History Main / FallingBass

10th Jun '18 9:23:17 PM Prfnoff
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Added DiffLines:

* "Can't Take My Eyes Off Of You" by Frankie Valli carries the chromatic progression beyond its usual endpoint for the first strain, but holds the actual bassline on a pedal point.
10th Jun '18 9:16:43 PM Prfnoff
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* For chromatic sequences: [=I, V6, Ib7 or bVII, IV6, iv6, and I64 or V=] in major keys, substitute i for I and the last chord could also be [=III6=] in minor keys. In pop chord notation, in the key of C major, that would be [=C, G/B, C7/Bb; or Bb, F/A, Fm/Ab, C/G or G=]. You can see the bottom note going [=C-B-Bb-A-Ab-G=]; that's the essence of this trope. After hitting the fifth scale degree ("so"), other bass motion usually happens, but it's usually chromatic down to the "so". Back in the ''{{Baroque|Music}}'' era, the chromatic Falling Bass was often used to depict (and interpreted as depicting) suffering. But back then, and during the ClassicalEra and RomanticEra, another progression for this same bass line was popular, which involved a lot of {{diminished seventh}} chords.

to:

* For chromatic sequences: [=I, V6, Ib7 or bVII, IV6, iv6, and I64 or V=] in major keys, substitute i for I and the last chord could also be [=III6=] in minor keys.keys (where the iv6 may also be replaced with an [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Augmented_sixth_chord augmented sixth chord]]). In pop chord notation, in the key of C major, that would be [=C, G/B, C7/Bb; or Bb, F/A, Fm/Ab, C/G or G=]. You can see the bottom note going [=C-B-Bb-A-Ab-G=]; that's the essence of this trope. After hitting the fifth scale degree ("so"), other bass motion usually happens, but it's usually chromatic down to the "so". Back in the ''{{Baroque|Music}}'' era, the chromatic Falling Bass was often used to depict (and interpreted as depicting) suffering. But back then, and during the ClassicalEra and RomanticEra, another progression for this same bass line was popular, which involved a lot of {{diminished seventh}} chords.



** Beethoven's Variations on an Original Theme in C minor ([=WoO=] 80) makes even more obvious use of this. The theme breaks rhythm dramatically in the sixth bar (of eight) where the chromatically descending progression stops.

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** Beethoven's Variations on an Original Theme in C minor ([=WoO=] 80) makes even more obvious use of this. The theme breaks rhythm dramatically in the sixth bar (of eight) where after the chromatically descending progression stops.reaches G.
10th Jun '18 9:11:55 PM Prfnoff
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** Beethoven's Variations on an Original Theme in C minor ([=WoO=] 80) makes even more obvious use of the descending bass.

to:

** Beethoven's Variations on an Original Theme in C minor ([=WoO=] 80) makes even more obvious use of this. The theme breaks rhythm dramatically in the sixth bar (of eight) where the chromatically descending bass.progression stops.
22nd Apr '18 10:25:41 AM nombretomado
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This also [[IThoughtItMeant nothing]] to do with [[{{Dubstep}} "dropping the bass"]].

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This also [[IThoughtItMeant [[JustForFun/IThoughtItMeant nothing]] to do with [[{{Dubstep}} "dropping the bass"]].
16th Jan '18 6:37:16 PM Twentington
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* Chromatic variant in "Mr. Businessman" by Music/RayStevens. The first stanza of the song has a descending line of E-Emaj7/D♯-E7/D-A/C♯-Am/C-B7, played on a piano.

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* Chromatic variant in "Mr. Businessman" by Music/RayStevens. The first stanza of the song has a descending line of E-Emaj7/D♯-E7/D-A/C♯-Am/C-B7, E-[=Emaj7=]/D♯-E7/D-A/C♯-Am/C-B7, played on a piano.
16th Jan '18 6:36:35 PM Twentington
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Added DiffLines:

* Chromatic variant in "Mr. Businessman" by Music/RayStevens. The first stanza of the song has a descending line of E-Emaj7/D♯-E7/D-A/C♯-Am/C-B7, played on a piano.
27th Dec '17 6:58:50 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* For chromatic sequences: [=I, V6, Ib7 or bVII, IV6, iv6, and I64 or V=] in major keys, substitute i for I and the last chord could also be [=III6=] in minor keys. In pop chord notation, in the key of C major, that would be [=C, G/B, C7/Bb; or Bb, F/A, Fm/Ab, C/G or G=]. You can see the bottom note going [=C-B-Bb-A-Ab-G=]; that's the essence of this trope. After hitting the fifth scale degree ("so"), other bass motion usually happens, but it's usually chromatic down to the "so". Back in the ''VideoGame/{{Baroque}}'' era, the chromatic Falling Bass was often used to depict (and interpreted as depicting) suffering. But back then, and during the ClassicalEra and RomanticEra, another progression for this same bass line was popular, which involved a lot of {{diminished seventh}} chords.

to:

* For chromatic sequences: [=I, V6, Ib7 or bVII, IV6, iv6, and I64 or V=] in major keys, substitute i for I and the last chord could also be [=III6=] in minor keys. In pop chord notation, in the key of C major, that would be [=C, G/B, C7/Bb; or Bb, F/A, Fm/Ab, C/G or G=]. You can see the bottom note going [=C-B-Bb-A-Ab-G=]; that's the essence of this trope. After hitting the fifth scale degree ("so"), other bass motion usually happens, but it's usually chromatic down to the "so". Back in the ''VideoGame/{{Baroque}}'' ''{{Baroque|Music}}'' era, the chromatic Falling Bass was often used to depict (and interpreted as depicting) suffering. But back then, and during the ClassicalEra and RomanticEra, another progression for this same bass line was popular, which involved a lot of {{diminished seventh}} chords.
27th Dec '17 6:58:24 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* For chromatic sequences: [=I, V6, Ib7 or bVII, IV6, iv6, and I64 or V=] in major keys, substitute i for I and the last chord could also be [=III6=] in minor keys. In pop chord notation, in the key of C major, that would be [=C, G/B, C7/Bb; or Bb, F/A, Fm/Ab, C/G or G=]. You can see the bottom note going [=C-B-Bb-A-Ab-G=]; that's the essence of this trope. After hitting the fifth scale degree ("so"), other bass motion usually happens, but it's usually chromatic down to the "so". Back in the {{Baroque}} era, the chromatic Falling Bass was often used to depict (and interpreted as depicting) suffering. But back then, and during the ClassicalEra and RomanticEra, another progression for this same bass line was popular, which involved a lot of {{diminished seventh}} chords.

to:

* For chromatic sequences: [=I, V6, Ib7 or bVII, IV6, iv6, and I64 or V=] in major keys, substitute i for I and the last chord could also be [=III6=] in minor keys. In pop chord notation, in the key of C major, that would be [=C, G/B, C7/Bb; or Bb, F/A, Fm/Ab, C/G or G=]. You can see the bottom note going [=C-B-Bb-A-Ab-G=]; that's the essence of this trope. After hitting the fifth scale degree ("so"), other bass motion usually happens, but it's usually chromatic down to the "so". Back in the {{Baroque}} ''VideoGame/{{Baroque}}'' era, the chromatic Falling Bass was often used to depict (and interpreted as depicting) suffering. But back then, and during the ClassicalEra and RomanticEra, another progression for this same bass line was popular, which involved a lot of {{diminished seventh}} chords.
11th Jun '17 11:57:41 AM nombretomado
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* LudwigVanBeethoven's "Waldstein Sonata", at the very beginning of the first movement. In C major.

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* LudwigVanBeethoven's Music/LudwigVanBeethoven's "Waldstein Sonata", at the very beginning of the first movement. In C major.
19th May '17 9:31:39 PM nombretomado
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* ''SchoolhouseRock'': "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jeq5a8bBh8c Figure Eight]]", the middle major-key section. (Also an example of an A-B-A form song.) This goes down to scale degree two ("re"), giving us [=C, G/B, C7/Bb, F/A, Fm/Ab, C/G, F#hdim7 (F#m7b5), Bdim7/F, C/E, D#dim7 Dmin7 G7 C=].

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* ''SchoolhouseRock'': ''WesternAnimation/SchoolhouseRock'': "[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jeq5a8bBh8c Figure Eight]]", the middle major-key section. (Also an example of an A-B-A form song.) This goes down to scale degree two ("re"), giving us [=C, G/B, C7/Bb, F/A, Fm/Ab, C/G, F#hdim7 (F#m7b5), Bdim7/F, C/E, D#dim7 Dmin7 G7 C=].
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