History Main / FailureToSaveMurder

1st Apr '18 12:25:26 AM Tyoria
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** The villain Redcloak threatens to have a group of prisoners killed DeaderThanDead unless the paladin O-Chul coughs up some critical information -- information that O-Chul does not have, although Redcloak insists otherwise. O-Chul's "refusal" to talk infuriates Redcloak, who calls him a callous savage willing to let innocents die, but O-Chul rejects the attempt at guilt-tripping and says the blood will be on Redcloak's hands. Ultimately, [[spoiler:Redcloak spares the prisoners and later admits to a subordinate that the event convinced him O-Chul really didn't know anything. For their part, the prisoners also reject Redcloak's attempt at spin, and far from resenting O-Chul for "abandoning" them are instead deeply inspired by his resistance under pressure.]]
** The trope comes up again much later when Roy is tussling with another villain [[spoiler:(vampire Durkon)]], who tries to prey on Roy's feelings of guilt over the death of his younger brother as a child, pointing out that Roy had known his father could be careless and should have done something to prevent the tragedy. Roy tries to protest that he'd been just a child, but it's clear the attack is getting to him. [[spoiler:However, Durkon* overplays his hand by asking a needlessly gruesome question about the aftermath, which doesn't send Roy into the HeroicBSOD he'd been aiming for but instead convinces him the vampire wasn't Durkon at all.]]

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** The villain TheDragon Redcloak threatens to have a group of prisoners killed DeaderThanDead unless the paladin O-Chul coughs up some critical information -- information that O-Chul does not have, although Redcloak insists otherwise. O-Chul's "refusal" to talk infuriates Redcloak, who calls him a callous savage willing to let innocents die, but O-Chul flatly rejects the hypocritical attempt at guilt-tripping and says the blood will be on Redcloak's hands. Ultimately, [[spoiler:Redcloak spares the prisoners and later admits to a subordinate that the event convinced him O-Chul really didn't know anything. For their part, the prisoners also reject Redcloak's attempt at spin, and far from resenting O-Chul for "abandoning" them are instead deeply inspired by his resistance under pressure.]]
** The trope comes up again much later when Roy is tussling with another villain [[spoiler:(vampire Durkon)]], who tries to prey on Roy's feelings of guilt over the [[spoiler:the death of his younger brother as a child, child]], pointing out that Roy had known his father could be careless and should have done something to prevent the tragedy. Roy tries to protest that he'd been just a child, but it's clear the attack is getting to him. [[spoiler:However, Durkon* overplays his hand by asking a needlessly gruesome question about the aftermath, which doesn't send Roy into the HeroicBSOD he'd been aiming for but instead convinces him the vampire wasn't Durkon at all.]]
31st Mar '18 9:55:58 PM Tyoria
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* A variation occurs in ''Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick'', when the villain Redcloak threatens to have a group of prisoners killed DeaderThanDead unless the paladin O-Chul coughs up some critical information -- information that O-Chul does not have, although Redcloak insists otherwise. O-Chul's "refusal" to talk infuriates Redcloak, who calls him a callous savage willing to let innocents die, but O-Chul rejects the attempt at guilt-tripping and says the blood will be on Redcloak's hands. Ultimately, [[spoiler:Redcloak spares the prisoners and later admits to a subordinate that the event convinced him O-Chul really didn't know anything. For their part, the prisoners also reject Redcloak's attempt at spin, and far from resenting O-Chul for "abandoning" them are instead deeply inspired by his resistance under pressure.]]

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* A variation occurs in ''Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick'', when the ''Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick'':
** The
villain Redcloak threatens to have a group of prisoners killed DeaderThanDead unless the paladin O-Chul coughs up some critical information -- information that O-Chul does not have, although Redcloak insists otherwise. O-Chul's "refusal" to talk infuriates Redcloak, who calls him a callous savage willing to let innocents die, but O-Chul rejects the attempt at guilt-tripping and says the blood will be on Redcloak's hands. Ultimately, [[spoiler:Redcloak spares the prisoners and later admits to a subordinate that the event convinced him O-Chul really didn't know anything. For their part, the prisoners also reject Redcloak's attempt at spin, and far from resenting O-Chul for "abandoning" them are instead deeply inspired by his resistance under pressure.]]
** The trope comes up again much later when Roy is tussling with another villain [[spoiler:(vampire Durkon)]], who tries to prey on Roy's feelings of guilt over the death of his younger brother as a child, pointing out that Roy had known his father could be careless and should have done something to prevent the tragedy. Roy tries to protest that he'd been just a child, but it's clear the attack is getting to him. [[spoiler:However, Durkon* overplays his hand by asking a needlessly gruesome question about the aftermath, which doesn't send Roy into the HeroicBSOD he'd been aiming for but instead convinces him the vampire wasn't Durkon at all.
]]
31st Mar '18 9:40:56 PM Tyoria
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* A variation occurs in ''Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick'', when Redcloak in all seriousness holds O-Chul responsible for the deaths of several captives - when it is in fact Redcloak who is about to have them killed (or worse) unless O-Chul reveals a particular bit of info (which he actually doesn't know). Ironically, since to him it's clear that O-Chul would callously let everyone die just to protect his secret no matter what, he lets the captives live. He then attempts to demoralize the captives by telling those prisoners to spread the word that O-Chul was willing to let them die. [[spoiler: This backfires as the captives take inspiration from O-Chul's devotion and resistance.]] Consider also how many goblins and goblinoids Redcloak has already sacrificed for his cause (including [[spoiler: his own brother and his brother's entire family]]). He later admits to a hobgoblin subordinate that he suspected for a while that O-Chul really didn't know anything. O-Chul not being able to say anything even with innocent lives at stake confirmed it.

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* A variation occurs in ''Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick'', when the villain Redcloak in all seriousness holds O-Chul responsible for the deaths of several captives - when it is in fact Redcloak who is about threatens to have them a group of prisoners killed (or worse) DeaderThanDead unless the paladin O-Chul reveals a particular bit of info (which he actually doesn't know). Ironically, since to him it's clear coughs up some critical information -- information that O-Chul would callously let everyone die just does not have, although Redcloak insists otherwise. O-Chul's "refusal" to protect his secret no matter what, he lets the captives live. He then attempts to demoralize the captives by telling those prisoners to spread the word that O-Chul was talk infuriates Redcloak, who calls him a callous savage willing to let them die. [[spoiler: This backfires as innocents die, but O-Chul rejects the captives take inspiration from O-Chul's devotion attempt at guilt-tripping and resistance.]] Consider also how many goblins says the blood will be on Redcloak's hands. Ultimately, [[spoiler:Redcloak spares the prisoners and goblinoids Redcloak has already sacrificed for his cause (including [[spoiler: his own brother and his brother's entire family]]). He later admits to a hobgoblin subordinate that he suspected for a while that the event convinced him O-Chul really didn't know anything. For their part, the prisoners also reject Redcloak's attempt at spin, and far from resenting O-Chul not being able to say anything even with innocent lives at stake confirmed it.for "abandoning" them are instead deeply inspired by his resistance under pressure.]]
20th Dec '17 6:11:34 AM Erkhyan
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** In ''[[Literature/XWingSeries Wraith Squadron]]'', Myn Donos is introduced as the leader of a X-Wing squadron that flies into a trap, of which he is the only survivor. Not only does he blame himself for failing to save his squadmates, he also starts believing that said squadmates' families must hate him as the man who led their loved ones to their deaths. It takes a heavy-handed intervention from his ''current'' squadmates before he snaps out of it.
20th Dec '17 6:05:03 AM Erkhyan
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* At the climax of ''Literature/HandOfThrawn'', [[spoiler:Tierce]] accuses Pellaeon of letting Thrawn die. Of course, by then he's [[VillainousBreakdown not really making a lot of sense.]]
-->"He ran out of time. He died at Bilbringi. You let him die at Bilbringi."

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* ''Franchise/StarWarsLegends''
**
At the climax of ''Literature/HandOfThrawn'', [[spoiler:Tierce]] accuses Pellaeon of letting Thrawn die. Of course, by then he's [[VillainousBreakdown not really making a lot of sense.]]
-->"He --->"He ran out of time. He died at Bilbringi. You let him die at Bilbringi.""
** At the conclusion of the ''Literature/NewJediOrder'' ''Dark Tide'' duology, Corran Horn is made the fall guy for the destruction of Ithor's ecosystem.
** The ''Literature/FateOfTheJedi'' series begins with Luke Skywalker exiled from the Galactic Alliance for failing to prevent [[spoiler:his nephew Jacen]] from falling to the Dark Side [[spoiler:and consequently the Second Galactic Civil War.]]



* At the conclusion of the ''Literature/NewJediOrder'' ''Dark Tide'' duology, Corran Horn is made the fall guy for the destruction of Ithor's ecosystem.
* The ''Literature/FateOfTheJedi'' series begins with Luke Skywalker exiled from the Galactic Alliance for failing to prevent [[spoiler:his nephew Jacen]] from falling to the Dark Side [[spoiler:and consequently the Second Galactic Civil War.]]
8th Nov '17 11:33:36 AM salvadorfranz
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* This is how Rean Schwarzer feels in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfHeroesTrailsOfColdSteel II'' after [[spoiler:accidentally killing a guy who was wanting to commit SuicideByCop on him, by having someone best him in combat.]]
22nd Oct '17 4:48:37 PM Occidensill
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* Nero's motive in ''Film/StarTrek''. The Fool is Nero, The Hero is [[spoiler:Spock, and by proxy the Federation]], and The Child is [[spoiler:Romulus, with Nero's pregnant wife on it]].

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** Notably, he fails to put any blame on the actual cause of her death - the car crash - and as part of his character trait of preferring old school manual ways of doing things, continues to drive mostly by hand instead of autopilot. Even at the films release, it was known that human error is the primary cause of the large majority of car accidents and fatalities, which played a large role in the desire for increased automation of driving as it became technologically possible.
* Nero's motive in ''Film/StarTrek''. The Fool is Nero, The Hero is [[spoiler:Spock, Spock, and by proxy the Federation]], Federation, and The Child is [[spoiler:Romulus, Romulus, with Nero's pregnant wife on it]].it.



* The killer's motivation in the original ''Film/{{Friday the 13th|1980}}'' is that the camp counselors were too busy having sex to prevent a young boy from drowning. However, the character's madness has extended this to ''all'' camp counselors, even those working at Camp Crystal Lake many years later. Though to be perfectly fair, ALL the counselors at Camp Crystal Lake are AWFULLY interested in having sex...

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* The killer's motivation in the original ''Film/{{Friday the 13th|1980}}'' is that the camp counselors were too busy having sex to prevent a young boy from drowning. However, the character's madness has extended this to ''all'' camp counselors, even those working at Camp Crystal Lake many years later. Though to be perfectly fair, ALL the counselors at Camp Crystal Lake are AWFULLY interested in having sex...sex.



** Ditto [[spoiler:his first love Susan.]] Also [[spoiler:his mother, although to be fair he ''was'' mind controlled into killing her himself.]] This trope could easily have been named Roland of Gilead Syndrome.

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** Ditto [[spoiler:his first love Susan.]] Also [[spoiler:his mother, mother]], although to be fair he ''was'' mind controlled into killing her himself.]] himself. This trope could easily have been named Roland of Gilead Syndrome.
28th Sep '17 3:59:04 PM eroock
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-->--''VideoGame/MortalKombatX''

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-->--''VideoGame/MortalKombatX''
-->-- ''VideoGame/MortalKombatX''
7th Sep '17 10:51:56 AM Linda58
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* In ''Film/IRobot'', Spooner plays the Fool against a robot who saved his life instead of a child because he had a bigger chance of survival. This caused him to develop hatred against all robots, arguing that the child's life was worth more and should have been prioritized over his regardless of the odds.

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* In ''Film/IRobot'', Spooner plays the Fool against a robot who saved his life instead of a child because he had a bigger chance of survival. This caused him to develop hatred against all robots, arguing that the child's life was worth more and should have been prioritized over his regardless of the odds. He supports this by saying a human would know that and would have chosen to save the child, but a robot can't think that way.
7th Sep '17 10:50:34 AM Linda58
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* In ''Series/{{Arrow}}'' Season 2, Laurel initially blames the Hood (and as such the Arrow) for failing to save [[spoiler:Tommy]] from being killed in the Undertaking. Her father is able to get to realize that's unfair and unreasonable...which makes her realize that since he was there to save her, its ''her'' [[ItsAllMyFault fault]]. This is a viewpoint that she never truly seems to recover from, and helps cause her downward spiral.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.FailureToSaveMurder