History Main / FantasticAesop

9th May '17 10:48:20 AM bificommander
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* The second ''{{Film/Hellboy}}'' film has a similar message as the ''X Men'' movies, with the same problem. The {{Muggle}}s are portrayed as nasty little shits for being afraid of Hellboy. Even ignoring that Hellboy (both the person and movie) [[WhatMeasureIsANonUnique doesn't show much concern for regular humans' lives]], there's the problem that he doesn't just look like a devil sent from Hell to bring destruction to the world of man, he actually ''is'' just that. In the previous movie he was seconds away from dooming the world. And this movie reveals that he had the human who stopped him doing that literally ReassignedToAntarctica, and an Angel states that the powers that be still fully expect that he'll destroy earth at some point.

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* The second ''{{Film/Hellboy}}'' film has a similar message as the ''X Men'' movies, with the same problem. The {{Muggle}}s are portrayed as nasty little shits for being afraid of Hellboy. Even ignoring that Hellboy (both the person and movie) [[WhatMeasureIsANonUnique doesn't show much concern for regular humans' lives]], there's the problem that he doesn't just look like a devil sent from Hell to bring destruction to the world of man, he actually ''is'' just that. In the previous movie he was seconds away from dooming the world. And this movie reveals that he had the human who stopped him doing that literally ReassignedToAntarctica, and an Angel states that the powers that be still fully expect that he'll destroy earth at some point. \n The humans he encounters may be judging a book by it's cover, but the contents of this particular book happen to be just as scary it seemed.
9th May '17 10:45:47 AM bificommander
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* The second ''{{Film/Hellboy}}'' film has a similar message as the ''X Men'' movies, with the same problem. The {{Muggle}}s are portrayed as nasty little shits for being afraid of Hellboy. Even ignoring that Hellboy (both the person and movie) [[WhatMeasureIsANonUnique doesn't show much concern for regular humans' lives]], there's the problem that he doesn't just look like a devil sent from Hell to bring destruction to the world of man, he actually ''is'' just that. In the previous movie he was seconds away from dooming the world. And this movie reveals that he had the human who stopped him doing that literally ReassignedToAntarctica, and an Angel states that the powers that be still fully expect that he'll destroy earth at some point.
23rd Apr '17 10:24:10 AM gophergiggles
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** The entire plot, resolution, and learned lesson of ''A Flurry Of Emotions'' relies entirely on Flurry Heart being an unstoppable infant PhysicalGod who even with a PowerLimiter is absurdly powerful, capable of flight, and seemingly much more intelligent than an infant should be. Any normal infant (even most from InUniverse) would only be able to sit grumpily in their baby carrier while Twilight completed her "boring" duties, and she would go on to spend some quality time with the kid with absolutely no conflict whatsoever.
17th Apr '17 11:48:57 AM HiddenWindshield
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** Both "Christmas" episodes, that is "[[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS2E13HearthsWarmingEve Hearth's Warming Eve]]" and "[[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS6E8AHearthsWarmingTail A Hearth's Warming Tale]]", have aesops simply don't mesh with Christmas as the ponies motivation for celebrating this holiday and the virtues it teaches is the threat of the Windigoes: evil winter spirits that will return and [[ApocalypseHow destroy the world with never-ending winter]] if the ponies ever stop celebrating this holiday, rather than loving one's friends and family and "good will to all".

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** Both Neither "Christmas" episodes, that is "[[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS2E13HearthsWarmingEve episode ("[[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS2E13HearthsWarmingEve Hearth's Warming Eve]]" and "[[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS6E8AHearthsWarmingTail A Hearth's Warming Tale]]", have aesops simply Tale]]") of ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' actually has a "love your friends and family, good will to all" aesop. Rather, the aesop is, "If you don't mesh with Christmas as the ponies motivation for celebrating celebrate this holiday and the virtues it teaches is the threat of the Windigoes: evil winter spirits that holiday, Windigoes will return and [[ApocalypseHow destroy the world world]] with [[EndlessWinter a never-ending winter]] if the ponies ever stop celebrating this holiday, rather than loving one's friends and family and "good will to all".winter]]."
17th Apr '17 11:24:38 AM HiddenWindshield
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* In Literature/LatawnyaTheNaughtyHorseLearnsToSayNoToDrugs, the author tries to present a DrugsAreBad message. One scene in this book features a horse die from a marijuana overdose, to warn kids that this could happen to them. But while marijuana is toxic to ''horses'', it cannot kill a ''human''.

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* In Literature/LatawnyaTheNaughtyHorseLearnsToSayNoToDrugs, the author tries to present a DrugsAreBad message. One scene in this book features a horse die from a marijuana overdose, to warn kids that this could happen to them. But while marijuana is toxic to ''horses'', it cannot kill a ''human''.it's much less toxic to ''humans''.
25th Mar '17 9:06:19 PM StrixObscuro
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** Finally, the Samsara of Heavenly Life technique can only be used by someone who possesses the Rinnegan, an eye power which was held centuries ago by the Messiah figure. This technique was used by Nagato to revive nearly the entire population of the most politically important city in the world. As confirmed by [[spoiler: Obito Uchiha]] in a recent chapter, this technique also costs the user their life.

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** Finally, the Samsara of Heavenly Life technique can only be used by someone who possesses the Rinnegan, an eye power which was held centuries ago by the Messiah figure. This technique was used by Nagato to revive nearly the entire population of the most politically important city in the world. As confirmed by [[spoiler: Obito [[spoiler:Obito Uchiha]] in a recent chapter, this technique also costs the user their life.


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[[folder:Comic Books]]
* In ''ComicBook/{{Runaways}}'', much of the development of Karolina and Xavin's relationship involved Karolina, a lesbian, having to learn to accept that Xavin changes gender, because it was supposedly difficult for Xavin to maintain a female form. Which is all well and good, except Xavin had no trouble maintaining a human male form at nearly all times, despite this not being their natural form, so Xavin's inability to maintain a female form (either human or Skrull) seems like an entirely arbitrary limitation.
[[/folder]]
23rd Feb '17 5:22:40 PM Prfnoff
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** The Genocide route is extremely unrelenting in hammering the point home you're likely only taking that route to see what happens, rather than any actual desire to hurt or punish the characters, and the few characters who are aware that [[spoiler: you're able to effectively time travel using the ability to SAVE]] argue the fact you can undo everything doesn't make you any better of a person. However, the only reason their point sticks is because the Genocide route ends with an all but literal DiabolusExMachine in which [[spoiler: [[DemonicPossession you become possessed]] by [[GreaterScopeVillain the Fallen Child]], who destroys the world whether you want to or not and then only allows you to recreate it if you [[DealWithTheDevil sell your SOUL to them]]]]. Doing so prevents you from ever achieving the GoldenEnding, as [[spoiler: the child takes you over in the final scene of the Pacifist route and is implied to kill everyone again anyway]]. So in some ways, it's an Arbitrary Rules Aesop about [[spoiler: DemonicPossession and [[DealWithTheDevil deals with the devil]]]], but since it's primary purpose is to drive the point the other characters are making, it makes you wonder how effective their point would have been without [[spoiler: the Child's cross-timeline possession of you]].

to:

** The Genocide route is extremely unrelenting in hammering the point home you're likely only taking that route to see what happens, rather than any actual desire to hurt or punish the characters, and the few characters who are aware that [[spoiler: you're able to effectively time travel using the ability to SAVE]] argue the fact you can undo everything doesn't make you any better of a person. However, the only reason their point sticks is because the Genocide route ends with an all but literal DiabolusExMachine DiabolusExMachina in which the form of [[spoiler: [[DemonicPossession you become possessed]] by [[GreaterScopeVillain the Fallen Child]], Child, who destroys the world whether you want to or not and then only allows you to recreate it if you [[DealWithTheDevil sell your SOUL to them]]]]. Doing so prevents you from ever achieving the GoldenEnding, as [[spoiler: the child takes you over in the final scene of the Pacifist route and is implied to kill everyone again anyway]]. So in some ways, it's an Arbitrary Rules Aesop about [[spoiler: DemonicPossession and [[DealWithTheDevil deals with the devil]]]], but since it's primary purpose is to drive the point the other characters are making, it makes you wonder how effective their point would have been without [[spoiler: the Child's cross-timeline possession of you]].
23rd Feb '17 5:21:23 PM Prfnoff
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** The Genocide route is extremely unrelenting in hammering the point home you're likely only taking that route to see what happens, rather than any actual desire to hurt or punish the characters, and the few characters who are aware that [[spoiler: you're able to effectively time travel using the ability to SAVE]] argue the fact you can undo everything doesn't make you any better of a person. However, the only reason their point sticks is because completing a Genocide playthrough causes you to [[spoiler: [[DemonicPossession become possessed]] by [[GreaterScopeVillain the Fallen Child]], who destroys the world whether you want to or not and then only allows you to recreate it if you [[DealWithTheDevil sell your SOUL to them]]]]. Doing so prevents you from ever achieving the GoldenEnding, as [[spoiler: the child takes you over in the final scene of the Pacifist route and is implied to kill everyone again anyway]]. So in some ways, it's an Arbitrary Rules Aesop about [[spoiler: DemonicPossession and [[DealWithTheDevil deals with the devil]]]], but since it's primary purpose is to drive the point the other characters are making, it makes you wonder how effective their point would have been without [[spoiler: the Child's cross-timeline possession of you]].

to:

** The Genocide route is extremely unrelenting in hammering the point home you're likely only taking that route to see what happens, rather than any actual desire to hurt or punish the characters, and the few characters who are aware that [[spoiler: you're able to effectively time travel using the ability to SAVE]] argue the fact you can undo everything doesn't make you any better of a person. However, the only reason their point sticks is because completing a the Genocide playthrough causes you to route ends with an all but literal DiabolusExMachine in which [[spoiler: [[DemonicPossession you become possessed]] by [[GreaterScopeVillain the Fallen Child]], who destroys the world whether you want to or not and then only allows you to recreate it if you [[DealWithTheDevil sell your SOUL to them]]]]. Doing so prevents you from ever achieving the GoldenEnding, as [[spoiler: the child takes you over in the final scene of the Pacifist route and is implied to kill everyone again anyway]]. So in some ways, it's an Arbitrary Rules Aesop about [[spoiler: DemonicPossession and [[DealWithTheDevil deals with the devil]]]], but since it's primary purpose is to drive the point the other characters are making, it makes you wonder how effective their point would have been without [[spoiler: the Child's cross-timeline possession of you]].
1st Feb '17 7:45:14 PM merotoker
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* Barbara Gordon (started as Comicbook/{{Batgirl}}, became Oracle, now back to being Comicbook/{{Batgirl}}) in [[Franchise/TheDCU the DC Comics Universe]] lost the use of her legs -- in a universe where incredible technology exists that should be able to restore them. Showing that handicapped people can be useful contributors to society doesn't work so well when the {{Phlebotinum}} in the world means that she's only handicapped by choice. DC has [[AuthorsSavingThrow tried]] to [[JustifiedTrope justify this]] by saying that she won't use technology that's available to superheroes [[ReedRichardsIsUseless but not to civilians]], which would make sense only if being handicapped places no burden whatsoever on other people; otherwise, choosing not to cure herself is unfair to those people. However, this is also part of a more general trend of Bat Family characters using (by [[Franchise/TheDCU DCU standards]]) very low-tech equipment. If they used all the technology they ''should'' have access to, they'd be hurling lasers around instead of boomerangs, and they'd wear robotic power suits that rival Comicbook/{{Superman}} in power instead of just some spandex with the occasional kevlar vest underneath.

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* Barbara Gordon (started as Comicbook/{{Batgirl}}, became Oracle, now back to being Comicbook/{{Batgirl}}) in [[Franchise/TheDCU the DC Comics Universe]] lost the use of her legs -- in a universe where incredible technology exists that should be able to restore them. Showing that handicapped people can be useful contributors to society doesn't work so well when the {{Phlebotinum}} in the world means that she's only handicapped by choice. DC has [[AuthorsSavingThrow tried]] to [[JustifiedTrope justify this]] by saying that she won't use technology that's available to superheroes [[ReedRichardsIsUseless but not to civilians]], which would make sense only if being handicapped places no burden whatsoever on other people; otherwise, choosing not to cure herself is unfair to those people. However, this is also part of a more general trend of Bat Family characters using (by [[Franchise/TheDCU DCU standards]]) very low-tech equipment. If they used all the technology they ''should'' have access to, they'd be hurling lasers around instead of boomerangs, and they'd wear robotic power suits that rival Comicbook/{{Superman}} Franchise/{{Superman}} in power instead of just some spandex with the occasional kevlar vest underneath.



* (Learned by Joaquin) in ''WesternAnimation/TheBookOfLife'', [[spoiler:if you are immortal and invincible, a willingness to fight isn't really courage.]]

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* (Learned by Joaquin) in ''WesternAnimation/TheBookOfLife'', [[spoiler:if you are immortal and invincible, a willingness to fight isn't really courage.]]courage]].



* Many movies from Pure Flix Entertainment (and many other religious movies in general) have a problem with the DeusExMachina nature of their plots. The premise of these movies center around Christianity and God's power. The whole idea is to establish the power of faith and prayer by having the Christian protagonists face hardships, pray, and have their problems solved. When people in Pure Flix movies pray, God often ''literally'' shows up to answer their prayers in the best possible way or at least does an out-and-out miracle for them, thus promoting the aesop "Prayer is magic: ask God for a miracle and you'll get one every time!" This is, at best, ArtisticLicenseReligion. In RealLife, the point of prayer and worship is to have faith even when God ''doesn't'' grant a convenient DeusExMachina, as in the case of many Jewish and Christian martyrs. (See, in particular, the Book of Job in TheBible for just one example.)

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* Many movies from Pure Flix Entertainment (and many other religious movies in general) have a problem with the DeusExMachina nature of their plots. The premise of these movies center around Christianity and God's power. The whole idea is to establish the power of faith and prayer by having the Christian protagonists face hardships, pray, and have their problems solved. When people in Pure Flix movies pray, God often ''literally'' shows up to answer their prayers in the best possible way or at least does an out-and-out miracle for them, thus promoting the aesop "Prayer is magic: ask God for a miracle and you'll get one every time!" This is, at best, ArtisticLicenseReligion. In RealLife, the point of prayer and worship is to have faith even when God ''doesn't'' grant a convenient DeusExMachina, as in the case of many Jewish and Christian martyrs. (See, in particular, the Book of Job in TheBible Literature/TheBible for just one example.)



* ''Film/XMen'':

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* ''Film/XMen'':''Film/XMenFilmSeries'':



** Also, mutants shouldn't be ashamed of their powers and shouldn't seek a cure for them because they're genetic, and therefore seeking a cure for mutant powers is just as much a form of internalized racism as seeking a cure for one's skin color would be. Tell that to Rogue, [[PowerIncontinence whose powers first manifested themselves by putting her boyfriend in a coma]], who's been socially and romantically isolated from humans and her fellow mutants alike by her inability to touch them, and whose powers made Magneto try to exploit her as a vessel into which he could pour his own powers so that [[PoweredByAForsakenChild her life would be the one sacrificed]] to his cause rather than his own. In the third movie, when she walks past a bunch of mutants and their sympathizers demonstrating outside a clinic dispensing the cure, you can see her looking at them with considerable contempt at their chant "We don't need a cure!" and obviously thinking "Speak for yourselves!"

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** Also, mutants shouldn't be ashamed of their powers and shouldn't seek a cure for them because they're genetic, and therefore seeking a cure for mutant powers is just as much a form of internalized racism as seeking a cure for one's skin color would be. Tell that to Rogue, [[PowerIncontinence whose powers first manifested themselves by putting her boyfriend in a coma]], who's been socially and romantically isolated from humans and her fellow mutants alike by her inability to touch them, and whose powers made Magneto try to exploit her as a vessel into which he could pour his own powers so that [[PoweredByAForsakenChild her life would be the one sacrificed]] to his cause rather than his own. In [[Film/XMenTheLastStand the third movie, movie]], when she walks past a bunch of mutants and their sympathizers demonstrating outside a clinic dispensing the cure, you can see her looking at them with considerable contempt at their chant "We don't need a cure!" and obviously thinking "Speak for yourselves!"



* ''{{Twilight}}'' has an anti-abortion Aesop in the fourth book. This doesn't really work, however, since the "baby" in question is clearly supernatural. Edward was reading the baby's mind at one point, which in real life would be impossible since brain activity doesn't start until a certain point during pregnancy.

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* ''{{Twilight}}'' ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'' has [[GoodGirlsAvoidAbortion an anti-abortion Aesop Aesop]] in the fourth book. This doesn't really work, however, since the "baby" in question is clearly supernatural. Edward was reading the baby's mind at one point, which in real life would be impossible since brain activity doesn't start until a certain point during pregnancy.



** It's also a bit much where they're unwilling to abort the baby even when she is literally eating Bella from the inside out, and this only gets prevented by Edward ''ripping her out'', then turning her into a vampire. Yeah...not very feasible for RealLife (note that although the LDS church--of which author Stephanie Meyers is a part--generally opposes abortion, they allow it to save the life of the mother as would be the case here).

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** It's also a bit much where they're unwilling to abort the baby even when she is literally eating Bella from the inside out, and this only gets prevented by Edward ''ripping her out'', then turning her into a vampire. Yeah...not very feasible for RealLife (note that although the LDS church--of which author Stephanie Meyers Creator/StephenieMeyer is a part--generally opposes abortion, they allow it to save the life of the mother as would be the case here).



** Especially weird because spells like Raise Dead and Resurrection explicitly state they cannot be used on an unwilling target. This prevents someone from being killed by their enemies and raised afterwards while in enemy hands. [[spoiler:This is partially justified in Erevis's case, since he'd met someone who was BlessedWithSuck and only agreed to be resurrected out of duty, but this hadn't been the case for Jak]].

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** Especially weird because spells like Raise Dead and Resurrection explicitly state they cannot be used on an unwilling target. This prevents someone from being killed by their enemies and raised afterwards while in enemy hands. [[spoiler:This is partially justified in Erevis's case, since he'd met someone who was BlessedWithSuck and only agreed to be resurrected out of duty, but this hadn't been the case for Jak]].Jak.]]



* Season 2 of Series/TheFlash2014 is rife with anti-drug message with Velocity series of speed-enhancing drugs being used as metaphor for performance-enhancing drugs used in sports. When faced with evil speedsters much faster than he is, Flash is tempted to use Velocity 9 to increase his performance and level the playing field, but is discouraqged by others since using Velocity 9 can ruin his health in long term. Problem here is that Flash is superhero, not a sportsman. The stake here isn't victory, fame or money, it's people's lives. If the Flash isn't fast enough someone may die, sometimes many people will die. Taking Velocity once wouldn't cause that much damage to his health and if it would stop a guy who's terrorising the world who is extremely hard if not impossible to stop otherwise it's not that hard to think it would be worth it. Doubles as BrokenAesop, since Jay Garrick used Velocity several times in the show and more often than not it ended up with him saving someone's life.

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* Season 2 of Series/TheFlash2014 ''Series/TheFlash2014'' is rife with anti-drug message with Velocity series of speed-enhancing drugs being used as metaphor for performance-enhancing drugs used in sports. When faced with evil speedsters much faster than he is, Flash is tempted to use Velocity 9 to increase his performance and level the playing field, but is discouraqged discouraged by others since using Velocity 9 can ruin his health in long term. Problem here is that Flash is superhero, not a sportsman. The stake here isn't victory, fame or money, it's people's lives. If the Flash isn't fast enough someone may die, sometimes many people will die. Taking Velocity once wouldn't cause that much damage to his health and if it would stop a guy who's terrorising the world who is extremely hard if not impossible to stop otherwise it's not that hard to think it would be worth it. Doubles as BrokenAesop, since Jay Garrick used Velocity several times in the show and more often than not it ended up with him saving someone's life.



* One episode of ''Series/SabrinaTheTeenageWitch'' has Zelda and Hilda deciding to hire someone to clean the house. Zelda rationalizes that they can't use their magic to clean in case they just get lazy.

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* ''Series/SabrinaTheTeenageWitch''
**
One episode of ''Series/SabrinaTheTeenageWitch'' has Zelda and Hilda deciding to hire someone to clean the house. Zelda rationalizes that they can't use their magic to clean in case they just get lazy.



* ''Series/StargateSG1'' seemed to be trying for a pacifism Aesop with the Nox (at least in their first episode), a race of {{Perfect Pacifist|People}} SpaceElves who look down on SG-1 for using violence against the Goa'uld. This completely ignores the fact that the Nox are SufficientlyAdvancedAliens with abilities that make pacifism a viable option (just for starters, they can turn invisible and raise the dead). Humans have no such abilities and must fight or be killed/enslaved.

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* ''Series/StargateSG1'' seemed to be trying for a pacifism Aesop with the Nox (at least in their first episode), a race of {{Perfect Pacifist|People}} SpaceElves who look down on SG-1 for using violence against the Goa'uld. This completely ignores the fact that the Nox are SufficientlyAdvancedAliens {{Sufficiently Advanced Alien}}s with abilities that make pacifism a viable option (just for starters, they can turn invisible and raise the dead). Humans have no such abilities and must fight or be killed/enslaved.



* ''Theatre/ShrekTheMusical'' has the song "Freak Flag", which starts off as a catch-all BeYourself message but is derailed when the fairy tale creatures realize that their problems, such as being animals with human intelligence or having magical powers, actually gives them ''an advantage'' in confronting their problems. Not really applicable to real-life discrimination (then again, as an adaptation of [[DeconstructorFleet Shrek]] this may have been intentional).

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* ''Theatre/ShrekTheMusical'' has the song "Freak Flag", which starts off as a catch-all BeYourself message but is derailed when the fairy tale creatures realize that their problems, such as being animals with human intelligence or having magical powers, actually gives them ''an advantage'' in confronting their problems. Not really applicable to real-life discrimination (then again, as an adaptation of [[DeconstructorFleet Shrek]] ''[[DeconstructorFleet Shrek]]'' this may have been intentional).



** The Genocide route is extremely unrelenting in hammering the point home you're likely only taking that route to see what happens, rather than any actual desire to hurt or punish the characters, and the few characters who are aware that [[spoiler: you're able to effectively time travel using the ability to SAVE]] argue the fact you can undo everything doesn't make you any better of a person. However, the only reason their point sticks is because completing a Genocide playthrough causes you to [[spoiler: [[DemonicPossession become possessed]] by [[BiggerBad the Fallen Child]], who destroys the world whether you want to or not and then only allows you to recreate it if you [[DealWithTheDevil sell your SOUL to them]]]]. Doing so prevents you from ever achieving the GoldenEnding, as [[spoiler: the child takes you over in the final scene of the Pacifist route and is implied to kill everyone again anyway]]. So in some ways, it's an Arbitrary Rules Aesop about [[spoiler: DemonicPossession and [[DealWithTheDevil deals with the devil]]]], but since it's primary purpose is to drive the point the other characters are making, it makes you wonder how effective their point would have been without [[spoiler: the Child's cross-timeline possession of you]].

to:

** The Genocide route is extremely unrelenting in hammering the point home you're likely only taking that route to see what happens, rather than any actual desire to hurt or punish the characters, and the few characters who are aware that [[spoiler: you're able to effectively time travel using the ability to SAVE]] argue the fact you can undo everything doesn't make you any better of a person. However, the only reason their point sticks is because completing a Genocide playthrough causes you to [[spoiler: [[DemonicPossession become possessed]] by [[BiggerBad [[GreaterScopeVillain the Fallen Child]], who destroys the world whether you want to or not and then only allows you to recreate it if you [[DealWithTheDevil sell your SOUL to them]]]]. Doing so prevents you from ever achieving the GoldenEnding, as [[spoiler: the child takes you over in the final scene of the Pacifist route and is implied to kill everyone again anyway]]. So in some ways, it's an Arbitrary Rules Aesop about [[spoiler: DemonicPossession and [[DealWithTheDevil deals with the devil]]]], but since it's primary purpose is to drive the point the other characters are making, it makes you wonder how effective their point would have been without [[spoiler: the Child's cross-timeline possession of you]].



** Related but not strictly falling into any of the prescribed types, the game uses Valkyria powers as a metaphor for nuclear weapons/[=WMDs=], which is part of why they're portrayed as being as negative as possible, and [[spoiler:Alicia]] stops using her powers because she's afraid of the one-instance dehumanizing effect they have on her, which basically renders that aspect of the Aesop down to ''Won't somebody please think of the hydrogen bombs?!''. Because the game's presentation of the Valkyria as a race [[BrokenAesop tries to satisfy the needs of two conflicting moral lessons]], the Valkyria are said to be mindless, soulless monsters that can do nothing but bring ruin, but the two we actually see in the game are good people with human emotions and free will; it's just that one of them is slavishly devoted to the villain and the other [[InternalizedCategorism just doesn't think for herself]]. This is exemplified in the ending, [[spoiler:where Alicia abandons her powers, essentially because she couldn't remain a Valkyria and still live a normal life, but couldn't arrive at that conclusion on her own.]]

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** Related but not strictly falling into any of the prescribed types, the game uses Valkyria powers as a metaphor for nuclear weapons/[=WMDs=], which is part of why they're portrayed as being as negative as possible, and [[spoiler:Alicia]] stops using her powers because she's afraid of the one-instance dehumanizing effect they have on her, which basically renders that aspect of the Aesop down to ''Won't somebody please think of the hydrogen bombs?!''. Because the game's presentation of the Valkyria as a race [[BrokenAesop tries to satisfy the needs of two conflicting moral lessons]], the Valkyria are said to be mindless, soulless monsters that can do nothing but bring ruin, but the two we actually see in the game are good people with human emotions and free will; it's just that one of them is slavishly devoted to the villain and the other [[InternalizedCategorism just doesn't think for herself]]. This is exemplified in the ending, [[spoiler:where Alicia abandons her powers, essentially because she couldn't remain a Valkyria and still live a normal life, but couldn't arrive at that conclusion on her own.]]own]].



** Both "Christmas" episodes, that is [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS2E13HearthsWarmingEve Hearths Warming Eve]] and [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS6E8AHearthsWarmingTail A Hearths Warming Tale]], have aesops simply don't mesh with Christmas as the ponies motivation for celebrating this holiday and the virtues it teaches is the threat of the Windigoes: evil winter spirits that will return and [[ApocalypseHow destroy the world with never-ending winter]] if the ponies ever stop celebrating this holiday, rather than loving one's friends and family and "good will to all".

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** Both "Christmas" episodes, that is [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS2E13HearthsWarmingEve Hearths "[[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS2E13HearthsWarmingEve Hearth's Warming Eve]] Eve]]" and [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS6E8AHearthsWarmingTail "[[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS6E8AHearthsWarmingTail A Hearths Hearth's Warming Tale]], Tale]]", have aesops simply don't mesh with Christmas as the ponies motivation for celebrating this holiday and the virtues it teaches is the threat of the Windigoes: evil winter spirits that will return and [[ApocalypseHow destroy the world with never-ending winter]] if the ponies ever stop celebrating this holiday, rather than loving one's friends and family and "good will to all".



* In the universe of ''Manga/FullmetalAlchemist'', raising the dead will [[IncrediblyLamePun cost you an arm and a leg]]. Results may vary. (Or you could sell your organs on the ''black'' market, but look where that got Izumi.)

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* In the universe of ''Manga/FullmetalAlchemist'', raising the dead will [[IncrediblyLamePun [[{{Pun}} cost you an arm and a leg]]. Results may vary. (Or you could sell your organs on the ''black'' market, but look where that got Izumi.)



* The film version of ''[[Film/TheTimeMachine2002 The Time Machine]]'' had a ButterflyOfDoom follow the time traveler around when he tried to change time to save his fiancée.
* If you are Adam Sandler in the movie ''{{Film/Click}}'' and find a "universal remote" that can apply TV-like functions (e.g. mute, fast-forward, etc.) to the universe, don't use fast-forward to skip the boring parts of life like traffic jams, or the remote will "remember" how you used it and automatically fast-forward through important parts of your life as well just because it contained a boring bit you previously skipped.

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* The film version of ''[[Film/TheTimeMachine2002 The Time Machine]]'' ''Film/TheTimeMachine2002'' had a ButterflyOfDoom follow the time traveler around when he tried to change time to save his fiancée.
* If you are Adam Sandler Creator/AdamSandler in the movie ''{{Film/Click}}'' and find a "universal remote" that can apply TV-like functions (e.g. mute, fast-forward, etc.) to the universe, don't use fast-forward to skip the boring parts of life like traffic jams, or the remote will "remember" how you used it and automatically fast-forward through important parts of your life as well just because it contained a boring bit you previously skipped.



* In the ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' episode "Superstar," the moral seems to be "dreaming about being super-cool perfect is just selfish narcissism." The way it does it is by having Jonathan cast a spell that turns him into a MartyStu. The moral has two halves; the first is that the spell creates an equally perfect evil opposite that torments people. This is a FantasticAesop, since the only reason the evil opposite exists is that the writers put it there. The other half can be considered a type 1 version: in the real world, people ''aren't'' perfect, so claiming perfection is narcissistic. But if it really ''were'' possible to be perfect, claiming perfection is not narcissistic, merely realistic. "Genuine" perfection just isn't a good metaphor for imaginary perfection.

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* In the ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' episode "Superstar," the moral seems to be "dreaming about being super-cool perfect is just selfish narcissism." The way it does it is by having Jonathan cast a spell that turns him into a MartyStu. The moral has two halves; the first is that the spell creates an equally perfect evil opposite that torments people. This is a FantasticAesop, qualifies, since the only reason the evil opposite exists is that the writers put it there. The other half can be considered a type 1 version: in the real world, people ''aren't'' perfect, so claiming perfection is narcissistic. But if it really ''were'' possible to be perfect, claiming perfection is not narcissistic, merely realistic. "Genuine" perfection just isn't a good metaphor for imaginary perfection.



** Interestingly subverted in one episode of ''Series/SabrinaTheTeenageWitch'', where she decides to use magic to interfere with other people's lives (usually Aesops in the show are about her using magic for herself) and does three different things to do so. She injures a first-string football player so Harvey would be called up to the main team, rigs a class president election with Jenny winning instead of Libby, and implants knowledge of how to perform "lead to gold" alchemy to her science teacher. The first two changes are self-limiting, with both Harvey and Jenny getting BeCarefulWhatYouWishFor {{aesop}}s: Harvey is immediately injured himself due to his inexperience with football, while Jenny quickly realizes she has no real power as class president apart from the lunch menu and school dances. Harvey actually finds he enjoys not having to play football, and Jenny resigns in favor of Libby after all. The science teacher, on the other hand, becomes fabulously rich and a much better teacher (teaching because he wants to, rather than for the money). When the magical authorities find out, they don't really care that she has messed with her classmates' lives; they only care that she ''changed the nature of the universe'' by rewriting atomic law (allowing gold to be created at will by the science teacher who knows how to do it). She ends up getting off scot-free for the other two stunts she pulled.

to:

** Interestingly subverted in one episode of ''Series/SabrinaTheTeenageWitch'', where she decides to use magic to interfere with other people's lives (usually Aesops aesops in the show are about her using magic for herself) and does three different things to do so. She injures a first-string football player so Harvey would be called up to the main team, rigs a class president election with Jenny winning instead of Libby, and implants knowledge of how to perform "lead to gold" alchemy to her science teacher. The first two changes are self-limiting, with both Harvey and Jenny getting BeCarefulWhatYouWishFor {{aesop}}s: [[AnAesop aesops]]: Harvey is immediately injured himself due to his inexperience with football, while Jenny quickly realizes she has no real power as class president apart from the lunch menu and school dances. Harvey actually finds he enjoys not having to play football, and Jenny resigns in favor of Libby after all. The science teacher, on the other hand, becomes fabulously rich and a much better teacher (teaching because he wants to, rather than for the money). When the magical authorities find out, they don't really care that she has messed with her classmates' lives; they only care that she ''changed the nature of the universe'' by rewriting atomic law (allowing gold to be created at will by the science teacher who knows how to do it). She ends up getting off scot-free for the other two stunts she pulled.



* {{Lampshaded}} by Creator/AllisonPregler in her review of ''Billy Owens and the Secret of the Runes:''

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* {{Lampshaded}} {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d by Creator/AllisonPregler in her review of ''Billy Owens and the Secret of the Runes:''



* Many cartoons and children's shows will introduce characters with disabilities and/or on wheelchairs to show that you shouldn't be discriminated against due to physical disabilities. The problem is said character usually has PsychicPowers to make up for it, or the wheelchair is some CoolCar[=/=]PoweredArmor hybrid. In which case the aesop becomes "{{disability superpower}}s are cool!"
* ''WesternAnimation/KimPossible'' learns through the hard way that if she overuses the SuperSpeed for taking care of far too many trivial tasks she doesn't even need to be doing, she gets stuck in hyper speed. Lesson learned: Get regular maintenance for your SuperSpeed shoes.
** {{Lampshaded}} and [[RuleOfFunny played for laughs]] in "Grande Size Me". Ron gets hit with a [[{{Phlebotinum}} mutation ray of sorts]], [[ComicBook/IncredibleHulk hulks out]] on junk food and wrecks the town. At the end of the episode, Ron [[BreakingTheFourthWall breaks the fourth wall]] and [[AndKnowingIsHalfTheBattle gives a short speech to the audience]] ([[PaintingTheMedium confusing the other characters]]) about how you should never use a mutation ray, and how important it is to keep your DNA in check. (Thus [[ComicallyMissingThePoint missing]] what was [[ExecutiveMeddling supposed to be the point of the episode]], a lesson in healthy eating.)

to:

* Many cartoons and children's shows will introduce characters with disabilities and/or on wheelchairs to show that you shouldn't be discriminated against due to physical disabilities. The problem is said character usually has PsychicPowers to make up for it, or the wheelchair is some CoolCar[=/=]PoweredArmor hybrid.[[SuperWheelchair hybrid]]. In which case the aesop becomes "{{disability superpower}}s are cool!"
* ''WesternAnimation/KimPossible'' ''WesternAnimation/KimPossible''
** Kim
learns through the hard way that if she overuses the SuperSpeed for taking care of far too many trivial tasks she doesn't even need to be doing, she gets stuck in hyper speed. Lesson learned: Get regular maintenance for your SuperSpeed shoes.
** {{Lampshaded}} {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d and [[RuleOfFunny played for laughs]] in "Grande Size Me". Ron gets hit with a [[{{Phlebotinum}} mutation ray of sorts]], [[ComicBook/IncredibleHulk [[HulkingOut hulks out]] on junk food and wrecks the town. At the end of the episode, Ron [[BreakingTheFourthWall breaks the fourth wall]] and [[AndKnowingIsHalfTheBattle gives a short speech to the audience]] ([[PaintingTheMedium confusing the other characters]]) about how you should never use a mutation ray, and how important it is to keep your DNA in check. (Thus [[ComicallyMissingThePoint missing]] what was [[ExecutiveMeddling supposed to be the point of the episode]], a lesson in healthy eating.)



* The second variant of Robot Revolution is mercilessly lampooned in an episode of ''WesternAnimation/MyLifeAsATeenageRobot'', where RidiculouslyHumanRobot Jenny insists on "liberating" the robots at an amusement park, refusing to realize they aren't and don't need to be RidiculouslyHumanRobots and are actually extremely limited in their programming and capabilities. Their efforts to live as they previously did -- since they can't live any other way -- cause chaos in the town, and eventually destroy the Martian civilization when she insists on sending them to another planet rather than sending them back to "slavery."

to:

* The second variant of Robot Revolution is mercilessly lampooned in an episode of ''WesternAnimation/MyLifeAsATeenageRobot'', where RidiculouslyHumanRobot {{Ridiculously Human Robot|s}} Jenny insists on "liberating" the robots at an amusement park, refusing to realize they aren't and don't need to be RidiculouslyHumanRobots and are actually extremely limited in their programming and capabilities. Their efforts to live as they previously did -- since they can't live any other way -- cause chaos in the town, and eventually destroy the Martian civilization when she insists on sending them to another planet rather than sending them back to "slavery."



** As Twilight said in ''[[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS4E23InspirationManifestation Inspiration Manifestation]]'', [[SchmuckBait "Never, ever, ever, EVER take another book out of the library at the castle without asking!"]] (Or three Princesses might have to spend their entire day cleaning up your mistake. [[AndThatsTerrible Shame on you.]]) Gets funnier when you realize Spike ''ate'' the book [[WhateverHappenedToTheMouse and Twilight doesn't even think it worth mentioning.]]

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** As Twilight said in ''[[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS4E23InspirationManifestation "[[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS4E23InspirationManifestation Inspiration Manifestation]]'', Manifestation]]", [[SchmuckBait "Never, ever, ever, EVER take another book out of the library at the castle without asking!"]] (Or three Princesses might have to spend their entire day cleaning up your mistake. [[AndThatsTerrible Shame on you.]]) Gets funnier when you realize Spike ''ate'' the book [[WhateverHappenedToTheMouse [[WhatHappenedToTheMouse and Twilight doesn't even think it worth mentioning.]]
8th Jan '17 6:20:44 PM HighCrate
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* ''ComicBook/XMen'' comic books about discrimination sometimes seem to forget that real-world oppressed minorities can't shoot EyeBeams or walk through walls or make YourHeadAsplode by looking at you funny. Conversely, the ComicBook/UltimateMarvel comics treating the rise of superheroes as a sort of [[WeaponOfMassDestruction WMD]] proliferation sometimes seem to forget that real-world WMD's can't walk, talk, and have minds of their own.

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* ''ComicBook/XMen'' comic books about discrimination sometimes seem to forget that real-world oppressed minorities can't shoot EyeBeams or walk through walls or make YourHeadAsplode by looking at you funny. Conversely, the ComicBook/UltimateMarvel comics treating the rise of superheroes as a sort of [[WeaponOfMassDestruction WMD]] proliferation sometimes seem to forget that real-world WMD's [=WMDs=] can't walk, talk, and have minds of their own.



** Related but not strictly falling into any of the prescribed types, the game uses Valkyria powers as a metaphor for nuclear weapons/WMD's, which is part of why they're portrayed as being as negative as possible, and [[spoiler:Alicia]] stops using her powers because she's afraid of the one-instance dehumanizing effect they have on her, which basically renders that aspect of the Aesop down to ''Won't somebody please think of the hydrogen bombs?!''. Because the game's presentation of the Valkyria as a race [[BrokenAesop tries to satisfy the needs of two conflicting moral lessons]], the Valkyria are said to be mindless, soulless monsters that can do nothing but bring ruin, but the two we actually see in the game are good people with human emotions and free will; it's just that one of them is slavishly devoted to the villain and the other [[InternalizedCategorism just doesn't think for herself]]. This is exemplified in the ending, [[spoiler:where Alicia abandons her powers, essentially because she couldn't remain a Valkyria and still live a normal life, but couldn't arrive at that conclusion on her own.]]

to:

** Related but not strictly falling into any of the prescribed types, the game uses Valkyria powers as a metaphor for nuclear weapons/WMD's, weapons/[=WMDs=], which is part of why they're portrayed as being as negative as possible, and [[spoiler:Alicia]] stops using her powers because she's afraid of the one-instance dehumanizing effect they have on her, which basically renders that aspect of the Aesop down to ''Won't somebody please think of the hydrogen bombs?!''. Because the game's presentation of the Valkyria as a race [[BrokenAesop tries to satisfy the needs of two conflicting moral lessons]], the Valkyria are said to be mindless, soulless monsters that can do nothing but bring ruin, but the two we actually see in the game are good people with human emotions and free will; it's just that one of them is slavishly devoted to the villain and the other [[InternalizedCategorism just doesn't think for herself]]. This is exemplified in the ending, [[spoiler:where Alicia abandons her powers, essentially because she couldn't remain a Valkyria and still live a normal life, but couldn't arrive at that conclusion on her own.]]
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.FantasticAesop