vasha
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At its most basic, this just means science fiction or fantasy whose main character is a woman who is the active center of her own story, making things happen. Maybe we just like seeing a woman save the world from aliens sometimes… These stories can, but don't have to, contain other feminist elements:

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At its most basic, this just means science fiction or fantasy whose main character is a woman who is the active center of her own story, making things happen. Maybe we just like seeing a woman save the world from aliens sometimes… sometimes…

These stories can, but don't have to, contain other feminist elements:
15th Dec '16 3:09:03 PM Vasha
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Added DiffLines:

* In the Alpennia series by Heather Rose Jones, set in a Ruritanian country, the main cast is all women: in the first book, we are introduced to a swordswoman who is surrounded by political intrigue, who needs to sort out her role, and another woman who is interested in recovering and improving old magical rituals; in the second volume, they are joined by an experimental alchemist and a society hostess and all four of them foil a plot against Alpennia; by the third volume, it's clear that the political intrigue has implications beyond the kingdom.
15th Dec '16 2:36:51 PM Vasha
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* ''Literature/ChildrenOfMotherEarth'' features a GreenAesop, it is a futuristic fantasy that is located in Greenland, which, due to global warming, is ''actually'' green. (The rest of the world has become a barren wasteland). The changes made to society to make the lifestyle more sustainable include the removal of patriarchy. Men are not allowed to carry weapons, so that they can't attempt to oppress women once again, but in all other respects, society is equal. (And men can get a special permission to carry weapons if they really need to).

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* Creator/StephenRDonaldson meets the definition of writing this (and also to some extent seem to see himself as writing this), but his credentials are still hotly debated. On the plus side: plenty of strong female characters in prominent positions in his stories, which generally take place in settings where no one thinks to question their right to take point and make the important decisions (and in settings where that is not the case, such as ''Daughter of Regals'' and ''Literature/MordantsNeed'', the emphasis is usually on a heroine overcoming her sexist surroundings). On the other hand: ''massive'' use of RapeAsDrama, as well as the controversial (especially in feminist circles) belief that rape, while certainly [[RapeIsASpecialKindOfEvil worse than just about everything else,]] is not necessarily a MoralEventHorizon - while it is very difficult for a rapist to redeem himself in Donaldson's stories, it ''is'' possible and Donaldson's [[Literature/TheGapCycle two longest and]] [[Literature/TheChroniclesOfThomasCovenant most well-known]] series have main protagonists who commit rape in the first book but change their ways and become (at least partly) forgiven by the last one.
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''Literature/ChildrenOfMotherEarth'' features a GreenAesop, it is a futuristic fantasy that is located in Greenland, which, due to global warming, is ''actually'' green. (The rest of the world has become a barren wasteland). The changes made to society to make the lifestyle more sustainable include the removal of patriarchy. Men are not allowed to carry weapons, so that they can't attempt to oppress women once again, but in all other respects, society is equal. (And men can get a special permission to carry weapons if they really need to).



* ''Literature/RangersAtRoadsend'', and the other volumes of the Celaeno series, by Jane Fletcher features lots of asskicking women who are members of the military elite unit, the Rangers, and a society completely free of sexism.



* In general, most of Creator/NnediOkorafor's works, from her first novel (''Zahrah the Windseeker'') onward, have women with magical powers who have to overcome sexism (and sometimes racism as well).



* The main character of ''The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms'', the first volume of the Literature/InheritanceTrilogy, is Yeine, who comes to the imperial center as a potential candidate for the throne, participates in intrigues in order to save her home country, deals with gods, and never backs down. The second volume of the trilogy is again centered on a woman, but she's a bit less in control of events.



* Most of the protagonists in the main series of ''Literature/WingsOfFire'' are female (presumably half when the main arc finishes). Pyrrhia is ruled by queens and in other jobs females are just as common as males, and there are plenty of powerful female characters on all factions.
* The Radchaai in ''Literature/AncillaryJustice'' do not see gender and thus, every character in the series is referred to with the pronoun "she" thanks to TranslationConvention. The protagonist is biologically female and very much an ActionGirl.
* All novels by Main/FrancesHardinge feature very strong and non-stereotypical female protagonists (except ''Verdigris Deep'', and even that one has a lot of important female characters), but ''The Lie Tree'' is a pure work of feminist fantasy, as it explores the image of woman in the Victorian society, concepts like learned helplessness and masochism and how the enormous contribution that the woman made to both that society and the natural science has gone most unnoticed until recently - all through the eyes of a 14-year-old girl against a backdrop of a murder mystery with a shade of supernatural.



* ''Literature/TheRadiantDawn'' plays this trope straight. Dawn, the main protagonist, is a OneWomanArmy and is not shown to have physical weaknesses, at least once she ascends. Her male partner takes a supporting role as a forklift operator who also functions as a warrior. Nadia and Laina also take major roles as the helicopter pilot and mythology expert respectively. On the side of the antagonists, Stacie is shown to be the more mature of the pair and is more intelligent than Aaron, who is boyish and impulsive.



* ''Literature/TheRadiantDawn'' plays this trope straight. Dawn, the main protagonist, is a OneWomanArmy and is not shown to have physical weaknesses, at least once she ascends. Her male partner takes a supporting role as a forklift operator who also functions as a warrior. Nadia and Laina also take major roles as the helicopter pilot and mythology expert respectively. On the side of the antagonists, Stacie is shown to be the more mature of the pair and is more intelligent than Aaron, who is boyish and impulsive.
* All novels by Main/FrancesHardinge feature very strong and non-stereotypical female protagonists (except ''Verdigris Deep'', and even that one has a lot of important female characters), but ''The Lie Tree'' is a pure work of feminist fantasy, as it explores the image of woman in the Victorian society, concepts like learned helplessness and masochism and how the enormous contribution that the woman made to both that society and the natural science has gone most unnoticed until recently - all through the eyes of a 14-year-old girl against a backdrop of a murder mystery with a shade of supernatural.
* The Radchaai in ''Literature/AncillaryJustice'' do not see gender and thus, every character in the series is referred to with the pronoun "she" thanks to TranslationConvention. The protagonist is biologically female and very much an ActionGirl.
* Creator/StephenRDonaldson meets the definition of writing this (and also to some extent seem to see himself as writing this), but his credentials are still hotly debated. On the plus side: plenty of strong female characters in prominent positions in his stories, which generally take place in settings where no one thinks to question their right to take point and make the important decisions (and in settings where that is not the case, such as ''Daughter of Regals'' and ''Literature/MordantsNeed'', the emphasis is usually on a heroine overcoming her sexist surroundings). On the other hand: ''massive'' use of RapeAsDrama, as well as the controversial (especially in feminist circles) belief that rape, while certainly [[RapeIsASpecialKindOfEvil worse than just about everything else,]] is not necessarily a MoralEventHorizon - while it is very difficult for a rapist to redeem himself in Donaldson's stories, it ''is'' possible and Donaldson's [[Literature/TheGapCycle two longest and]] [[Literature/TheChroniclesOfThomasCovenant most well-known]] series have main protagonists who commit rape in the first book but change their ways and become (at least partly) forgiven by the last one.
* ''Literature/RangersAtRoadsend'' by Jane Fletcher features lots of asskicking women who are members of the military elite unit, the Rangers, and a society completely free of sexism.
* Most of the protagonists in the main series of ''Literature/WingsOfFire'' are female (presumably half when the main arc finishes). Pyrrhia is ruled by queens and in other jobs females are just as common as males, and there are plenty of powerful female characters on all factions.
* In general, much of Creator/NnediOkorafor's works have women with magical powers who have to overcome sexism (and sometimes racism as well).
* The main character of ''The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms'', the first volume of the Literature/InheritanceTrilogy, is Yeine, who comes to the imperial center as a potential candidate for the throne, participates in intrigues in order to save her home country, deals with gods, and never backs down. The second volume of the trilogy is again centered on a woman, but she's a bit less in control of events.
15th Dec '16 12:52:32 PM Vasha
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** Incidentally (and probably not coincidentally), Baum's mother-in-law was Matilda Gage, one of the greats of the First Wave of Feminism.

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** Incidentally (and probably Probably not coincidentally), coincidentally, Baum's mother-in-law was Matilda Gage, one of the greats of the First Wave of Feminism.



* ''The Etched City'' by K. J. Bishop. Raule, a healer, plumbs the secrets of a very bizarre city while working in a slum hospital.



* ''Literature/TheSecretsOfTheImmortalNicholasFlamel'' a FantasyKitchenSink that uses many famous figures from history and classical mythology. One of the protagonists is Scathach the Shadow from Celtic mythology, and she's noted to be a OneWomanArmy and the fiercest warrior alive. Perenelle Flamel is likewise reimagined as a powerful sorceress who is stated to be a BadassInDistress in the first three books. Numerous other empowered women appear as both heroes and villains - such as Joan of Arc, the Witch of Endor, Hecate, Bastet, Aoife of the Shadows, the Morrigan and Virginia Dare. One of the lead characters is an ExtraordinarilyEmpoweredGirl too.


Added DiffLines:

* The main character of ''The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms'', the first volume of the Literature/InheritanceTrilogy, is Yeine, who comes to the imperial center as a potential candidate for the throne, participates in intrigues in order to save her home country, deals with gods, and never backs down. The second volume of the trilogy is again centered on a woman, but she's a bit less in control of events.
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