History Main / FantasticAesop

8th Nov '17 8:32:05 PM kundoo
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* Stage example: ''The Gingerbread House''. From the New York Times review:

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* Stage example: ''The Gingerbread House''. From the New York Times review:
3rd Sep '17 9:59:38 AM wingedcatgirl
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** Less {{Anvilicious}}ly, the fact that the GoldenEnding can only be achieved by refraining from committing the CrimeOfSelfDefense no matter how violent your enemy is only makes sense in-universe because the barrier needs seven human souls worth of power to be destroyed; the six human souls in reserve plus ''every monster in the Underground'' conveniently make up the correct amount, and you can't do it with one iota less. It's a pretty convenient coincidence that this is the number of monsters currently alive, and the fact that every living monster soul adds up to one human soul is only mentioned on one PamphletShelf.

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** Less {{Anvilicious}}ly, the fact that the GoldenEnding can only be achieved by refraining from committing the CrimeOfSelfDefense no matter how violent your enemy is only makes sense in-universe because the barrier needs seven human souls worth of power to be destroyed; the six human souls in reserve plus ''every monster in the Underground'' conveniently make up the correct amount, and you can't do it with one iota less. It's a pretty convenient coincidence that this is the number of monsters currently alive, and the fact that every living monster soul adds up to one human soul is only mentioned on one PamphletShelf.PamphletShelf, in a way that seems more like PurpleProse than an actual mathematical fact.
21st Aug '17 12:55:00 PM merotoker
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** '''Failed Metaphor:''' The StockSuperpower or [[FunctionalMagic magical ability]] the hero has is quite potent, perhaps [[StoryBreakerPower story breakingly so]], but is never as good as old-fashioned, character-building ''hard work''. So the hero must never use her powers [[AmbitionIsEvil for self-gain]], or even just [[MundaneUtility baking a pizza]]. Why? Because [[PersonalGainHurts that way lies]] JumpingOffTheSlipperySlope and [[GoodPowersBadPeople villainy]]. Never mind that Adam Smith has different ideas about [[ComesGreatResponsibility using your talents to help yourself and others]], if it's a power, it's [[InverseLawOfUtilityAndLethality only good for beating stuff up]]. Alternatively, the powers work great and make everyone's life better; so today's moral is that you should go get yourself some superpowers.

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** '''Failed Metaphor:''' The StockSuperpower {{Stock Superpower|s}} or [[FunctionalMagic magical ability]] the hero has is quite potent, perhaps [[StoryBreakerPower story breakingly so]], but is never as good as old-fashioned, character-building ''hard work''. So the hero must never use her powers [[AmbitionIsEvil for self-gain]], or even just [[MundaneUtility baking a pizza]]. Why? Because [[PersonalGainHurts that way lies]] JumpingOffTheSlipperySlope and [[GoodPowersBadPeople villainy]]. Never mind that Adam Smith has different ideas about [[ComesGreatResponsibility using your talents to help yourself and others]], if it's a power, it's [[InverseLawOfUtilityAndLethality only good for beating stuff up]]. Alternatively, the powers work great and make everyone's life better; so today's moral is that you should go get yourself some superpowers.



** '''Failed Metaphor:''' The differences between two groups are not trivial, and in fact a case can be made for treating those involved differently. Like a vampire needing human blood to "live", or an alien [[EmotionEater feeding detrimentally on another's emotions.]] While the author would like us to consider this as a clear metaphor for racism, sexism, or other forms of segregation, the situation shown is less about trivial surface differences and more substantial. On the other hand, maybe the author ''acknowledges'' these differences and that ViolenceReallyIsTheAnswer therefore. Today's lesson? If your enemy is a race of psycopathic vampire space monsters from Hell, ''then'' [[FamilyUnfriendlyAesop genocidal racism is perfectly justifiable]].

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** '''Failed Metaphor:''' The differences between two groups are not trivial, and in fact a case can be made for treating those involved differently. Like a vampire needing human blood to "live", or an alien [[EmotionEater feeding detrimentally on another's emotions.]] While the author would like us to consider this as a clear metaphor for racism, sexism, or other forms of segregation, the situation shown is less about trivial surface differences and more substantial. On the other hand, maybe the author ''acknowledges'' these differences and that ViolenceReallyIsTheAnswer therefore. Today's lesson? If your enemy is a race of psycopathic psychopathic vampire space monsters from Hell, ''then'' [[FamilyUnfriendlyAesop genocidal racism is perfectly justifiable]].



'''IMPORTANT NOTE:''' Sometimes a writer will put their characters through an interesting dilemma / character development that is only made possible by the fantastic setting, but has no intended bearing on the real world. It becomes a FantasticAesop ''if and only if'' the author was demonstrably trying to get their audience to learn a specific moral lesson from this bizarre situation. Think carefully before citing something as an example!

'''ADDITIONAL IMPORTANT NOTE:''' Something does not become a FantasticAesop simply because it falls apart when interpreted literally; many works introduce or advocate aesops indirectly through allegory, allusion, or symbolism.

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'''IMPORTANT NOTE:''' Sometimes a writer will put their characters through an interesting dilemma / character development that is only made possible by the fantastic setting, but has no intended bearing on the real world. It becomes a FantasticAesop Fantastic Aesop ''if and only if'' the author was demonstrably trying to get their audience to learn a specific moral lesson from this bizarre situation. Think carefully before citing something as an example!

'''ADDITIONAL IMPORTANT NOTE:''' Something does not become a FantasticAesop Fantastic Aesop simply because it falls apart when interpreted literally; many works introduce or advocate aesops indirectly through allegory, allusion, or symbolism.



* At the end of ''Anime/TengenToppaGurrenLagann'' [[spoiler:it's not really clear whether Spiral Energy ''can'' resurrect the dead, or if the characters are speculating if it could. Regardless though, the characters conclude they shouldn't bring back the dead.]] ''Gurren Lagann'' has the major theme of accepting and moving on after death. While a good value in real life, this might not be as good in a world where resurrection is possible.

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* At the end of ''Anime/TengenToppaGurrenLagann'' [[spoiler:it's not really clear whether Spiral Energy ''can'' resurrect the dead, or if the characters are speculating if it could. Regardless though, the characters conclude they shouldn't bring back the dead.]] dead]]. ''Gurren Lagann'' has the major theme of accepting and moving on after death. While a good value in real life, this might not be as good in a world where resurrection is possible.



** Another example for ''Gurren Lagann'' is the core theme that ideals should never be sacrificed, because in its universe idealism and willpower literally ''can'' do anything. I.e. [[spoiler: what Rossiu does in the third arc of the series is, for the most part, technically correct. He holds Simon accountable for recklessly charging into battle and subsequently causing a huge explosion in the middle of the city, and when it becomes clear that there's no way to save all of humanity, he conceals this information to prevent (more of) a panic while trying to save as many as he can. However his actions are cast as being wrong because he acts in a totalitarian way in the process, and one of Gurren Lagann's big ideas is the importance of freedom, and compromising that value for the sake of safety basically makes you evil. In fact all the series' villains practice forms of "population control" to preserve peace, and this is portrayed as a sad and "limited" way to live, effectively sacrificing what life should be (growth) in exchange for trying to hold on to it as long as possible (stagnation). However, in the real world, taking an all-or-nothing approach to the survival of the human race would be seen by most people as really, really stupid. Especially since being manly tends not to break the laws of physics in reality.]] It's a powerful message, and it has relevance to the real world, but the things that make it possible that everything works out in GL don't actually exist.

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** Another example for ''Gurren Lagann'' is the core theme that ideals should never be sacrificed, because in its universe idealism and willpower literally ''can'' do anything. I.e. [[spoiler: what Rossiu does in the third arc of the series is, for the most part, technically correct. He holds Simon accountable for recklessly charging into battle and subsequently causing a huge explosion in the middle of the city, and when it becomes clear that there's no way to save all of humanity, he conceals this information to prevent (more of) a panic while trying to save as many as he can. However his actions are cast as being wrong because he acts in a totalitarian way in the process, and one of Gurren Lagann's big ideas is the importance of freedom, and compromising that value for the sake of safety basically makes you evil. In fact all the series' villains practice forms of "population control" to preserve peace, and this is portrayed as a sad and "limited" way to live, effectively sacrificing what life should be (growth) in exchange for trying to hold on to it as long as possible (stagnation). However, in the real world, taking an all-or-nothing approach to the survival of the human race would be seen by most people as really, really stupid. Especially since being manly tends not to break the laws of physics in reality.]] reality]]. It's a powerful message, and it has relevance to the real world, but the things that make it possible that everything works out in GL don't actually exist.



* ''ComicBook/ChickTracts'' often have these. Quite often, the Real True Christians are capable of performing supernatural feats which back up what they say. This commonly takes the form of the ability to dispel any dark forces in their vicinity, thus showing that Jesus is superior to whatever the villain of the week is. We've also seen a brief five-second prayer dispel a massive tornado (the guy who said the prayer told everyone it was safe literally as soon as he finished), summon storms to blind terrorists in the Middle East, briefly resurrect those who've died so they can accept Jesus, and sense an assassination plot on someone's granddaughter taking place thousands of miles away. It's difficult to say whether these miracles are a cheap plot device or a reflection on how the author seriously views reality.

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* ''ComicBook/ChickTracts'' often have these. Quite often, the Real True Christians are capable of performing supernatural feats which back up what they say. This commonly takes the form of the ability to dispel any dark forces in their vicinity, thus showing that Jesus UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}} is superior to whatever the villain of the week is. We've also seen a brief five-second prayer dispel a massive tornado (the guy who said the prayer told everyone it was safe literally as soon as he finished), summon storms to blind terrorists in the Middle East, briefly resurrect those who've died so they can accept Jesus, and sense an assassination plot on someone's granddaughter taking place thousands of miles away. It's difficult to say whether these miracles are a cheap plot device or a reflection on how the author seriously views reality.



* The second ''{{Film/Hellboy}}'' film has a similar message as the ''X Men'' movies, with the same problem. The {{Muggle}}s are portrayed as nasty little shits for being afraid of Hellboy. Even ignoring that Hellboy (both the person and movie) [[WhatMeasureIsANonUnique doesn't show much concern for regular humans' lives]], there's the problem that he doesn't just look like a devil sent from Hell to bring destruction to the world of man, he actually ''is'' just that. In the previous movie he was seconds away from dooming the world. And this movie reveals that he had the human who stopped him doing that literally ReassignedToAntarctica, and an Angel states that the powers that be still fully expect that he'll destroy earth at some point. The humans he encounters may be judging a book by it's cover, but the contents of this particular book happen to be just as scary it seemed.

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* The second ''{{Film/Hellboy}}'' film has a similar message as the ''X Men'' movies, with the same problem. The {{Muggle}}s {{Muggles}} are portrayed as nasty little shits for being afraid of Hellboy. Even ignoring that Hellboy (both the person and movie) [[WhatMeasureIsANonUnique [[UniquenessValue doesn't show much concern for regular humans' lives]], there's the problem that he doesn't just look like a devil sent from Hell to bring destruction to the world of man, he actually ''is'' just that. In the previous movie he was seconds away from dooming the world. And this movie reveals that he had the human who stopped him doing that literally ReassignedToAntarctica, and an Angel states that the powers that be still fully expect that he'll destroy earth at some point. The humans he encounters may be judging a book by it's cover, but the contents of this particular book happen to be just as scary it seemed.
seemed.



* In ''Series/GoGoSentaiBoukenger'', the moral regarding Eiji/[[SixthRanger BoukenSilver]] (he's mixed race and fighting against his other half) would be a FamilyUnfriendlyAesop since he's fighting against his racially undesireable side...except it falls into this because he's a HalfHumanHybrid[[note]]he is part human, part Quester[[/note]], something you can't be in real life. Even then, it's somewhat justified, since with the exception of his mother, his non-human half is a race of literal monsters who desire destruction.

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* In ''Series/GoGoSentaiBoukenger'', the moral regarding Eiji/[[SixthRanger BoukenSilver]] (he's mixed race and fighting against his other half) would be a FamilyUnfriendlyAesop since he's fighting against his racially undesireable undesirable side...except it falls into this because he's a HalfHumanHybrid[[note]]he is part human, part Quester[[/note]], something you can't be in real life. Even then, it's somewhat justified, since with the exception of his mother, his non-human half is a race of literal monsters who desire destruction.
23rd Jul '17 11:38:08 PM ex_ottoyuhr
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* Much of the criticism of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyTacticsAdvance'' stems from the attempt to use an idealized fantasy world as a metaphor for escapism, with critics arguing that Alterna-Ivalice is just as "real" as Earth in any practical sense.

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* Much of the criticism of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyTacticsAdvance'' stems from the attempt to use an idealized fantasy world as a metaphor for escapism, with critics arguing escapism; there's a [[AlternativeCharacterInterpretation/FinalFantasy very strong case to be made]] that Alterna-Ivalice is just as "real" as Earth in any practical sense.real in-setting.
6th Jul '17 12:06:28 PM Julia1984
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Added DiffLines:

* Many TimeTravel stories (ex. ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents'' episode "Father Time," the ''WesternAnimation/DannyPhantom'' episode "Masters Of All Time") try to teach a moral about accepting what you can't change, usually by having characters' attempts to change the past make the present/future worse instead of better. However, the message this almost always sends is "Don't use time travel to solve your problems because meddling with time can make things worse" -- not exactly a temptation the viewers will (likely) ever be tempted with.
5th Jul '17 5:26:04 PM RoarkTenjouin
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* The ''Series/DoctorWho'' episode "The Woman Who Lived" devotes a good deal of time to discussing the Aesop that "Just because you're immortal doesn't mean you should stop caring about mortals." [[/folder]]
* In ''Series/GoGoSentaiBoukenger'', the moral regarding Eiji/[[SixthRanger BoukenSilver]] (he's mixed race and fighting against his other half) would be a FamilyUnfriendlyAesop since he's fighting against his racially undesireable side...except it falls into this because he's a HalfHumanHybrid[[note]]he is part human, part Quester[[/note]], something you can't be in real life. Even then, it's somewhat justified, since with the exception of his mother, his non-human half is a race of literal monsters who desire destruction.


[[folder:Newspaper Comics]]
* The page quote comes from ''ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes'' story arc involving Calvin [[{{Snowlems}} bringing a snowman to life.]] The snowman became a vicious monster and created an army of "snow goons" that kept trying to kill Calvin. After defeating them by spraying them with the hose to freeze them solid, Calvin stated that he had learned a lesson from this misadventure: "Snow goons are bad news.", which he was glad was completely inapplicable.

to:

* The ''Series/DoctorWho'' episode "The Woman Who Lived" devotes a good deal of time to discussing the Aesop that "Just because you're immortal doesn't mean you should stop caring about mortals." [[/folder]]
"
* In ''Series/GoGoSentaiBoukenger'', the moral regarding Eiji/[[SixthRanger BoukenSilver]] (he's mixed race and fighting against his other half) would be a FamilyUnfriendlyAesop since he's fighting against his racially undesireable side...except it falls into this because he's a HalfHumanHybrid[[note]]he is part human, part Quester[[/note]], something you can't be in real life. Even then, it's somewhat justified, since with the exception of his mother, his non-human half is a race of literal monsters who desire destruction.


[[folder:Newspaper Comics]]
* The page quote comes from ''ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes'' story arc involving Calvin [[{{Snowlems}} bringing a snowman to life.]] The snowman became a vicious monster and created an army of "snow goons" that kept trying to kill Calvin. After defeating them by spraying them with the hose to freeze them solid, Calvin stated that he had learned a lesson from this misadventure: "Snow goons are bad news.", which he was glad was completely inapplicable.
destruction.


Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Newspaper Comics]]
* The page quote comes from ''ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes'' story arc involving Calvin [[{{Snowlems}} bringing a snowman to life.]] The snowman became a vicious monster and created an army of "snow goons" that kept trying to kill Calvin. After defeating them by spraying them with the hose to freeze them solid, Calvin stated that he had learned a lesson from this misadventure: "Snow goons are bad news.", which he was glad was completely inapplicable.
[[/folder]]
5th Jul '17 5:25:18 PM RoarkTenjouin
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to:

* In ''Series/GoGoSentaiBoukenger'', the moral regarding Eiji/[[SixthRanger BoukenSilver]] (he's mixed race and fighting against his other half) would be a FamilyUnfriendlyAesop since he's fighting against his racially undesireable side...except it falls into this because he's a HalfHumanHybrid[[note]]he is part human, part Quester[[/note]], something you can't be in real life. Even then, it's somewhat justified, since with the exception of his mother, his non-human half is a race of literal monsters who desire destruction.

14th Jun '17 8:07:59 AM mogryo
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:: It may be worth mentioning that Riley was in a very dark place at the time, displaying overtly self-destructive tendencies verging on a death wish, and that people paying others to inflict pain on them is definitely not without real world precedent. Moreover, the KissOfTheVampire trope ''had'' been used before-Buffy being bitten by Angel and William (Spike) by Drusilla were both portrayed as painful at first, then pleasurable.
9th Jun '17 7:34:52 AM Morgenthaler
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** Even ignoring the threat of [[TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt the Spiral Nemesis]], the power to bring ''anybody'' back to life is pretty much a one-way ticket to disaster. The fact that Gimmy's list starts with Kamina and starts growing should give you an idea where I'm going with this: once you start, where do you stop? If you can resurrect your friends, why are all the other victims you ''didn't'' personally know any less deserving? [[http://www.kiwisbybeat.com/minus119.html This]] {{minus}} comic might have the answer to that...

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** Even ignoring the threat of [[TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt the Spiral Nemesis]], the power to bring ''anybody'' back to life is pretty much a one-way ticket to disaster. The fact that Gimmy's list starts with Kamina and starts growing should give you an idea where I'm going with this: once you start, where do you stop? If you can resurrect your friends, why are all the other victims you ''didn't'' personally know any less deserving? [[http://www.kiwisbybeat.com/minus119.html This]] {{minus}} Webcomic/{{minus}} comic might have the answer to that...
2nd Jun '17 3:11:30 AM jormis29
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* George Romero's ''Film/LivingDeadSeries'' is another example that puts forth the idea that [[HumansAreTheRealMonsters humans, for all their claims of being civilized, are really savages]] and that a supernatural species, in this case the zombies, are people too. This aesop became more emphasized as the films went on. ''Film/LandOfTheDead'' eventually went so far as to give the zombies their own storyline with a SympatheticPOV, and presenting their invasion of the last remaining human city, which was run by a CorruptCorporateExecutive and his private army, as a liberation for the oppressed humans. The problem with this is that while the zombies are too animalistic to be considered truly ''malevolent'', they are still undeniably ''dangerous'' predators whose biology demands that [[HungryMenace they feast on human flesh]]. During their assault towards Fiddler's Green, the zombies consumed just as many of the destitute poor as the corrupt rich, which the film glosses over.

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* George Romero's Creator/GeorgeARomero's ''Film/LivingDeadSeries'' is another example that puts forth the idea that [[HumansAreTheRealMonsters humans, for all their claims of being civilized, are really savages]] and that a supernatural species, in this case the zombies, are people too. This aesop became more emphasized as the films went on. ''Film/LandOfTheDead'' eventually went so far as to give the zombies their own storyline with a SympatheticPOV, and presenting their invasion of the last remaining human city, which was run by a CorruptCorporateExecutive and his private army, as a liberation for the oppressed humans. The problem with this is that while the zombies are too animalistic to be considered truly ''malevolent'', they are still undeniably ''dangerous'' predators whose biology demands that [[HungryMenace they feast on human flesh]]. During their assault towards Fiddler's Green, the zombies consumed just as many of the destitute poor as the corrupt rich, which the film glosses over.
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