History Main / FantasticAesop

24th Jan '16 4:30:21 PM Ninja857142
Is there an issue? Send a Message
** Scootaloo is a variant of the above-mentioned characters with disabilities, except that her "disability" is the inability to fly. Her wings are supposedly undergrown for flight (though you [[InformedDeformity can't really tell]]), yet oddly they can, [[ArtisticLicensePhysics for some reason]], propel her at high speeds and great distances on her scooter. In [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS4E5FlightToTheFinish "Flight to the Finish"]], Scootaloo learns that even though she can't fly, she still awesome in other ways... like scooter riding. Thus we get the message, "Your limbs don't function properly? No problem! They can be used for other stuff, like SuperSpeed!" Ironically, with the exception of this episode, Scootaloo has never been portrayed as a disadvantaged filly, probably because most of the local population can't fly either.
to:
** The pegasus Scootaloo is a variant of the above-mentioned characters with disabilities, except that her "disability" is the inability to fly. Her wings are supposedly undergrown for flight (though you [[InformedDeformity can't really tell]]), yet oddly they can, [[ArtisticLicensePhysics for some reason]], propel her at high speeds and great distances on her scooter. In [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS4E5FlightToTheFinish "Flight to the Finish"]], Scootaloo learns that even though she can't fly, she she's still awesome in other ways... like scooter riding. Thus we get the message, "Your limbs don't function properly? No problem! They can be used for other stuff, like SuperSpeed!" Ironically, with the exception of this episode, Scootaloo has never been portrayed as a disadvantaged filly, probably because most of the local population can't fly either.
19th Jan '16 11:27:50 PM Killchrono
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
* The Genocide route of ''VideoGame/{{Undertale}}'' is extremely unrelenting in hammering the point home you're likely only taking that route to see what happens, rather than any actual desire to hurt or punish the characters, and the few characters who are aware that [[spoiler: you're able to effectively time travel using the ability to SAVE]] argue the fact you can undo everything doesn't make you any better of a person. However, the only reason their point sticks is because completing a Genocide playthrough causes you to [[spoiler: [[DemonicPossession become possessed]] by [[BiggerBad the Fallen Child]], who destroys the world whether you want to or not and then only allows you to recreate it if you [[DealWithTheDevil sell your SOUL to him]]]]. Doing so prevents you from ever achieving the GoldenEnding, as [[spoiler: the child takes you over in the final scene of the Pacifist route and is implied to kill everyone again anyway]]. So in some ways, it's an Arbitrary Rules Aesop about [[spoiler: DemonicPossession and [[DealWithTheDevil deals with the devil]]]], but since it's primary purpose is to drive the point the other characters are making, it makes you wonder how effective their point would have been without [[spoiler: the Child's cross-timeline possession of you]].
18th Jan '16 10:30:05 PM Ninja857142
Is there an issue? Send a Message
** Scootaloo is a variant of the above-mentioned characters with disabilities, except that her "disability" is the inability to fly. Her wings are supposedly undergrown for flight (though you [[InformedDeformity can't really tell]]), yet oddly they can, [[ArtisticLicensePhysics for some reason]], propel her at high speeds and great distances on her scooter. Thus we get the message, "Your limbs don't function properly? No problem! They can be used for other stuff, like SuperSpeed!" Ironically, with the exception of [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS4E5FlightToTheFinish one episode]], Scootaloo has never been portrayed as a disadvantaged filly, probably because most of the local population can't fly either.
to:
** Scootaloo is a variant of the above-mentioned characters with disabilities, except that her "disability" is the inability to fly. Her wings are supposedly undergrown for flight (though you [[InformedDeformity can't really tell]]), yet oddly they can, [[ArtisticLicensePhysics for some reason]], propel her at high speeds and great distances on her scooter. In [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS4E5FlightToTheFinish "Flight to the Finish"]], Scootaloo learns that even though she can't fly, she still awesome in other ways... like scooter riding. Thus we get the message, "Your limbs don't function properly? No problem! They can be used for other stuff, like SuperSpeed!" Ironically, with the exception of [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS4E5FlightToTheFinish one episode]], this episode, Scootaloo has never been portrayed as a disadvantaged filly, probably because most of the local population can't fly either.
18th Jan '16 10:23:02 PM Ninja857142
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' is generally pretty good at avoiding this, but it still runs into it on occasion. "Cutie Mark Chronicles" is a good example, as its moral is that friendship is important because everyone has a special connection with their friends, even before they've met. Which is a nice thought, and may very well be true InUniverse, but in real life it's entirely possible to become really good friends without having ever crossed paths in the past.
to:
* ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' is generally pretty good at avoiding this, but it still runs into it on occasion. "Cutie Mark Chronicles" is a good example, as its moral is that friendship is important because everyone has a special connection with their friends, even before they've met. Which is a nice thought, and may very well be true InUniverse, but in real life it's entirely possible impossible to become really good friends without having ever crossed paths in the past.

* Many cartoons and children's shows will introduce characters on wheelchairs to show that you shouldn't be discriminated due to physical disabilities. The problem is said character usually has PsychicPowers to make up for it, or the wheelchair is some CoolCar[=/=]PoweredArmor hybrid. In which case the aesop becomes "{{disability superpower}}s are cool!"
to:
* Many cartoons and children's shows will introduce characters with disabilities and/or on wheelchairs to show that you shouldn't be discriminated against due to physical disabilities. The problem is said character usually has PsychicPowers to make up for it, or the wheelchair is some CoolCar[=/=]PoweredArmor hybrid. In which case the aesop becomes "{{disability superpower}}s are cool!"

* ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'': As Twilight said in ''[[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS4E23InspirationManifestation Inspiration Manifestation]]'', [[SchmuckBait "Never, ever, ever, EVER take another book out of the library at the castle without asking!"]] (Or three Princesses might have to spend their entire day cleaning up your mistake. [[AndThatsTerrible Shame on you.]]) Gets funnier when you realize Spike ''ate'' the book [[WhateverHappenedToTheMouse and Twilight doesn't even think it worth mentioning.]]
to:
* ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'': ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'': ** Scootaloo is a variant of the above-mentioned characters with disabilities, except that her "disability" is the inability to fly. Her wings are supposedly undergrown for flight (though you [[InformedDeformity can't really tell]]), yet oddly they can, [[ArtisticLicensePhysics for some reason]], propel her at high speeds and great distances on her scooter. Thus we get the message, "Your limbs don't function properly? No problem! They can be used for other stuff, like SuperSpeed!" Ironically, with the exception of [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS4E5FlightToTheFinish one episode]], Scootaloo has never been portrayed as a disadvantaged filly, probably because most of the local population can't fly either. ** As Twilight said in ''[[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS4E23InspirationManifestation Inspiration Manifestation]]'', [[SchmuckBait "Never, ever, ever, EVER take another book out of the library at the castle without asking!"]] (Or three Princesses might have to spend their entire day cleaning up your mistake. [[AndThatsTerrible Shame on you.]]) Gets funnier when you realize Spike ''ate'' the book [[WhateverHappenedToTheMouse and Twilight doesn't even think it worth mentioning.]]
14th Jan '16 6:06:11 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* The ''Series/DoctorWho'' episode "The Woman Who Lived" devotes a good deal of time to discussing the Aesop that "Just because you're immortal doesn't mean you should stop caring about mortals." [[/folder]] [[folder:Newspaper Comics]] * The page quote comes from ''ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes'' story arc involving Calvin [[{{Snowlems}} bringing a snowman to life.]] The snowman became a vicious monster and created an army of "snow goons" that kept trying to kill Calvin. After defeating them by spraying them with the hose to freeze them solid, Calvin stated that he had learned a lesson from this misadventure: "Snow goons are bad news.", which he was glad was completely inapplicable.

[[folder:Newspaper Comics]] * The page quote comes from ''ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes'' story arc involving Calvin [[{{Snowlems}} bringing a snowman to life.]] The snowman became a vicious monster and created an army of "snow goons" that kept trying to kill Calvin. After defeating them by spraying them with the hose to freeze them solid, Calvin stated that he had learned a lesson from this misadventure: "Snow goons are bad news.", which he was glad was completely inapplicable. [[/folder]]
14th Jan '16 6:05:12 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
* The ''Series/DoctorWho'' episode "The Woman Who Lived" devotes a good deal of time to discussing the Aesop that "Just because you're immortal doesn't mean you should stop caring about mortals."
9th Jan '16 11:19:50 AM Cailleach
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' is generally pretty good at avoiding this, but it still runs into it on occasion. "Cute Mark Chronicles" is a good example, as its moral is that friendship is important because everyone has a special connection with their friends, even before they've met. Which is a nice thought, and may very well be true InUniverse, but in real life it's entirely Impossible to become really good friends without having ever crossed paths in the past.
to:
* ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' is generally pretty good at avoiding this, but it still runs into it on occasion. "Cute "Cutie Mark Chronicles" is a good example, as its moral is that friendship is important because everyone has a special connection with their friends, even before they've met. Which is a nice thought, and may very well be true InUniverse, but in real life it's entirely Impossible possible to become really good friends without having ever crossed paths in the past.
2nd Jan '16 12:53:50 PM Ninja857142
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* Many movies from Pure Flix Entertainment (and many other religious movies in general) have a problem with the DeusExMachina nature of their plots. The premise of these movies center around Christianity and God's power. The whole idea is to establish the power of faith and prayer by having the Christian protagonists face hardships, pray, and have their problems solved. When people in Pure Flix movies pray, God often ''literally'' shows up to answer their prayers in the best possible way or at least does an out-and-out miracle for them, thus promoting the aesop "Prayer is magic: ask God for a miracle and you'll get one every time!" This is, at best, ArtisticLicenseReligion. In RealLife, the point of prayer and worship is to have faith even when God ''doesn't'' grant an immediate DeusExMachina, as in the case of a great many Jewish and Christian martyrs. (See, in particular, the Book of Job in TheBible for just one example.)
to:
* Many movies from Pure Flix Entertainment (and many other religious movies in general) have a problem with the DeusExMachina nature of their plots. The premise of these movies center around Christianity and God's power. The whole idea is to establish the power of faith and prayer by having the Christian protagonists face hardships, pray, and have their problems solved. When people in Pure Flix movies pray, God often ''literally'' shows up to answer their prayers in the best possible way or at least does an out-and-out miracle for them, thus promoting the aesop "Prayer is magic: ask God for a miracle and you'll get one every time!" This is, at best, ArtisticLicenseReligion. In RealLife, the point of prayer and worship is to have faith even when God ''doesn't'' grant an immediate a convenient DeusExMachina, as in the case of a great many Jewish and Christian martyrs. (See, in particular, the Book of Job in TheBible for just one example.)
1st Jan '16 7:28:42 PM Ninja857142
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* ''Film/RevengeOfTheSith'' contains two in one movie. YouCantFightFate plays into the central plot and Anakin's attempt to save Padme from dying led to her path to death. The movie also touches on ImmortalityImmorality with Palpatine suggesting that immortality is a Sith exclusive technique.
to:
* ''Film/RevengeOfTheSith'' contains two in one movie. YouCantFightFate plays into George Romero's ''Film/LivingDeadSeries'' is another example that puts forth the central plot idea that [[HumansAreTheRealMonsters humans, for all their claims of being civilized, are really savages]] and Anakin's attempt that a supernatural species, in this case the zombies, are people too. This aesop became more emphasized as the films went on. ''Film/LandOfTheDead'' eventually went so far as to save Padme from dying led to her path to death. The movie also touches on ImmortalityImmorality give the zombies their own storyline with Palpatine suggesting a SympatheticPOV, and presenting their invasion of the last remaining human city, which was run by a CorruptCorporateExecutive and his private army, as a liberation for the oppressed humans. The problem with this is that immortality is a Sith exclusive technique.while the zombies are too animalistic to be considered truly ''malevolent'', they are still undeniably ''dangerous'' predators whose biology demands that they feast on human flesh. During their assault towards Fiddler's Green, the zombies consumed just as many of the destitute poor as the corrupt rich, which the film glosses over.

* Many movies from Pure Flix Entertainment (and many other religious movies in general) have a problem with the DeusExMachina nature of their plots. The premise of these movies center around Christianity and God's power. The whole idea is to establish the power of faith and prayer by having the Christian protagonists face hardships, pray, and have their problems solved. When people in Pure Flix movies pray, God often ''literally'' shows up to answer their prayers in the best possible way or at least does an out-and-out miracle for them, thus promoting the aesop "Prayer is magic: ask God for a miracle and you'll get one every time!" This is, at best, ArtisticLicenseReligion. In RealLife, the point of prayer and worship is to have faith even when God ''doesn't'' grant an immediate DeusExMachina, as in the case of a great many Jewish and Christian martyrs. (See, in particular, the Book of Job in TheBible for just one example.) * ''Film/RevengeOfTheSith'' contains two in one movie. YouCantFightFate plays into the central plot and Anakin's attempt to save Padme from dying led to her path to death. The movie also touches on ImmortalityImmorality with Palpatine suggesting that immortality is a Sith exclusive technique.technique. * ''Film/StarTrekInsurrection'' uses the relocation of the Ba'ku as an analogy for the Trail of Tears and how it utterly destroyed several Amerindian cultures. Fair enough, most people can agree that the Trail of Tears was a bad thing, but ''Insurrection'' changes it so much that it actually seems to be arguing in its favor. The relocation of the Amerindian tribes was forcing thousands of members of a native minority populace to traverse an incredibly dangerous and lengthy route to nowhere, out of a desire for gold and territory. The relocation of the Ba'ku would have been forcing a few hundred non-native white humans to get on a ship and fly to an opulent Federation colony out of a need (the Federation is at war) to obtain a MacGuffin particle that could advance medicine by centuries and add a few decades onto the lifespan of the Federation's entire populace. It's true that the Ba'ku will die off, just like the Amerindians, but only because they'll no longer be immortal, and plenty of them are already well past their time. The movie does try to address the issue of racism as a motivating factor... by introducing an evil race of ugly mutants who want to get revenge on the angelic and all-white Ba'ku. A more accurate analogy would be a group of about three people refusing to move when the city needs to demolish their lavish house to build a hospital.

* Virtually every movie from Pure Flix Entertainment (and a great many hyper-religious movies in general) has a problem with the DeusExMachina nature of their plots. The premise of these movies center around Christianity and God's power. The whole idea is to establish the power of faith and prayer by having the Christian protagonists face hardships, pray, and have their problems solved. When people in Pure Flix movies pray, God often ''literally'' shows up to answer their prayers in the best possible way or at least does an out-and-out miracle for them, thus promoting the aesop "Prayer is magic: ask God for a miracle and you'll get one every time!" This is, at best, ArtisticLicenseReligion. In RealLife, the point of prayer and worship is to have faith even when God ''doesn't'' give you a DeusExMachina, as in the case of a great many Jewish and Christian martyrs. (See, in particular, the Book of Job in TheBible for just one example.) * ''Film/StarTrekInsurrection'' uses the relocation of the Ba'ku as an analogy for the Trail of Tears and how it utterly destroyed several Amerindian cultures. Fair enough, most people can agree that the Trail of Tears was a bad thing, but ''Insurrection'' changes it so much that it actually seems to be arguing in its favor. The relocation of the Amerindian tribes was forcing thousands of members of a native minority populace to traverse an incredibly dangerous and lengthy route to nowhere, out of a desire for gold and territory. The relocation of the Ba'ku would have been forcing a few hundred non-native white humans to get on a ship and fly to an opulent Federation colony out of a need (the Federation is at war) to obtain a MacGuffin particle that could advance medicine by centuries and add a few decades onto the lifespan of the Federation's entire populace. It's true that the Ba'ku will die off, just like the Amerindians, but only because they'll no longer be immortal, and plenty of them are already well past their time. The movie does try to address the issue of racism as a motivating factor... by introducing an evil race of ugly mutants who want to get revenge on the angelic and all-white Ba'ku. A more accurate analogy would be a group of about three people refusing to move when the city needs to demolish their lavish house to build a hospital. * George Romero's ''Film/LivingDeadSeries'' is another example that puts forth the idea that [[HumansAreTheRealMonsters humans, for all their claims of being civilized, are really savages]] and that a supernatural species, in this case the zombies, are people too. This aesop became more emphasized as the films went on. ''Film/LandOfTheDead'' eventually went so far as to give the zombies their own storyline with a SympatheticPOV, and presenting their invasion of the last remaining human city, which was run by a CorruptCorporateExecutive and his private army, as a liberation for the oppressed humans. The problem with this is that while the zombies are too animalistic to be considered truly ''malevolent'', they are still undeniably ''dangerous'' predators whose biology demands that they feast on human flesh. During their assault towards Fiddler's Green, the zombies consumed just as many of the destitute poor as the corrupt rich, which the film glosses over.
23rd Dec '15 3:55:08 AM Doug86
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* ''RegularShow'' does this all the time. Lessons learned include "Rock Paper Scissors is evil and will probably get you killed." (Mordecai and Rigby nonetheless catch AesopAmnesia at the end of the same episode.)
to:
* ''RegularShow'' ''WesternAnimation/RegularShow'' does this all the time. Lessons learned include "Rock Paper Scissors is evil and will probably get you killed." (Mordecai and Rigby nonetheless catch AesopAmnesia at the end of the same episode.)
This list shows the last 10 events of 267. Show all.