History Main / FailSafeFailure

20th Nov '17 1:58:08 AM KingClark
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->''"Out of order?! ''[[PrecisionFStrike Fuck]]!'' Even in the future nothing works!"''

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->''"Out of order?! ''[[PrecisionFStrike Fuck]]!'' '''[[PrecisionFStrike Fuck]]!''' Even in the future future, nothing works!"''
15th Oct '17 7:39:41 PM kouta
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* Modern internal combustion engines with multi-gear transmissions have at least two failsafes to protect the engine, transmission and/or drivetrain from catastrophic overspeed failures. The first is a governer that automatically shuts off the fuel flow at or slightly above redline. The second is a set of interlocks in the transmission meant to prevent gear changes from placing the engine, transmission, and/or drivetrain into a state that will either severely damage or destroy any part of them. These are not new technologies. The former has been around since the 1940s (early gas turbines had them) and maybe even earlier. The latter was a standard feature of mid-80s Honda 5-speed manual transmissions (5th to reverse wasn't possible without stopping at neutral along the way). If both fail you probably just totaled your car.
12th Oct '17 8:00:30 PM DavidDelony
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* This is believed to have contributed to the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hinton_train_collision Hinton train collision]] in Canada in 1986. A CN freight train ran a red signal and collided head-on with a passenger train, killing 23 people, including the crew in the engine. While the lead locomotive was equipped with a "dead man's pedal," the subsequent investigation found that it was common practice for CN crew to keep the pedal depressed with a heavy object so they didn't need to keep their feet on it. The engineer was found to have a number of health problems that put him at high risk for a heart attack or stroke. It also didn't help that the crew was also suffering from a severe lack of sleep due to the shifting train schedules. One possible explanation is that the engineer was incapacitated and with the dead man's pedal depressed, the train kept running when it should have stopped. Ironically, the second engine had a newer reset safety control that didn't require engineers to keep their feet on the pedal, but it wasn't used because [[SkewedPriorities the cab wasn't as comfortable]]. After the accident, the railroad industry moved toward these safer controls.

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* This is believed to have contributed to the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hinton_train_collision Hinton train collision]] in Canada in 1986. A CN freight train ran a red signal and collided head-on with a passenger train, killing 23 people, including the crew in the engine. While the lead locomotive was equipped with a "dead man's pedal," the subsequent investigation found that it was common practice for CN crew to keep the pedal depressed with a heavy object so they didn't need to keep their feet on it. The engineer was found to have a number of health problems that put him at high risk for a heart attack or stroke. It also didn't help that the crew was also suffering from a severe lack of sleep due to the shifting train schedules. One possible explanation is that the engineer was incapacitated and with [[DeadFootLeadfoot the dead man's pedal depressed, the train kept running when it should have stopped.stopped]]. Ironically, the second engine had a newer reset safety control that didn't require engineers to keep their feet on the pedal, but it wasn't used because [[SkewedPriorities the cab wasn't as comfortable]]. After the accident, the railroad industry moved toward these safer controls.
12th Oct '17 7:55:51 PM DavidDelony
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to:

* This is believed to have contributed to the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hinton_train_collision Hinton train collision]] in Canada in 1986. A CN freight train ran a red signal and collided head-on with a passenger train, killing 23 people, including the crew in the engine. While the lead locomotive was equipped with a "dead man's pedal," the subsequent investigation found that it was common practice for CN crew to keep the pedal depressed with a heavy object so they didn't need to keep their feet on it. The engineer was found to have a number of health problems that put him at high risk for a heart attack or stroke. It also didn't help that the crew was also suffering from a severe lack of sleep due to the shifting train schedules. One possible explanation is that the engineer was incapacitated and with the dead man's pedal depressed, the train kept running when it should have stopped. Ironically, the second engine had a newer reset safety control that didn't require engineers to keep their feet on the pedal, but it wasn't used because [[SkewedPriorities the cab wasn't as comfortable]]. After the accident, the railroad industry moved toward these safer controls.
10th Jul '17 6:52:54 PM Fireblood
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* In ''Comicbook/{{Watchmen}}'', Dr Jon Osterman is trapped inside the Intrinsic Field test chamber by the door closing behind him when the automatic timer starts up the generators for that afternoon's experiment. As Dr Glass puts it, "I'm sorry, Osterman. The program's locked in and we can't over-ride the time lock. It's a safety feature."

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* In ''Comicbook/{{Watchmen}}'', Dr Dr. Jon Osterman is trapped inside the Intrinsic Field test chamber by the door closing behind him when the automatic timer starts up the generators for that afternoon's experiment. As Dr Dr. Glass puts it, "I'm sorry, Osterman. The program's locked in and we can't over-ride the time lock. It's It's... it's a safety feature."" His last words indicate how horribly aware he is that this trope has come into play.
10th Jul '17 6:42:57 PM Fireblood
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Added DiffLines:

** There is no way that the bridge life-support systems would fail on their own, as Geordi points out; there are seven independent interlocks to prevent it. Data is able to seize absolute control of the ship's computer, mainly by virtue of the fact that, having sophisticated speech capabilities, he can ''precisely'' mimic Picard's vocal patterns and fool the voice biometrics authentication that the computer uses. The fact that "Picard" is giving verbal orders to the ship's computer from the bridge when he is actually in main engineering (location supposedly being something that the computer tracks) does not hinder Data in any way. It could also have been avoided by just requiring more biometric controls than just Picard's voice (like scanning his eyes and face too). It's really unsettling too seeing how easily one android hijacks the entire ''Enterprise'', and none of the security holes this reveals are ever mentioned or shown to be fixed. (TNG: "Brothers")
27th Jun '17 1:07:15 AM morane
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* Probably the worst known roller coaster incident in history occurred on rhe Battersea Funfair Big Dipper on 30 May 1972. The lift chain malfunctioned, followed by the anti-rollback mechanism, and the train rolled back to the station and collided with the other train. Five children died and another 13 were injured. The park struggled on for another 16 months, before closing at the end of the 1974 season.

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* Probably the worst known roller coaster incident in history occurred on rhe the Battersea Funfair Big Dipper on 30 May 1972. The lift chain malfunctioned, followed by the anti-rollback mechanism, and the train rolled back to the station and collided with the other train. Five children died and another 13 were injured. The park struggled on for another 16 months, before closing at the end of the 1974 season.




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* [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automatic_activation_device Automatic activation devices]] are lifesaving devices in skydiving, and they are intended to automatically deploy the reserve parachute if the main has failed or is not opened and flying at certain altitude. They have saved hundreds of lives, but sometimes they can fail disastrously. As they register the air pressure changes and acceleration, they can sometimes fire unintentionally if the skydiver tries something daring at very low altitudes, resulting in both main and reserve canopies flying simultaneously. There are three possible [[ParachuteMalfunction malfunctions]]: ''biplane'', where the canopies are one above each other, ''side-by-side'' where the canopies are aside each other and ''downplane'' where they are ''vertically'' aside each other, creating no lift. Biplane and side-by-side are mere nasty nuisances, but the downplane malfunction is likely to be fatal unless the skydiver a) has enough altitude and b) manages to perform immediately main cutaway. And pray...
19th Jun '17 9:03:07 AM Macsen
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->''"Out of order?! ''Fuck!'' Even in the future nothing works!"''

to:

->''"Out of order?! ''Fuck!'' ''[[PrecisionFStrike Fuck]]!'' Even in the future nothing works!"''
16th Jun '17 1:26:31 PM nm3youtube
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* Class D cargo holds were designed to be airtight in order to starve cargo fires of oxygen, preventing them from bringing down a plane. However, in the case of [=ValuJet=] Flight 592, the fire was caused by [[NoOSHACompliance incorrectly declared, unsafely packaged oxygen generators]], resulting in a self-sustaining inferno that brought the DC-9 down within minutes, killing all 110 occupants. Class D holds were discontinued after the accident because the FAA realised how useless hoping a cargo fire would peter out was.
9th Jun '17 1:39:06 AM Medinoc
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* sudo (in POSIX style operating systems) and UAC (in Windows) is a failsafe, sort of, to make the user aware that whatever they're going to do may have an impact on the system. When used, most programs that try to do an action that will cause system changes will trigger this. Bypassing it, by either running as root or disabling UAC, will allow a program to do whatever it wants.

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* sudo (in POSIX style operating systems) and UAC (in Windows) is a failsafe, sort of, to make the user aware that whatever they're going to do may have an impact on the system. When used, most programs that try to do an action that will cause system changes will trigger this. Bypassing it, by either running as root or disabling UAC, UAC (or even [[https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/oldnewthing/20160816-00/?p=94105 leaving the latter at its default "recommended" setting]]), will allow a program to do whatever it wants.
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