History Main / Faust

25th Jun '17 11:04:59 AM ImperialMajestyXO
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'''Faust''' is the central character of the archetypal story of a DealWithTheDevil. Though there were earlier stories of individuals bargaining with demons for magical power (such as Simon Magus, Cyprian, and Theophilus), it is the legend of an [[TheRenaissance early 16th century]] [[UsefulNotes/HolyRomanEmpire German]] scholar that has been [[TropeCodifier the most frequent and profoundest inspiration for works of art on this theme]].

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'''Faust''' is the central character of the archetypal story of a DealWithTheDevil. Though there were earlier stories of individuals bargaining with demons for magical power (such as Simon Magus, Cyprian, and Theophilus), it is the legend of an [[TheRenaissance [[UsefulNotes/TheRenaissance early 16th century]] [[UsefulNotes/HolyRomanEmpire German]] scholar that has been [[TropeCodifier the most frequent and profoundest inspiration for works of art on this theme]].
20th Jun '17 9:22:03 AM DustSnitch
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'''Faust''' is the central character of the archetypal story of a DealWithTheDevil. Though there were earlier stories of individuals bargaining with demons for magical power (such as Simon Magus, Cyprian, and Theophilus), it is the legend of an [[TheRenaissance early 16th century]] [[UsefulNotes/HolyRomanEmpire German]] scholar that has been the most frequent and profoundest inspiration for works of art on this theme.

to:

'''Faust''' is the central character of the archetypal story of a DealWithTheDevil. Though there were earlier stories of individuals bargaining with demons for magical power (such as Simon Magus, Cyprian, and Theophilus), it is the legend of an [[TheRenaissance early 16th century]] [[UsefulNotes/HolyRomanEmpire German]] scholar that has been [[TropeCodifier the most frequent and profoundest inspiration for works of art on this theme.
theme]].
6th Jun '17 9:13:09 AM Timjames98
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* OffingTheOffspring: Gretchen drowns the illigitimate child she had with Faust.

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* OffingTheOffspring: Gretchen drowns the illigitimate illegitimate child she had with Faust.
6th Jun '17 9:12:59 AM Timjames98
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Added DiffLines:

* OffingTheOffspring: Gretchen drowns the illigitimate child she had with Faust.
22nd Mar '17 12:47:52 AM EspeonArcaninePines
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** WholePlotReference: The essential story of ''Faust'', in particular the Marlowe and Goethe versions, has been lifted for dozens, if not hundreds, of works over the centuries. Modern examples include ''ComicBook/{{Spawn}}'', ''ComicBook/{{Preacher}}'', ''Anime/BlackButler'' and ''Anime/PuellaMagiMadokaMagica'' (though the last isn't obvious at first). Also seen in the ''Manga/BlueExorcist'' anime- notice the name Mephistopheles.

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** WholePlotReference: The essential story of ''Faust'', in particular the Marlowe and Goethe versions, has been lifted for dozens, if not hundreds, of works over the centuries. Modern examples include ''ComicBook/{{Spawn}}'', ''ComicBook/{{Preacher}}'', ''Anime/BlackButler'' and ''Anime/PuellaMagiMadokaMagica'' (though the last isn't obvious at first). Even done in an important episode of ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'', a Disney XD cartoon of all things, and quite intentionally too. Also seen in the ''Manga/BlueExorcist'' anime- notice the name Mephistopheles.
15th Mar '17 11:23:59 AM DustSnitch
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The greatest embodiment of the story is probably [[Creator/JohannWolfgangVonGoethe Johann Wolfgang von Goethe's]] ''[[Theatre/{{Faust}} Faust: Eine Tragödie]]'' (begun ''c''. 1770). Published in two parts: the first (1808) tells the story of Faust's pact with Mephistopheles and his affair with the hapless Gretchen; the second (1832) recounts his union with Helen of Troy and the birth of Euphorion, the Spirit of Poetry, from this mating of northern Romanticism and Greek classicism. Despite the work's title, Goethe would seem to have been the first to have given the Faust story itself a happy ending (though earlier DealWithTheDevil stories had sometimes featured [[{{Jesus}} Christ]], the Virgin Mary, or some saint, tricking the devil out of his prey, often in an elaborate trial scene featuring a number of quite far-fetched legalistic quibbles) -- Faust is redeemed from Hell because he uses his magical power to ''serve'' his fellow men, rather than exploit them. Goethe also popularized the image of Mephistopheles as a DeadpanSnarker in red silk doublet and hose (leading to the modern "devil in tights" image); his devil is less an elemental spirit of pure Evil than a sort of universal cynic.

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The greatest embodiment of the story is probably [[Creator/JohannWolfgangVonGoethe Johann Wolfgang von Goethe's]] ''[[Theatre/{{Faust}} Faust: Eine Tragödie]]'' (begun ''c''. 1770). Published in two parts: the first (1808) tells the story of Faust's pact with Mephistopheles and his affair with the hapless Gretchen; the second (1832) recounts his union with Helen of Troy and the birth of Euphorion, the Spirit of Poetry, from this mating of northern Romanticism and Greek classicism. Despite the work's title, Goethe would seem to have been the first to have given the Faust story itself a happy ending (though earlier DealWithTheDevil stories had sometimes featured [[{{Jesus}} [[UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}} Christ]], the Virgin Mary, or some saint, tricking the devil out of his prey, often in an elaborate trial scene featuring a number of quite far-fetched legalistic quibbles) -- Faust is redeemed from Hell because he uses his magical power to ''serve'' his fellow men, rather than exploit them. Goethe also popularized the image of Mephistopheles as a DeadpanSnarker in red silk doublet and hose (leading to the modern "devil in tights" image); his devil is less an elemental spirit of pure Evil than a sort of universal cynic.
3rd Sep '16 7:44:21 AM Morgenthaler
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'''Faust''' is the central character of the archetypal story of a DealWithTheDevil. Though there were earlier stories of individuals bargaining with demons for magical power (such as Simon Magus, Cyprian, and Theophilus), it is the legend of an [[TheRenaissance early 16th century]] [[HolyRomanEmpire German]] scholar that has been the most frequent and profoundest inspiration for works of art on this theme.

to:

'''Faust''' is the central character of the archetypal story of a DealWithTheDevil. Though there were earlier stories of individuals bargaining with demons for magical power (such as Simon Magus, Cyprian, and Theophilus), it is the legend of an [[TheRenaissance early 16th century]] [[HolyRomanEmpire [[UsefulNotes/HolyRomanEmpire German]] scholar that has been the most frequent and profoundest inspiration for works of art on this theme.
19th Jun '16 8:01:10 AM LordGro
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* OlderThanDirt: Stories with a Faustian Bargain date to Gilgamesh and earlier.
19th Jun '16 7:41:47 AM ScrewySqrl
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Added DiffLines:

* OlderThanDirt: Stories with a Faustian Bargain date to Gilgamesh and earlier.
11th Dec '15 5:01:19 AM Dravencour
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'''Faust''' is the central character of the archetypical story of a DealWithTheDevil. Though there were earlier stories of individuals bargaining with demons for magical power (such as Simon Magus, Cyprian, and Theophilus), it is the legend of an [[TheRenaissance early 16th century]] [[HolyRomanEmpire German]] scholar that has been the most frequent and profoundest inspiration for works of art on this theme.

to:

'''Faust''' is the central character of the archetypical archetypal story of a DealWithTheDevil. Though there were earlier stories of individuals bargaining with demons for magical power (such as Simon Magus, Cyprian, and Theophilus), it is the legend of an [[TheRenaissance early 16th century]] [[HolyRomanEmpire German]] scholar that has been the most frequent and profoundest inspiration for works of art on this theme.
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