History Main / FamilyUnFriendlyAesop

7th Dec '16 9:46:19 AM Allronix
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* "Rudolf the Red-Nosed Reindeer" seems to be saying that freaks will only be accepted if someone in authority declares them to be useful.

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* "Rudolf the Red-Nosed Reindeer" seems to be saying that freaks will only be accepted if someone in authority declares them finds that their difference can be ''exploited'' to be useful.the authority's benefit.


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26th Nov '16 8:35:50 AM TheSinful
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* ''[[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/8233288/34/Faery-Heroes Faery Heroes]]'' includes a minor lesson against both TurnTheOtherCheek and ComesGreatResponsibility. Harry is only willing to tutor a few students in Defense Against the Dark Arts and quickly shuts down the idea that because he's such a great teacher he should tutor everyone. First, he's not getting paid to do so and is using his own free time to help them. Second, most of the people in the school have turned against him at some point which leaves him rather opposed to the idea of helping them with their schoolwork.
* When he finally gets around to telling his history in ''[[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/11157943/13/I-Still-Haven-t-Found-What-I-m-Looking-For I Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For]]'', Harry Potter admits that [[ComesGreatResponsiblity always saving the world because he could]] was actually a rather poor choice. Fifteen hundred years of every dark wizard being stopped by him meant the world became overly reliant upon him. When an accident with a time turner flings Harry two hundred years into the future, the world's been ravaged for decades by a war between two dark wizards. And when Harry kills them, the people of the world blame him for not stopping them sooner.
22nd Nov '16 8:34:21 PM merotoker
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* The 2007 version of ''WesternAnimation/{{Beowulf|2007}}'' diverges from the moral of [[Literature/{{Beowulf}} its source material]], essentially making the point that heroic stories are often lies told to cover up questionable or outright shitty behavior, and by the time you realize you shouldn't have told the story in the first place, you'll be too old and full of regret for it to make any difference.

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* The 2007 version of ''WesternAnimation/{{Beowulf|2007}}'' ''WesternAnimation/{{Beowulf 2007}}'' diverges from the moral of [[Literature/{{Beowulf}} its source material]], essentially making the point that heroic stories are often lies told to cover up questionable or outright shitty behavior, and by the time you realize you shouldn't have told the story in the first place, you'll be too old and full of regret for it to make any difference.



* ''Film/SoulFood'':Ironically, it plays out more like Family-''Friendly''. Career-focused oldest sister Teri is on her second marriage, which is itself in serious trouble and she's such a bitch that when her husband cheats on her, our sympathies are clearly supposed to be with ''him''. Meanwhile, second sister Maxine is a HappilyMarried housewife and mother of three kids. It's not hard to assume the writers are implying that career women are bad while stay-at-home mom's are good.

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* ''Film/SoulFood'':Ironically, ''Film/SoulFood'': Ironically, it plays out more like Family-''Friendly''. Career-focused oldest sister Teri is on her second marriage, which is itself in serious trouble and she's such a bitch that when her husband cheats on her, our sympathies are clearly supposed to be with ''him''. Meanwhile, second sister Maxine is a HappilyMarried housewife and mother of three kids. It's not hard to assume the writers are implying that career women are bad while stay-at-home mom's are good.



* In-universe example: Martin states one in the appropriately titled ''Series/{{Frasier}}'' episode "Bully for Martin." He essentially says that "You should put up with any amount of unreasonable and even disrespectful crap from your supervisor [[HonorBeforeReason because it's respectful to the chain of command]]." Naturally, Frasier disagrees.



** "Murtaugh" puts the "Winning and losing doesn't matter, it's about having fun" mindset against the "Play to win, winning is fun" mentality. However, it plays them in such a way it approaches parody. The "Play to win" mentality is portrayed with Marshall being a DrillSergeantNasty when coaching Lily's kindergarten class how to play Basketball, making them do nothing but drills and sucking out any enjoyment from the game. Lily's "It's about fun" mentality sees her ''not even teaching the kids how to play'', just letting them run around aimlessly before giving them a reward for taking part. At the end of the episode, Marshall accepts that being rewarded for taking part isn't bad, but Lily still stands by her opinion that Marshall was completely wrong, which leaves us with the Aesop "Winning and losing isn't important, because you'll be rewarded if you didn't even try in the first place". The lunacy of this is even {{lampshaded}} within the episode, as Marshall points out that you don't get handed things in the real world and you need to put work in to achieve your goals.

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** "Murtaugh" puts the "Winning and losing doesn't matter, it's about having fun" mindset against the "Play to win, winning is fun" mentality. However, it plays them in such a way it approaches parody. The "Play to win" mentality is portrayed with Marshall being a DrillSergeantNasty when coaching Lily's kindergarten class how to play Basketball, making them do nothing but drills and sucking out any enjoyment from the game. Lily's "It's about fun" mentality sees her ''not even teaching the kids how to play'', just letting them run around aimlessly before giving them a reward for taking part. At the end of the episode, Marshall accepts that being rewarded for taking part isn't bad, but Lily still stands by her opinion that Marshall was completely wrong, which leaves us with the Aesop "Winning and losing isn't important, because you'll be rewarded if you didn't even try in the first place". The lunacy of this is even {{lampshaded}} {{lampshade|Hanging}}d within the episode, as Marshall points out that you don't get handed things in the real world and you need to put work in to achieve your goals.



* On one episode of ''Series/StepByStep'', college-age Dana moves into her own apartment and goes too wild with her first party, getting drunk and making a fool of herself. When she wakes up hung over the next morning, her mother comes to visit and they have a talk about Dana's behavior. You'd think this would be where Carol advised Dana to use better judgment and give her some tips on how to let loose without going overboard, but clearly the previous night meant the adult Dana wasn't ready to live on her own. So Dana happily agrees to move back home, having learned her lesson.



* An in-universe example in ''Series/TheThundermans''. The show that Nora and Billy used to watch when they were younger was Hootie the Owl, which taught anti-social behaviors.



* On one episode of ''Series/StepByStep'', college-age Dana moves into her own apartment and goes too wild with her first party, getting drunk and making a fool of herself. When she wakes up hung over the next morning, her mother comes to visit and they have a talk about Dana's behavior. You'd think this would be where Carol advised Dana to use better judgment and give her some tips on how to let loose without going overboard, but clearly the previous night meant the adult Dana wasn't ready to live on her own. So Dana happily agrees to move back home, having learned her lesson.
* In-universe example: Martin states one in the appropriately titled ''Series/{{Frasier}}'' episode "Bully for Martin." He essentially says that "You should put up with any amount of unreasonable and even disrespectful crap from your supervisor [[HonorBeforeReason because it's respectful to the chain of command]]." Naturally, Frasier disagrees.



* Music/CarrieUnderwood's song "Church Bells" describes an girl marrying an physically aabusive partner who repeatedly abused her. That is, until she reaches her breaking point and dishes out some, err, lethal justice. This self-enforced death sentence would prevent him from abusing any other woman and you could possibly call it self-defensive, yes, but she's legally a murderer, a lot worse then anything he did to her. The other message being taught here? Don't trust the police, if you want justice served then best do it yourself and in an unlawful fashion. Depending on the society which the listener is in, this could be quite possibly a painful reality, especially in difficult to prove cases including rape.

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* Music/CarrieUnderwood's song "Church Bells" describes an a girl marrying an a physically aabusive abusive partner who repeatedly abused her. That is, until she reaches her breaking point and dishes out some, err, lethal justice. This self-enforced death sentence would prevent him from abusing any other woman and you could possibly call it self-defensive, yes, but she's legally a murderer, a lot worse then anything he did to her. The other message being taught here? Don't trust the police, if you want justice served then best do it yourself and in an unlawful fashion. Depending on the society which the listener is in, this could be quite possibly a painful reality, especially in difficult to prove cases including rape.



* An in-universe example in ''Series/TheThundermans''. The show that Nora and Billy used to watch when they were younger was Hootie the Owl, which taught anti-social behaviors.



* Fallout4: The best outcome involves [[spoiler:obliterating your own son's legacy by inducing a full-scale war in the most isolated and peaceful community in Boston (albeit arrogant and ruthless), and forcing the surviving scientists to work for various extremist factions]]. Remember kids, isolationism is bad, because it leaves you oblivious to how your agents on the field torture and murder innocent people. But if you work for a group of extremists then they'll give you major funding for your wacky and dangerous science and hit you whenever you do something horribly wrong and everything will be okay!

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* Fallout4: ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 4}}'': The best outcome involves [[spoiler:obliterating your own son's legacy by inducing a full-scale war in the most isolated and peaceful community in Boston (albeit arrogant and ruthless), and forcing the surviving scientists to work for various extremist factions]]. Remember kids, isolationism is bad, because it leaves you oblivious to how your agents on the field torture and murder innocent people. But if you work for a group of extremists then they'll give you major funding for your wacky and dangerous science and hit you whenever you do something horribly wrong and everything will be okay!



** An episode where AJ is getting all As and Timmy is getting all Fs has AJ gloating about it. Later he apologizes to Timmy who says "You deserved to gloat" for getting high marks. So if you are doing better than someone, rub it in their face?
*** Though it helps a little that in the end, AJ is so busy gloating he accidentally breaks the trophy he won and decides he should stop gloating.

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** An episode where AJ is getting all As and Timmy is getting all Fs has AJ gloating about it. Later he apologizes to Timmy who says "You deserved to gloat" for getting high marks. So if you are doing better than someone, rub it in their face?
***
face? Though it helps a little that in the end, AJ is so busy gloating he accidentally breaks the trophy he won and decides he should stop gloating.



* ''WesternAnimation/{{SpongeBob SquarePants}}'': The infamous episode "Stuck In The Wringer" ends with Spongebob, after going through an [[TraumaCongaLine incredibly rough day]] while stuck in a wringer, breaking down crying...which gets him out of the wringer. Spongebob then turns to the camera and says: "I guess crying can solve your problems after all!". Considering the delivery of the line, [[SpoofAesop it likely wasn't intended to be taken seriously]], but considering everything that had just happened...

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* ''WesternAnimation/{{SpongeBob SquarePants}}'': The infamous episode "Stuck In The Wringer" ends with Spongebob, [=SpongeBob=], after going through an [[TraumaCongaLine incredibly rough day]] while stuck in a wringer, breaking down crying...which gets him out of the wringer. Spongebob [=SpongeBob=] then turns to the camera and says: "I guess crying can solve your problems after all!". Considering the delivery of the line, [[SpoofAesop it likely wasn't intended to be taken seriously]], but considering everything that had just happened...
21st Nov '16 9:21:33 AM hyphz
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** ''The Fox and the Goat'': don't trust anyone who's in trouble, because they're probably using you to get out of it.

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** ''The Fox and the Goat'': don't trust anyone who's in trouble, because they're probably likely to be using you to get out of it.



** ''The Kid and the Wolf'': it's OK to insult your neighbour as long as he can't do anything about it.



** ''The Ass and his Driver'': if someone is determined to destroy themselves, let them.

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** ''The Ass and his Driver'': if someone is determined to destroy themselves, step back and let them.them, or they'll destroy you too.
21st Nov '16 9:17:33 AM hyphz
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* Literature/AesopsFables sometimes encounter this trope. For example, The Fox and The Stork leads you to believe it's fine and dandy to take payback on someone who pulled a fast one on you, because "One bad turn deserves another." Interestingly, Game Theory says that that's a quite reasonable (and, indeed, quite effective) strategy for some types of situations (the 'Tit-For-Tat' strategy). There is research that indicates humans may even be hard wired to accept this practice.
** Another one is "The Bat and the Weasels", in which a bat escapes from a bird-hating weasel by claiming to be a mouse, then later from a second weasel who hates mice by pretending to be a bird. The moral, which Aesop himself states outright at the end of the fable, is that it's sometimes wiser to change your affiliation in order to save your own skin. It's ethically questionable and it encourages cowardice, deception and equivocation, but it's also undeniably practical and effective. (Although it also verges on BrokenAesop since, as many people have pointed out, the bat could just [[TakeAThirdOption tell the weasels he's neither a bird]] ''[[TakeAThirdOption nor]]'' [[TakeAThirdOption a mouse]], though this might be a side effect of ScienceMarchesOn.)

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* ''Many'' of the original Literature/AesopsFables sometimes encounter have this trope. For example, The trope - in fact, family friendly modern selections of Aesop's Fables have to tactically omit many of the original ones. Some examples include:
** ''The
Fox and The Stork leads you to believe Stork'': it's fine and dandy to take payback on someone who pulled a fast one on you, because "One bad turn deserves another." Interestingly, Game Theory says that that's a quite reasonable (and, indeed, quite effective) strategy for some types of situations (the 'Tit-For-Tat' strategy). There is research that indicates humans may even be hard wired to accept this practice.
"
** Another one is "The ''The Bat and the Weasels", in which a bat escapes from a bird-hating weasel by claiming to be a mouse, then later from a second weasel who hates mice by pretending to be a bird. The moral, which Aesop himself states outright at the end of the fable, is that Weasels'': it's sometimes wiser wise to change or lie about your affiliation in order to save your own skin. It's ethically questionable skin.
** ''The Fox
and it encourages cowardice, deception the Goat'': don't trust anyone who's in trouble, because they're probably using you to get out of it.
** ''The Lion
and equivocation, the Dolphin'': no matter how friendly someone is, don't bother allying with them if they're useless.
** ''The Hawk and the Pigeons'': any people who have elected or nominated a ruler have only themselves to blame if the ruler turns out to be a tyrant.
** ''The Farmer and the Nightingale'': never believe a captive's promise and never give up what you have.
** ''The Ass and the Lap Dog'' (and ''The Eagle and the Crow''): just because someone else achieves something good doesn't mean that you can.
** ''The Eagle and the Fox'' has the well known moral "do unto others as you would have them do unto you",
but the actual story (in which a fox threatens to burn down an eagle's tree in revenge for the eagle taking one of its cubs) gives the implication that this moral is read as a justification for revenge, not a moral code for oneself.
** ''The Kid and the Wolf'':
it's also undeniably practical OK to insult your neighbour as long as he can't do anything about it.
** ''The Porcupine
and effective. (Although it also verges on BrokenAesop since, as many people have pointed out, the bat could just [[TakeAThirdOption tell the weasels he's neither Snakes'': be careful who you take as a bird]] ''[[TakeAThirdOption nor]]'' [[TakeAThirdOption a mouse]], though this guest, because they might be an asshole.
** ''The Fox without
a side effect Tail'': avoid miserable people because they'll try to make you miserable too.
** ''The Lark and her Young Ones'': if something is worth doing, the only one you can trust to do it is yourself.
** ''The Wolf and the Lamb'': arguing rationally with the powerful is useless, they'll just overwhelm you.
** ''The Wolf and the Crane'': the higher your hopes, the more likely you are to be disappointed.
** ''The Two Pots'': don't hang around powerful people, if there's any mutual trouble you'll get the worst
of ScienceMarchesOn.)it.
** ''The Man and the Lion'': never believe what anyone says in their own defense.
** ''The Lion's Share'' or ''The Lion and Other Beasts Go Hunting'': just because someone wants you to co-operate with them in work does not mean they will give you a share of the reward.
** ''The Farmer and the Snake'': some people are just plain evil and no amount of building trust will change that.
** ''The Ass and his Driver'': if someone is determined to destroy themselves, let them.
16th Nov '16 6:39:36 PM ectostar
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* ''WesternAnimation/AmericanDad'': S4 Ep 19 has Terry's dad coming to visit him, then discovering he's gay and disowning him. After the characters scramble to convince him to accept homosexuals, he says "I know it's not dangerous. I know it isn't something that can be changed. I just don't like it." The moral is, "Bigots will be bigots no matter what you say to them, and sometimes they're people you love" (which, sadly, is TruthInTelevision). It could also be a much more blunt version of [[Creator/DrSeuss “Be who you are and say what you feel because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind"]]. Maybe not very comforting or "family-friendly" when it involves a loved one acting unreasonable or callous, but it's still arguably true.

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* ''WesternAnimation/AmericanDad'': S4 Ep 19 "Daddy Queerest" has Terry's dad coming to visit him, then discovering he's gay and disowning him. After the characters scramble to convince him to accept homosexuals, he says "I know it's not dangerous. I know it isn't something that can be changed. I just don't like it." The moral is, "Bigots will be bigots no matter what you say to them, and sometimes they're people you love" (which, sadly, is TruthInTelevision). It could also be a much more blunt version of [[Creator/DrSeuss “Be who you are and say what you feel because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind"]]. Maybe not very comforting or "family-friendly" when it involves a loved one acting unreasonable or callous, but it's still arguably true.
7th Nov '16 3:19:07 PM JJHIL325
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* Considering how ''Disney/{{Zootopia}}'' is a metaphor for racism using mammals in place of humans, it was kind of inevitable. The movie demonstrates that intentionally [[InnocentlyInsensitive or not]], ''anybody'' can be a carrier of racism (up to and including the main characters ''themselves''), even those who are open-minded and/or suffered the most from racism. While it's harsh, and not really a thing anybody wants to admit, it's pretty much how racism works in the real world. Fortunately, the blow is softened in a couple of senses; 1), it shows that anybody ''can'' overcome their biases if one acknowledges and actively on moving past them. 2) Some bigoted characters ''are'' able to become more open-minded and accepting of other groups when given the time and encouragement, such as Judy's parents and [[DaChief Chief Bogo]].

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* Considering how ''Disney/{{Zootopia}}'' is a metaphor an allegory for modern-day racism using mammals in place of humans, it was kind of inevitable. The movie demonstrates that intentionally [[InnocentlyInsensitive or not]], ''anybody'' can be a carrier of racism (up to and including the main characters ''themselves''), even those who are open-minded and/or suffered the most from racism. While it's harsh, and not really a thing anybody wants to admit, it's pretty much how racism works in the real world. Fortunately, the blow is softened in a couple of senses; 1), it shows that anybody ''can'' overcome their biases if one acknowledges and actively on moving past them. 2) Some bigoted characters ''are'' able to become more open-minded and accepting of other groups when given the time and encouragement, such as Judy's parents and [[DaChief Chief Bogo]].
2nd Nov '16 4:23:09 PM AlienPatch
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* Early on in ''Film/BatmanVSupermanDawnOfJustice'', Martha Kent gives Superman a rousing speech about being a hero, and a symbol, and then abruptly ends it by saying, "Or be none of it. You don't owe this world a thing. You never did." Although it's obvious from the context that what she's saying is "having super powers does not mean you are obligated to let public opinion and peer pressure force you to use them how the public sees fit, especially if they are ultimately ungrateful to you for your efforts to help; be a hero because that's what ''you'' feel is the right thing to do, not because people demand that you should," people have had ComesGreatResponsibility beaten into their head by superhero media for decades, so it elicits a very strong reaction.

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* Early on in ''Film/BatmanVSupermanDawnOfJustice'', Martha Kent gives Superman a rousing speech about being a hero, and a symbol, and then abruptly ends it by saying, "Or be none of it. You don't owe this world a thing. You never did." Although it's obvious from the context that what she's saying is "having super powers does not mean you are obligated to let public opinion and peer pressure force you to use them how the public sees fit, be a hero, especially if they are ultimately ungrateful to you for your efforts to help; be [[UngratefulBastard those who won't appreciate it]]" and "be a hero because that's what ''you'' feel is the right thing to do, not because people demand that you should," should"; people have had ComesGreatResponsibility beaten into their head by superhero media for decades, so it elicits a very strong reaction.
29th Oct '16 4:58:18 AM StFan
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'Family unfriendly' does not necessarily mean 'wrong': the lesson may be both true and well-supported in context, but it frequently jars the audience since they weren't expecting it. After all, most shows, especially ones aimed at children, teach viewers that they should help the less fortunate, be modest, and solve their problems without coming to blows.

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'Family unfriendly' "Family-Unfriendly" does not necessarily mean 'wrong': "wrong": the lesson may be both true and well-supported in context, but it frequently jars the audience since they weren't expecting it. After all, most shows, especially ones aimed at children, teach viewers that they should help the less fortunate, be modest, and solve their problems without coming to blows.



* The Truth anti-tobacco initiative's [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XPS9Op5dhCw "Left Swipe Dat"]] music video tries to get its anti-tobacco message across by having [[WereStillRelevantDammit popular Youtubers and Vine-makers]] sing a song about instantly rejecting people on Tinder if they smoke cigarettes in their profile pics. It's basically two Family Unfriendly Aesops at once: "If you enjoy a frowned-upon vice, make sure you don't advertise it to potential romantic partners!" and "Don't even consider speaking to someone--or even learning anything else about them--if they have a personal habit that you don't approve of!"

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* The Truth anti-tobacco initiative's [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XPS9Op5dhCw "Left Swipe Dat"]] music video tries to get its anti-tobacco message across by having [[WereStillRelevantDammit popular Youtubers YouTubers and Vine-makers]] sing a song about instantly rejecting people on Tinder if they smoke cigarettes in their profile pics. It's basically two Family Unfriendly Family-Unfriendly Aesops at once: "If you enjoy a frowned-upon vice, make sure you don't advertise it to potential romantic partners!" and "Don't even consider speaking to someone--or someone -- or even learning anything else about them--if them -- if they have a personal habit that you don't approve of!"



* The recurring theme of the Trix cereal commercials - the kids denying the Rabbit the cereal, claiming "Trix is for kids" - is starting to sound like it's glorifying selfishness and bullying in this day and age. (Fortunately, most modern viewers are [[UnpopularPopularCharacter starting to side with the Rabbit.]]

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* The recurring theme of the Trix cereal commercials - -- the kids denying the Rabbit the cereal, claiming "Trix is for kids" - -- is starting to sound like it's glorifying selfishness and bullying in this day and age. (Fortunately, most modern viewers are [[UnpopularPopularCharacter starting to side with the Rabbit.]]]])



* A recurring theme in the ''Manga/{{Area 88}}'' manga and OVA is that engaging in combat will transform you into a traumatized basketcase who can never integrate into normal society ever again.

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* A recurring theme in the ''Manga/{{Area 88}}'' ''Manga/Area88'' manga and OVA is that engaging in combat will transform you into a traumatized basketcase who can never integrate into normal society ever again.



[[folder:Comics]]

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[[folder:Comics]][[folder:Comic Books]]



[[folder:Fairy Tales -- General]]

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[[folder:Comic Strips]]
* The trope picture comes from ''ComicStrip/CalvinAndHobbes'', and the mom ends up grudgingly giving him the pie. Calvin is clearly portrayed as a brat, though.
* In ''ComicStrip/LittleOrphanAnnie'', one World War II strip has Annie seeing a man physically attack an obnoxious war-profiteer for declaring that he hopes the war will continue for another twenty years. When a policeman tries to intervene, Annie stops him because "it's better some times to let folks settle some questions by what you might call democratic processes."
* Parodied with Rat's children's stories in ''ComicStrip/PearlsBeforeSwine''.
-->'''Goat:''' [[WhatDoYouMeanItsForKids You are not putting this in a children's book.]]\\
'''Rat:''' "So remember, kids, luck and timing are more important than personal effort."
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Fairy Tales -- General]]Tales]]



[[/folder]]

[[folder:Fairy Tales -- Specific Stories]]



* The standard fairy tale plot of a hero overcoming impossible quests to marry a princess gets subverted in Friedrich Schiller's ballad ''The Diver''. A King throws a golden cup into some rough water and declares that whoever can retrieve it can keep it. After the hero manages this the king ups the ante by throwing a ring into the water and telling the hero that he will get the princess if he can do it again. The hero tries and drowns. The new moral here might be "she is probably not worth it" or simply "quit while you are ahead." Schiller also subverts the "Idiotic challenges will win you the heart of a woman" plot in ''The Glove'' in which a lady throws her glove into an arena full of lions and tigers and challenges (mockingly) her suitor to get it. He retrieves the glove, the lady immediately falls for him - and he throws the glove in her face, saying "Den Dank, Dame, begeher ich nicht" ("Such Gratitude, madame, is not desired by me") - the Aesop is probably not to mock your suitor or he'll run away. Plus that a woman demanding such ridiculous things is not worth it.
* ''Theatre/IntoTheWoods'' added "It's probably not a good idea to marry someone you just met" Aesops to the ''{{Literature/Cinderella}}'' and ''{{Literature/Rapunzel}}'' stories. Cinderella's prince is a philanderer (probably ''both'' of them are, it's just that Cinderella's is the only one who explicitly does it on or rather just off stage), whereas Rapunzel is somewhat crazy. The only original story Aesop it leaves intact is ''Literature/LittleRedRidingHood'''s Aesop of "Don't talk to strangers," who became a good deal creepier (as a bonus, traditionally the wolf is played by the same actor who plays Cinderella's prince). Near the end, we get an Aesop of "Listen to people who know what they're talking about, even if they're witches." And the overarching moral is "don't tell your children stories that feature a Family Unfriendly Aesop, because it ''will'' mess them up."
** "Nice is different than good". And, even more damningly, [[GrayingMorality neither "nice" nor "good" are necessarily the same as]] ''[[GrayingMorality "right"]]''.

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* The standard fairy tale plot of a hero overcoming impossible quests to marry a princess gets subverted in Friedrich Schiller's ballad ''The Diver''. A King throws a golden cup into some rough water and declares that whoever can retrieve it can keep it. After the hero manages this the king ups the ante by throwing a ring into the water and telling the hero that he will get the princess if he can do it again. The hero tries and drowns. The new moral here might be "she is probably not worth it" or simply "quit while you are ahead." "
*
Schiller also subverts the "Idiotic challenges will win you the heart of a woman" plot in ''The Glove'' in which a lady throws her glove into an arena full of lions and tigers and challenges (mockingly) her suitor to get it. He retrieves the glove, the lady immediately falls for him - -- and he throws the glove in her face, saying "Den Dank, Dame, begeher ich nicht" ("Such Gratitude, madame, is not desired by me") - -- the Aesop is probably not to mock your suitor or he'll run away. Plus that a woman demanding such ridiculous things is not worth it.
* ''Theatre/IntoTheWoods'' added "It's probably not a good idea to marry someone you just met" Aesops to the ''{{Literature/Cinderella}}'' ''Literature/{{Cinderella}}'' and ''{{Literature/Rapunzel}}'' ''Literature/{{Rapunzel}}'' stories. Cinderella's prince is a philanderer (probably ''both'' of them are, it's just that Cinderella's is the only one who explicitly does it on or rather just off stage), whereas Rapunzel is somewhat crazy. The only original story Aesop it leaves intact is ''Literature/LittleRedRidingHood'''s Aesop of "Don't talk to strangers," who became a good deal creepier (as a bonus, traditionally the wolf is played by the same actor who plays Cinderella's prince). Near the end, we get an Aesop of "Listen to people who know what they're talking about, even if they're witches." And the overarching moral is "don't tell your children stories that feature a Family Unfriendly Aesop, because it ''will'' mess them up."
**
" "Nice is different than good". And, even more damningly, [[GrayingMorality neither "nice" nor "good" are necessarily the same as]] ''[[GrayingMorality "right"]]''.



* ''WesternAnimation/InsideOut'' teaches that living a life of happiness, wonder and simple pleasures is simply unrealistic beyond early childhood, and that everyone will have some bad experiences that shape them for better or worse. It also teaches that sadness is a necessary part of life and that growing up means losing some parts of childhood and dealing with complex emotions, which will make you a [[MiseryBuildsCharacter stronger and more rounded person]].
** Even more family-unfriendly: it also teaches you that trying to always live up to your family's expectations of you can drive you crazy, or at any rate destroy your sense of yourself.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/InsideOut'' teaches that living a life of happiness, wonder and simple pleasures is simply unrealistic beyond early childhood, and that everyone will have some bad experiences that shape them for better or worse. It also teaches that sadness is a necessary part of life and that growing up means losing some parts of childhood and dealing with complex emotions, which will make you a [[MiseryBuildsCharacter stronger and more rounded person]].
**
person]]. Even more family-unfriendly: it also teaches you that trying to always live up to your family's expectations of you can drive you crazy, or at any rate destroy your sense of yourself.



* Considering how ''{{Disney/Zootopia}}'' is a metaphor for racism using mammals in place of humans, it was kind of inevitable. The movie demonstrates that intentionally [[InnocentlyInsensitive or not]], ''anybody'' can be a carrier of racism (up to and including the main characters ''themselves''), even those who are open-minded and/or suffered the most from racism. While it's harsh, and not really a thing anybody wants to admit, it's pretty much how racism works in the real world. Fortunately, the blow is softened in a couple of senses; 1), it shows that anybody ''can'' overcome their biases if one acknowledges and actively on moving past them. 2) Some bigoted characters ''are'' able to become more open-minded and accepting of other groups when given the time and encouragement, such as Judy's parents and [[DaChief Chief Bogo]].

to:

* Considering how ''{{Disney/Zootopia}}'' ''Disney/{{Zootopia}}'' is a metaphor for racism using mammals in place of humans, it was kind of inevitable. The movie demonstrates that intentionally [[InnocentlyInsensitive or not]], ''anybody'' can be a carrier of racism (up to and including the main characters ''themselves''), even those who are open-minded and/or suffered the most from racism. While it's harsh, and not really a thing anybody wants to admit, it's pretty much how racism works in the real world. Fortunately, the blow is softened in a couple of senses; 1), it shows that anybody ''can'' overcome their biases if one acknowledges and actively on moving past them. 2) Some bigoted characters ''are'' able to become more open-minded and accepting of other groups when given the time and encouragement, such as Judy's parents and [[DaChief Chief Bogo]].



[[folder:Films -- Live Action]]
* Early on in ''Film/BatmanVSupermanDawnOfJustice'', Martha Kent gives Superman a rousing speech about being a hero, and a symbol, and then abruptly ends it by saying, "Or be none of it. You don't owe this world a thing. You never did." Although it's obvious from the context that what she's saying is "having super powers does not mean you are obligated to let public opinion and peer pressure force you to use them how the public sees fit, especially if they are ultimately ungrateful to you for your efforts to help; be a hero because that's what ''you'' feel is the right thing to do, not because people demand that you should,", people have had ComesGreatResponsibility beaten into their head by superhero media for decades, so it elicits a very strong reaction.
* ''Film/{{Case 39}}''. Sometimes, parents are totally justified in abusing their child. (The astonishing number of children in RealLife who suffer physical and mental abuse because their parents think they're possessed by demons may have a bone to pick with this movie. The ones who survive the abuse, anyway.)
* ''Crossing Delancey''--some people might see either of the following:

to:

[[folder:Films -- Live Action]]
Live-Action]]
* Early on in ''Film/BatmanVSupermanDawnOfJustice'', Martha Kent gives Superman a rousing speech about being a hero, and a symbol, and then abruptly ends it by saying, "Or be none of it. You don't owe this world a thing. You never did." Although it's obvious from the context that what she's saying is "having super powers does not mean you are obligated to let public opinion and peer pressure force you to use them how the public sees fit, especially if they are ultimately ungrateful to you for your efforts to help; be a hero because that's what ''you'' feel is the right thing to do, not because people demand that you should,", should," people have had ComesGreatResponsibility beaten into their head by superhero media for decades, so it elicits a very strong reaction.
* ''Film/{{Case 39}}''.''Film/Case39''. Sometimes, parents are totally justified in abusing their child. (The astonishing number of children in RealLife who suffer physical and mental abuse because their parents think they're possessed by demons may have a bone to pick with this movie. The ones who survive the abuse, anyway.)
* ''Crossing Delancey''--some Delancey'' -- some people might see either of the following:



[[folder:Live Action TV]]
* ''Series/{{The 100}}'' frequently has the moral that sometimes there ''isn't'' a moral choice. Sometimes the only options available all involve doing something terrible that you'll regret forever.
-->'''Clarke:''' I tried. I tried to be the good guy.
-->'''Abby:''' Maybe there are no good guys.
* ''[[Series/TwentyFour 24]]'' and its liberal use of the JackBauerInterrogationTechnique has been heavily criticised for seeming to give the message that TortureAlwaysWorks, government abuse of power is completely justified to fight terrorism, and civil rights get in the way of the good guys keeping us safe. So much so that a group of military and law enforcement leaders (including the Dean of West Point and the Director of the FBI) made a delegation to the producers and asked them to stop, since they were facing a generation of recruits raised on the show who were willing and sometimes frighteningly eager to use torture.

to:

[[folder:Live Action [[folder:Live-Action TV]]
* ''Series/{{The 100}}'' ''Series/The100'' frequently has the moral that sometimes there ''isn't'' a moral choice. Sometimes the only options available all involve doing something terrible that you'll regret forever.
-->'''Clarke:''' I tried. I tried to be the good guy.
-->'''Abby:'''
guy.\\
'''Abby:'''
Maybe there are no good guys.
* ''[[Series/TwentyFour 24]]'' ''Series/TwentyFour'' and its liberal use of the JackBauerInterrogationTechnique has been heavily criticised for seeming to give the message that TortureAlwaysWorks, government abuse of power is completely justified to fight terrorism, and civil rights get in the way of the good guys keeping us safe. So much so that a group of military and law enforcement leaders (including the Dean of West Point and the Director of the FBI) made a delegation to the producers and asked them to stop, since they were facing a generation of recruits raised on the show who were willing and sometimes frighteningly eager to use torture.



* ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|2003}}'': Sometimes you have to ShootTheDog, you can't always TakeAThirdOption, and you have to KnowWhenToFoldEm.
** You can't get much more family-unfriendly than "[[SlidingScaleofIdealismVersusCynicism suicide bombing is justified]]."
* ''Series/TheBigBangTheory'' episode "The Table for Polarization" has [[AmbiguousDisorder Sheldon]] get grumpy over a new kitchen table; when he gets his own way at the end he smugly tells Leonard "Sometimes the baby wins."

to:

* ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|2003}}'': Sometimes you have to ShootTheDog, you can't always TakeAThirdOption, and you have to KnowWhenToFoldEm.
**
KnowWhenToFoldEm. You can't get much more family-unfriendly than "[[SlidingScaleofIdealismVersusCynicism suicide bombing is justified]]."
* ''Series/TheBigBangTheory'' ''Series/TheBigBangTheory'':
** The
episode "The Table for Polarization" has [[AmbiguousDisorder Sheldon]] get grumpy over a new kitchen table; when he gets his own way at the end he smugly tells Leonard "Sometimes the baby wins."



** Jane is being harassed by the new Degrassi football team since she's the only female player. The coach [[JerkJock (who is also the principal)]] is turning a blind eye. She does the "right thing" - she tells another adult about the harassment but bullying worsens and she's actually assaulted in the hallway. It isn't until she makes a stand for herself (along with a handful of teammates behind her) that bullying goes away. This episode actually makes the case it's better to stand up against bullies yourself and that telling about an adult could make the bullying ''intensify.''\\
\\

to:

** Jane is being harassed by the new Degrassi football team since she's the only female player. The coach [[JerkJock (who is also the principal)]] is turning a blind eye. She does the "right thing" - she tells another adult about the harassment but bullying worsens and she's actually assaulted in the hallway. It isn't until she makes a stand for herself (along with a handful of teammates behind her) that bullying goes away. This episode actually makes the case it's better to stand up against bullies yourself and that telling about an adult could make the bullying ''intensify.''\\
\\
''\\\



** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E1TheDominators "The Dominators"]]. Pacificism, even if war-hungry ways have nearly wiped out the planet and left an island a whole island a nuclear wasteland full of corpses, is bad, because the first attacker will destroy you. Gun control is also bad. Arm the hippies.
** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS12E2TheArkInSpace "The Ark in Space"]], the Doctor manipulates Sarah Jane out of a situation in which she's panicking and screaming by giving her a very hurtful and rather sexist TheReasonYouSuckSpeech until she pulls herself together out of pure rage. It's an awesome moment and one of both Sarah Jane's and the Doctor's best, but does give the impression that bullying your best friend and crushing her self-esteem is a good idea to do to someone in a panic.
*** The Doctor does the same thing to Ace in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS26E3TheCurseOfFenric "The Curse Of Fenric"]]. He destroys her self-esteem in order to save both their lives. [[spoiler: Learning to forgive the Doctor also helps her to forgive her mother, allowing her to let go of the resentment she's been holding onto all her life.]]
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS25E1RemembranceOfTheDaleks "Remembrance Of The Daleks"]] War is a tragic waste - the trick is getting your enemies to wipe themselves out.
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E10LoveAndMonsters "Love & Monsters"]]. Most of your friends are dead, and your girlfriend is immobilized and completely dependent on you for literally everything? No problem, as long as she can still give you blowjobs!
** A ''lot'' of Creator/StevenMoffat stories (particularly in the Eleventh Doctor's tenure) have characters destroying themselves or causing huge amounts of destruction for love, which might not come off as so bad were his romances not overwhelmingly [[DestructiveRomance destructive and unhealthy fixations held by sociopaths]] that [[RomanticisedAbuse it's hard to imagine anyone wanting anyway]], although he rarely writes a romantic relationship without at least a kernel of genuine goodness in it. His use of 'charming psychopaths' as positive {{Escapist Character}}s leads some viewers to find his stories glorifying selfishness and brutality.

to:

** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E1TheDominators "The Dominators"]]."[[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E1TheDominators The Dominators]]". Pacificism, even if war-hungry ways have nearly wiped out the planet and left an island a whole island a nuclear wasteland full of corpses, is bad, because the first attacker will destroy you. Gun control is also bad. Arm the hippies.
** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS12E2TheArkInSpace "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS12E2TheArkInSpace The Ark in Space"]], Space]]", the Doctor manipulates Sarah Jane out of a situation in which she's panicking and screaming by giving her a very hurtful and rather sexist TheReasonYouSuckSpeech until she pulls herself together out of pure rage. It's an awesome moment and one of both Sarah Jane's and the Doctor's best, but does give the impression that bullying your best friend and crushing her self-esteem is a good idea to do to someone in a panic.
*** ** The Doctor does the same thing to Ace in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS26E3TheCurseOfFenric "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS26E3TheCurseOfFenric The Curse Of Fenric"]].of Fenric]]". He destroys her self-esteem in order to save both their lives. [[spoiler: Learning [[spoiler:Learning to forgive the Doctor also helps her to forgive her mother, allowing her to let go of the resentment she's been holding onto all her life.]]
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS25E1RemembranceOfTheDaleks "Remembrance Of The Daleks"]] "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS25E1RemembranceOfTheDaleks Remembrance of the Daleks]]": War is a tragic waste - -- the trick is getting your enemies to wipe themselves out.
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E10LoveAndMonsters "Love "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E10LoveAndMonsters Love & Monsters"]].Monsters]]". Most of your friends are dead, and your girlfriend is immobilized and completely dependent on you for literally everything? No problem, as long as she can still give you blowjobs!
** A ''lot'' of Creator/StevenMoffat stories (particularly in the Eleventh Doctor's tenure) have characters destroying themselves or causing huge amounts of destruction for love, which might not come off as so bad were his romances not overwhelmingly [[DestructiveRomance destructive and unhealthy fixations held by sociopaths]] that [[RomanticisedAbuse it's hard to imagine anyone wanting anyway]], although he rarely writes a romantic relationship without at least a kernel of genuine goodness in it. His use of 'charming psychopaths' "charming psychopaths" as positive {{Escapist Character}}s leads some viewers to find his stories glorifying selfishness and brutality.



*** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS34E11DarkWater "Dark Water"]], Clara is willing to stab the Doctor in the back, cut him off from the TARDIS forever and possibly condemn both himself and her to death in lava just because the Doctor won't break the laws of time to save her boyfriend, and while this isn't portrayed entirely sympathetically (and Clara breaks down into tears upon realising what she's doing) the Doctor reveals he was testing her to see how far she would go and tells her "Do you think I care about you so little that your betrayal means anything?" Both sides of this are loaded with unfortunate readings as the aesop seems to be that unconditional love even forgives really bad things -- at least if the beloved is genuinely sorry.

to:

*** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS34E11DarkWater "Dark Water"]], "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS34E11DarkWater Dark Water]]", Clara is willing to stab the Doctor in the back, cut him off from the TARDIS forever and possibly condemn both himself and her to death in lava just because the Doctor won't break the laws of time to save her boyfriend, and while this isn't portrayed entirely sympathetically (and Clara breaks down into tears upon realising realizing what she's doing) the Doctor reveals he was testing her to see how far she would go and tells her "Do you think I care about you so little that your betrayal means anything?" Both sides of this are loaded with unfortunate readings as the aesop seems to be that unconditional love even forgives really bad things -- at least if the beloved is genuinely sorry. sorry.



** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E1TheEleventhHour "The Eleventh Hour"]]. Amy Pond gets a little messed up by The Doctor's intrusion into her life (and the crack in space-time in her room), letting him into her house and then waiting for him for decades, which sends her to see psychiatrists, trying to convince she made up The Doctor. While she was right to hold onto what she knew was true (rather than succumbing to what was unwitting gaslighting), and we know The Doctor is great with kids, it still might be an uncomfortable message for those with experience with adult on kid crime, or people who are genuinely hallucinating or delusional and refuse help.
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E7AmysChoice "Amy's Choice"]]. Amy believes she's in a dream because Rory has died, and attempts suicide to escape the dream. While she's correct, and there are people who believe life wouldn't be worth living without their true love, it can be uncomfortable for people to ponder.
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E6TheAlmostPeople "The Almost People"]]. Gangers are people too -- if the original is dead that is. If not then they should be used as suicide bombers to take out enemies even though the originals could do the same job with no risk to themselves.
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS34E10InTheForestOfTheNight "In The Forest of the Night"]]. It is okay to let a mental illness go un-medicated because the voices in your head are helpful.

to:

** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E1TheEleventhHour "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E1TheEleventhHour The Eleventh Hour"]].Hour]]". Amy Pond gets a little messed up by The Doctor's intrusion into her life (and the crack in space-time in her room), letting him into her house and then waiting for him for decades, which sends her to see psychiatrists, trying to convince she made up The Doctor. While she was right to hold onto what she knew was true (rather than succumbing to what was unwitting gaslighting), and we know The Doctor is great with kids, it still might be an uncomfortable message for those with experience with adult on kid crime, or people who are genuinely hallucinating or delusional and refuse help.
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E7AmysChoice "Amy's Choice"]]."[[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E7AmysChoice Amy's Choice]]". Amy believes she's in a dream because Rory has died, and attempts suicide to escape the dream. While she's correct, and there are people who believe life wouldn't be worth living without their true love, it can be uncomfortable for people to ponder.
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E6TheAlmostPeople "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS32E6TheAlmostPeople The Almost People"]].People]]". Gangers are people too -- if the original is dead that is. If not then they should be used as suicide bombers to take out enemies even though the originals could do the same job with no risk to themselves.
** [[Recap/DoctorWhoS34E10InTheForestOfTheNight "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS34E10InTheForestOfTheNight "In The the Forest of the Night"]].Night]]". It is okay to let a mental illness go un-medicated because the voices in your head are helpful.



* ''Series/OnceUponATime'' has ''frequently'' pushed the messages that "Being the good guy means you'll always lose," "Being a nasty bastard will get you everything you want" and "NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished." We have a town full of fairy tale characters stranded in small-town Maine because [[TheBadGuyWins the evil stepmother queen]] successfully cursed the entire land. But even she was groomed since birth to be a mess because of her social-climbing bitch of a mother (who was a classic FromNobodyToNightmare wanting the entire universe bowing to her in a twisted form of revenge) and MagnificentBastard Rumplestitskin wanting someone else to cast his curse for him. Regina has lied, cheated, raped, burned entire villages to the ground, sent dozens of children to their deaths, murdered a man to try and take his little boy for herself...''and regrets absolutely none of it'' because she got what she wanted in the end.

to:

* ''Series/OnceUponATime'' has ''frequently'' pushed the messages that "Being the good guy means you'll always lose," "Being a nasty bastard will get you everything you want" and "NoGoodDeedGoesUnpunished." "
**
We have a town full of fairy tale characters stranded in small-town Maine because [[TheBadGuyWins the evil stepmother queen]] successfully cursed the entire land. But even she was groomed since birth to be a mess because of her social-climbing bitch of a mother (who was a classic FromNobodyToNightmare wanting the entire universe bowing to her in a twisted form of revenge) and MagnificentBastard Rumplestitskin wanting someone else to cast his curse for him. Regina has lied, cheated, raped, burned entire villages to the ground, sent dozens of children to their deaths, murdered a man to try and take his little boy for herself... ''and regrets absolutely none of it'' because she got what she wanted in the end.



** Some - but not all - of these aesops are in the process of being reversed now that [[spoiler: Rumplestiltskin has lost nearly everything he had because he refused to change. He and Regina even discuss the "if you're sneaky about it, you can get everything" aesop shortly before Rumples point of view is proven wrong]].

to:

** Some - -- but not all - -- of these aesops are in the process of being reversed now that [[spoiler: Rumplestiltskin has lost nearly everything he had because he refused to change. He and Regina even discuss the "if you're sneaky about it, you can get everything" aesop shortly before Rumples point of view is proven wrong]].



[[folder:Newspaper Comics]]
* The trope picture comes from ''ComicStrip/{{Calvin and Hobbes}}'', and the mom ends up grudgingly giving him the pie. Calvin is clearly portrayed as a brat, though.
* In ''ComicStrip/LittleOrphanAnnie'', one World War II strip has Annie seeing a man physically attack an obnoxious war-profiteer for declaring that he hopes the war will continue for another twenty years. When a policeman tries to intervene, Annie stops him because "it's better some times to let folks settle some questions by what you might call democratic processes."
* Parodied with Rat's children's stories in ''ComicStrip/PearlsBeforeSwine''.
-->'''Goat:''' [[WhatDoYouMeanItsForKids You are not putting this in a children's book.]]\\
'''Rat:''' "So remember, kids, luck and timing are more important than personal effort."
[[/folder]]



26th Oct '16 4:05:12 PM nombretomado
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* The 2007 version of ''Film/{{Beowulf|2007}}'' diverges from the moral of [[Literature/{{Beowulf}} its source material]], essentially making the point that heroic stories are often lies told to cover up questionable or outright shitty behavior, and by the time you realize you shouldn't have told the story in the first place, you'll be too old and full of regret for it to make any difference.

to:

* The 2007 version of ''Film/{{Beowulf|2007}}'' ''WesternAnimation/{{Beowulf|2007}}'' diverges from the moral of [[Literature/{{Beowulf}} its source material]], essentially making the point that heroic stories are often lies told to cover up questionable or outright shitty behavior, and by the time you realize you shouldn't have told the story in the first place, you'll be too old and full of regret for it to make any difference.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.FamilyUnFriendlyAesop