History Main / FamilyUnFriendlyAesop

24th Sep '16 8:01:15 PM somebob
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* An in-universe example in ''Series/TheThundermans''. The show that Nora and Billy used to watch when they were younger was Hootie the Owl, which taught anti-social behaviors.
24th Sep '16 11:24:22 AM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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*** Though it helps a little that in the end, AJ is so busy gloating he accidentally breaks the trophy he won and decides he should stop gloating

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*** Though it helps a little that in the end, AJ is so busy gloating he accidentally breaks the trophy he won and decides he should stop gloatinggloating.
24th Sep '16 11:22:22 AM TotalDramaRox97
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*** Though it helps a little that in the end, AJ is so busy gloating he accidentally breaks the trophy he won and decides he should stop gloating
21st Sep '16 10:02:48 AM DrOO7
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* ''Film/MaidInManhattan'': In a movie geared toward the very impressionable preteen/young teen set (many of whom idolized star Creator/JenniferLopez at the time the movie came out), the titular character and her paramour sleep together despite barely knowing each other and believing (at the time) that they're never going to see each other again.
21st Sep '16 9:20:34 AM Demetrios
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* In-universe example: Martin states one in the appropriately titled ''Series/{{Frasier}}'' episode "Bully for Martin." He essentially says that "You should put up with any amount of unreasonable and even disrespectful crap from your supervisor [[HonorBeforeReason just because it's respectful to the chain of command]]."

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* In-universe example: Martin states one in the appropriately titled ''Series/{{Frasier}}'' episode "Bully for Martin." He essentially says that "You should put up with any amount of unreasonable and even disrespectful crap from your supervisor [[HonorBeforeReason just because it's respectful to the chain of command]]."" Naturally, Frasier disagrees.
18th Sep '16 6:40:39 PM DrOO7
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* ''Film/SoulFood'':Ironically, it plays out more like Family-''Friendly''. Career-focused oldest sister Teri is on her second marriage, which is itself in serious trouble and she's such a bitch that when her husband cheats on her, our sympathies are clearly supposed to be with ''him''. Meanwhile, second sister Maxine is a HappilyMarried housewife and mother of three kids. It's not hard to assume the writers are implying that career women are bad while stay-at-home mom's are good.
** Also, youngest sister Bird's (admittedly underhanded) efforts to help husband Lem find a job by asking her ex-boyfriend to give him one. Lem is furious when he finds out and the whole situation blows up. . .and everyone makes ''Bird'' out to be in the wrong and chews her for not letting Lem "be a man" and find his own job. The idea of a woman helping a man is made out to be something utterly abhorrent.
5th Sep '16 11:41:09 AM erforce
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* The 2007 version of ''Film/{{Beowulf}}'' diverges from the moral of [[Literature/{{Beowulf}} its source material]], essentially making the point that heroic stories are often lies told to cover up questionable or outright shitty behavior, and by the time you realize you shouldn't have told the story in the first place, you'll be too old and full of regret for it to make any difference.

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* The 2007 version of ''Film/{{Beowulf}}'' ''Film/{{Beowulf|2007}}'' diverges from the moral of [[Literature/{{Beowulf}} its source material]], essentially making the point that heroic stories are often lies told to cover up questionable or outright shitty behavior, and by the time you realize you shouldn't have told the story in the first place, you'll be too old and full of regret for it to make any difference.
31st Aug '16 1:28:34 PM Demetrios
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* In-universe example: Martin states one in the appropriately titled ''Series/{{Frasier}}'' episode "Bully for Martin." He essentially says that "You should put up with any amount of unreasonable and even disrespectful crap from your supervisor [[HonorBeforeReason just because it's respectful to the chain of command]]."
27th Aug '16 10:51:07 AM SaraJaye
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* On one episode of ''Series/StepByStep'', college-age Dana moves into her own apartment and goes too wild with her first party, getting drunk and making a fool of herself. When she wakes up hung over the next morning, her mother comes to visit and they have a talk about Dana's behavior. You'd think this would be where Carol advised Dana to use better judgment and give her some tips on how to let loose without going overboard, but clearly the previous night meant the adult Dana wasn't ready to live on her own. So Dana happily agrees to move back home, having learned her lesson.
26th Aug '16 12:28:34 PM Sapphirea2
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** A ''lot'' of Steven Moffat stories have characters destroying themselves or causing huge amounts of destruction for love, which might not come off as so bad were his romances not overwhelmingly [[DestructiveRomance destructive and unhealthy fixations held by sociopaths]] that [[RomanticisedAbuse it's hard to imagine anyone wanting anyway]]. (Although he rarely writes a romantic relationship without at least a kernel of genuine goodness in it.) His use of 'charming psychopaths' as positive {{Escapist Character}}s leads some viewers to find his stories glorifying selfishness and brutality.

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** A ''lot'' of Steven Moffat Creator/StevenMoffat stories (particularly in the Eleventh Doctor's tenure) have characters destroying themselves or causing huge amounts of destruction for love, which might not come off as so bad were his romances not overwhelmingly [[DestructiveRomance destructive and unhealthy fixations held by sociopaths]] that [[RomanticisedAbuse it's hard to imagine anyone wanting anyway]]. (Although anyway]], although he rarely writes a romantic relationship without at least a kernel of genuine goodness in it.) it. His use of 'charming psychopaths' as positive {{Escapist Character}}s leads some viewers to find his stories glorifying selfishness and brutality.brutality.
*** This gets particularly interesting with the show's treatment of Rose Tyler, a companion of the Creator/RussellTDavies era, and River Song, Moffat's most famous "charming psychopath". Both make comments about how their love for the Doctor is so deep that losing him would be worse than destroying the universe (or in Rose's case two), which some critics say sends a message that if you love someone, they should be the center of your world and you should be completely selfish in pursuing them. But Rose is [[KarmaHoudini basically]] ''rewarded'' and always treated well for her selfish behavior while River is not; rather, she is called out on her actions in "The Husbands of River Song".
*** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS34E11DarkWater "Dark Water"]], Clara is willing to stab the Doctor in the back, cut him off from the TARDIS forever and possibly condemn both himself and her to death in lava just because the Doctor won't break the laws of time to save her boyfriend, and while this isn't portrayed entirely sympathetically (and Clara breaks down into tears upon realising what she's doing) the Doctor reveals he was testing her to see how far she would go and tells her "Do you think I care about you so little that your betrayal means anything?" Both sides of this are loaded with unfortunate readings as the aesop seems to be that unconditional love even forgives really bad things -- at least if the beloved is genuinely sorry.
*** Compare "Dark Water" to the next season's finale "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E12HellBent Hell Bent]]". The Doctor, as a result of a vicious TraumaCongaLine culminating in ColdBloodedTorture turning him into a WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds, breaks the laws of time -- which threatens to ''destroy the universe'' -- to [[spoiler: save Clara from '''her''' fixed-point death. She's horrified by his actions and stands up to his selfishness but also implicitly forgives him. '''However''' he realizes their love is unhealthy for everyone and not only lets her go but also ends up being mind-wiped of memories of her, seeing his fate as a way of making amends for his selfish actions]]. So he is condemned up and down by other characters and in the end is willing to accept punishment...but he's also TheMentallyDisturbed by that point, given that [[spoiler: he let himself be tortured in hopes of saving her]]. Clara was sane-but-selfish when she tried to betray him, and yet was not held responsible for her actions the way the Doctor is, even though he has a far better defense. This could be compared to the Rose vs. River situation above, as River's psyche was also warped by villainous forces while Rose's was not, but it's only the character who has genuine mental heath issues who gets punished for acting up.



** In [[Recap/DoctorWhoS34E11DarkWater "Dark Water"]], Clara is willing to stab the Doctor in the back, cut the Doctor off from the TARDIS forever and possibly condemn both himself and her to a death in lava just because the Doctor won't break the laws of time to save her boyfriend, and while this isn't portrayed entirely sympathetically (and Clara breaks down into tears upon realising what she's doing) the Doctor reveals he was testing her to see how far she would go and tells her "Do you think I care about you so little that your betrayal means anything?" Both sides of this are loaded with unfortunate readings as the aesop seems to be that unconditional love even forgives really bad things -- at least if the beloved is genuinely sorry. Compare the next season's finale "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E12HellBent Hell Bent]]", in which the Doctor, as a result of a vicious TraumaCongaLine turning him into a WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds, [[spoiler: breaks the laws of time -- which threatens to ''destroy the universe'' -- to save Clara from her fixed-point death. She's horrified by his actions and stands up to his selfishness but also implicitly forgives him. '''However''' he realizes their love is unhealthy for everyone and not only lets her go but also ends up being mind-wiped of memories of her, seeing his fate as a way of making amends for his selfish actions]]. And then compare his situation to those of...
** Rose Tyler and River Song. Both make comments about how their love for the Doctor is so deep that losing him would be worse than destroying the universe (or in Rose's case two), which some critics say sends a message that if you love someone, they should be the center of your world and you should be completely selfish in pursuing them. Made worse in that Rose is [[KarmaHoudini basically]] rewarded for this and always treated well for her selfish behavior, but River and the Doctor are not in their respective stories; rather, they are called out on their actions and end up maturing as a result. Indeed, "Hell Bent" argues an opposite Aesop to Rose's Series 4 actions, and "The Husbands of River Song" (the very next episode) actually rewards River and the Doctor for their hard-won maturity by [[spoiler: granting them twenty-four happy years together]] when their paths cross once more.
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