History Main / FalseConfession

7th Apr '17 6:19:48 AM CerotechOmega
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* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 5}}'' justifies naming the protagonist as him being forced to sign one of these after taking a bout of pre-interrogation PoliceBrutality; act smarmy to the agent pushing this upon you, and he threatens to break your legs [[ButThouMust before the game makes you sign]].
3rd Apr '17 4:28:35 PM Sonofstranger
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* ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorney'':

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* ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorney'':''Franchise/AceAttorney'':


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*** [[spoiler:Hugh O'Connor does this ''again'' the next day when it starts seeming like Juniper would be found guilty]], even using InsaneTrollLogic to "prove" how he could have committed the crime. It's so ridiculous that Simon Blackquill [[ScrewThisImOuttaHere leaves the courthouse to take a walk]] while Athena tears it apart.
** During the fifth case of ''Dual Destinies'', [[spoiler:it's revealed that Simon Blackquill did this during the UR-1 incident to try to keep the blame off of Athena, who would have been the prime suspect otherwise due to what he himself and Ponco had witnessed. Athena became a lawyer in the first place because she and Simon's sister (and a few others, like Edgeworth) were the only ones who believed that he was truly innocent.]]
17th Mar '17 6:06:39 AM ChronoLegion
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* Sort-of done in ''Film/MyCousinVinnie'' in a good example of why it's ''always'' a good idea to get a lawyer, even if you're innocent. After the boys are arrested, they assume it's because they accidentally shoplifted a can of tuna. In fact, they're suspected of murdering the store clerk ([[spoiler:it was a completely different pair of guys that happened to do it mere minutes after they leave and who happened to have a similar car color]]). One of them starts explaining the shoplifting, causing the sheriff to ask if that's why they shot the clerk. Cue the kid's confused half-question-half-statement, "I shot the clerk?..", which he repeats several times, trying to wrap his head around the idea. The sheriff takes it as confession and later testifies to that effect in court.

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* Sort-of done in ''Film/MyCousinVinnie'' ''Film/MyCousinVinny'' in a good example of why it's ''always'' a good idea to get a lawyer, even if you're innocent. After the boys are arrested, they assume it's because they accidentally shoplifted a can of tuna. In fact, they're suspected of murdering the store clerk ([[spoiler:it was a completely different pair of guys that happened to do it mere minutes after they leave and who happened to have a similar car color]]). One of them starts explaining the shoplifting, causing the sheriff to ask if that's why they shot the clerk. Cue the kid's confused half-question-half-statement, "I shot the clerk?..", which he repeats several times, trying to wrap his head around the idea. The sheriff takes it as confession and later testifies to that effect in court. Notably, the kid doesn't sign a written confession, but his utterance is treated as one.
17th Mar '17 6:06:01 AM ChronoLegion
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* Sort-of done in ''Film/MyCousinVinnie'' in a good example of why it's ''always'' a good idea to get a lawyer, even if you're innocent. After the boys are arrested, they assume it's because they accidentally shoplifted a can of tuna. In fact, they're suspected of murdering the store clerk ([[spoiler:it was a completely different pair of guys that happened to do it mere minutes after they leave and who happened to have a similar car color]]). One of them starts explaining the shoplifting, causing the sheriff to ask if that's why they shot the clerk. Cue the kid's confused half-question-half-statement, "I shot the clerk?..", which he repeats several times, trying to wrap his head around the idea. The sheriff takes it as confession and later testifies to that effect in court.
4th Mar '17 11:25:10 AM Fireblood
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** Another tactic is "tainting the suspect". The suspect is "accidentally" brought into a room where a bunch of evidence is on display and left there for a few minutes before taken into the interrogation room. When the suspect is then finally brow-beaten into confessing he can mention the key detail mentioned above as "proof" he is the real thing.
* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lee_Strobel Lee Strobel]], during his job as a reporter for ''The Chicago Tribune'' once recalled an unusual case where a man pleaded guilty to shooting the host of a party. It was later found that the host had shot himself by accident, and the man "confessing" had done so because he found that his time being spent in jail while awaiting his trial counted as part of his sentence. If he was found guilty, he would get to go home anyway in three days. If he pleaded not guilty, but was found guilty, then his sentence could have been massively increased.

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** Another tactic is "tainting the suspect". The suspect is "accidentally" brought into a room where a bunch of evidence is on display and left there for a few minutes before taken into the interrogation room. When the suspect is then finally brow-beaten into confessing he can mention the key detail mentioned above as "proof" he is the real thing.
thing. It's also common to feed the suspect crucial information during the interrogation that they can repeat back as if it were their own. Thankfully interrogations are often recorded now and this can be shown.
* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lee_Strobel Lee Strobel]], during his job as a reporter for ''The Chicago Tribune'' Tribune'', once recalled an unusual case where a man pleaded guilty to shooting the host of a party. It was later found that the host had shot himself by accident, and the man "confessing" had done so because he found that his time being spent in jail while awaiting his trial counted as part of his sentence. If he was found guilty, he would get to go home anyway in three days. If he pleaded not guilty, but was found guilty, then his sentence could have been massively increased.



* A Swedish man named [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sture_Bergwall Sture Bergwall]] (or more famously in the media, Thomas Quick) once confessed to having committed over thirty murders while incarcerated att Säter mental hospital. He would later on get convicted for eight of the murders solely on the basis of his own confessions while undergoing recovered-memory therapy. Many years later, he confessed having made it all up, partly because he did not want to leave the hospital, partly because he wanted to please his doctors and get their friendship by being an interesting patient and partly because he was "rewarded" with strong medications when he confessed. Journalists later found out that the prosecution, the police, Bergwall's doctors and even the original defense attorney had systematicly withheld information from the courts showing that he lacked any detailed knowledge about the murders he confessed. The Swedish legal system ended up granting him re-trials and ultimately acquitting him on all charges, even if the prosecutor and some of the people originally involved in his case still insists on his guilt.

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* A Swedish man named [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sture_Bergwall Sture Bergwall]] (or more famously in the media, Thomas Quick) once confessed to having committed over thirty murders while incarcerated att at Säter mental hospital. He would later on get convicted for eight of the murders solely on the basis of his own confessions while undergoing recovered-memory therapy. Many years later, he confessed having made it all up, partly because he did not want to leave the hospital, partly because he wanted to please his doctors and get their friendship by being an interesting patient and partly because he was "rewarded" with strong medications when he confessed. Journalists later found out that the prosecution, the police, Bergwall's doctors and even the original defense attorney had systematicly systematically withheld information from the courts showing that he lacked any detailed knowledge about the murders he confessed. The Swedish legal system ended up granting him re-trials and ultimately acquitting him on all charges, even if the prosecutor and some of the people originally involved in his case still insists on his guilt.
19th Jan '17 3:52:56 PM eroock
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* A mentally unstable grocery boy in ''Film/TheNakedCity'' confesses to have killed Jean Dexter but detective Muldoon convicts him of lying by asking details of the murder which the boy answers wrong.
15th Jan '17 2:21:40 PM gb00393
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* ''Series/GameOfThrones'':
** Ned Stark makes one to save his daughter Sansa.
** Tyrion subverts this twice by claiming he wishes to confess only to launch into a TheReasonYouSuckSpeech against his accusers.
11th Nov '16 8:02:42 PM Dimensio
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** Another episode has a man confess to stabbing the victim with a screwdriver, but Jessica quickly determines that the victim was already dead at the time, making the man guilty only of ''attempted'' murder. Later, however, she deduces that the confessor actually knew that the victim was already dead at the time [[spoiler: because he had strangled him earlier, and committed and confessed to the "stabbing" murder, knowing that a coroner would figure it out, to throw off suspicion]].
11th Nov '16 3:57:40 PM Dimensio
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* An early episode of ''Series/MurderSheWrote'' does this. A woman confesses to shooting her father before he feel overboard while at sea. Later, when his body washes ashore with two gunshot wounds to his chest she claims to have fabricated the story as part of a plan to help her father fake his death. The established time of death and the mismatch of the bullets in his body with her gun seems to support her claim, as does Jessica having met the man ''after'' he had been "lost" at sea. [[spoiler: In a twist, the daughter actually ''had'' murdered her father, and was hoping that her easily disproved false confession would create the impression that she was being framed and eliminate her as a suspect.]]
27th Oct '16 12:21:20 PM Chabal2
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* ''{{Series/House}}'' had a pillar-of-the-community PatientOfTheWeek who confessed a series of petty personal crimes to the well-wishers who' gathered, and accused himself of ever-worse activities, like sleeping with a teenager or murdering his business partner. The team learn the partner committed suicide and manage to show the wife that he's making a lot of it up (Chase casually mentions he can't find his spare shoes, and the guy confesses immediately). [[spoiler:It turns out that he ''did'' sleep with the teenager, though they don't tell her.]]
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