History Main / FailSafeFailure

24th Mar '17 6:47:10 AM Trueman001
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* The Smiler roller coaster at Alton Towers​ suffered a bad incident (although not as bad as the Battersea incident) on 2 June 2015; the operator, following standard procedure, sent a test train around the track, but assumed that it had completed the circuit instead of checking that it had. He then sent a passenger train, and the ride safety systems detected the impending collision and shut down the ride -- and the operator assumed that this was a malfunction in the safety systems, and manually restarted the ride without doing any further checking, probably using a key he wasn't supposed to have.
21st Mar '17 6:58:23 AM Trueman001
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* Probably the worst known roller coaster incident in history occurred on rhe Battersea Funfair Big Dipper on 30 May 1972. The lift chain malfunctioned, followed by the anti-rollback mechanism, and the train rolled back to the station and collided with the other train. Five children died and another 13 were injured. The park struggled on for another 16 months, before closing at the end of the 1974 season.
20th Jan '17 9:32:57 AM KhymChanur
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* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RMS_Titanic The sinking]] of the ''Titanic'' on 15 April 1912 was so unexpected because of its novel failsafe design, with multiple watertight compartments that should have been able to keep it afloat even if one compartment was breached. The bulkheads that were supposed to seal off the compartments, while extending above the waterline, were not sealed at the top, meaning that they could still overflow and fill other compartments, something of a design flaw. And of course, the final failsafe on any ship--the lifeboats--failed to save most of the passengers, because there weren't enough of them. The ''Titanic'' had room to carry enough lifeboats, but it sailed with only one-third of its capacity. Contrary to urban legend, this wasn't due to the hubris of the designer and crew in believing it unsinkable. Carrying only a fraction of lifeboat capacity was standard practice at the time, based on assumptions about how slowly passenger ships sank--it was expected that help would arrive before the ship had to be completely evacuated and the lifeboats would simply ferry the passengers to the rescue vessels. The only ships that sailed with enough lifeboats for everybody were warships, which were expected to go down in conditions where they would sink ''fast''. There ''were'' regulations on the bare-minimum number of lifeboats to be carried, but they were based around the weight of the ship, not passenger capacity, and the number aboard ''Titanic'' as-built was already ''over'' that limit.

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* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RMS_Titanic [[UsefulNotes/RMSTitanic The sinking]] of the ''Titanic'' on 15 April 1912 was so unexpected because of its novel failsafe design, with multiple watertight compartments that should have been able to keep it afloat even if one compartment was breached. The bulkheads that were supposed to seal off the compartments, while extending above the waterline, were not sealed at the top, meaning that they could still overflow and fill other compartments, something of a design flaw. And of course, the final failsafe on any ship--the lifeboats--failed to save most of the passengers, because there weren't enough of them. The ''Titanic'' had room to carry enough lifeboats, but it sailed with only one-third of its capacity. Contrary to urban legend, this wasn't due to the hubris of the designer and crew in believing it unsinkable. Carrying only a fraction of lifeboat capacity was standard practice at the time, based on assumptions about how slowly passenger ships sank--it was expected that help would arrive before the ship had to be completely evacuated and the lifeboats would simply ferry the passengers to the rescue vessels. The only ships that sailed with enough lifeboats for everybody were warships, which were expected to go down in conditions where they would sink ''fast''. There ''were'' regulations on the bare-minimum number of lifeboats to be carried, but they were based around the weight of the ship, not passenger capacity, and the number aboard ''Titanic'' as-built was already ''over'' that limit.
10th Jan '17 4:18:59 PM BobTanaka
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* Referenced in the Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000 Episode [[Recap/MysteryScienceTheater3000S03E02Gamera Gamera]]:
-->'''Soldier:''' "The electrical shocks don't seem to bother Gamera at all!"
-->'''Servo:''' "Hm, and I was counting ''very heavily'' on them..."
8th Dec '16 12:12:05 AM upupandaway42
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* Combined with TheGuardsMustBeCrazy in the Series/{{Supergirl}} episode [[Recap/Supergirl2015S2E7TheDarkestPlace "The Darkest Place"]], where the Fortress of Solitude's secruity robot, Kelex, is fooled into thinking Hank Henshaw is [[{{Comicbook/{{Supergirl}} Kara]] by Hank dumping a vial of blood onto the Fortress' console, even though Kelex is looking right at Hank and should see that he isn't her.

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* Combined with TheGuardsMustBeCrazy in the Series/{{Supergirl}} episode [[Recap/Supergirl2015S2E7TheDarkestPlace "The Darkest Place"]], where the Fortress of Solitude's secruity robot, Kelex, is fooled into thinking Hank Henshaw is [[{{Comicbook/{{Supergirl}} [[Comicbook/{{Supergirl}} Kara]] by Hank dumping a vial of blood onto the Fortress' console, even though Kelex is looking right at Hank and should see that he isn't her.
8th Dec '16 12:10:10 AM upupandaway42
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* Combined with TheGuardsMustBeCrazy in the Series/{{Supergirl}} episode [[Recap/Supergirl2015S2E7TheDarkestPlace "The Darkest Place"]], where the Fortress of Solitude's secruity robot, Kelex, is fooled into thinking Hank Henshaw is [[{{Comicbook/{{Supergirl}} Kara]] by Hank dumping a vial of blood onto the Fortress' console, even though Kelex is looking right at Hank and should see that he isn't her.
4th Dec '16 5:17:37 PM Andyroid
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* Parodied in a ''WebAnimation/HomestarRunner'' cartoon. In a Strong Bad e-mail that parodies ''Franchise/StarTrek,'' Strong Bad activates "the forward humbuckers" to prevent his ship from colliding with a comet. A message comes up on a screen saying "the forward humbuckers have never worked."

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* Parodied in a ''WebAnimation/HomestarRunner'' cartoon. In a the WebAnimation/StrongBadEmail "cliffhangers". Strong Bad e-mail that parodies ''Franchise/StarTrek,'' Strong Bad activates Bad, in his sci-fi persona of Space Captainface, orders his trusty engineer "Strap" Coopmore (the Cheat) to activate "the forward humbuckers" to and prevent his their ship from colliding with a comet. A message comes up on The Cheat points to a screen saying "the sign reading "The forward humbuckers have never ''never'' worked."
21st Nov '16 7:27:22 PM psionycx
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* In ''Film/StarTrekBeyond'', the air processing system on starbase Yorktown has all kinds of elaborate safeguards to prevent anyone from tampering with it via the computer network. But a person can simply take an elevator to the roof of the building it's on and release a bio-weapon with ease even as people in the command center struggle to overcome those very security protocols to try to stop them.
14th Nov '16 8:01:52 AM Mr_White
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What's a failsafe? Well, the world is full of a lot of dangerous machinery and devices. Huge electrical turbines and nuclear reactors, Power lines carrying enough juice to light a whole city and pipelines carrying megatons of explosive petroleum or natural gas. Trains speeding down the tracks at 300 km/h, semi trucks that weigh in excess of 40 tons rolling down the freeways, aircraft that weigh more than ''400'' tons flying over our heads. And that's just the stuff that ''isn't'' designed to kill anyone. There's plenty of stockpiled bombs, missiles and such out there too. These could all cause some spectacular collateral damage if they suddenly went out of control.

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What's a failsafe? Well, the world is full of a lot of dangerous machinery and devices. Huge electrical turbines and nuclear reactors, Power lines carrying enough juice to light a whole city and pipelines carrying megatons millions of tons of explosive petroleum or natural gas. Trains speeding down the tracks at 300 km/h, semi trucks that weigh in excess of 40 tons rolling down the freeways, aircraft that weigh more than ''400'' tons flying over our heads. And that's just the stuff that ''isn't'' designed to kill anyone. There's plenty of stockpiled bombs, missiles and such out there too. These could all cause some spectacular collateral damage if they suddenly went out of control.
13th Aug '16 10:30:48 PM Kalaong
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* In ''{{Webcomic/Freefall}}'', [[http://freefall.purrsia.com/ff2300/fc02268.htm security does fail safe. Which means it's not dangerous. A flaw when you have intruders.]]

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* In ''{{Webcomic/Freefall}}'', ''{{Webcomic/Freefall}}'' [[http://freefall.purrsia.com/ff2300/fc02268.htm security does #2268]] is an aversion; the failsafe ''works'', but the user still complains.
-->Stupid computer! Security should not
fail safe. Which means it's not dangerous. A flaw when you have intruders.]]safe! Security should fail dangerous!
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