History Main / ExactWords

18th Sep '17 6:34:58 PM Sirmat
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** At any ending where someone escapes, the announcer comments that all doors other than the Number 9 Door have been unlocked. [[spoiler:This includes the door nigh-identical to the 9 Door that sits in the warehouse one floor down.]]
11th Sep '17 3:05:47 PM Shadoboy
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* In the legend of Tristan and Isolde, in order to discover if Isolde was having an afair with Tristan, she was forced into a ritual where she would swear and grab a hot iron, which would burn her if lying. She swore that the only men who had ever been between her legs were her husband and the peasant who carried her across the river, who tripped and accidentaly landed with his head between her legs. She was telling the truth and thus the iron didn't burn her. She just didn't mention that the peasant was Tristan in disguise.
5th Sep '17 10:47:34 AM kazokuhouou
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* In ''ComicStrip/{{Retail}}'', after Cooper's busted charging his electric car in the storeroom, he assures Marla that she won't ''see'' the car in there again. Marla's GenreSavvy enough to notice the suspicious phrasing, but elects to ignore it. He uses cleverly taped together boxes to hide the car.
27th Aug '17 12:26:06 AM TheCuza
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** At one point in ''Justice for All'', [[spoiler:Matt Engarde]] gets away with lying to Phoenix despite his Magatama which lets him physically see people keeping secrets from him using this method. Specifically, the client answers "No, I didn't kill anybody" when questioned. [[spoiler:While he didn't kill the victim, as he claimed, he did pay an assassin to do it.]] It's implied that this only worked because [[spoiler:the client was warped enough to consider there to be an honest, meaningful difference between the two, and so he didn't himself consciously hide anything from Phoenix. ]]

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** At one point in ''Justice for All'', [[spoiler:Matt Engarde]] gets away with lying to Phoenix despite his Magatama which lets him physically see people keeping secrets from him using this method. Specifically, the client answers "No, I didn't kill anybody" when questioned. [[spoiler:While he didn't kill the victim, as he claimed, he did pay an assassin to do it.]] It's implied that this only worked because [[spoiler:the client was warped enough to consider there to be an honest, meaningful difference between the two, and so he didn't himself consciously hide anything from Phoenix. ]]



** In the third game, Godot is introduced as yet another prosecutor Phoenix has to deal with who is said to have legendary skill and has never lost a case... or won, for that matter, because he's never prosecuted a case. [[spoiler:And this is actually two examples in one: he's never ''prosecuted'' a case before, because he used to be a defense attorney.]]

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** In the third game, Godot is introduced as yet another prosecutor Phoenix has to deal with who is said to have of legendary skill and who has never lost a case... or won, for that matter, because case. When the judge asks him how many cases he's prosecuted, he answers with zero.
--->'''Judge:''' But you said you've
never prosecuted a case. lost before.\\
'''Godot:''' ...Exactly. I've never lost. I've never won before either.
***
[[spoiler:And this is actually two examples in one: he's never ''prosecuted'' a case before, because he used to be a defense attorney.]]
17th Aug '17 6:22:43 AM Luigifan
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** Indestructible creatures can't be destroyed...but they can still be exiled (a stronger effect that pushes the card onto 'exile zone' outside the normal game), bounced back into the player's hand, and weakened with minus effects applied to toughness enough to die on their own. Hexproof creatures can't be targeted by spells or abilities an opponent controls... but their controller may be forced to sacrifice them, or an effect may be untargeted, affecting all creatures on the battlefield indiscrimiately.

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** Indestructible creatures permanents can't be destroyed...destroyed... but they can still be exiled (a stronger effect that pushes the card onto into the 'exile zone' zone', outside the normal game), game[[note]]it used to be called "removed from the game" until that term proved to be both too cumbersome and somewhat inaccurate[[/note]]), bounced back into the player's hand, and (in the case of creatures) weakened with minus effects applied to toughness enough to die on their own. Hexproof creatures can't be targeted by spells or abilities an opponent controls... but their controller may be forced to sacrifice them, or an effect may be untargeted, affecting all creatures on the battlefield indiscrimiately.



** Many rules depend on ''exactly'' how things are worded, and slight changes will completely ruin the effect of the card. One notorious example is "Substance", an ability whose only reason for existing was to cheat around the significant length of time between "''at'' end of turn" and "''until'' end of turn," and certain cards ''really needed'' the second one[[note]]The problem here was that these cards were creature enchantments that could be played at instant speed, but if you did, they were sacrificed at the end of the turn. The idea was that you could use them to "save" a creature that was about to die, at the cost of the permanent benefit of the enchantment. However, the timing difference was crucial: If the card is sacrificed "at end of turn," the creature hasn't had its damage removed yet, so the effect of saving the creature is rendered moot. The fix was to say, essentially, "This has Substance until end of turn; when it loses Substance, sacrifice this." "Until end of turn" effects resolve at the actual, literal end of the turn, and the creature has had its damage removed by then. This no longer exists; as of the June 2009 rules overhaul, a special "at the beginning of the next cleanup step" trigger is used for these cards, which has (close enough to) the same timing as "until end of turn"[[/note]].

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** Many rules depend on ''exactly'' how things are worded, and slight changes will completely ruin the effect of the card. One notorious example is "Substance", an ability whose only reason for existing was to cheat around the significant length of time between "''at'' end of turn" and "''until'' end of turn," and certain cards ''really needed'' the second one[[note]]The one.[[note]]The problem here was that these cards were creature enchantments that could be played at instant speed, but if you did, they were sacrificed at the end of the turn. The idea was that you could use them to "save" a creature that was about to die, at the cost of the permanent benefit of the enchantment. However, the timing difference was crucial: If the card is sacrificed "at end of turn," the creature hasn't had its damage removed yet, so the effect of saving the creature is rendered moot. The fix was to say, essentially, "This has Substance until end of turn; when it loses Substance, sacrifice this." "Until end of turn" effects resolve at the actual, literal end of the turn, and the creature has had its damage removed by then. This no longer exists; as of the June 2009 rules overhaul, a special "at the beginning of the next cleanup step" trigger is used for these cards, which has (close enough to) the same timing as "until end of turn"[[/note]].turn".[[/note]]



*** Perhaps inspired by the above, there's another card with the effect "Take an extra turn after this one. [[DeathOrGloryAttack You lose the game at the end of that turn]]." This needed errata to specifically state that [[CaptainObvious you don't lose if you've already won]], to prevent people from interpreting it as [[PyrrhicVictory causing the caster to lose even if they ended the turn by winning the game]].
** The Unglued (joke set) card "[[http://magiccards.info/query?q=Chaos+Confetti&v=card&s=cname Chaos Confetti]]" was inspired by an infamous incident at a tournament involving the card "[[http://magiccards.info/query?q=Chaos+Orb&v=card&s=cname Chaos Orb]]". You see, Chaos Orb's text declares: "If Chaos Orb is on the battlefield, flip Chaos Orb onto the battlefield from a height of at least one foot. If Chaos Orb turns over completely at least once during the flip, [[TouchOfDeath destroy all nontoken permanents it touches]]. Then destroy Chaos Orb." So the player in question [[TakeTheThirdOption tore up the card]], and tossed the now-multiple pieces of it onto the field. The judge ruled it as valid at the time because ''technically'' they were indeed touching Chaos Orb...thus inspiring the "Confetti" card, which does almost the exact same thing but ''requires'' you to [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin tear it up in the process]].

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*** Perhaps inspired by the above, there's another card with the effect "Take an extra turn after this one. [[DeathOrGloryAttack You lose the game at the end of that turn]]." turn.]]" This needed errata to specifically state that [[CaptainObvious you don't lose if you've already won]], to prevent people from interpreting it as [[PyrrhicVictory causing the caster to lose even if they ended the turn by winning the game]].
** The Unglued (joke set) card "[[http://magiccards.info/query?q=Chaos+Confetti&v=card&s=cname Chaos Confetti]]" was inspired by an infamous incident at a tournament involving the card "[[http://magiccards.info/query?q=Chaos+Orb&v=card&s=cname Chaos Orb]]". You see, Chaos Orb's text declares: "If Chaos Orb is on the battlefield, flip Chaos Orb onto the battlefield from a height of at least one foot. If Chaos Orb turns over completely at least once during the flip, [[TouchOfDeath destroy all nontoken permanents it touches]]. Then destroy Chaos Orb." So the player in question [[TakeTheThirdOption tore up the card]], and tossed the now-multiple pieces of it onto the field. The judge ruled it as valid at the time because ''technically'' they were indeed touching Chaos Orb... thus inspiring the "Confetti" card, which does almost the exact same thing but ''requires'' you to [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin tear it up in the process]].



*** To which one player suggested: "[[RulesLawyer So put your Chaos Orb deck in ''really big sleeves''...]]"

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*** To which one player suggested: "[[RulesLawyer So put your Chaos Orb deck in ''really in]] ''[[RefugeInAudacity really big sleeves''...]]"sleeves]]''..."



** An interesting side-effect of Equip Spell Cards that give Piercing is that you can inflict damage to your opponent by equipping them to your opponent's monster(s). Then, when your opponent attacks one of your Defense Position monsters with an ATK greater than your monsters DEF, he/she will take the difference. After all, even though it's '''your''' opponent's monster, it's your Spell Card, and thus it's your opponent -- not ''you'' -- who takes the extra damage, due to the wording on the cards.
** Some continuous card effects have linkage to another monster cards such as [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Future_Fusion Future Fusion]] and [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Call_of_the_Haunted Call of the Haunted]]. However, when the monster is removed from field other than being destroyed, the continuous effect card remains on the field meaninglessly. Those hinder the user more than helping them…but not so with [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Premature_Burial Premature Burial]]. Its text states that when it is '''destroyed''', destroy the equipped monster[[note]]If you return it to your hand, it isn't destroyed, so the revived monster stays on the field and you can play the card again on your next turn. And the next... and the next..[[/note]]. ''That card'' is the primary offender, so much so that it's been banned in tournament play.
** Another card that deserves special mention is [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Question Question]]. The card states that the opposing player must remember the name of the first monster card on the bottom of his/her opponent's graveyard or it gets special summoned to the field. This was fairly jarring if your opponent enforced including prefixes such as if the monster's card name began with "The" (Like many a Six Samurai deck) or enforces his/her own specific pronunciation of the card's name.

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** An interesting side-effect of Equip Spell Cards that give Piercing is that you can inflict damage to your opponent by equipping them to your opponent's monster(s). Then, when your opponent attacks one of your Defense Position monsters with an ATK greater than your monsters monster's DEF, he/she will take the difference. After all, even though it's your opponent's monster, it's '''your''' opponent's monster, it's your Spell Card, and thus it's your opponent -- not ''you'' -- who takes the extra damage, due to the wording on the cards.
** Some continuous card effects have linkage to another monster cards card, such as [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Future_Fusion Future Fusion]] and [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Call_of_the_Haunted Call of the Haunted]]. However, when the monster is removed from the field other than being destroyed, the continuous effect card remains on the field meaninglessly. Those hinder the user more than helping them…but them… but not so with [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Premature_Burial Premature Burial]]. Its text states that when it is '''destroyed''', destroy the equipped monster[[note]]If you return it to your hand, it isn't destroyed, so the revived monster stays on the field and you can play the card again on your next turn. And the next... and the next..[[/note]]. ''That card'' is the primary offender, so much so that it's been banned in tournament play.
** Another card that deserves special mention is [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Question Question]]. The card states that the opposing player must remember the name of the first monster card on the bottom of his/her opponent's graveyard or it gets special summoned to the field. This was fairly jarring if your opponent enforced including prefixes prefixes, such as if the monster's card name began with "The" (Like (like many a Six Samurai deck) or enforces his/her own specific pronunciation of the card's name.



** A common mistake most beginners make is the difference between "destroying" a card and "negating" a card. The former simply means the card no longer exists on the field, the latter means it's effects are stopped until the negating effect ends. This means that playing something like Mystical Space Typhoon on an activated spell/trap card with the same or lower spell speed is meaningless, as it's effect is already in motion and it would go to the graveyard regardless anyways. Likewise, simply negating the effect of a continuous card without destroying it is moot, as the effect would resume as soon as the negation card is gone.
** There's a card called "Yu-Jo Friendship". When activated, you offer a handshake to your opponent. The effects of the card are dependent on whether or not the opponent accepts the handshake, but you can reveal a "Unity" card in your hand to your opponent, and then they must "accept the handshake". It doesn't say to apply the one specific effect, just that they must accept the handshake. So one player, [[LoopholeAbuse after using this card]], stuck his hand down his pants, and then showed Unity to force a handshake. His opponent wisely chose to forfeit rather than to shake that hand.

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** A common mistake most beginners make is the difference between "destroying" a card and "negating" a card. The former simply means the card no longer exists on the field, the latter means it's its effects are stopped until the negating effect ends. This means that playing something like Mystical Space Typhoon on an activated spell/trap card with the same or lower spell speed is meaningless, as it's its effect is already in motion and it would go to the graveyard regardless anyways. Likewise, simply negating the effect of a continuous card without destroying it is moot, as the effect would resume as soon as the negation card is gone.
** There's a card called "Yu-Jo Friendship". When activated, you offer a handshake to your opponent. The effects of the card are dependent on whether or not the opponent accepts the handshake, but you can reveal a "Unity" card in your hand to your opponent, and then they must "accept the handshake". It doesn't say to apply the one specific effect, just that they must accept the handshake. So one player, [[LoopholeAbuse after using this card]], stuck his hand down his pants, and then showed Unity to force a handshake. His opponent wisely chose to forfeit rather than to [[{{Squick}} shake that hand.hand]].



* ''TabletopGame/{{Pokemon}}'': Certain moves like Selfdestruct don't tell you to remove the card as if it had fainted, but to put as many damage counters on it as it has HP. As seen in the UsefulNotes/GameBoy version, this means that you can use a Defender card to remove two of those damage counters, allowing the card to remain in play at least one more turn.

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* ''TabletopGame/{{Pokemon}}'': Certain moves like Selfdestruct [[note]]which, in the mainline video games, has obscenely high power but causes the user to faint[[/note]] don't tell you to remove the card as if it had fainted, but to put as many damage counters on it as it has HP. As seen in the UsefulNotes/GameBoy version, this means that you can use a Defender card to remove two of those damage counters, allowing the card to remain in play for at least one more turn.turn. This one got foreseen, as some Pokémon with Selfdestruct, Explosion, etc. do damage to themselves ''[[ThereIsNoKillLikeOverkill greater than]]'' their HP, and other self-sacrificial moves skip the self-damage and ''do'' outright state that the user is Knocked Out.
17th Aug '17 5:18:59 AM Luigifan
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When the exact wording of a rule, promise, prophecy etc. matters more than the spirit of the wording, it's an Exact Words situation.

The KnightTemplar, the AntiHero, and those with even looser standards (but some standards) will often stick to Exact Words even as they declare IGaveMyWord. A common trait of LawfulEvil characters. Also a common (and not always evil) way to play with JustFollowingOrders or the LeonineContract. Undercover heroes often tell the BigBad that, "Your operation is very impressive, and you deserve everything that's coming to you,"--both of which are true, without specifying what exactly ''is'' coming their way.

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When the exact wording of a rule, promise, prophecy prophecy, etc. matters more than the spirit of the wording, it's an Exact Words situation.

The KnightTemplar, the AntiHero, and those with even looser standards (but some standards) will often stick to Exact Words even as they declare IGaveMyWord. A common trait of LawfulEvil characters. Also a common (and not always evil) way to play with JustFollowingOrders or the LeonineContract. Undercover heroes often tell the BigBad that, "Your operation is very impressive, and you deserve everything that's coming to you,"--both you" -- both of which are true, [[FalseReassurance without specifying specifying]] [[LaserGuidedKarma what exactly exactly]] ''is'' coming their way.



Subtrope of DoubleMeaning. Compare HeroicVow, IWouldSayIfICouldSay and IronicEcho. UnhandThemVillain is a specific variant. ThreatBackfire is a common result. It's very commonly used in FalseReassurance. The actual interpretation of the words is often NotHyperbole. When used in response to a question can often result in a MathematiciansAnswer. Can also lead to a LiteralMetaphor and to LiteralistSnarking, as well as LoopholeAbuse. Also see NoManOfWomanBorn. Contrast with ILied, for when the opposing party makes no effort to hide the fact that they were not holding to their end.

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Subtrope of DoubleMeaning. Compare HeroicVow, IWouldSayIfICouldSay IWouldSayIfICouldSay, and IronicEcho. UnhandThemVillain is a specific variant. ThreatBackfire is a common result. It's very commonly used in FalseReassurance. The actual interpretation of the words is often NotHyperbole. When used in response to a question can often result in a MathematiciansAnswer. Can also lead to a LiteralMetaphor and to LiteralistSnarking, as well as LoopholeAbuse. Also see NoManOfWomanBorn. Contrast with ILied, for when the opposing party makes no effort to hide the fact that they were not holding to their end.
20th Jul '17 4:46:13 AM hyphz
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** In the adventure book ''Three Days to Kill'', the players are hired to wipe out the head of a thieves' guild, and assured that the town watch would be very grateful to have the guild organized. This is perfectly true, but the person hiring them didn't say he worked for the town watch.. he works for an opposing thieves' guild. Technically the players are still doing something good, and the person hiring them doesn't backstab them (as they might expect), so it's just an additional secret they might find.

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** In the adventure book ''Three Days to Kill'', the players are hired to wipe out the head of a thieves' guild, and assured that the town watch would be very grateful to have the guild organized. become disorganized. This is perfectly quite true, but the person hiring them didn't say he worked for the town watch.. he works for an opposing thieves' guild. Technically the players are still doing something good, and the person hiring them doesn't backstab them (as they might expect), so it's just an additional secret they might find.
20th Jul '17 4:45:22 AM hyphz
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** The move from 2.* editions to 3.0 and later 3.5 was accompanied by move to much more formal ruleset. One of introduced formalities was 'type' of bonus to characteristics and their stackability (unnamed bonuses and bonuses with different type stack, bonuses with same type do not). Given exponetial growth of cost of any bonus, it is a lot cheaper to have a lot of different small bonuses than one large bonus, so people have to keep track of types of all bonuses.

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** The move from 2.* editions In the adventure book ''Three Days to 3.0 Kill'', the players are hired to wipe out the head of a thieves' guild, and later 3.5 was accompanied by move to much more formal ruleset. One of introduced formalities was 'type' of bonus to characteristics and their stackability (unnamed bonuses and bonuses with different type stack, bonuses with same type do not). Given exponetial growth of cost of any bonus, it is a lot cheaper assured that the town watch would be very grateful to have a lot of different small bonuses than one large bonus, the guild organized. This is perfectly true, but the person hiring them didn't say he worked for the town watch.. he works for an opposing thieves' guild. Technically the players are still doing something good, and the person hiring them doesn't backstab them (as they might expect), so people have to keep track of types of all bonuses.it's just an additional secret they might find.
2nd Jul '17 10:54:01 AM nombretomado
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* TheUndertaker uses this as an entrance at times. Many a wrestler has loudly proclaimed that there isn't a man ''alive'' who can defeat him, only to freeze in terror when the lights dim and the gong sounds and everyone knows ''The Dead Man'' is in the house.

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* TheUndertaker Wrestling/TheUndertaker uses this as an entrance at times. Many a wrestler has loudly proclaimed that there isn't a man ''alive'' who can defeat him, only to freeze in terror when the lights dim and the gong sounds and everyone knows ''The Dead Man'' is in the house.
18th Jun '17 3:32:01 PM Odacon_Spy
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* ''WebAnimation/{{Tonin}}''
** In ''Tonin - O Ninja Que Veio da Roça'', a Brazilian web series featured in Chargesdotcomdotbr, Vilano-san, the main villain, asked a spirit to make his body resistant to harm. The spirit said he'd only do it if Vilano defeated him in a card game. Vilano only agreed on the condition that each one would draw one's own cards. Instead of drawing cards from the spirit's deck, he drew cards from his pocket, getting himself a better hand. When the spirit protested, Vilano reminded him about the agreement about drawing one's ''own'' cards.

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* ''WebAnimation/{{Tonin}}''
''WebAnimation/{{Tonin}}'', a Brazilian web series featured in ''Charges.com.br'', has many instances of this:
** In ''Tonin - O Ninja Que Veio da Roça'', a Brazilian web series featured in Chargesdotcomdotbr, , Vilano-san, the main villain, asked a spirit to make his body resistant to harm. The spirit said he'd only do it if Vilano defeated him in a card game. Vilano only agreed on the condition that each one would draw one's own cards. Instead of drawing cards from the spirit's deck, he drew cards from his pocket, getting himself a better hand. When the spirit protested, Vilano reminded him about the agreement about drawing one's ''own'' cards.
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