History Main / FantasticCasteSystem

21st Feb '18 2:59:59 PM Discar
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* In ''Literature/TheStormlightArchive'', the populations of most of the the major countries are divided into darkeyed common people, and the lighteyed leaders. Within these categories the people are further divided into ten nahns (the darkeyes) and ten dahns (the lighteyes) with the tenth being the lowest and the first the highest. It's possible to work your way up the ladder, through work (such as military service, or through marriage, well-off darkeyes can sometimes marry into a lighteyed family, and thus possibly have lighteyed children. Also, anybody that has a [[AbsurdlySharpBlade Shardblade]] and/or [[PoweredArmor Shardplate]] is automatically important regardless of their birth, and it's commonly believed that a darkeyes who wins a Shardblade in battle will have their eyes change color, which is proven true in the second book. (Notably, "light" colors aren't limited to the ones usually found on Earth- there's mention of nobles with [[PurpleEyes pale purple]] and [[EyesOfGold light yellow]] eyes, with no indication that this is at all unusual.)

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* In ''Literature/TheStormlightArchive'', the populations of most of the the major countries are divided into darkeyed common people, and the lighteyed leaders. Within these categories the people are further divided into ten nahns (the darkeyes) and ten dahns (the lighteyes) with the tenth being the lowest and the first the highest. It's possible to work your way up the ladder, through work (such such as military service, or through marriage, well-off darkeyes can sometimes marry into a lighteyed family, and thus possibly have lighteyed children. Also, anybody that has a [[AbsurdlySharpBlade Shardblade]] and/or [[PoweredArmor Shardplate]] is automatically important regardless of their birth, and it's commonly believed that a darkeyes who wins a Shardblade in battle will have their eyes change color, which is proven true in the second book. (Notably, Notably, "light" colors aren't limited to the ones usually found on Earth- there's mention of nobles with [[PurpleEyes pale purple]] and [[EyesOfGold light yellow]] eyes, with no indication that this is at all unusual.)
17th Feb '18 7:25:37 AM Generality
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India's caste system is a popular provider for ample analogies. This trope might also owe a debt to both Creator/{{Plato}}, whose {{utopia}} in ''Literature/TheRepublic'' was highly socially stratified, as well as Karl Marx, in his conception of the relationship between bourgeoisie and proletariat. The feudal "three estates" system of warrior, cleric, and laborer is another common inspiration. When a fantasy or alien race has specialized castes with physical dimorphism, as with worker and queen ants or bees, that's HiveCasteSystem. Compare with FantasticRacism and UrbanSegregation, which have some overlap with this trope. Settings where the political system is based on alternative ruling methods like [[TheMagocracy Magocracy]] or [[TheTheocracy Theocracy]] will inevitably have one of these systems to systematically organize what happens to everyone who doesn't have the traits desired of typical citizens. See also DividedStatesOfAmerica, which similarly extrapolates on a real-world situation. Compare HiveCasteSystem, which adds a heap more fantasy. For notes about caste systems in RealLife, see TypeCaste regarding ''varna'' and ''jati'' in UsefulNotes/{{India}}, and UsefulNotes/KnightFever regarding [[BlueBlood hereditary peerage]] and the associated noble titles (along with non-hereditary titles) in UsefulNotes/{{Britain}}.

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India's caste system is a popular provider for ample analogies. This trope might also owe a debt to both Creator/{{Plato}}, whose {{utopia}} in ''Literature/TheRepublic'' was highly socially stratified, as well as Karl Marx, in his conception of the relationship between bourgeoisie and proletariat. The feudal "three estates" system of warrior, cleric, and laborer is another common inspiration. When a fantasy or alien race has specialized castes with physical dimorphism, as with worker and queen ants or bees, that's HiveCasteSystem. Compare with ExtremeSpeculativeStratification, FantasticRacism and UrbanSegregation, which have some overlap with this trope. Settings where the political system is based on alternative ruling methods like [[TheMagocracy Magocracy]] or [[TheTheocracy Theocracy]] will inevitably have one of these systems to systematically organize what happens to everyone who doesn't have the traits desired of typical citizens. See also DividedStatesOfAmerica, which similarly extrapolates on a real-world situation. Compare HiveCasteSystem, which adds a heap more fantasy. For notes about caste systems in RealLife, see TypeCaste regarding ''varna'' and ''jati'' in UsefulNotes/{{India}}, and UsefulNotes/KnightFever regarding [[BlueBlood hereditary peerage]] and the associated noble titles (along with non-hereditary titles) in UsefulNotes/{{Britain}}.
2nd Feb '18 11:02:00 AM Someoneman
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** The entire Third Imperium depends on the team spirit of the ruling class. Unlike other empires the Third Imperium does not have an ethnic group as it's cadre. Instead it has a caste.

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** The entire Third Imperium depends on the team spirit of the ruling class. Unlike other empires the Third Imperium does not have an ethnic group as it's its cadre. Instead it has a caste.



* The races of giants in ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' are bound by a caste system called the Ordning, which dictates that regardless of a giant's standing amongst it's own race, it is superior to every giant in the castes below it, so a frost giant king is actually inferior to a fire giant peasant. The storm giants are at the top of the Ordning, followed by cloud giants, fire giants, frost giants, stone giants, hill giants and giantkin (a category for all races the giants regard as distant cousins, including ogres, trolls and fomorians).

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* The races of giants in ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' are bound by a caste system called the Ordning, which dictates that regardless of a giant's standing amongst it's its own race, it is superior to every giant in the castes below it, so a frost giant king is actually inferior to a fire giant peasant. The storm giants are at the top of the Ordning, followed by cloud giants, fire giants, frost giants, stone giants, hill giants and giantkin (a category for all races the giants regard as distant cousins, including ogres, trolls and fomorians).
31st Jan '18 9:53:23 PM zealots
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* The Saiyan race of ''Anime/DragonBallZ'' had one of these during the brief period of time between them forming an organized society under King Vegeta and being driven to near-extinction by Frieza less than a decade later. It's a 3-tiered system, with King Vegeta and his son unsurprisingly at the very top as Super Elites, then the Elite Class which is numbered at around ten or so individual Saiyans (Nappa is the only confirmed member of this class, though Paragus might have been one as well), and then at the bottom the Low-Class Saiyans which are... well, everyone else. It's not clear if there are actual biological differences between the classes or if they amount to no more than cultural preening on the part of King Vegeta and his inner circle -- Nappa and Vegeta have the ability to retain their reason in their Great Ape forms and have stronger tails than low-class Saiyans, but it is unclear if these are genuine biological advantages or simply trained feats that any Saiyan can master. Turles from ''Anime/DragonBallZTheTreeOfMight'' also states that low-class Saiyans "only come in a few types", of which he and series hero Goku share a type (explaining their uncanny resemblance).
12th Jan '18 7:18:24 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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* ''Literature/HarryPotter'' has three castes among WizardsAndWitches. Purebloods belong to [[BlueBlood elite families]] that purport (falsely) to have no {{Muggles}} in their lineage; half-bloods have {{mixed|Ancestry}} wizarding and Muggle heritage; and Muggle-borns face widespread FantasticRacism, as evidenced by the FantasticSlur "Mudblood" to denote their supposedly impure ancestry. [[WhatMeasureIsANonHuman Non-humans]], {{half human hybrid}}s, [[OurWerewolvesAreDifferent werewolves]], and [[MuggleBornOfMages Squibs]] hold similar low status. And of course, most Muggles exist outside the system altogether, since the {{Masquerade}} prevents them from even knowing about it unless they have close magical relatives.

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* ''Literature/HarryPotter'' has three castes among human WizardsAndWitches. Purebloods belong to [[BlueBlood elite families]] that purport (falsely) to have no {{Muggles}} in their lineage; half-bloods have {{mixed|Ancestry}} wizarding and Muggle heritage; and Muggle-borns face widespread FantasticRacism, as evidenced by the FantasticSlur "Mudblood" to denote their supposedly impure ancestry. [[WhatMeasureIsANonHuman Non-humans]], {{half human hybrid}}s, [[OurWerewolvesAreDifferent werewolves]], and [[MuggleBornOfMages Squibs]] hold similar low status. And of course, most Muggles exist outside the system altogether, since the {{Masquerade}} prevents them from even knowing about it unless they have close magical relatives.
12th Jan '18 7:17:57 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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* ''Literature/HarryPotter'' has three castes among WizardsAndWitches. Purebloods belong to [[BlueBlood elite families]] that purport (falsely) to have no {{Muggles}} in their lineage; half-bloods have {{mixed|Ancestry}} wizarding and Muggle heritage; and Muggle-borns face widespread FantasticRacism, as evidenced by the FantasticSlur "Mudblood" to denote their supposedly impure ancestry. [[WhatMeasureIsANonHuman Non-humans]], {{half human hybrid}}s, [[OurWerewolvesAreDifferent werewolves]], and [[MuggleBornOfMages Squibs]] hold similar low status. And of course, most Muggles exist outside the system, since the {{Masquerade}} prevents them from even knowing about it unless they have magical relatives.

to:

* ''Literature/HarryPotter'' has three castes among WizardsAndWitches. Purebloods belong to [[BlueBlood elite families]] that purport (falsely) to have no {{Muggles}} in their lineage; half-bloods have {{mixed|Ancestry}} wizarding and Muggle heritage; and Muggle-borns face widespread FantasticRacism, as evidenced by the FantasticSlur "Mudblood" to denote their supposedly impure ancestry. [[WhatMeasureIsANonHuman Non-humans]], {{half human hybrid}}s, [[OurWerewolvesAreDifferent werewolves]], and [[MuggleBornOfMages Squibs]] hold similar low status. And of course, most Muggles exist outside the system, system altogether, since the {{Masquerade}} prevents them from even knowing about it unless they have close magical relatives.
12th Jan '18 7:17:20 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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India's caste system is a popular provider for ample analogies. This trope might also owe a debt to both Creator/{{Plato}}, whose {{utopia}} in ''Literature/TheRepublic'' was highly socially stratified, as well as Karl Marx, in his conception of the relationship between bourgeoisie and proletariat. The feudal "three estates" system of warrior, cleric, and laborer is another common inspiration. When a fantasy or alien race has specialized castes with physical dimorphism, as with worker and queen ants or bees, that's HiveCasteSystem. Compare with FantasticRacism and UrbanSegregation, which have some overlap with this trope. Settings where the political system is based on alternative ruling methods like [[TheMagocracy Magocracy]] or [[TheTheocracy Theocracy]] will inevitably have one of these systems to systematically organize what happens to everyone who doesn't have the traits desired of typical citizens. See also DividedStatesOfAmerica, which similarly extrapolates on a real-world situation. Compare HiveCasteSystem, which adds a heap more fantasy. For caste systems in RealLife, see TypeCaste regarding ''varna'' and ''jati'' in UsefulNotes/{{India}}, and UsefulNotes/KnightFever regarding [[BlueBlood hereditary peerage]] and the associated noble titles (along with non-hereditary titles) in UsefulNotes/{{Britain}}).

to:

India's caste system is a popular provider for ample analogies. This trope might also owe a debt to both Creator/{{Plato}}, whose {{utopia}} in ''Literature/TheRepublic'' was highly socially stratified, as well as Karl Marx, in his conception of the relationship between bourgeoisie and proletariat. The feudal "three estates" system of warrior, cleric, and laborer is another common inspiration. When a fantasy or alien race has specialized castes with physical dimorphism, as with worker and queen ants or bees, that's HiveCasteSystem. Compare with FantasticRacism and UrbanSegregation, which have some overlap with this trope. Settings where the political system is based on alternative ruling methods like [[TheMagocracy Magocracy]] or [[TheTheocracy Theocracy]] will inevitably have one of these systems to systematically organize what happens to everyone who doesn't have the traits desired of typical citizens. See also DividedStatesOfAmerica, which similarly extrapolates on a real-world situation. Compare HiveCasteSystem, which adds a heap more fantasy. For notes about caste systems in RealLife, see TypeCaste regarding ''varna'' and ''jati'' in UsefulNotes/{{India}}, and UsefulNotes/KnightFever regarding [[BlueBlood hereditary peerage]] and the associated noble titles (along with non-hereditary titles) in UsefulNotes/{{Britain}}).
UsefulNotes/{{Britain}}.


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* ''Literature/HarryPotter'' has three castes among WizardsAndWitches. Purebloods belong to [[BlueBlood elite families]] that purport (falsely) to have no {{Muggles}} in their lineage; half-bloods have {{mixed|Ancestry}} wizarding and Muggle heritage; and Muggle-borns face widespread FantasticRacism, as evidenced by the FantasticSlur "Mudblood" to denote their supposedly impure ancestry. [[WhatMeasureIsANonHuman Non-humans]], {{half human hybrid}}s, [[OurWerewolvesAreDifferent werewolves]], and [[MuggleBornOfMages Squibs]] hold similar low status. And of course, most Muggles exist outside the system, since the {{Masquerade}} prevents them from even knowing about it unless they have magical relatives.
12th Jan '18 6:52:27 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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India's caste system is a popular provider for ample analogies. This trope might also owe a debt to both Creator/{{Plato}}, whose {{utopia}} in ''Literature/TheRepublic'' was highly socially stratified, as well as Karl Marx, in his conception of the relationship between bourgeoisie and proletariat. The feudal "three estates" system of warrior, cleric, and laborer is another common inspiration. When a fantasy or alien race has specialized castes with physical dimorphism, as with worker and queen ants or bees, that's HiveCasteSystem. Compare with FantasticRacism and UrbanSegregation, which have some overlap with this trope. Settings where the political system is based on alternative ruling methods like [[TheMagocracy Magocracy]] or [[TheTheocracy Theocracy]] will inevitably have one of these systems to systematically organize what happens to everyone who doesn't have the traits desired of typical citizens. See also DividedStatesOfAmerica, which similarly extrapolates on a real-world situation. Compare HiveCasteSystem, which adds a heap more fantasy. For caste systems in RealLife, see TypeCaste regarding ''varna'' and ''jati'' in UsefulNotes/{{India}}, and UsefulNotes/KnightFever regarding [[BlueBlood hereditary nobility]] (along with non-hereditary elite titles) in UsefulNotes/{{Britain}}).

to:

India's caste system is a popular provider for ample analogies. This trope might also owe a debt to both Creator/{{Plato}}, whose {{utopia}} in ''Literature/TheRepublic'' was highly socially stratified, as well as Karl Marx, in his conception of the relationship between bourgeoisie and proletariat. The feudal "three estates" system of warrior, cleric, and laborer is another common inspiration. When a fantasy or alien race has specialized castes with physical dimorphism, as with worker and queen ants or bees, that's HiveCasteSystem. Compare with FantasticRacism and UrbanSegregation, which have some overlap with this trope. Settings where the political system is based on alternative ruling methods like [[TheMagocracy Magocracy]] or [[TheTheocracy Theocracy]] will inevitably have one of these systems to systematically organize what happens to everyone who doesn't have the traits desired of typical citizens. See also DividedStatesOfAmerica, which similarly extrapolates on a real-world situation. Compare HiveCasteSystem, which adds a heap more fantasy. For caste systems in RealLife, see TypeCaste regarding ''varna'' and ''jati'' in UsefulNotes/{{India}}, and UsefulNotes/KnightFever regarding [[BlueBlood hereditary nobility]] peerage]] and the associated noble titles (along with non-hereditary elite titles) in UsefulNotes/{{Britain}}).
12th Jan '18 6:51:18 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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India's caste system is a popular provider for ample analogies. This trope might also owe a debt to both Creator/{{Plato}}, whose {{utopia}} in ''Literature/TheRepublic'' was highly socially stratified, as well as Karl Marx, in his conception of the relationship between bourgeoisie and proletariat. The feudal "three estates" system of warrior, cleric, and laborer is another common inspiration. When a fantasy or alien race has specialized castes with physical dimorphism, as with worker and queen ants or bees, that's HiveCasteSystem. Compare with FantasticRacism and UrbanSegregation, which have some overlap with this trope. Settings where the political system is based on alternative ruling methods like [[TheMagocracy Magocracy]] or [[TheTheocracy Theocracy]] will inevitably have one of these systems to systematically organize what happens to everyone who doesn't have the traits desired of typical citizens. See also DividedStatesOfAmerica, which similarly extrapolates on a real-world situation. Compare HiveCasteSystem, which adds a heap more fantasy. See TypeCaste for the actual caste system used by Indian traditions.

to:

India's caste system is a popular provider for ample analogies. This trope might also owe a debt to both Creator/{{Plato}}, whose {{utopia}} in ''Literature/TheRepublic'' was highly socially stratified, as well as Karl Marx, in his conception of the relationship between bourgeoisie and proletariat. The feudal "three estates" system of warrior, cleric, and laborer is another common inspiration. When a fantasy or alien race has specialized castes with physical dimorphism, as with worker and queen ants or bees, that's HiveCasteSystem. Compare with FantasticRacism and UrbanSegregation, which have some overlap with this trope. Settings where the political system is based on alternative ruling methods like [[TheMagocracy Magocracy]] or [[TheTheocracy Theocracy]] will inevitably have one of these systems to systematically organize what happens to everyone who doesn't have the traits desired of typical citizens. See also DividedStatesOfAmerica, which similarly extrapolates on a real-world situation. Compare HiveCasteSystem, which adds a heap more fantasy. See For caste systems in RealLife, see TypeCaste for the actual caste system used by Indian traditions.
regarding ''varna'' and ''jati'' in UsefulNotes/{{India}}, and UsefulNotes/KnightFever regarding [[BlueBlood hereditary nobility]] (along with non-hereditary elite titles) in UsefulNotes/{{Britain}}).
12th Jan '18 1:29:22 AM Cryoclaste
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* The ''InfiniteCrisis''-to-''Comicbook/{{Flashpoint}}'' version of [[{{Superman}} Krypton]] has society divided into Guilds. While it's possible to choose a Guild, most people are expected to enter the same Guild as their parents, especially the Workers' Guild, who seem to have fewer opportunities to qualify for the others. (The others are Religious, Artist, Military, and Science. Science is, of course, [[ProudScholarRace the most important]].)

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* The ''InfiniteCrisis''-to-''Comicbook/{{Flashpoint}}'' ''ComicBook/InfiniteCrisis''-to-''Comicbook/{{Flashpoint}}'' version of [[{{Superman}} Krypton]] has society divided into Guilds. While it's possible to choose a Guild, most people are expected to enter the same Guild as their parents, especially the Workers' Guild, who seem to have fewer opportunities to qualify for the others. (The others are Religious, Artist, Military, and Science. Science is, of course, [[ProudScholarRace the most important]].)
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