History Main / FantasticAesop

7th Aug '16 11:16:47 AM nombretomado
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* Barbara Gordon (started as Comicbook/{{Batgirl}}, became Oracle, now back to being Comicbook/{{Batgirl}}) in [[TheDCU the DC Comics Universe]] lost the use of her legs -- in a universe where incredible technology exists that should be able to restore them. Showing that handicapped people can be useful contributors to society doesn't work so well when the {{Phlebotinum}} in the world means that she's only handicapped by choice. DC has [[AuthorsSavingThrow tried]] to [[JustifiedTrope justify this]] by saying that she won't use technology that's available to superheroes [[ReedRichardsIsUseless but not to civilians]], which would make sense only if being handicapped places no burden whatsoever on other people; otherwise, choosing not to cure herself is unfair to those people. However, this is also part of a more general trend of Bat Family characters using (by [[TheDCU DCU standards]]) very low-tech equipment. If they used all the technology they ''should'' have access to, they'd be hurling lasers around instead of boomerangs, and they'd wear robotic power suits that rival Comicbook/{{Superman}} in power instead of just some spandex with the occasional kevlar vest underneath.

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* Barbara Gordon (started as Comicbook/{{Batgirl}}, became Oracle, now back to being Comicbook/{{Batgirl}}) in [[TheDCU [[Franchise/TheDCU the DC Comics Universe]] lost the use of her legs -- in a universe where incredible technology exists that should be able to restore them. Showing that handicapped people can be useful contributors to society doesn't work so well when the {{Phlebotinum}} in the world means that she's only handicapped by choice. DC has [[AuthorsSavingThrow tried]] to [[JustifiedTrope justify this]] by saying that she won't use technology that's available to superheroes [[ReedRichardsIsUseless but not to civilians]], which would make sense only if being handicapped places no burden whatsoever on other people; otherwise, choosing not to cure herself is unfair to those people. However, this is also part of a more general trend of Bat Family characters using (by [[TheDCU [[Franchise/TheDCU DCU standards]]) very low-tech equipment. If they used all the technology they ''should'' have access to, they'd be hurling lasers around instead of boomerangs, and they'd wear robotic power suits that rival Comicbook/{{Superman}} in power instead of just some spandex with the occasional kevlar vest underneath.
8th Jul '16 8:19:28 PM DoctorTItanX
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However, the [[AnAesop Aesops]] delivered via unicorn or rocket ship sometimes get {{lost|Aesop}} or [[BrokenAesop break]]. In the course of presenting the story the Aesop either gets shoehorned to fit into [[TheVerse that world]] or is arbitrarily discarded. The problem isn't that we can't relate to it. [[RuleOfEmpathy We usually can]], because the metaphor is [[{{Anvilicious}} so obvious]]. The problem is that the deck is stacked, causing one of two problems:

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However, the [[AnAesop Aesops]] delivered via unicorn or rocket ship sometimes get {{lost|Aesop}} or [[BrokenAesop break]]. In the course of presenting the story story, the Aesop either gets shoehorned to fit into [[TheVerse that world]] or is arbitrarily discarded. The problem isn't that we can't relate to it. [[RuleOfEmpathy We usually can]], because the metaphor is [[{{Anvilicious}} so obvious]]. The problem is that the deck is stacked, causing one of two problems:



** One such common Aesop is simply that we must [[SourGrapes accept something in real life because changing it is impossible]], which is, in and of itself, a fairly FamilyUnfriendlyAesop. In the fictional world we're shown that changing it is possible, but we're still supposed to accept it, which quite often takes this into MisappliedPhlebotinum territory.

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** One such common Aesop is simply that we must [[SourGrapes accept something in real life because changing it is impossible]], which is, in and of itself, a fairly FamilyUnfriendlyAesop. In the fictional world other (fictional) world, we're shown that changing it is possible, completely possible and is not just wishful thinking in that reality, but we're still supposed to accept it, which quite often takes this into MisappliedPhlebotinum territory.



* '''Arbitrary Rules:''' The writer, in order to prevent MisappliedPhlebotinum, provides [[HoldingBackThePhlebotinum arbitrary rules and restrictions on the phlebotinum]]. Now the Aesop makes sense within the fictional universe, but makes no sense as a metaphor. A variety of {{Aesoptinum}}, and often a SpaceWhaleAesop.

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* '''Arbitrary Rules:''' The writer, in order to prevent MisappliedPhlebotinum, provides [[HoldingBackThePhlebotinum arbitrary rules and restrictions on the phlebotinum]]. Now the Aesop makes sense within the fictional universe, but makes no sense as a metaphor.metaphor at all. A variety of {{Aesoptinum}}, and often a SpaceWhaleAesop.
15th May '16 3:33:21 PM Fireblood
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** '''Failed Metaphor:''' Using the metaphor of "Robots are like [[WeWillUseManualLaborInTheFuture human slaves]]" (as Karel Čapek did when he invented the term "robot"), with the Aesop that if you don't treat them like equals you will face [[CrushKillDestroy the wrath]] of machines who have TurnedAgainstTheirMasters. However, the fictional robots are different from human beings in a way that makes it much more justified to treat them as dangerous or makes it much more likely they could successfully revolt; human workers don't have {{Death Ray}}s or an [[MookMaker infinitely respawning population]] (well, not the way those robots do). Also, human slaves are sentient. Robots aren't. Then again, maybe everybody acknowledges this and therefore programs the robots ''not'' to revolt, leading to a utopian future where everyone is served by willing slaves. Go thou and do likewise, viewers!

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** '''Failed Metaphor:''' Using the metaphor of "Robots are like [[WeWillUseManualLaborInTheFuture human slaves]]" (as Karel Čapek did when he invented the term "robot"), with the Aesop that if you don't treat them like equals you will face [[CrushKillDestroy the wrath]] of machines who have TurnedAgainstTheirMasters. However, the fictional robots are different from human beings in a way that makes it much more justified to treat them as dangerous or makes it much more likely they could successfully revolt; human workers don't have {{Death Ray}}s or an [[MookMaker infinitely respawning population]] (well, not the way those robots do). Also, human slaves are sentient. Robots aren't.may not be. Then again, maybe everybody acknowledges this and therefore programs the robots ''not'' to revolt, leading to a utopian future where everyone is served by willing slaves. Go thou and do likewise, viewers!



** '''Failed Metaphor:''' The StockSuperpower or [[FunctionalMagic magical ability]] the hero has is quite potent, perhaps [[StoryBreakerPower story breakingly so]], but is never as good as old fashioned, character building ''hard work''. So the hero must never use her powers [[AmbitionIsEvil for self gain]], or even just [[MundaneUtility baking a pizza]]. Why? Because [[PersonalGainHurts that way lies]] JumpingOffTheSlipperySlope and [[GoodPowersBadPeople villainy]]. Never mind that Adam Smith has different ideas about [[ComesGreatResponsibility using your talents to help yourself and others]], if it's a power, it's [[InverseLawOfUtilityAndLethality only good for beating stuff up]]. Alternatively, the powers work great and make everyone's life better; so today's moral is that you should go get yourself some superpowers.
** '''Arbitrary Rules:''' Same as above, using powers for self gain is bad, except this time it's not because of any corrupting influence... but because it never works. UselessSuperpowers are the order of the day, ReedRichardsIsUseless and the poor witch is really BlessedWithSuck. Chores done with magic are sloppy, things made with super powers lack heart, and in general "laziness" begets problems. Particularly common for Teenage Witches and pre-teen Super Heroes. Perhaps this BrokenAesop can be repaired, if this trope variant were ever to be subverted with the message that "Just because magic is no substitute for good hard work doesn't excuse you from putting in some good hard work practicing your magic!" With sufficiently refined skill and subtlety, even super powers that were once [[InverseLawOfUtilityAndLethality only good for beating stuff up]] could realistically find broader application with an artisan's approach to spellcraft.

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** '''Failed Metaphor:''' The StockSuperpower or [[FunctionalMagic magical ability]] the hero has is quite potent, perhaps [[StoryBreakerPower story breakingly so]], but is never as good as old fashioned, character building old-fashioned, character-building ''hard work''. So the hero must never use her powers [[AmbitionIsEvil for self gain]], self-gain]], or even just [[MundaneUtility baking a pizza]]. Why? Because [[PersonalGainHurts that way lies]] JumpingOffTheSlipperySlope and [[GoodPowersBadPeople villainy]]. Never mind that Adam Smith has different ideas about [[ComesGreatResponsibility using your talents to help yourself and others]], if it's a power, it's [[InverseLawOfUtilityAndLethality only good for beating stuff up]]. Alternatively, the powers work great and make everyone's life better; so today's moral is that you should go get yourself some superpowers.
** '''Arbitrary Rules:''' Same as above, using powers for self gain self-gain is bad, except this time it's not because of any corrupting influence... but because it never works. UselessSuperpowers are the order of the day, ReedRichardsIsUseless and the poor witch is really BlessedWithSuck. Chores done with magic are sloppy, things made with super powers lack heart, and in general "laziness" begets problems. Particularly common for Teenage Witches and pre-teen Super Heroes. Perhaps this BrokenAesop can be repaired, if this trope variant were ever to be subverted with the message that "Just because magic is no substitute for good hard work doesn't excuse you from putting in some good hard work practicing your magic!" With sufficiently refined skill and subtlety, even super powers that were once [[InverseLawOfUtilityAndLethality only good for beating stuff up]] could realistically find broader application with an artisan's approach to spellcraft.spell craft.
7th May '16 4:32:44 PM billybobfred
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** The Genocide route is extremely unrelenting in hammering the point home you're likely only taking that route to see what happens, rather than any actual desire to hurt or punish the characters, and the few characters who are aware that [[spoiler: you're able to effectively time travel using the ability to SAVE]] argue the fact you can undo everything doesn't make you any better of a person. However, the only reason their point sticks is because completing a Genocide playthrough causes you to [[spoiler: [[DemonicPossession become possessed]] by [[BiggerBad the Fallen Child]], who destroys the world whether you want to or not and then only allows you to recreate it if you [[DealWithTheDevil sell your SOUL to him]]]]. Doing so prevents you from ever achieving the GoldenEnding, as [[spoiler: the child takes you over in the final scene of the Pacifist route and is implied to kill everyone again anyway]]. So in some ways, it's an Arbitrary Rules Aesop about [[spoiler: DemonicPossession and [[DealWithTheDevil deals with the devil]]]], but since it's primary purpose is to drive the point the other characters are making, it makes you wonder how effective their point would have been without [[spoiler: the Child's cross-timeline possession of you]].

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** The Genocide route is extremely unrelenting in hammering the point home you're likely only taking that route to see what happens, rather than any actual desire to hurt or punish the characters, and the few characters who are aware that [[spoiler: you're able to effectively time travel using the ability to SAVE]] argue the fact you can undo everything doesn't make you any better of a person. However, the only reason their point sticks is because completing a Genocide playthrough causes you to [[spoiler: [[DemonicPossession become possessed]] by [[BiggerBad the Fallen Child]], who destroys the world whether you want to or not and then only allows you to recreate it if you [[DealWithTheDevil sell your SOUL to him]]]].them]]]]. Doing so prevents you from ever achieving the GoldenEnding, as [[spoiler: the child takes you over in the final scene of the Pacifist route and is implied to kill everyone again anyway]]. So in some ways, it's an Arbitrary Rules Aesop about [[spoiler: DemonicPossession and [[DealWithTheDevil deals with the devil]]]], but since it's primary purpose is to drive the point the other characters are making, it makes you wonder how effective their point would have been without [[spoiler: the Child's cross-timeline possession of you]].
6th May '16 6:18:00 PM billybobfred
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* The Genocide route of ''VideoGame/{{Undertale}}'' is extremely unrelenting in hammering the point home you're likely only taking that route to see what happens, rather than any actual desire to hurt or punish the characters, and the few characters who are aware that [[spoiler: you're able to effectively time travel using the ability to SAVE]] argue the fact you can undo everything doesn't make you any better of a person. However, the only reason their point sticks is because completing a Genocide playthrough causes you to [[spoiler: [[DemonicPossession become possessed]] by [[BiggerBad the Fallen Child]], who destroys the world whether you want to or not and then only allows you to recreate it if you [[DealWithTheDevil sell your SOUL to him]]]]. Doing so prevents you from ever achieving the GoldenEnding, as [[spoiler: the child takes you over in the final scene of the Pacifist route and is implied to kill everyone again anyway]]. So in some ways, it's an Arbitrary Rules Aesop about [[spoiler: DemonicPossession and [[DealWithTheDevil deals with the devil]]]], but since it's primary purpose is to drive the point the other characters are making, it makes you wonder how effective their point would have been without [[spoiler: the Child's cross-timeline possession of you]].

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Undertale}}'':
**
The Genocide route of ''VideoGame/{{Undertale}}'' is extremely unrelenting in hammering the point home you're likely only taking that route to see what happens, rather than any actual desire to hurt or punish the characters, and the few characters who are aware that [[spoiler: you're able to effectively time travel using the ability to SAVE]] argue the fact you can undo everything doesn't make you any better of a person. However, the only reason their point sticks is because completing a Genocide playthrough causes you to [[spoiler: [[DemonicPossession become possessed]] by [[BiggerBad the Fallen Child]], who destroys the world whether you want to or not and then only allows you to recreate it if you [[DealWithTheDevil sell your SOUL to him]]]]. Doing so prevents you from ever achieving the GoldenEnding, as [[spoiler: the child takes you over in the final scene of the Pacifist route and is implied to kill everyone again anyway]]. So in some ways, it's an Arbitrary Rules Aesop about [[spoiler: DemonicPossession and [[DealWithTheDevil deals with the devil]]]], but since it's primary purpose is to drive the point the other characters are making, it makes you wonder how effective their point would have been without [[spoiler: the Child's cross-timeline possession of you]].you]].
** Less {{Anvilicious}}ly, the fact that the GoldenEnding can only be achieved by refraining from committing the CrimeOfSelfDefense no matter how violent your enemy is only makes sense in-universe because the barrier needs seven human souls worth of power to be destroyed; the six human souls in reserve plus ''every monster in the Underground'' conveniently make up the correct amount, and you can't do it with one iota less. It's a pretty convenient coincidence that this is the number of monsters currently alive, and the fact that every living monster soul adds up to one human soul is only mentioned on one PamphletShelf.
4th May '16 12:44:41 PM Morgenthaler
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* George Romero's ''Film/LivingDeadSeries'' is another example that puts forth the idea that [[HumansAreTheRealMonsters humans, for all their claims of being civilized, are really savages]] and that a supernatural species, in this case the zombies, are people too. This aesop became more emphasized as the films went on. ''Film/LandOfTheDead'' eventually went so far as to give the zombies their own storyline with a SympatheticPOV, and presenting their invasion of the last remaining human city, which was run by a CorruptCorporateExecutive and his private army, as a liberation for the oppressed humans. The problem with this is that while the zombies are too animalistic to be considered truly ''malevolent'', they are still undeniably ''dangerous'' predators whose biology demands that they feast on human flesh. During their assault towards Fiddler's Green, the zombies consumed just as many of the destitute poor as the corrupt rich, which the film glosses over.

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* George Romero's ''Film/LivingDeadSeries'' is another example that puts forth the idea that [[HumansAreTheRealMonsters humans, for all their claims of being civilized, are really savages]] and that a supernatural species, in this case the zombies, are people too. This aesop became more emphasized as the films went on. ''Film/LandOfTheDead'' eventually went so far as to give the zombies their own storyline with a SympatheticPOV, and presenting their invasion of the last remaining human city, which was run by a CorruptCorporateExecutive and his private army, as a liberation for the oppressed humans. The problem with this is that while the zombies are too animalistic to be considered truly ''malevolent'', they are still undeniably ''dangerous'' predators whose biology demands that [[HungryMenace they feast on human flesh.flesh]]. During their assault towards Fiddler's Green, the zombies consumed just as many of the destitute poor as the corrupt rich, which the film glosses over.



* ''Series/TheOuterLimits1995'': In the episode "First Anniversary", two aliens who are stranded on Earth use their shapeshifting/psychic powers to make themselves appear as beautiful women to seduce men. The problem is that the effect wears off after a year of exposure and reveals their hideous true forms to their husbands. The guys can't handle this revelation and are unable to see that TrueBeautyIsOnTheInside. However, the aliens are not just ''ugly'' but ''so'' [[StarfishAliens inhuman]] that even touching them makes the men violently ill and eventually GoMadFromTheRevelation. As a result they look less like a bunch of superficial jerks and more like a bunch of duped victims; it's implied that the two aliens have been doing this for some time, and one of them has already stopped caring about the damaging effect she has on humans.

to:

* ''Series/TheOuterLimits1995'': In the episode "First Anniversary", two aliens who are stranded on Earth use their shapeshifting/psychic powers to make themselves appear as beautiful women to seduce men. The problem is that the effect wears off after a year of exposure and reveals their hideous true forms to their husbands. The guys can't handle this revelation and are unable to see that TrueBeautyIsOnTheInside. However, the aliens are not just ''ugly'' ugly but ''so'' so [[StarfishAliens downright inhuman]] that even touching them makes the men violently ill and eventually GoMadFromTheRevelation. As a result they look less like a bunch of superficial jerks and more like a bunch of duped victims; it's implied that the two aliens have been doing this for some time, and one of them has already stopped caring about the damaging effect she has on humans.
4th May '16 5:54:25 AM Morgenthaler
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/TheOuterLimits1995'': In the episode "First Anniversary", two aliens who are stranded on Earth use their shapeshifting/psychic powers to make themselves appear as beautiful women to seduce men. The problem is that the effect wears off after a year of exposure and reveals their hideous true forms to their husbands. The guys can't handle this revelation and are unable to see that TrueBeautyIsOnTheInside. However, the aliens are not just ''ugly'' but ''so'' [[StarfishAliens inhuman]] that even touching them makes the men violently ill and eventually GoMadFromTheRevelation. As a result they look less like a bunch of superficial jerks and more like a bunch of duped victims; it's implied that the two aliens have been doing this for some time, and one of them has already stopped caring about the damaging effect she has on humans.
1st Apr '16 3:25:17 PM NNinja
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Added DiffLines:

* Season 2 of Series/TheFlash2014 is rife with anti-drug message with Velocity series of speed-enhancing drugs being used as metaphor for performance-enhancing drugs used in sports. When faced with evil speedsters much faster than he is, Flash is tempted to use Velocity 9 to increase his performance and level the playing field, but is discouraqged by others since using Velocity 9 can ruin his health in long term. Problem here is that Flash is superhero, not a sportsman. The stake here isn't victory, fame or money, it's people's lives. If the Flash isn't fast enough someone may die, sometimes many people will die. Taking Velocity once wouldn't cause that much damage to his health and if it would stop a guy who's terrorising the world who is extremely hard if not impossible to stop otherwise it's not that hard to think it would be worth it. Doubles as BrokenAesop, since Jay Garrick used Velocity several times in the show and more often than not it ended up with him saving someone's life.
26th Mar '16 11:38:45 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* At the end of ''GurrenLagann'' [[spoiler:it's not really clear whether Spiral Energy ''can'' resurrect the dead, or if the characters are speculating if it could. Regardless though, the characters conclude they shouldn't bring back the dead.]] ''Gurren Lagann'' has the major theme of accepting and moving on after death. While a good value in real life, this might not be as good in a world where resurrection is possible.

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* At the end of ''GurrenLagann'' ''Anime/TengenToppaGurrenLagann'' [[spoiler:it's not really clear whether Spiral Energy ''can'' resurrect the dead, or if the characters are speculating if it could. Regardless though, the characters conclude they shouldn't bring back the dead.]] ''Gurren Lagann'' has the major theme of accepting and moving on after death. While a good value in real life, this might not be as good in a world where resurrection is possible.
10th Mar '16 12:39:04 PM Spheniscine
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* If you are Adam Sandler in the movie ''Film/Click'' and find a "universal remote" that can apply TV-like functions (e.g. mute, fast-forward, etc.) to the universe, don't use fast-forward to skip the boring parts of life like traffic jams, or the remote will "remember" how you used it and automatically fast-forward through important parts of your life as well just because it contained a boring bit you previously skipped.

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* If you are Adam Sandler in the movie ''Film/Click'' ''{{Film/Click}}'' and find a "universal remote" that can apply TV-like functions (e.g. mute, fast-forward, etc.) to the universe, don't use fast-forward to skip the boring parts of life like traffic jams, or the remote will "remember" how you used it and automatically fast-forward through important parts of your life as well just because it contained a boring bit you previously skipped.
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