History Main / ExactWords

2nd Dec '16 8:50:57 AM Mr.Phorcys
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* In some versions of the [[Literature/TheBible Biblical]] story of Jacob, this is pulled by Laban. Jacob was in love with Laban's daughter Rachel, and asked her father for her hand in marriage. Jacob couldn't produce the normal bride-price for Rachel, though, so Laban told him that he could work for him for seven years instead and afterwards, Jacob could marry his daughter. However, Laban had ''two'' daughters, and he never specified which one Jacob would marry, leaving Jacob with Rachel's sister Leah as his wife.
** As the story continues, Jacob then worked ''another'' seven-years so that he could finally marry Rachel.
* Elisha served this up with a side of ProphecyTwist in II Kings 8:7-15. A lot of translators have trouble with 8:10 because the Hebrew seems ambiguous, instructing Hazael either to lie or tell the truth to his master King Ben-Hadad about whether he'd recover from his illness. However, as the story goes on to reveal, what the prophecy really meant was "Tell him his illness won't kill him, although I'm telling you he's going to die anyway." Taking his cue from a further prophecy that he would soon be the new King, Hazael returned to Ben-Hadad and told him Elisha had promised he would recover; but the next day, he [[InsistentTerminology cured Ben-Hadad of his illness]] ''once and for all'' by suffocating him with a washcloth. Then he [[KlingonPromotion seized the throne]] for himself.
* Jesus pulls a particularly effective one in Luke 20:25 when challenged by his opponents to take a stand on whether the Jews should pay taxes to the Romans. This ''should'' have put him on MortonsFork: say yes, and his detractors could frame him for a [[LesCollaborateurs boot-licking Roman collaborator]]; say no, and either Pontius Pilate or Herod Antipas would have to have him arrested for preaching sedition against Rome. However, "He said to them, 'Then give to Caesar what is Caesar's, and to God what is God's.'" Arguably, since he was pointing to a coin with Caesar's image on it at the time, that does amount to saying "Pay ''this'' tax." What he didn't actually say is what--other than the coin used in paying this particular tax--rightfully belongs to Caesar. People in the audience wouldn't have automatically assumed that ''anything'' they had rightfully belonged to a foreign pagan occupier such as Rome. Thus, no patriotic Roman listener could honestly claim Jesus had told anyone not to pay taxes, and no loyal Jew (even the Zealots, who were violently anti-Roman hardliners) could claim that Jesus had told them they had to pay ''any'' and ''every'' tax Rome might think to levy on them.

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* ** In some versions of the [[Literature/TheBible Biblical]] story of Jacob, this is pulled by Laban. Jacob was in love with Laban's daughter Rachel, and asked her father for her hand in marriage. Jacob couldn't produce the normal bride-price for Rachel, though, so Laban told him that he could work for him for seven years instead and afterwards, Jacob could marry his daughter. However, Laban had ''two'' daughters, and he never specified which one Jacob would marry, leaving Jacob with Rachel's sister Leah as his wife.
** *** As the story continues, Jacob then worked ''another'' seven-years so that he could finally marry Rachel.
* ** Elisha served this up with a side of ProphecyTwist in II Kings 8:7-15. A lot of translators have trouble with 8:10 because the Hebrew seems ambiguous, instructing Hazael either to lie or tell the truth to his master King Ben-Hadad about whether he'd recover from his illness. However, as the story goes on to reveal, what the prophecy really meant was "Tell him his illness won't kill him, although I'm telling you he's going to die anyway." Taking his cue from a further prophecy that he would soon be the new King, Hazael returned to Ben-Hadad and told him Elisha had promised he would recover; but the next day, he [[InsistentTerminology cured Ben-Hadad of his illness]] ''once and for all'' by suffocating him with a washcloth. Then he [[KlingonPromotion seized the throne]] for himself.
* ** Jesus pulls a particularly effective one in Luke 20:25 when challenged by his opponents to take a stand on whether the Jews should pay taxes to the Romans. This ''should'' have put him on MortonsFork: say yes, and his detractors could frame him for a [[LesCollaborateurs boot-licking Roman collaborator]]; say no, and either Pontius Pilate or Herod Antipas would have to have him arrested for preaching sedition against Rome. However, "He said to them, 'Then give to Caesar what is Caesar's, and to God what is God's.'" Arguably, since he was pointing to a coin with Caesar's image on it at the time, that does amount to saying "Pay ''this'' tax." What he didn't actually say is what--other than the coin used in paying this particular tax--rightfully belongs to Caesar. People in the audience wouldn't have automatically assumed that ''anything'' they had rightfully belonged to a foreign pagan occupier such as Rome. Thus, no patriotic Roman listener could honestly claim Jesus had told anyone not to pay taxes, and no loyal Jew (even the Zealots, who were violently anti-Roman hardliners) could claim that Jesus had told them they had to pay ''any'' and ''every'' tax Rome might think to levy on them.
18th Nov '16 12:41:18 AM TheCuza
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** In the third game, Godot is introduced as yet another prosecutor Phoenix has to deal with who is said to have legendary skill and has never lost a case. When the judge asks him how many cases he has worked, he bluntly replies that this is his first one. He's never lost a case, but he's never won one either. [[spoiler:At least, not as a prosecutor.]]

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** In the third game, Godot is introduced as yet another prosecutor Phoenix has to deal with who is said to have legendary skill and has never lost a case. When the judge asks him how many case.
--->'''Judge:''' Yes, your reputation precedes you. What kind of
cases he has worked, he bluntly replies that this have you dealt with so far?\\
'''Godot:''' Ha...! None.\\
'''Judge:''' What did you say...?\\
'''Godot:''' I've never prosecuted a case before.\\
'''Judge:''' N-Never? But you said you've never lost before.\\
'''Godot:''' ...Exactly. I've never lost. I've never won before either.
*** [[spoiler:The above
is his first actually two examples in one. He's never lost ''prosecuted'' a case, but he's never won one either. [[spoiler:At least, not as case before, because he used to be a prosecutor.defense attorney.]]
12th Nov '16 2:05:17 PM Tamfang
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** Many rules depend on ''exactly'' how things are worded, and slight changes will completely ruin the effect of the card. One notorious example is "Substance", an ability whose only reason for existing was to cheat around the fact that there is a significant length of time between "''at'' end of turn" and "''until'' end of turn," and certain cards ''really needed'' the second one[[note]]The problem here was that these cards were creature enchantments that could be played at instant speed, but if you did, they were sacrificed at the end of the turn. The idea was that you could use them to "save" a creature that was about to die, at the cost of the permanent benefit of the enchantment. However, the timing difference was crucial: If the card is sacrificed "at end of turn," the creature hasn't had its damage removed yet, so the effect of saving the creature is rendered moot. The fix was to say, essentially, "This has Substance until end of turn; when it loses Substance, sacrifice this." "Until end of turn" effects resolve at the actual, literal end of the turn, and the creature has had its damage removed by then. This no longer exists; as of the June 2009 rules overhaul, a special "at the beginning of the next cleanup step" trigger is used for these cards, which has (close enough to) the same timing as "until end of turn"[[/note]].

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** Many rules depend on ''exactly'' how things are worded, and slight changes will completely ruin the effect of the card. One notorious example is "Substance", an ability whose only reason for existing was to cheat around the fact that there is a significant length of time between "''at'' end of turn" and "''until'' end of turn," and certain cards ''really needed'' the second one[[note]]The problem here was that these cards were creature enchantments that could be played at instant speed, but if you did, they were sacrificed at the end of the turn. The idea was that you could use them to "save" a creature that was about to die, at the cost of the permanent benefit of the enchantment. However, the timing difference was crucial: If the card is sacrificed "at end of turn," the creature hasn't had its damage removed yet, so the effect of saving the creature is rendered moot. The fix was to say, essentially, "This has Substance until end of turn; when it loses Substance, sacrifice this." "Until end of turn" effects resolve at the actual, literal end of the turn, and the creature has had its damage removed by then. This no longer exists; as of the June 2009 rules overhaul, a special "at the beginning of the next cleanup step" trigger is used for these cards, which has (close enough to) the same timing as "until end of turn"[[/note]].



** In ''Theatre/JuliusCaesar'', Marc Antony agrees to give the assassins credit for allowing him to speak at Caesar's funeral and to refrain from denouncing them. Antony proceeds to turn the crowd against the assassins even while repeatedly referring to them as [[StealthInsult "honorable men"]].

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** In ''Theatre/JuliusCaesar'', Marc Antony agrees to give the assassins credit for allowing him to speak at Caesar's funeral and to refrain from denouncing them. Antony proceeds to turn the crowd against the assassins even while repeatedly referring to describing them as [[StealthInsult "honorable men"]].



* In ''VisualNovel/UminekoWhenTheyCry'', anything said [[LanguageOfTruth in red is true]]. This means its exact wording (including what is ''not'' told) is really important in figuring out what actually happened. For example, for the first twilight of the first game, it is said that "The identity of all unidentified corpses is guaranteed" and that "no body double was used". But no red truth says [[spoiler:that there were six corpses in the garden shed. It turns out Shannon's corpse ''wasn't actually there'' from the beginning.]] It's made all the more crucial by the fact that third-person narration is ''not'' neutral, and lies to the player in a number of scenes.

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* In ''VisualNovel/UminekoWhenTheyCry'', anything said [[LanguageOfTruth in red is true]]. This means its exact wording (including what is ''not'' told) is really important in figuring out what actually happened. For example, for the first twilight of the first game, it is said that "The identity of all unidentified corpses is guaranteed" and that "no body double was used". But no red truth says [[spoiler:that there were six corpses in the garden shed. It turns out Shannon's corpse ''wasn't actually there'' from the beginning.]] It's made all the more crucial by the fact that because third-person narration is ''not'' neutral, and lies to the player in a number of scenes.
5th Nov '16 1:33:42 PM LordInsane
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*** ''Yet another'' dodge is that it is only the ''Ecclesiarchy'' that is to have no men under arms. Planetary Governors in the Imperium are allowed to raise armies, and many cardinals of the Ministorum are planetary governors as well, so while it is frowned upon by some, so long as the armies are raised in the role and legal persona of governor rather than cardinal it is not a violation of the Decree Passive.
5th Nov '16 7:38:45 AM F1Krazy
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* In 2008, Music/BiffyClyro performed an acoustic cover of Music/RageAgainstTheMachine's "Killing In The Name" at the Reading Festival. Since the performance was being broadcast live over BBC Radio, the band agreed that they would censor the infamous ClusterFBomb at the song's climax. The ''audience'', however, were bound by no such agreement, and happily filled in the blanks.
25th Oct '16 6:23:59 AM Eievie
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'''The Death Knight:''' Terms accepted. ''(stab)''

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'''The Death Knight:''' Terms accepted. ''(stab)''''[stab]''



The KnightTemplar, the AntiHero, and those with even looser standards (but some standards) will often stick to Exact Words even as they declare IGaveMyWord. A common trait of LawfulEvil characters. Also a common (and not always evil) way to play with JustFollowingOrders or the LeonineContract. Undercover heroes often tell the BigBad that 'Your operation is very impressive, and you deserve everything that's coming to you' - both of which are true, without specifying what exactly ''is'' coming their way.

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The KnightTemplar, the AntiHero, and those with even looser standards (but some standards) will often stick to Exact Words even as they declare IGaveMyWord. A common trait of LawfulEvil characters. Also a common (and not always evil) way to play with JustFollowingOrders or the LeonineContract. Undercover heroes often tell the BigBad that 'Your that, "Your operation is very impressive, and you deserve everything that's coming to you' - both you,"--both of which are true, without specifying what exactly ''is'' coming their way.
12th Sep '16 10:15:12 AM Market43Fan
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* The old UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}}-based electronics chain Silo found themselves in this situation due to an advertising campaign that backfired. In 1986; Silo ran a commercial featuring a sale on stereo systems in which the $299 stereos were described as "[[http://articles.philly.com/1986-05-01/news/26048987_1_bananas-silo-stereos 299 bananas]]"[[note]]which ran between $35-$50 in 1986 dollars[[/note]]. While most customers figured out what Silo meant; several customers in [[UsefulNotes/OtherCitiesInTexas El Paso, TX]] and [[UsefulNotes/{{Seattle}} Seattle, WA]] decided to test the "299 bananas" gambit; bringing in a total of 11,000 bananas to the local Silo stores. The chain, to their credit, accepted the bananas (the Seattle location donated the bananas they received to a local zoo; with the zoo keeping around 1,000 and donating the rest to area food banks) but quickly scrapped the ad after announcing a loss of just over $10,000.
5th Sep '16 11:07:20 AM permeakra
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** The move from 2.* editions to 3.0 and later 3.5 was accompanied by move to much more formal ruleset. One of introduced formalities was 'type' of bonus to characteristics and their stackability (unnamed bonuses and bonuses with different type stack, bonuses with same type do not). Given exponetial growth of cost of any bonus, it is a lot cheaper to have a lot of different small bonuses than one large bonus, so people have to keep track of types of all bonuses.
5th Sep '16 10:59:10 AM permeakra
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** Some creatures have abilities that prevent them from being targeted by spells or other abilities. They can be affected by spells or abilities that don't target them. Similarly, indestructible creatures can't be destroyed...but they can still be sacrificed, because sacrifice is not the same as destroy. They can also be put into a graveyard if their toughness stat is reduced to 0, which is explicitly ''not'' a destroy effect.

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** Some creatures have abilities that prevent them from being targeted by spells or other abilities. They can be affected by spells or abilities that don't target them. Similarly, indestructible Indestructible creatures can't be destroyed...but they can still be sacrificed, because exiled (a stronger effect that pushes the card onto 'exile zone' outside the normal game), bounced back into the player's hand, and weakened with minus effects applied to toughness enough to die on their own. Hexproof creatures can't be targeted by spells or abilities an opponent controls... but their controller may be forced to sacrifice is not them, or an effect may be untargeted, affecting all creatures on the same as destroy. They can also be put into a graveyard if their toughness stat is reduced to 0, which is explicitly ''not'' a destroy effect.battlefield indescrimiatedely.
** Similarly, there are effects that deal damage and thouse that cause loss of life. An effect protecting from damage won't help against loss of life.
1st Sep '16 4:35:10 AM Silverblade2
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* Common in many fairy tales where it concerns deals with the devil/leprechauns. The good, God-fearing farmer will get the better of the bad character using this trope.
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