History Main / FakeBalance

2nd May '16 10:55:08 PM jormis29
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** EmptyLevels are a problem in basically every edition (except 4th, which gives everyone the same advancement for everything). LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards was in effect even in 1st Edition, where Fighters gained nothing from leveling besides incremental bonuses. One common common designer fix in the 3.5 era was to give the character utility class features whenever it seemed like they wouldn't get anything from their core abilities. In theory, this meant that the character would always have something to look forward to. In practice, this left some classes laden with disparate and near-useless class features that were so minor and situational that they frequently forgot them. The Monk was the worst offender by far; sure, you get something every level, but when that something is a once-per-day fourth-level spell or a once-per-''week'' OneHitKill attack that [[UselessUsefulSpell usually misses,]] why bother? (Exemplified by one {{Narm}}-tastic [[http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=dnd/cwc/20061013a article]] on the Wizards of the Coast website, which claimed that "[[BlatantLies players always have something to look forward to with the Monk]]." On the other end of the power scale, the Sorcerer and Cleric get nothing for leveling up but advancement of their spells and familiar (for Sorcerer) and domains and TurnUndead (for Cleric). Since TurnUndead was [[GuideDangIt needlessly complex]], familiars were liabilities, and many domains didn't advance by levels, players would simply jump into a PrestigeClass that advanced casting and lose basically jack in the process. Some even used alternate class features that swapped out their familiar or Turn Undead, giving them literally no reason to ''not'' take a PrestigeClass. ''{{Tabletop/Pathfinder}}'' did its level best to rectify this by nerfing spellcasting some, cutting down on full-casting prestige classes, buffing many formerly-useless abilities, and redesigning many classes so their abilities ''always'' advanced by level. Sadly, as the problem is built into the game, it didn't work, though it did boost the power of the weaker classes... though they were still useless compared to casters.

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** EmptyLevels are a problem in basically every edition (except 4th, which gives everyone the same advancement for everything). LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards was in effect even in 1st Edition, where Fighters gained nothing from leveling besides incremental bonuses. One common common designer fix in the 3.5 era was to give the character utility class features whenever it seemed like they wouldn't get anything from their core abilities. In theory, this meant that the character would always have something to look forward to. In practice, this left some classes laden with disparate and near-useless class features that were so minor and situational that they frequently forgot them. The Monk was the worst offender by far; sure, you get something every level, but when that something is a once-per-day fourth-level spell or a once-per-''week'' OneHitKill attack that [[UselessUsefulSpell usually misses,]] why bother? (Exemplified by one {{Narm}}-tastic [[http://www.wizards.com/default.asp?x=dnd/cwc/20061013a article]] on the Wizards of the Coast website, which claimed that "[[BlatantLies players always have something to look forward to with the Monk]]." On the other end of the power scale, the Sorcerer and Cleric get nothing for leveling up but advancement of their spells and familiar (for Sorcerer) and domains and TurnUndead (for Cleric). Since TurnUndead was [[GuideDangIt needlessly complex]], familiars were liabilities, and many domains didn't advance by levels, players would simply jump into a PrestigeClass that advanced casting and lose basically jack in the process. Some even used alternate class features that swapped out their familiar or Turn Undead, giving them literally no reason to ''not'' take a PrestigeClass. ''{{Tabletop/Pathfinder}}'' ''TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}}'' did its level best to rectify this by nerfing spellcasting some, cutting down on full-casting prestige classes, buffing many formerly-useless abilities, and redesigning many classes so their abilities ''always'' advanced by level. Sadly, as the problem is built into the game, it didn't work, though it did boost the power of the weaker classes... though they were still useless compared to casters.
19th Apr '16 2:07:46 PM DaNuke
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** The jungler role entered a state of almost complete flux after season 4 finished. Pre-season 5 rolled in with a complete update of the Summoner's Rift, including, of course, the jungle monsters. The update initially introduced two little crabs that are rather hard to kill but deal no damage and give line of sight of the river when you kill them. Then the Smite summoner spell was split into ''five'': the base spell that just hurts CPU-controlled units, White Smite for plundering the enemy jungle, Red and Blue Smite for slowing and hurting enemy champions, and Purple Smite for extra fast jungle clearing. And every time you Smite a jungle monster, you gain a special buff depending on the one you smote. The result was a ''much'' greater protagonism for the jungler, who could now be as decisive as the mid-laner or the ADC on early and mid-game regarding the team's entire performance. As of early season 5, fighter-tanky junglers are now back in vogue, thanks to a jungler item enchantment that grants 25% extra health instead of just a fixed number.

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** The jungler role entered a state of almost complete flux after season 4 finished. Pre-season 5 rolled in with a complete update of the Summoner's Rift, including, of course, the jungle monsters. The update initially introduced two little crabs that are rather hard to kill but deal no damage and give line of sight of the river when you kill them. The Dragon, instead of just giving its killer a big gold bonus, now gave a permanent, team-wide buff depending on how much Dragon kills your team had, peaking at a massive temporary buff after killing the Dragon five times. Baron Nashor was likewise reworked to grant a team buff that grants a shorter recall and causes any minions near a buffed champion to gain a lot of health, toughness and damage. Season 6 then introduced a Rift Herald that is basically a mini-Baron Nashor that grants a similar bonus to the individual champions who killed it. Then the Smite summoner spell was split into ''five'': three (initially ''five'', but two were axed): the base spell that just hurts CPU-controlled units, the now defunct White Smite for plundering the enemy jungle, Red and Blue Smite for hurting and slowing and hurting enemy champions, and the now defunct Purple Smite for extra fast jungle clearing. clearing, plus a jungler item introduced on season 6 that doesn't change your Smite but gives you instead refillable sight wards. And every time you Smite a jungle monster, you gain a special buff depending on the one you smote.smote, such as being able to see enemy wards if you smite the Razorbeak. The result was a ''much'' greater protagonism for the jungler, who could now be as decisive as the mid-laner or the ADC on early and mid-game regarding the team's entire performance. As of early season 5, Season 5 started out with fighter-tanky junglers are now back in vogue, vogue thanks to a jungler item enchantment that grants 25% extra health instead of just a fixed number.number, then moved on to mage junglers gaining an upper hand with an enchantment that granted a lot of ability power.
23rd Mar '16 12:24:10 PM Chadius
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** The final power in a sets tried to be a SuperMode, but they were usually a PowerUpLetDown. Some required you die first and simply revived you ("balanced" by hurting enemies nearby you.) Some gave you incredible resistances for a few minutes, ending with a massive crash (players noted the duration and the crash lasted too long to make them reliable.)
** Later in the game's lifespan, Willpower was added, addressing many problems with other sets. It seemed to take the best ideas from Invulnerability and Regeneration, granting heroes decent resistance with a generous HealingFactor without any weaknesses. In theory a Willpower hero could be quickly defeated in an opening salvo, but like Regeneration this rarely happened. Even the SuperMode was "balanced" with a smaller defensive boost, short duration and minor crash, which is exactly what the player base had been asking for! Unsurprisingly Willpower became a fan favorite in short order.
23rd Mar '16 12:15:57 PM Chadius
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[[folder:Massively Multiplayer Role Playing Game]]
* The ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' expansion "Wrath of the Lich King" did this accidentally. Due to combination of a number of issues healers found that they could quickly grow to the point where they would never run out of mana to cast spells. This allowed non stop casting (ie spamming) the strongest and quickest heals in the game, which were suppose to be balanced by their higher mana cost. With the infinite and powerful heals available the only way to challenge a raid of 10 or 25 men was by creating bosses that could kill your tank in seconds and raid encounters that made every single raid member take damage no mater what they did just to give the raid healers something to do. This in turn led to Paladins (with the ability to cast one strong fast heal non stop) being the only class capable of healing the primary tank and changed all the raid healers to using one or two type of heals that they cast on every raid member as quickly as possible. Meanwhile Player vs Player combat was all about burst damage, at the peak players could die in one to two GCD (minimum length of time between abilities). If that wasn't bad enough the easier AOE tanking combined with a faster progression of gear quality then originally intended led to all non-raid encounters being a tank running headlong into packs of 10 or 20 monsters at a time, keeping them all distracted and allowing the damage dealers to use their one best area effect spell to do damage on all foes. The Cataclysm expansion has changed all of this. There is now limited mana for healers, who have to use every one of their healing spells. Wars have been fought deciding whether the easy AOE fest or (currently) insanely difficult heroics are preferable.
** In classic, [=PvP=] had a rule of thumb that casters would beat warriors (Whose armour didn't help with resistance and could easily be kited), warriors would beat rogues (Who could shrug off their fast attacks with their armour and attack their low defenses), and rogues would beat casters (by shredding through their nonexistent armour). The problem was that warriors could easily close the gap caused by kiting and could DPS just as bad as rogues if they were specced for [=PvP=] - since all intellect did was give casters more mana and didn't increase the damage their spells did. This meant that casters tended to be a [=PvE=] class for the most part, and paladins became more effective healers in [=PvP=] because they could take hits and throw immunity buffs. There was also no collision detection, casters had to ''see'' their targets (as in, the ''character'' has to see them) and hold still - melee attackers could attack while moving.
* ''PuzzlePirates'' implemented possibly the most bizarre piece of "balancing" in the history of computer games. Apparently players used [[strike:obvious and ubiquitous strategy of armed convoys for transport]] unfair "double floating" exploit all the time, so it was fixed. Enter the GiantSpaceFleaFromNowhere to catch all giant fleas from nowhere: [[http://yppedia.puzzlepirates.com/Monkey_boat monkey boat]]. It also broke [=PvP=] since these wonder monkeys shoved a ship aside every time its opponent has as much as ''one pineapple'' on board (see the link). Of course.
* While ''LaTale'' tries to avert from this with its [=PvP=], it fails often usually because the creators ''just dont care''.At first, gunslingers were just your ''fragile speedsters'' the use of super puzzles quickly made them able to outdo pretty much every class except Guardians. but since every class can do this if the have the time and money to do so, its really a case of ''everybody's cheap''
* ''VideoGame/CityOfHeroes'' had a lot of trouble balancing melee defense sets. Invulnerability and Regeneration are prime examples of Unbalanced Skillset and Unfair/Situational Advantages.
** Invulnerability offers superior protection against the most common damage types, smashing and lethal while offering no protection against psionic damage. The thing is, the number of psionic foes at launch could be counted on one hand. So there was no problem, just quickly squish the one foe in the StandardPsychicStance and continue snoring through mobs. This was "balanced" by weakening all of the resistance powers in the set. But that made the passive resistance powers worthless, so min/maxers simply ignored them. To "balance" the NoSell power Tough Skin, they added a defense penalty to one of Invulnerability's core powers that Tough Skin perfectly negates. So for 18 - 19 levels Invulnerability users were actually MORE likely to get hit than SquishyWizard blasters!
** Regeneration applies a massive HealingFactor with little defense, so it's a GoodThingYouCanHeal. The regeneration was so easy to maximize at launch foes had less than a second to take out heroes before they completely recovered. The developers struggled with nerfing the redundant regeneration and self-healing powers in the set without rendering them useless, to the point where players joked that every update included a nerf to Regen, just for good measure. The final power in the set served as a PowerUpLetDown, because it reduced your health to 25% max with great resistances and defenses, but [[ViolationOfCommonSense shut off your regeneration]], making you even more vulnerable than blasters.
[[/folder]]



* The ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' expansion "Wrath of the Lich King" did this accidentally. Due to combination of a number of issues healers found that they could quickly grow to the point where they would never run out of mana to cast spells. This allowed non stop casting (ie spamming) the strongest and quickest heals in the game, which were suppose to be balanced by their higher mana cost. With the infinite and powerful heals available the only way to challenge a raid of 10 or 25 men was by creating bosses that could kill your tank in seconds and raid encounters that made every single raid member take damage no mater what they did just to give the raid healers something to do. This in turn led to Paladins (with the ability to cast one strong fast heal non stop) being the only class capable of healing the primary tank and changed all the raid healers to using one or two type of heals that they cast on every raid member as quickly as possible. Meanwhile Player vs Player combat was all about burst damage, at the peak players could die in one to two GCD (minimum length of time between abilities). If that wasn't bad enough the easier AOE tanking combined with a faster progression of gear quality then originally intended led to all non-raid encounters being a tank running headlong into packs of 10 or 20 monsters at a time, keeping them all distracted and allowing the damage dealers to use their one best area effect spell to do damage on all foes. The Cataclysm expansion has changed all of this. There is now limited mana for healers, who have to use every one of their healing spells. Wars have been fought deciding whether the easy AOE fest or (currently) insanely difficult heroics are preferable.
** In classic, [=PvP=] had a rule of thumb that casters would beat warriors (Whose armour didn't help with resistance and could easily be kited), warriors would beat rogues (Who could shrug off their fast attacks with their armour and attack their low defenses), and rogues would beat casters (by shredding through their nonexistent armour). The problem was that warriors could easily close the gap caused by kiting and could DPS just as bad as rogues if they were specced for [=PvP=] - since all intellect did was give casters more mana and didn't increase the damage their spells did. This meant that casters tended to be a [=PvE=] class for the most part, and paladins became more effective healers in [=PvP=] because they could take hits and throw immunity buffs. There was also no collision detection, casters had to ''see'' their targets (as in, the ''character'' has to see them) and hold still - melee attackers could attack while moving.
* ''PuzzlePirates'' implemented possibly the most bizarre piece of "balancing" in the history of computer games. Apparently players used [[strike:obvious and ubiquitous strategy of armed convoys for transport]] unfair "double floating" exploit all the time, so it was fixed. Enter the GiantSpaceFleaFromNowhere to catch all giant fleas from nowhere: [[http://yppedia.puzzlepirates.com/Monkey_boat monkey boat]]. It also broke [=PvP=] since these wonder monkeys shoved a ship aside every time its opponent has as much as ''one pineapple'' on board (see the link). Of course.
* While ''LaTale'' tries to avert from this with its [=PvP=], it fails often usually because the creators ''just dont care''.At first, gunslingers were just your ''fragile speedsters'' the use of super puzzles quickly made them able to outdo pretty much every class except Guardians. but since every class can do this if the have the time and money to do so, its really a case of ''everybody's cheap''
23rd Feb '16 4:07:58 PM TheOneWhoTropes
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Consider also that skill levels of players vary, and simply adding an example because you feel it is “cheap” is missing the point, not to mention a great way to start an EditWar. For the types of players likely to do this, see {{Scrub}}, {{Munchkin}}, ComplacentGamingSyndrome, and StopHavingFunGuys. May be caused by a PowerCreep. [[IThoughtItMeant Not to be confused with]] [[FoxNewsLiberal fake balance]] in news coverage.

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Consider also that skill levels of players vary, and simply adding an example because you feel it is “cheap” is missing the point, not to mention a great way to start an EditWar.Administrivia/EditWar. For the types of players likely to do this, see {{Scrub}}, {{Munchkin}}, ComplacentGamingSyndrome, and StopHavingFunGuys. May be caused by a PowerCreep. [[IThoughtItMeant Not to be confused with]] [[FoxNewsLiberal fake balance]] in news coverage.
21st Feb '16 2:40:36 PM ReyKenobi
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Added DiffLines:

** In classic, [=PvP=] had a rule of thumb that casters would beat warriors (Whose armour didn't help with resistance and could easily be kited), warriors would beat rogues (Who could shrug off their fast attacks with their armour and attack their low defenses), and rogues would beat casters (by shredding through their nonexistent armour). The problem was that warriors could easily close the gap caused by kiting and could DPS just as bad as rogues if they were specced for [=PvP=] - since all intellect did was give casters more mana and didn't increase the damage their spells did. This meant that casters tended to be a [=PvE=] class for the most part, and paladins became more effective healers in [=PvP=] because they could take hits and throw immunity buffs. There was also no collision detection, casters had to ''see'' their targets (as in, the ''character'' has to see them) and hold still - melee attackers could attack while moving.
11th Feb '16 7:40:51 AM Medinoc
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** 3.5 had this problem when they introduced a MagicKnight class, the hexblade, and overestimated the usefulness of being able to cast spells in armor (there were already low-level spells which acted as superior substitutes to armor). As a result, the hexblade couldn't cast ''or'' fight [[MasterOfNone very well]]. The designers basically admitted that they'd messed up, and their next attempt at the archetype (the duskblade) was much more balanced ([[CharacterTiers A low tier 3]] with tier 1 and 2 belonging to classes considered to have GameBreaker stats). The opposite problem was the full caster classes, all of which completely shattered the game - most could turn themselves into better melee combatants than the actual melee combatant classes, and even worse, oftentimes that was pointless anyway because they could do even STRONGER things. High level full casters make the game utterly unplayable because they simply cannot be threatened effectively by anything which does not use similar tactics. This criticism of the game was termed as "rocket tag", as in, whoever hit with their rocket first won.

to:

** 3.5 had this problem when they introduced a MagicKnight class, the hexblade, and overestimated the usefulness of being able to cast spells in armor (there were already low-level spells which acted as superior substitutes to armor). As a result, the hexblade couldn't cast ''or'' fight [[MasterOfNone very well]]. The designers basically admitted that they'd messed up, and their next attempt at the archetype (the duskblade) was much more balanced ([[CharacterTiers A low tier 3]] with tier 1 and 2 belonging to classes considered to have GameBreaker stats). The opposite problem was the full caster classes, all of which completely shattered the game - most could turn themselves into better melee combatants than the actual melee combatant classes, and even worse, oftentimes that was pointless anyway because they could do even STRONGER things. High level full casters make the game utterly unplayable because they simply cannot be threatened effectively by anything which does not use similar tactics. This criticism of the game was termed as [[RocketTagGameplay "rocket tag", as in, whoever hit with their rocket first won.won]].
1st Feb '16 4:37:17 AM mario0987
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** Ice-type Pokémon the most useless type in the series thanks to this. Most of the types they have an advantage to (Grass, Rock, Flying and Ground) have other, easier to find weaknesses available earlier than you will have access to Ice and Ice-type weaknesses (Fire, Fighting and Rock) are easy to find too. This means [[CripplingOverspecialisation the only advantage they had prior to Gen VI was been the only type that is strong against Dragon-types apart from Dragon itself.]] However, most Dragon Pokémon can learn a Fire move and most Water types can lean an Ice move too making this redundant. Then Fairy-Type in Gen VI gave every other type viewed as useless a reason to be used while making Ice even more useless.

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** Ice-type Pokémon are the most useless type in the series thanks to this. Most of the types they have an advantage to (Grass, Rock, Flying and Ground) have other, easier to find weaknesses available earlier than you will have access to Ice and Ice-type weaknesses (Fire, Fighting and Rock) are easy to find too. This means [[CripplingOverspecialisation the only advantage they had prior to Gen VI was been the only type that is strong against Dragon-types apart from Dragon itself.]] However, most Dragon Pokémon can learn a Fire move and most Water types can lean an Ice move too making this redundant. Then Fairy-Type in Gen VI gave every other type viewed as useless a reason to be used while making Ice even more useless.removing the only reason to use Ice.
1st Feb '16 4:35:16 AM mario0987
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*** However, there is still the consistent problem caused by an unbalance in what moves outside your type most Pokemon can use. Just taking the core "Grass->Water->Fire->Grass" triangle, it is unbalanced by the fact that nearly ''every'' Water-type Pokemon can learn Ice-type attacks against Grass-types, while few Fire types can learn moves effective against Water-types (this was somewhat fixed by letting many of them learn Solar Beam and/or Energy Ball) and even fewer Grass-types can learn Rock-type moves to take out Fire-types. In fact, Ice types are {{Glass Cannon}}s, as they have many weaknesses and are only resistant to themselves, while Ice attacks are super-effective against many types, but the abundance of non-Ice types which learn Ice-type moves simply leads to Ice-types being horribly underused and Ice-type moves being practically omnipresent.

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*** However, there is still the consistent problem caused by an unbalance in what moves outside your type most Pokemon can use. Just taking the core "Grass->Water->Fire->Grass" triangle, it is unbalanced by the fact that nearly ''every'' Water-type Pokemon can learn Ice-type attacks against Grass-types, while few Fire types can learn moves effective against Water-types (this was somewhat fixed by letting many of them learn Solar Beam and/or Energy Ball) and even fewer Grass-types can learn Rock-type moves to take out Fire-types. In fact, Ice types are {{Glass Cannon}}s, as they have many weaknesses and are only resistant to themselves, while Ice attacks are super-effective against many types, but the abundance of non-Ice types which learn Ice-type moves simply leads to Ice-types being horribly underused and Ice-type moves being practically omnipresent.


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** Ice-type Pokémon the most useless type in the series thanks to this. Most of the types they have an advantage to (Grass, Rock, Flying and Ground) have other, easier to find weaknesses available earlier than you will have access to Ice and Ice-type weaknesses (Fire, Fighting and Rock) are easy to find too. This means [[CripplingOverspecialisation the only advantage they had prior to Gen VI was been the only type that is strong against Dragon-types apart from Dragon itself.]] However, most Dragon Pokémon can learn a Fire move and most Water types can lean an Ice move too making this redundant. Then Fairy-Type in Gen VI gave every other type viewed as useless a reason to be used while making Ice even more useless.
17th Jan '16 4:12:47 PM nombretomado
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* The Thraddash in ''[[StarControl Star Control II]]''. This ship is designed to be a JokeCharacter: it has very few crew, and its weapon does a measly one damage. However, said weapon also has an unusually long range, and the ship is one of the fastest in the game when its afterburner is used. This allows a skilled Thraddash player to stay out of range from the other ship's guns while [[DeathOfAThousandCuts slowly wearing it down]]. Thraddash is the only ship which is routinely banned from competitive play, for this reason.

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* The Thraddash in ''[[StarControl Star Control II]]''.''VideoGame/StarControlII''. This ship is designed to be a JokeCharacter: it has very few crew, and its weapon does a measly one damage. However, said weapon also has an unusually long range, and the ship is one of the fastest in the game when its afterburner is used. This allows a skilled Thraddash player to stay out of range from the other ship's guns while [[DeathOfAThousandCuts slowly wearing it down]]. Thraddash is the only ship which is routinely banned from competitive play, for this reason.
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