History Main / FakeBalance

16th Jul '16 1:03:51 PM DoctorTItanX
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* '''Counterplay-based balance''': An item or character is ridiculously overpowered, but falls apart if you use a certain item, character or strategy, but this can be undone with another item/character/strategy, and so on and on until you end up with a multiplicity of layers of counterplay. The rationale here is that overpowered characters can be negated by skilled people capable of exploiting their weaknesses. This also has the side effect of creating {{Skill Gate Character}}s that are very strong against unskilled players, but weak against skilled players.

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* '''Counterplay-based balance''': An item or character is ridiculously overpowered, overpowering, but falls apart if you use a certain item, character or strategy, but this can be undone with another item/character/strategy, and so on and on until you end up with a multiplicity of layers of counterplay. The rationale here is that overpowered these powerful characters can be negated by skilled people capable of exploiting their weaknesses. This also has the side effect of creating {{Skill Gate Character}}s that are very strong against unskilled players, but weak against skilled players.



* An example of a failed attempt of balance by rarity can be found in ''MagicTheGathering''. When the game was first released, it was known that cards such as Black Lotus, Ancestral Recall, Timetwister and the Moxes were game-breakingly powerful if present in sufficient quantities. However, they believed that since most players would only buy a starter deck and a couple of boosters, their power would never become an issue. This is especially evident when you look at the initial deck construction rules: 40-card minimum for decks, and no maximum for any individual cards. The deck of nothing but Black Lotus/Channel/Fireball was 100% legal, and that's not even the most broken deck you could build. Constructed tournament later evolved to have a 60 card minimum limit and a maximum of 4 individual non-land cards, thus effectively removing the fake balance.

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* An example of a failed attempt of balance by rarity can be found in ''MagicTheGathering''. When the game was first released, it was known that cards such as Black Lotus, Ancestral Recall, Timetwister and the Moxes were game-breakingly powerful if present in sufficient quantities. However, they believed that since most players would only buy a starter deck and a couple of boosters, their power would never become an issue. This is especially evident when you look at the initial deck construction rules: 40-card minimum for decks, and no maximum for any individual cards. The deck of nothing but Black Lotus/Channel/Fireball was 100% legal, and that's not even the most broken powerful deck you could build. Constructed tournament later evolved to have a 60 card minimum limit and a maximum of 4 individual non-land cards, thus effectively removing the fake balance.



*** In ''Magic'' limited formats, there is the ''BREAD'' principle, which describe what card to draft - Bombs, Removal, Evasion, Advantage and Dregs. While Removal, Evasion, Advantage and Dregs cards are available in every rarity, Bombs are usually in the rare slot. A deck with a good amount of bomb and removal cards usually has a considerable upper hand. Whether a player obtained those cards by luck or by skills is something that is often discussed in [=MTG=] boards. Large amounts of removal can make up for a lack of bombs by ensuring you can always get rid of whatever overpowered creature is thrown out by your opponent. The bombiest of bombs tend to be cards which are immune to removal, either non-creatures which thus naturally evade anti-creature removal spells, creatures which are somehow immune to removal due to protection, shroud, regeneration, or similar effects, or bombs which act as removal themselves.

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*** In ''Magic'' limited formats, there is the ''BREAD'' principle, which describe what card to draft - Bombs, Removal, Evasion, Advantage and Dregs. While Removal, Evasion, Advantage and Dregs cards are available in every rarity, Bombs are usually in the rare slot. A deck with a good amount of bomb and removal cards usually has a considerable upper hand. Whether a player obtained those cards by luck or by skills is something that is often discussed in [=MTG=] boards. Large amounts of removal can make up for a lack of bombs by ensuring you can always get rid of whatever overpowered overpowering creature is thrown out by your opponent. The bombiest greatest of bombs tend to be cards which are immune to removal, either non-creatures which thus naturally evade anti-creature removal spells, creatures which are somehow immune to removal due to protection, shroud, regeneration, or similar effects, or bombs which act as removal themselves.



* ''VideoGame/{{Hearthstone}}'' isn't generally considered a "serious competitive" CCG, with the massive number of [[RandomNumberGod RNG]]-based effects making it clearly more of a "for fun" game, so people are generally more easy-going on its balance deficiencies. However, the developers have repeatedly shown that they have absolutely NO idea how to properly evaluate power when designing new cards. Probably the most infamous example came in the Grand Tournament expansion which featured two class 6-drop minions- the Paladin epic Mysterious Challenger and the Shaman legendary The Mistcaller. The former was something they thought might kind of interesting (a 6/6 minion which, when played, searches your deck for a copy of every Secret in it and puts it into play automatically), while they assumed the latter (a 4/4 which, when played, gives a permanent +1/+1 bonus to ''every minion still in your hand and deck'') would be an extremely powerful and desirable card. Shortly after the expansion launched, the playerbase rapidly deduced that Mysterious Challenger was ''nauseatingly broken beyond measure'' (since in a Paladin deck using every Secret available to them -which are individually weak but, pivotally, ''extremely powerful when used in combination-'' it effectively let you draw up to five cards and play them all for ''free,'' giving it an effective value of nearly ''twenty mana'' when you added its 6/6 body) and it became the centerpiece of the most overpowered deck in the game, while The Mistcaller was immediately derided as utterly worthless, so bad that merely playing it would effectively ''lose you the game immediately'' (since ''Hearthstone'' is incredibly tempo-based and playing a pathetic 4/4 which has NO immediate impact on the board on your 6th turn would put you so far behind that you were basically kneecapping yourself). The basic issue is that the developer seem incapable of grasping that THE most important aspects of a useful card are cost-effectiveness and tempo; ''everything'' else (especially the mythical "fun factor") is a secondary concern at ''best.'' Don't even ''ask'' about [[GameBreaker Dr. Boom]] aka. [[FanNickname "Dr. Balanced", "Dr. Broken", "Dr. 7-drop" etc etc]]...

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* ''VideoGame/{{Hearthstone}}'' isn't generally considered a "serious competitive" CCG, with the massive number of [[RandomNumberGod RNG]]-based effects making it clearly more of a "for fun" game, so people are generally more easy-going on its balance deficiencies. However, the developers have repeatedly shown that they have absolutely NO idea how to properly evaluate power when designing new cards. Probably the most infamous example came in the Grand Tournament expansion which featured two class 6-drop minions- the Paladin epic Mysterious Challenger and the Shaman legendary The Mistcaller. The former was something they thought might kind of interesting (a 6/6 minion which, when played, searches your deck for a copy of every Secret in it and puts it into play automatically), while they assumed the latter (a 4/4 which, when played, gives a permanent +1/+1 bonus to ''every minion still in your hand and deck'') would be an extremely powerful and desirable card. Shortly after the expansion launched, the playerbase rapidly deduced that Mysterious Challenger was ''nauseatingly broken beyond measure'' (since in a Paladin deck using every Secret available to them -which are individually weak but, pivotally, ''extremely powerful when used in combination-'' it effectively let you draw up to five cards and play them all for ''free,'' giving it an effective value of nearly ''twenty mana'' when you added its 6/6 body) and it became the centerpiece of the most overpowered powerful deck in the game, while The Mistcaller was immediately derided as utterly worthless, so bad that merely playing it would effectively ''lose you the game immediately'' (since ''Hearthstone'' is incredibly tempo-based and playing a pathetic 4/4 which has NO immediate impact on the board on your 6th turn would put you so far behind that you were basically kneecapping yourself). The basic issue is that the developer seem incapable of grasping that THE most important aspects of a useful card are cost-effectiveness and tempo; ''everything'' else (especially the mythical "fun factor") is a secondary concern at ''best.'' Don't even ''ask'' about [[GameBreaker Dr. Boom]] aka. [[FanNickname "Dr. Balanced", "Dr. Broken", "Dr. 7-drop" etc etc]]...



* ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' had LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards from the get go, resulting in exactly what would be expected - wizards being really tough to get up to a decent level, but if they survived (and in a party, they would survive, especially in later iterations like 3rd edition) they were just broken. This was not specific to wizards; all full casters tended to be broken because they had abilities which simply didn't care about how many hit points enemies had, and which enemies had no defenses against - indeed, some even worked against enemies immune to magic because they did not directly affect them, and such difficulties could often be circumvented anyway by simply focusing on buffing yourself to godlike capabilities. This was fixed in 4th edition by greatly restricting what magic users were capable of as well as expanding what other characters could do, resulting in complaints by players who completely missed the point - that if a character can do everything there's no need for an adventuring party, or other classes.
** 3.5 had this problem when they introduced a MagicKnight class, the hexblade, and overestimated the usefulness of being able to cast spells in armor (there were already low-level spells which acted as superior substitutes to armor). As a result, the hexblade couldn't cast ''or'' fight [[MasterOfNone very well]]. The designers basically admitted that they'd messed up, and their next attempt at the archetype (the duskblade) was much more balanced ([[CharacterTiers A low tier 3]] with tier 1 and 2 belonging to classes considered to have GameBreaker stats). The opposite problem was the full caster classes, all of which completely shattered the game - most could turn themselves into better melee combatants than the actual melee combatant classes, and even worse, oftentimes that was pointless anyway because they could do even STRONGER things. High level full casters make the game utterly unplayable because they simply cannot be threatened effectively by anything which does not use similar tactics. This criticism of the game was termed as [[RocketTagGameplay "rocket tag", as in, whoever hit with their rocket first won]].

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* ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' had LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards from the get go, resulting in exactly what would be expected - wizards being really tough to get up to a decent level, but if they survived (and in a party, they would survive, especially in later iterations like 3rd edition) they were just broken. This was not specific to wizards; all full casters tended to be broken because they had abilities which simply didn't care about how many hit points enemies had, and which enemies had no defenses against - indeed, some even worked against enemies immune to magic because they did not directly affect them, and such difficulties could often be circumvented anyway by simply focusing on buffing yourself to godlike capabilities. This was fixed in 4th edition by greatly restricting what magic users were capable of as well as expanding what other characters could do, resulting in complaints by players who completely missed the point - that if a character can do everything there's no need for an adventuring party, or other classes.
** 3.5 had this problem when they introduced a MagicKnight class, the hexblade, Hexblade, and overestimated the usefulness of being able to cast spells in armor (there were already low-level spells which acted as superior substitutes to armor). As a result, the hexblade couldn't cast ''or'' fight [[MasterOfNone very well]]. The designers basically admitted that they'd messed up, and their next attempt at the archetype (the duskblade) was much more balanced ([[CharacterTiers A low tier 3]] with tier 1 and 2 belonging to classes considered to have GameBreaker stats). The opposite problem was the full caster classes, all of which completely shattered the game - most could turn themselves into better melee combatants than the actual melee combatant classes, and even worse, oftentimes that was pointless anyway because they could do even STRONGER things. High level full casters make the game utterly unplayable because they simply cannot be threatened effectively by anything which does not use similar tactics. This criticism of the game was termed as [[RocketTagGameplay "rocket tag", as in, whoever hit with their rocket first won]].



* Despite being designed with an eye for better balance, 4th Edition D&D hasn't entirely avoided this. Initially, many players did not understand how to play controller characters properly, and there were a large number of what amounted to fake choices in the original power set for the wizard, the first controller class. Controllers do exactly that, control the battlefield and debuff enemies, but many players picked area damage spells instead, which were terrible because the Wizard is not a damage-dealing class (and never really was, though many players played them as such - and the fact that they seemed powerful even then says something about how broken the casters really were). [[strike:Bad]] Players used to the previous editions, where wizards were often played as ''damage-dealers'' rather than controllers, constantly [[strike:whined]] complained about wizards [[strike:being underpowered]] not being able to do what they ''used'' to be able to do in previous editions, while, ironically, they were actually one of the strongest classes, and acquired some game breaking abilities at higher levels which required errata. They later released the Sorcerer, who was a more conventional blaster-wizard designed to deal damage similar to the "throwing fireballs and lightning bolts" evoker that many players played previously.

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* Despite being designed with an eye for better balance, 4th Edition D&D hasn't entirely avoided this. Initially, many players did not understand how to play controller characters properly, and there were a large number of what amounted to fake choices in the original power set for the wizard, the first controller class. Controllers do exactly that, control the battlefield and debuff enemies, but many players picked area damage spells instead, which were terrible because the Wizard is not a damage-dealing class (and never really was, though many players played them as such - and the fact that they seemed powerful even then says something about how broken useful the casters really truly were). [[strike:Bad]] Players used to the previous editions, where wizards were often played as ''damage-dealers'' rather than controllers, constantly [[strike:whined]] complained about wizards [[strike:being underpowered]] not being able to do what they ''used'' to be able to do in previous editions, while, ironically, they were actually one of the strongest classes, and acquired some game breaking abilities at higher levels which required errata. They later released the Sorcerer, who was a more conventional blaster-wizard designed to deal damage similar to the "throwing fireballs and lightning bolts" evoker that many players played previously.



** Other balance items that look good on paper but really don't work: Weapons with a higher accuracy are much, much better than weapons that lose accuracy for special properties, due to the way the game math works at higher levels. Because most powers only have an effect if they connect, hitting is much important than some incidental rider ability on the strike, and yet weapons got balanced between those that had extra accuracy and those that didn't but had other effects. This is less of an issue for fighters, who have powers which make some of the less accurate weapons much stronger (hammers are amongst the best fighter weapons, despite their slightly lower accuracy, for this very reason), but for every other class...

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** Other balance items that look good on paper but really don't work: Weapons with a higher accuracy are much, much better than weapons that lose accuracy for special properties, due to the way the game math works at higher levels. Because most powers only have an effect if they connect, hitting is much more important than some incidental rider ability on the strike, and yet weapons got balanced between those that had extra accuracy and those that didn't but had other effects. This is less of an issue for fighters, who have powers which make some of the less accurate weapons much stronger (hammers are amongst the best fighter weapons, despite their slightly lower accuracy, for this very reason), but for every other class...



** For those non-players: Orbizards (or Orb Wizards) are Wizards that get a special ability as long as they wield an orb as an implement - as opposed to those who wield a staff, a wand and so on. These also get special abilities, but they weren't nearly as powerful. Orbizards could once per encounter debuff a monster's saving throw against an effect the wizard cast. To succeed on a saving throw, you have to get a 10 or higher on a d20 roll. Solo monsters get a +5 to saving throws, which means they can succeed on a 5 or higher. But the orbizard could - if he took the right items, skills and feats - debuff a monster's save by -17! So you cast "Sleep" or any spell that makes the monster unconscious and needs a save to be ended onto the enemy, couple that with your -17 to saves, and even the highest level monster in the game would need to roll a 22 to succeed. [[ImpossibleTask On a d20.]] This could trivialize entire encounters, and was WAY overpowered. They errataed it out, along with most other saving throw penalties which lasted longer than a round.

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** For those non-players: Orbizards (or Orb Wizards) are Wizards that get a special ability as long as they wield an orb as an implement - as opposed to those who wield a staff, a wand and so on. These also get special abilities, but they weren't nearly as powerful. Orbizards could once per encounter debuff a monster's saving throw against an effect the wizard cast. To succeed on a saving throw, you have to get a 10 or higher on a d20 roll. Solo monsters get a +5 to saving throws, which means they can succeed on a 5 or higher. But the orbizard could - if he took the right items, skills and feats - debuff a monster's save by -17! So you cast "Sleep" or any spell that makes the monster unconscious and needs a save to be ended onto the enemy, couple that with your -17 to saves, and even the highest level monster in the game would need to roll a 22 to succeed. [[ImpossibleTask On a d20.]] This could trivialize entire encounters, and was WAY overpowered.too powerful. They errataed it out, along with most other saving throw penalties which lasted longer than a round.



** Skill Underestimated: 5th edition Outflanking. Essentially, this allows you to deploy a unit by walking on from a board edge, usually allowing a brutal assault onto anything near that edge. Since you have a 2/3 shot of deploying along the side you want (1/3 of getting the flank you want, 1/3 of getting the flank you don't want, 1/3 of being able to choose which flank you want to deploy on), it's not exactly unreliable. What's more: any unit with the incredibly-common Scouts or Infiltrate special rules can use Outflank deployment. Cue the demise of any army with a CripplingOverspecialization in shooting. (So long as said army doesn't deploy vehicles en masse, which are far less vulnerable to close combat so long as they move at least 6" every turn.) Lash of Submission also deserves honorable mention, as [[WordOfGod Games Workshop themselves]] reportedly remarked how they didn't think anybody would use it in broken ways when they wrote and tested it.

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** Skill Underestimated: 5th edition Outflanking. Essentially, this allows you to deploy a unit by walking on from a board edge, usually allowing a brutal assault onto anything near that edge. Since you have a 2/3 shot of deploying along the side you want (1/3 of getting the flank you want, 1/3 of getting the flank you don't want, 1/3 of being able to choose which flank you want to deploy on), it's not exactly unreliable. What's more: any unit with the incredibly-common Scouts or Infiltrate special rules can use Outflank deployment. Cue the demise of any army with a CripplingOverspecialization in shooting. (So long as said army doesn't deploy vehicles en masse, which are far less vulnerable to close combat so long as they move at least 6" every turn.) Lash of Submission also deserves honorable mention, as [[WordOfGod Games Workshop themselves]] reportedly remarked how they didn't think anybody would use it in broken great ways when they wrote and tested it.



*** The MP-40 of ''World at War'' was widely considered an overpowered weapon, which a developer from Treyarch admitted and apologized for [[http://www.callofduty.com/board/viewtopic.php?f=70&t=237415&p=2753427&sid=45183683136faca8daa3631da2e5a017#p2753427 here]]. The imbalance was on account of the weapon being balanced mathematically so that its direct time to kill a player, if all the bullets hit, was made equal to the killing speed of the other sub-machine guns within their respective effective ranges. Problem was, seemingly, the gun itself was not properly playtested and is why the MP-40 was able to slip into the released game so overpowered.

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*** The MP-40 of ''World at War'' was widely considered an overpowered a deadly weapon, which a developer from Treyarch admitted and apologized for [[http://www.callofduty.com/board/viewtopic.php?f=70&t=237415&p=2753427&sid=45183683136faca8daa3631da2e5a017#p2753427 here]]. The imbalance was on account of the weapon being balanced mathematically so that its direct time to kill a player, if all the bullets hit, was made equal to the killing speed of the other sub-machine guns within their respective effective ranges. Problem was, seemingly, the gun itself was not properly playtested and is why the MP-40 was able to slip into the released game so overpowered.overpowering.



** In reality, the net effect of this is that the map that is being played on heavily influences the balance of the game; on maps with excellent sniping opportunities, such as Aztec, the AWP and the automatic sniper rifles are hilariously overpowered and it is not uncommon to see literally everyone on a winning team wielding them, particularly when they're playing on the defensive. On maps which are close in, where the limited field of view is more of a problem, constant movement is necessary, or flanking is really easy, the AWP and other sniper rifles are strong but balanced weapons which leave you vulnerable in many cases and cost two rounds' worth of money to buy. This is also a somewhat annoying case of where getting better at the game makes the problem worse - most poor to mid-level players do not use smoke grenades and flashbangs very well, and consequently as their opponents with [=AWPs=] get better at aiming, [=AWPs=] become increasingly more "broken". Extremely high-skilled players may be very likely to hit with the AWP, but high-skilled players are also more likely to use flashbangs and smoke grenades properly, which makes [=AWPing=] less useful as your field of view is much more likely to get ruined.

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** In reality, the net effect of this is that the map that is being played on heavily influences the balance of the game; on maps with excellent sniping opportunities, such as Aztec, the AWP and the automatic sniper rifles are hilariously overpowered effective and it is not uncommon to see literally everyone on a winning team wielding them, particularly when they're playing on the defensive. On maps which are close in, where the limited field of view is more of a problem, constant movement is necessary, or flanking is really easy, the AWP and other sniper rifles are strong but balanced weapons which leave you vulnerable in many cases and cost two rounds' worth of money to buy. This is also a somewhat annoying case of where getting better at the game makes the problem worse - most poor to mid-level players do not use smoke grenades and flashbangs very well, and consequently as their opponents with [=AWPs=] get better at aiming, [=AWPs=] become increasingly more "broken". Extremely high-skilled players may be very likely to hit with the AWP, but high-skilled players are also more likely to use flashbangs and smoke grenades properly, which makes [=AWPing=] less useful as your field of view is much more likely to get ruined.



** The whole type chart in the first ''Pokémon'' trilogy suffered from fake balance. The designers greatly underrated the Psychic type; not only were both its counters broken (Bug had no strong moves, the only offensive Ghost-type move worth using was horribly weak) and a programming error made Psychics ''immune'' to Ghost instead of the opposite, but it was strong against Poison, a type the designers had spread around the Pokéworld like it was going out of style (especially among Grass, Bugs and Ghosts, where only the former type gets any noticeable amount of mons that ''aren't'' dual-typed as Poison). The apparent balance between "physical" and "special" types was an illusion; physical Attack and Defense were separate stats, but the Special stat governed both offense and defense, making strong Specialists automatically tanks. Needless to say, Psychic is one of the special types. Meanwhile, the Dragon type basically failed to ''exist'' offensively -- its only move was Dragon Rage, which always does 40 damage. The second generation addressed these flaws, and each succeeding generation has fine-tuned the system further.
** Note that there is a slight balance in Special and Physical in the first generation. Special still did not give you protection against Physical. And the Physical side happens to have the Normal type. In the first generation, it was typing that had 1 resistor (Rock) and 1 immunity (Ghost), but nothing weak to it. Defensively, it is immune to the underdeveloped Ghost Type, and weak to Fighting Type. The catch is, in Gen I, the resistor in question is weak (or, in the case of Omastar and Kabutops, at least neutrally-affected) to the ever-common Water, and those that are immune are extremely fragile and weak to the ever-common Ground, and Fighting types are taken down without question by Psychic-types and the fact that good Fighting-type moves are are ridiculously rare. In return, Normal has the crit-fest Slash, the extremely powerful Hyper Beam (with no recharge if it defeats the other mon), and Body Slam, which has the power, wide distribution, and chance to paralyze to make it an extremely game changing move. There is a reason why many Gen I competitive analysis for Normal type on Website/{{Smogon}} go around "This thing is good but is not [[ALoadOfBull Tauros]]" or "This thing is really good, but has no Water moves". Like Psychic type above, Normal types were severely nerfed in second gen onwards.

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** The whole type chart in the first ''Pokémon'' trilogy suffered from fake balance. The designers greatly underrated the Psychic type; not only were both its counters broken inconvenient (Bug had no strong moves, the only offensive Ghost-type move worth using was horribly weak) and a programming error made Psychics ''immune'' ''completely immune'' to Ghost instead of the opposite, but it was strong against Poison, a type the designers had spread around the Pokéworld like it was going out of style (especially among Grass, Bugs and Ghosts, where only the former type gets any noticeable amount of mons that ''aren't'' dual-typed as Poison). The apparent balance between "physical" and "special" types was an illusion; physical Attack and Defense were separate stats, but the Special stat governed both offense and defense, making strong Specialists automatically tanks. Needless to say, Psychic is one of the special types. Meanwhile, the Dragon type basically failed to ''exist'' offensively -- its only move was Dragon Rage, which always does 40 damage. The second generation addressed these flaws, and each succeeding generation has fine-tuned the system further.
** Note that there is a slight balance in Special and Physical in the first generation. Special still did not give you protection against Physical. And the Physical side happens to have the Normal type. In the first generation, it was typing that had 1 resistor (Rock) and 1 immunity (Ghost), but nothing weak to it. Defensively, it is immune to the underdeveloped Ghost Type, and weak to Fighting Type. The catch is, in Gen I, the resistor in question is weak (or, in the case of Omastar and Kabutops, at least neutrally-affected) to the ever-common Water, and those that are immune are extremely fragile and weak to the ever-common Ground, and Fighting types are taken down without question by Psychic-types and the fact that good Fighting-type moves are are ridiculously rare. In return, Normal has the crit-fest Slash, the extremely powerful Hyper Beam (with no recharge if it defeats the other mon), Pokemon), and Body Slam, which has the power, wide distribution, and chance to paralyze to make it an extremely game changing move. There is a reason why many Gen I competitive analysis for Normal type on Website/{{Smogon}} go around "This thing is good but is not [[ALoadOfBull Tauros]]" or "This thing is really good, but has no Water moves". Like Psychic type above, Normal types were severely nerfed in second gen onwards.



** Regigigas falls under "Skill Overestimated". It has extremely high stats in nearly every category, but is hindered by its "Slow Start" ability, which halves its attack and speed until it stays in battle for five straight turns. Unfortunately, five turns is more than enough time for your opponent to take advantage of, and switching out resets the timer, so once Regigigas is sent out in battle you have to keep it there, which takes away a big part of battle strategy. To make matters worse, to try and make it even more "balanced", it is the only Pokémon who can learn [=TMs=] that is unable to learn Protect or Rest, two moves that could normally help it try and stall for time. In the end, the game designers went way too far in trying to balance Regigigas's power, and it ended up becoming useless instead.
** Gen VI brought certain Mega Evolutions and abilities which indirectly gave a power boost to moves with priority, which falls under "Skill Underestimated". Mega Lucario can use powerful Bullet Punches. Talonflame has priority Brave Birds (an attack 3 times stronger than the typical priority move). Azumarill has now one of the best typings in the game and can use Aqua Jet with a hefty Attack Power. Mega Kangaskhan and Mega Mawile can OHKO the vast majority of attackers with Sucker Punch. Mega Pinsir can use it's ability to boost quick attacks to insanely high powe levels. Pokemon who would be viable sweepers now suffer if they don't carry any type of priority attack.

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** Regigigas falls under "Skill Overestimated". It has extremely high stats in nearly every category, but is hindered by its "Slow Start" ability, which halves its attack and speed until it stays in battle for five straight turns. Unfortunately, Unfortunately for the trainer, five turns is more than enough time for your opponent to take advantage of, and switching out resets the timer, so once Regigigas is sent out in battle you have to keep it there, which takes away a big part of battle strategy. To make matters worse, to try and make it even more "balanced", it is the only Pokémon who can learn [=TMs=] that is unable to learn Protect or Rest, two moves that could normally help it try and stall for time. In the end, the game designers went way too far in trying to balance Regigigas's power, and it ended up becoming useless instead.
** Gen VI brought certain Mega Evolutions and abilities which indirectly gave a power boost to moves with priority, which falls under "Skill Underestimated". Mega Lucario can use particularly powerful Bullet Punches. Talonflame has priority Brave Birds (an attack 3 times stronger than the typical priority move). Azumarill has now one of the best typings in the game and can use Aqua Jet with a hefty Attack Power. Mega Kangaskhan and Mega Mawile can OHKO the vast majority of attackers with Sucker Punch. Mega Pinsir can use it's its ability to boost quick attacks Quick Attacks to insanely high powe power levels. Pokemon who would be viable sweepers now suffer if they don't carry any type of priority attack.



** Aliens are ridiculously overpowered. They only have to spend points to create units once (assuming the Queen never needs to fight), and their unit cap is incredibly large (As expected from a race of zerg rushers). The fact that every unit only costs one supply only allows then to get even more numbers.

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** Aliens are ridiculously overpowered.powerful. They only have to spend points to create units once (assuming the Queen never needs to fight), and their unit cap is incredibly large (As expected from a race of zerg rushers). The fact that every unit only costs one supply only allows then to get even more numbers.



** The Spathi Eluder manages to achieve this in ''both directions''. Against the A.I., the Spathi is massively overpowered; the A.I. stupidly chases a fleeing player around, and the Spathi shoots homing missiles from behind, so many A.I. controlled ships can be easily decimated by the Spathi. Against humans who know better than to blindly chase around the other ship, however, the Spathi's rear-facing missile is pretty much useless because of its slow speed.

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** The Spathi Eluder manages to achieve this in ''both directions''. Against the A.I., the Spathi is massively overpowered; overpowering; the A.I. stupidly chases a fleeing player around, and the Spathi shoots homing missiles from behind, so many A.I. controlled ships can be easily decimated by the Spathi. Against humans who know better than to blindly chase around the other ship, however, the Spathi's rear-facing missile is pretty much useless because of its slow speed.
16th Jul '16 1:03:51 PM DoctorTItanX
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26th Jun '16 7:17:08 PM Kadorhal
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** Subverted in the Remake, though. Chris now handles weapons much better (he shoots faster and has a far higher chance of a [[OneHitKill headshot]], which saves ammo), and has a flash grenade for a secondary weapon which explodes heads. That durability also comes into much better effect as the enemies do hit harder (or Jill got that much weaker). The Grenade Launcher has been considerably nerfed (unless you count the infinite ammo glitch for it), and the immolation mechanic to keep zombies from respawning as more dangerous Crimson Heads takes away Jill's two other item slots anyway (Chris can do it with just his lighter).
* ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil2'' flipped the genders, with Claire being near ''useless'' compared to Leon. Leon gets a ''vastly'' superior load-out: A magnum, shotgun, and even his starting handgun is better (and all can be upgraded), and takes far less damage. Claire can pick locks, but there are only three locks in the entire game that can be opened this way (two in the police station and one in the sewers on the B scenario), and although she gets the superior grenade launcher and the LethalJokeWeapon Spark Shot, she is still outclassed in pretty much every aspect. At least it's justified, with Leon being a prodigy cop and Claire simply being a university student, but despite this most players pick Claire for the first playthrough anyway simply because [[WrongGenreSavvy they remember the last game]]. In fact, so many fans insist on playing Claire's story first that [[AscendedFanon the official canon events of the game are Claire A Leon B]].

to:

** Subverted in the Remake, though. Chris now handles weapons much better (he shoots faster and has a far higher chance of a [[OneHitKill headshot]], which saves ammo), and has a flash grenade for a secondary weapon which explodes heads. That durability also comes into much better effect as the enemies do hit harder (or Jill got that much weaker). The Grenade Launcher has been considerably nerfed (unless you count the infinite ammo glitch for it), and the immolation mechanic to keep zombies from respawning as more dangerous Crimson Heads takes away Jill's two other item slots anyway (Chris can do it with just his lighter).
lighter, which doesn't take up a slot).
* ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil2'' flipped the genders, with Claire being near ''useless'' compared to Leon. Leon gets a ''vastly'' superior load-out: A magnum, shotgun, and even his starting handgun is better than Claire's, and he also gets access to a magnum and a shotgun (and all three can be upgraded), and takes far less damage. Claire can pick locks, but there are only three locks in the entire game that can be opened this way (two in the police station and one in the sewers on the B scenario), and although she gets the superior grenade launcher and the LethalJokeWeapon Spark Shot, she is still outclassed in pretty much every aspect. At least it's justified, with Leon being a prodigy cop and Claire simply being a university student, but despite this most players pick Claire for the first playthrough anyway simply because [[WrongGenreSavvy they remember the last game]]. In fact, so many fans insist on playing Claire's story first that [[AscendedFanon the official canon events of the game are Claire A Leon B]].



* In ''VideoGame/ToejamAndEarl'' [=ToeJam=] is slightly faster, and Earl has slightly more HP. Earl's extra hit points aren't worth much (especially after gaining a few ranks) when [=ToeJam=] could have avoided being hit entirely. Later stages only exacerbate the difference. Certain enemies are faster than Earl, meaning if he's caught in an open area, he's pretty much guaranteed to lose a life, while [=ToeJam=] could escape with only a few hits.

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* In ''VideoGame/ToejamAndEarl'' ''VideoGame/ToejamAndEarl'', [=ToeJam=] is slightly faster, and Earl has slightly more HP. Earl's extra hit points aren't worth much (especially after gaining a few ranks) ranks), when [=ToeJam=] could have avoided can avoid being hit entirely.entirely much easier. Later stages only exacerbate the difference. Certain enemies are faster than Earl, meaning if he's caught in an open area, he's pretty much guaranteed to lose a life, while [=ToeJam=] could escape with only a few hits.
22nd Jun '16 5:07:49 PM Beacon80
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* In ''VideoGame/ToejamAndEarl'' [=ToeJam=] is slightly faster, and Earl has slightly more HP. Earl's extra hit points aren't worth much (especially after gaining a few ranks) when [=ToeJam=] could have avoided being hit entirely. Later stages only exacerbate the difference. Certain enemies are faster than Earl, meaning if he's caught in an open area, he's pretty much guaranteed to lose a life, while [=ToeJam=] could escape with only a few hits.
13th Jun '16 8:38:32 AM VampireBuddha
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* ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquerRenegade'' was balanced in that GDI and Nod each had an approximately equal chance of winning a given match. Other than that, you had infantry which were only worth a damn fighting other infantry, matches that devolved into neverending reverse tug-of-war tank battles due to the repair mechanics, HitScan snipers who could kill with 1-3 bodyshots, and so on. To avoid taking up the entire page with how this game failed to achieve balance, I'll leave it at that.

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* ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquerRenegade'' was balanced in that GDI and Nod each had an approximately equal chance of winning a given match. Other than that, you had infantry which were only worth a damn fighting other infantry, matches that devolved into neverending reverse tug-of-war tank battles due to the repair mechanics, HitScan {{hitscan}} snipers who could kill with 1-3 bodyshots, and so on. To avoid taking up the entire page with how this game failed to achieve balance, I'll leave it at that.
7th Jun '16 3:05:43 AM ArcaneAzmadi
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* ''VideoGame/{{Hearthstone}}'' isn't generally considered a "serious competitive" CCG, with the massive number of [[RandomNumberGod RNG]]-based effects making it clearly more of a "for fun" game, so people are generally more easy-going on its balance deficiencies. However, the developers have repeatedly shown that they have absolutely NO idea how to properly evaluate power when designing new cards. Probably the most infamous example came in the Grand Tournament expansion which featured two class 6-drop minions- the Paladin epic Mysterious Challenger and the Shaman legendary The Mistcaller. The former was something they thought might kind of interesting (a 6/6 minion which, when played, searches your deck for a copy of every Secret in it and puts it into play automatically), while they assumed the latter (a 4/4 which, when played, gives a permanent +1/+1 bonus to ''every minion still in your hand and deck'') would be an extremely powerful and desirable card. Shortly after the expansion launched, the playerbase rapidly deduced that Mysterious Challenger was ''nauseatingly broken beyond measure'' (since in a Paladin deck using every Secret available to them -which are individually weak but, pivotally, ''extremely powerful when used in combination-'' it effectively let you draw up to five cards and play them all for ''free,'' giving it an effective value of nearly ''twenty mana'' when you added its 6/6 body) and it became the centerpiece of the most overpowered deck in the game, while The Mistcaller was immediately derided as utterly worthless, so bad that merely playing it would effectively ''lose you the game immediately'' (since ''Hearthstone'' is incredibly tempo-based and playing a pathetic 4/4 which has NO immediate impact on the board on your 6th turn would put you so far behind that you were basically kneecapping yourself). Don't even ''ask'' about [[GameBreaker Dr. Boom]] aka. [[FanNickname "Dr. Balanced", "Dr. Broken", "Dr. 7-drop" etc etc]]...

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Hearthstone}}'' isn't generally considered a "serious competitive" CCG, with the massive number of [[RandomNumberGod RNG]]-based effects making it clearly more of a "for fun" game, so people are generally more easy-going on its balance deficiencies. However, the developers have repeatedly shown that they have absolutely NO idea how to properly evaluate power when designing new cards. Probably the most infamous example came in the Grand Tournament expansion which featured two class 6-drop minions- the Paladin epic Mysterious Challenger and the Shaman legendary The Mistcaller. The former was something they thought might kind of interesting (a 6/6 minion which, when played, searches your deck for a copy of every Secret in it and puts it into play automatically), while they assumed the latter (a 4/4 which, when played, gives a permanent +1/+1 bonus to ''every minion still in your hand and deck'') would be an extremely powerful and desirable card. Shortly after the expansion launched, the playerbase rapidly deduced that Mysterious Challenger was ''nauseatingly broken beyond measure'' (since in a Paladin deck using every Secret available to them -which are individually weak but, pivotally, ''extremely powerful when used in combination-'' it effectively let you draw up to five cards and play them all for ''free,'' giving it an effective value of nearly ''twenty mana'' when you added its 6/6 body) and it became the centerpiece of the most overpowered deck in the game, while The Mistcaller was immediately derided as utterly worthless, so bad that merely playing it would effectively ''lose you the game immediately'' (since ''Hearthstone'' is incredibly tempo-based and playing a pathetic 4/4 which has NO immediate impact on the board on your 6th turn would put you so far behind that you were basically kneecapping yourself). The basic issue is that the developer seem incapable of grasping that THE most important aspects of a useful card are cost-effectiveness and tempo; ''everything'' else (especially the mythical "fun factor") is a secondary concern at ''best.'' Don't even ''ask'' about [[GameBreaker Dr. Boom]] aka. [[FanNickname "Dr. Balanced", "Dr. Broken", "Dr. 7-drop" etc etc]]...
7th Jun '16 3:01:28 AM ArcaneAzmadi
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Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/{{Hearthstone}}'' isn't generally considered a "serious competitive" CCG, with the massive number of [[RandomNumberGod RNG]]-based effects making it clearly more of a "for fun" game, so people are generally more easy-going on its balance deficiencies. However, the developers have repeatedly shown that they have absolutely NO idea how to properly evaluate power when designing new cards. Probably the most infamous example came in the Grand Tournament expansion which featured two class 6-drop minions- the Paladin epic Mysterious Challenger and the Shaman legendary The Mistcaller. The former was something they thought might kind of interesting (a 6/6 minion which, when played, searches your deck for a copy of every Secret in it and puts it into play automatically), while they assumed the latter (a 4/4 which, when played, gives a permanent +1/+1 bonus to ''every minion still in your hand and deck'') would be an extremely powerful and desirable card. Shortly after the expansion launched, the playerbase rapidly deduced that Mysterious Challenger was ''nauseatingly broken beyond measure'' (since in a Paladin deck using every Secret available to them -which are individually weak but, pivotally, ''extremely powerful when used in combination-'' it effectively let you draw up to five cards and play them all for ''free,'' giving it an effective value of nearly ''twenty mana'' when you added its 6/6 body) and it became the centerpiece of the most overpowered deck in the game, while The Mistcaller was immediately derided as utterly worthless, so bad that merely playing it would effectively ''lose you the game immediately'' (since ''Hearthstone'' is incredibly tempo-based and playing a pathetic 4/4 which has NO immediate impact on the board on your 6th turn would put you so far behind that you were basically kneecapping yourself). Don't even ''ask'' about [[GameBreaker Dr. Boom]] aka. [[FanNickname "Dr. Balanced", "Dr. Broken", "Dr. 7-drop" etc etc]]...
25th May '16 8:48:49 PM Kadorhal
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** Subverted in the Remake, though. Chris now handles weapons much better (He shoots faster and has a far higher chance of a [[OneHitKill headshot]], which saves ammo), and has a flash grenade for a secondary weapon which explodes heads. That durability also comes into much better effect as the enemies do hit harder (or Jill got that much weaker). The Grenade Launcher has been considerably nerfed (unless you count the infinite ammo glitch for it), and the immolation mechanic takes away Jill's two other item slots anyway.
* ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil2'' flipped the genders, with Claire being near ''useless'' compared to Leon. Leon gets a ''vastly'' superior load-out: A magnum, shotgun, and even his starting handgun is better (and all can be upgraded), and takes far less damage. Claire can pick locks, but there are only three locks in the entire game that can be opened this way (two in the police station and one in the sewers on the B scenario), and although she gets the superior grenade launcher and the LethalJokeWeapon Spark Shot, she is still outclassed in pretty much every aspect. At least it's justified, with Leon being a prodigy cop and Claire simply being a university student, but despite this most players pick Claire anyway simply because [[WrongGenreSavvy they remember the last game]]. In fact, so many fans insist on playing Claire's story first that the [[AscendedFanon official canon events of the game are Claire A Leon B]].

to:

** Subverted in the Remake, though. Chris now handles weapons much better (He (he shoots faster and has a far higher chance of a [[OneHitKill headshot]], which saves ammo), and has a flash grenade for a secondary weapon which explodes heads. That durability also comes into much better effect as the enemies do hit harder (or Jill got that much weaker). The Grenade Launcher has been considerably nerfed (unless you count the infinite ammo glitch for it), and the immolation mechanic to keep zombies from respawning as more dangerous Crimson Heads takes away Jill's two other item slots anyway.
anyway (Chris can do it with just his lighter).
* ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil2'' flipped the genders, with Claire being near ''useless'' compared to Leon. Leon gets a ''vastly'' superior load-out: A magnum, shotgun, and even his starting handgun is better (and all can be upgraded), and takes far less damage. Claire can pick locks, but there are only three locks in the entire game that can be opened this way (two in the police station and one in the sewers on the B scenario), and although she gets the superior grenade launcher and the LethalJokeWeapon Spark Shot, she is still outclassed in pretty much every aspect. At least it's justified, with Leon being a prodigy cop and Claire simply being a university student, but despite this most players pick Claire for the first playthrough anyway simply because [[WrongGenreSavvy they remember the last game]]. In fact, so many fans insist on playing Claire's story first that the [[AscendedFanon the official canon events of the game are Claire A Leon B]].
21st May '16 11:21:59 AM Kadorhal
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*** The Medic's Bonesaw and Pyro's Fire Axe are in the uniquely awful position of being obsoleted by direct upgrades (the Solemn Vow and Third Degree, respectively). However, the Solemn Vow has since been nerfed and the Third Degree is only a minor upgrade to the Fire Axe.

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*** The Medic's Bonesaw and Pyro's Fire Axe are in the uniquely awful position of being obsoleted by direct upgrades (the Solemn Vow and Third Degree, respectively). which respectively let you see enemy health and damage whoever your target is healing or being healed by). However, the Solemn Vow has since been nerfed (given a slightly slower swing-speed with the Gun Mettle update) and the Third Degree is only a minor upgrade to the Fire Axe.



* In the same vein as the page quote, ''VideoGame/CallOfJuarezTheCartel'' has this in regards to its three player characters' special abilities. All three characters have one type of weapon they specialize in and can use far better than the other two can, but each of those types consists of exactly two weapons. Ben also gets secondary bonuses for shotguns, which are very useful in the close-quarters of the early gang-fighting, and the pistols and revolvers, which make up a good 70% of the game's arsenal. Kim likewise gets a secondary bonus for the assault rifles and two-handed [=SMGs=], the only other weapon type with more than three guns in it. Eddie just gets the ability to use one-handed [=SMGs=] in the place of pistols - an ability that is largely A) useless, due to them having no advantages over the pistols save a slightly-higher capacity (which some of the best pistols match) and full-auto fire rate (which, again, every handgun save for the higher-powered revolvers match in semi-auto), and B) redundant, due to a ''very'' easy to activate glitch that lets the other two characters use an SMG as a pistol as well.

to:

* In the same vein as the page quote, ''VideoGame/CallOfJuarezTheCartel'' has this in regards to its three player characters' special abilities. All three characters have one type of weapon they specialize in and can use far better than the other two can, but each of those types consists of exactly two weapons. Ben also gets secondary bonuses for shotguns, which are very useful in the close-quarters of the early gang-fighting, and the pistols and revolvers, which make up a good 70% of the game's arsenal.arsenal and can be [[GunsAkimbo paired up]]. Kim likewise gets a secondary bonus for the assault rifles and two-handed [=SMGs=], the only other weapon type with more than three guns in it. Eddie just gets the ability to use one-handed [=SMGs=] in the place of pistols - an ability that is largely A) useless, due to them having no advantages over the pistols save a slightly-higher capacity (which some of the best pistols match) and full-auto fire rate (which, again, every handgun save for the higher-powered revolvers match in semi-auto), and B) redundant, due to a ''very'' easy to activate glitch that lets the other two characters use an SMG as a pistol as well.



* ''PuzzlePirates'' implemented possibly the most bizarre piece of "balancing" in the history of computer games. Apparently players used [[strike:obvious and ubiquitous strategy of armed convoys for transport]] unfair "double floating" exploit all the time, so it was fixed. Enter the GiantSpaceFleaFromNowhere to catch all giant fleas from nowhere: [[http://yppedia.puzzlepirates.com/Monkey_boat monkey boat]]. It also broke [=PvP=] since these wonder monkeys shoved a ship aside every time its opponent has as much as ''one pineapple'' on board (see the link). Of course.

to:

* ''PuzzlePirates'' implemented possibly the most bizarre piece of "balancing" in the history of computer games. Apparently players used an [[strike:obvious and ubiquitous strategy of armed convoys for transport]] unfair "double floating" exploit all the time, so it was fixed. Enter the GiantSpaceFleaFromNowhere to catch all giant fleas from nowhere: [[http://yppedia.puzzlepirates.com/Monkey_boat monkey boat]]. It also broke [=PvP=] since these wonder monkeys shoved a ship aside every time its opponent has as much as ''one pineapple'' on board (see the link). Of course.



** The whole type chart in the first ''Pokémon'' trilogy suffered from fake balance. The designers greatly underrated the Psychic type; not only were both its counters broken (Bug had no strong moves, the only offensive Ghost-type move worth using was horribly weak) and a programming error made Psychics ''immune'' to Ghost instead of the opposite, but it was strong against Poison, a type the designers had spread around the Pokéworld like it was going out of style (especially among Grass, Bugs and Ghosts). The apparent balance between "physical" and "special" types was an illusion; physical Attack and Defense were separate stats, but the Special stat governed both offense and defense, making strong Specialists automatically tanks. Needless to say, Psychic is one of the special types. Meanwhile, the Dragon type basically failed to ''exist'' offensively -- its only move was Dragon Rage, which always does 40 damage. The second generation addressed these flaws, and each succeeding generation has fine-tuned the system further.

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** The whole type chart in the first ''Pokémon'' trilogy suffered from fake balance. The designers greatly underrated the Psychic type; not only were both its counters broken (Bug had no strong moves, the only offensive Ghost-type move worth using was horribly weak) and a programming error made Psychics ''immune'' to Ghost instead of the opposite, but it was strong against Poison, a type the designers had spread around the Pokéworld like it was going out of style (especially among Grass, Bugs and Ghosts).Ghosts, where only the former type gets any noticeable amount of mons that ''aren't'' dual-typed as Poison). The apparent balance between "physical" and "special" types was an illusion; physical Attack and Defense were separate stats, but the Special stat governed both offense and defense, making strong Specialists automatically tanks. Needless to say, Psychic is one of the special types. Meanwhile, the Dragon type basically failed to ''exist'' offensively -- its only move was Dragon Rage, which always does 40 damage. The second generation addressed these flaws, and each succeeding generation has fine-tuned the system further.
11th May '16 2:17:38 PM Octorok103
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* ''VideoGame/{{Warframe}}'' features a few examples, but none so extreme as the Tonkor. At release, the Tonkor was advertised as a weapon designed for grenade-jumping, a la the Demoman from ''VideoGame/TeamFortress2''; previous explosive weapons had been tempered by the potential for users to kill themselves via splash damage, but in order to facilitate this unique mechanic, the developers capped the Tonkor's self-damage at a fixed 50 points (low enough to be negligible most of the time). In exchange, it came with low ammo reserves and a tiny magazine, even among its fellow launchers, and a relatively low reload speed punished missed shots; compared to its direct competitor, the Penta, it also suffered a small penalty to base damage and lost the ability to manually detonate its grenades. Unfortunately, the developers made two fatal miscalculations: the negligible self-damage made the weapon much safer in close quarters, which are vastly over-represented in the game's tilesets, and it featured very high crit stats, which let it deal 5.5 times its normal damage seven shots out of eight if properly modded. The end result? A devastating crowd-clearer with little-to-no skill required for use.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.FakeBalance