History Main / EveryoneOwnsAMac

13th Sep '17 4:42:22 PM nombretomado
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In the real world, the vast, vast majority (85%90%) of personal/home computers run some version of UsefulNotes/MicrosoftWindows. In particular, the majority of engineers, accountants, self-employed people and teachers use Windows [=PCs=]. A fairly small number of geeks, a decently large number of data centers and supercomputer labs, and many, many scientists also run UsefulNotes/{{Unix}}-like systems, particularly GNU/Linux.[[note]]Mac OS X is a Unix-like system[[/note]] This leaves {{Apple Macintosh}}es as the minority interest mainly of a small minority of college students, academics, and a number of "creative" types--artists, writers, musicians, etc.

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In the real world, the vast, vast majority (85%90%) of personal/home computers run some version of UsefulNotes/MicrosoftWindows. In particular, the majority of engineers, accountants, self-employed people and teachers use Windows [=PCs=]. A fairly small number of geeks, a decently large number of data centers and supercomputer labs, and many, many scientists also run UsefulNotes/{{Unix}}-like systems, particularly GNU/Linux.[[note]]Mac OS X is a Unix-like system[[/note]] This leaves {{Apple UsefulNotes/{{Apple Macintosh}}es as the minority interest mainly of a small minority of college students, academics, and a number of "creative" types--artists, writers, musicians, etc.



* ''Lambada'' (1990) has a schoolroom full of {{Apple Macintosh}}es, which isn't that far removed from RealLife until the kids are inspired to rock out by watching a graphics demo on a Mac SE.

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* ''Lambada'' (1990) has a schoolroom full of {{Apple UsefulNotes/{{Apple Macintosh}}es, which isn't that far removed from RealLife until the kids are inspired to rock out by watching a graphics demo on a Mac SE.
5th Sep '17 5:25:11 PM Peteman
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* Many countries especially in the Third World avoids this trope ''hard'', like Mexico: Not only Macs are more expensive in Mexico compared with even branded [=PCs=] (not to mention assembled [=PCs=]) the only places in that country you will find someone using Macs are music studios, TV and radio stations and universities and even in Mexican universities, the use of a Mac is ''severely restricted'' for specific degrees and work niches (like audio and video editing) and many times you will need permission from higher-ups for using one for something not related with its intended use, and sometimes you will need permission to ''even'' touch one.[[note]]Justified in this case. because Macs are so expensive in Mexico and letting anyone who normally only knows how to use a IBM-compatible PC it's not a good idea.[[/note]] So this trope is more of a First World phenomenon than a universal one.

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* Many countries especially in the Third World avoids this trope ''hard'', trope, like Mexico: Not only Macs are more expensive in Mexico compared with even branded [=PCs=] (not to mention assembled [=PCs=]) the only places in that country you will find someone using Macs are music studios, TV and radio stations and universities and even in Mexican universities, the use of a Mac is ''severely restricted'' for specific degrees and work niches (like audio and video editing) and many times you will need permission from higher-ups for using one for something not related with its intended use, and sometimes you will need permission to ''even'' touch one.[[note]]Justified in this case. because Macs are so expensive in Mexico and letting anyone who normally only knows how to use a IBM-compatible PC it's not a good idea.[[/note]] So this trope is more of a First World phenomenon than a universal one.
30th Aug '17 4:20:58 AM NamelessFragger
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*** Apple took this further by introducing the [=LaserWriter=], one of the first laser printers in an age when most printers were dot-matrix or impact printers, making it possible to produce a master copy of black-and-white publications right from the office.

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*** Apple took this further by introducing the [=LaserWriter=], one of the first laser printers in an age when most printers were dot-matrix or impact printers, making it possible to produce a master copy of black-and-white publications right from the office. As a bonus, the [=LaserWriter=] was a networked printer, allowing an entire office of Macs to share the one printer without having to leave one running, and it ran on a 12 [=MHz=] 68000 with 1.5 MB of RAM - that's 50% more speed and anywhere from three times to ''15 times'' the RAM of the original Macintosh models it would have interfaced with!



*** Macs are more or less industry standard in both music and film production and have been for many years. Macs are so widely used in the creative industries that just about anything with a trope page made since the '90s likely had a Mac involved in post-production. Avid, the first digital editing software started out on an Apple II system. Behind Avid (also owner of [=ProTools=]) the other industry standard is Final Cut Pro (for video) and Logic (for music), both of them made by Apple. Combine that with Quicktime codecs being standard for most professional video-work and most platforms being based around Firewire interface, it really is easier to work with it from Apple products.
*** Averted in the late 80s to early 90s. In that period, the go-to video production machine was the UsefulNotes/{{Amiga}} due to its killer app, Video Toaster (that, and the Amiga had some pretty slick video capabilities built-in, and that Macs only started getting color displays and video capture abilities in the early 90s). Once the Amiga died out, Macs quickly claimed the crown since Macs from that period also had onboard video capture - it's just that video editing software were hard to come by in that era and only basic video capture software was available, which was remedied when Adobe introduced the Adobe Premiere video editing suite on the Mac at around the same time. The main music machine during the same period was the UsefulNotes/AtariST, which had built-in MIDI ports. A number of major music programs still in use today on the Mac, including Cubase and Logic, started life as Atari ST programs and migrated over when Atari discontinued the ST line.

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*** Sadly averted with earlier [=PowerBooks=], which had a habit of using passive-matrix forms of twisted-nematic [=LCDs=], particularly on lower-cost models like the [="MainStreet" PowerBook G3=] to separate them from models with active-matrix screens, albeit still TN. Apple would not adopt IPS panels on their laptop line until the "Retina" [=MacBook=] Pro.
*** Macs are more or less industry standard in both music and film production and have been for many years. Macs are so widely used in the creative industries that just about anything with a trope page made since the '90s likely had a Mac involved in post-production. Avid, the first digital editing software started out on an Apple II system. Behind Avid (also owner of [=ProTools=]) the other industry standard is Final Cut Pro (for video) and Logic (for music), both of them made acquired and developed by Apple. Combine that with Quicktime [=QuickTime=] codecs being standard for most professional video-work and most platforms being based around Firewire the [=FireWire/IEEE 1394=] interface, it really is easier to work with it from Apple products.
*** Averted in the late 80s to early 90s. In that period, the go-to video production machine was the UsefulNotes/{{Amiga}} due to its killer app, the Newtek Video Toaster (that, and the Amiga had some pretty slick video capabilities built-in, and that Macs only started getting color displays and video capture abilities in the early 90s). Once the Amiga died out, Macs quickly claimed the crown since Macs from that period also had onboard video capture - it's just that video editing software were hard to come by in that era and only basic video capture software was available, which was remedied when Adobe introduced the Adobe Premiere video editing suite on the Mac at around the same time. The main music machine during the same period was the UsefulNotes/AtariST, which had built-in MIDI ports. A number of major music programs still in use today on the Mac, including Cubase and Logic, started life as Atari ST programs and migrated over when Atari discontinued the ST line.



** Averted for most of the 1990s, when gaming on a Mac was a viable option due to color displays becoming standard and ports from DOS being noticeably enhanced with higher-resolution 640x480 graphics at a time when 320x200 was still the PC standard, though DOS and Windows quickly gained ground after better driver and API support, not to mention a much larger market share and much lower price tag. By 1997, Mac ports had near feature parity, but lacked the [=A3D=] and EAX audio effects of Windows releases on top of getting fewer game ports, [[UsefulNotes/ComputerWars having clearly fallen into the second-class category for computer gaming.]]

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** Averted for most of the 1990s, when gaming on a Mac was a viable option due to color displays becoming standard and ports from DOS being noticeably enhanced with higher-resolution 640x480 graphics at a time when 320x200 was still the PC standard, though standard (some notable examples being ''VideoGame/Wolfenstein3D'' and ''VideoGame/XWing'' / ''VideoGame/TIEFighter''), often to the point of computer games having their definitive versions on the ''Mac'' of all platforms. However, DOS and Windows quickly gained ground after better driver and API support, not to mention a much larger market share and much lower price tag. tag.
***
By 1997, Mac ports had near feature parity, but lacked the [=A3D=] and EAX audio effects of Windows releases on top of getting fewer game ports, [[UsefulNotes/ComputerWars having clearly fallen into the second-class category for computer gaming.]]
30th Aug '17 4:07:05 AM NamelessFragger
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* In contrast, one market that has never widely adopted the Macintosh are PC gamers, for two significant reasons. One, other than the tower-style Mac Pros, which are prohibitively expensive to begin with even at the lowest hardware specs, Macs can't be upgraded beyond replacing the RAM (and you can't upgrade the RAM on many new lower-end Macs either) or hard drive, one of the main motivations of using a PC for gaming. The other is relatively poor driver support from AMD and Nvidia, at least when it comes to the real-time rendering that games do--something Valve learned the hard way when they committed to supporting the Mac, though it seems to have improved in recent years.
** Averted in the earlier years, when gaming on a Mac was a viable option, though DOS and Windows quickly gained ground after better driver and API support, not to mention a larger market share.
** Another issue with Apple computers not taking off in modern PC gaming is, aside from Steve Jobs' creed that "Macs aren't toys", everything but the Mac Pro is ill-equipped in the GPU department. One needs to get at the minimum, a 15" Macbook Pro before a dedicated GPU pops up or an upgraded [=iMac=] (which has to be built to order). And even then, they're all laptop [=GPUs=], which are quite a bit weaker. Macs are also a bit notorious for running really hot.

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* In contrast, one market that has never widely adopted the Macintosh are PC gamers, for two significant reasons. One, other than the tower-style Mac Pros, which are prohibitively expensive to begin with even at the lowest hardware specs, Macs can't be upgraded beyond replacing the RAM (and you can't upgrade the RAM on many new lower-end Macs either) or hard drive, one of the main motivations of using a PC for gaming. The other is relatively poor driver support from AMD and Nvidia, at least when it comes to the real-time rendering that games do--something do - something Valve learned the hard way when they committed to supporting the Mac, though it seems to have improved in recent years.
** Averted in for most of the earlier years, 1990s, when gaming on a Mac was a viable option, option due to color displays becoming standard and ports from DOS being noticeably enhanced with higher-resolution 640x480 graphics at a time when 320x200 was still the PC standard, though DOS and Windows quickly gained ground after better driver and API support, not to mention a much larger market share.
share and much lower price tag. By 1997, Mac ports had near feature parity, but lacked the [=A3D=] and EAX audio effects of Windows releases on top of getting fewer game ports, [[UsefulNotes/ComputerWars having clearly fallen into the second-class category for computer gaming.]]
** Another issue with Apple computers not taking off in modern PC gaming is, aside from Steve Jobs' creed that "Macs aren't toys", everything but the Mac Pro is ill-equipped in the GPU department. One needs to get at the minimum, a 15" Macbook Pro before a dedicated GPU pops up or an upgraded [=iMac=] (which has to be built to order). And even then, they're all laptop [=GPUs=], which are quite a bit weaker. Macs are also a bit notorious for running really hot.hot, which leads to thermal throttling and even hardware failures, as any Power Mac G5 owner will attest to.
*** The [[UsefulNotes/GraphicsProcessingUnit GPU]] deficiency was all but admitted by Apple in 2017, when they had to apologize for the lack of updates to the Mac Pro ever since its "trash can" 2013 redesign, unveiled the [=iMac=] Pro with a considerably upgraded Radeon Pro Vega GPU, and most of all, released an external GPU [[https://developer.apple.com/development-kit/external-graphics/ development kit]] for Thunderbolt 3.0-equipped Macs that houses a Radeon RX 480, with a $100 discount for the [[UsefulNotes/HTCVive HTC Vive]] in a bid to not look completely irrelevant in the VirtualReality content creation space. Note that VR requires exceptionally strong single GPU performance, and the [[UsefulNotes/OculusRift Oculus Rift]] actually ''dropped'' Mac support between the [=DK2=] and [=CV1=] because no Mac met the requirements for over a year after the consumer Rift's official release!
26th Jun '17 6:46:43 PM ThePocket
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* The characters of ''ComicStrip/FoxTrot'' have an "iFruit" family computer. In the storyline where they first got it, it was specifically chosen to keep Jason from playing PC games. Of course, the creator, Bill Amend, is a huge Mac fan, as is Jason's mother, Andy Fox (a columnist). The strip's geekier characters (Jason, Marcus, Eileen...) clearly ''aren't''.

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* The characters of ''ComicStrip/FoxTrot'' have have, possibly, owned Apple computers since day 1. An early storyline had Andy buying a Mac to replace the Apple II that Jason kept hogging playing games (quite literally "a computer for the rest of us"). In the early '90s, this was quietly replaced with an unspecified desktop box that resembled an early Quadra or Performa. Then in 1999, another storyline was dedicated to Andy buying an "iFruit" family computer. In the storyline where they first got it, it was computer, specifically chosen to keep Jason from playing PC games.games. Since then, Jason has been seen using a modern-style iMac. Of course, the creator, Bill Amend, is a huge Mac fan, as is Jason's mother, Andy Fox (a columnist). The strip's geekier characters (Jason, Marcus, Eileen...) clearly ''aren't''.
28th May '17 1:47:03 PM nombretomado
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* In the TVTropes original Web series ''WebVideo/EchoChamber'', [[InsufferableGenius Tom]] and [[DeadpanSnarker Dana]] have both been shown using Mac laptops, and the room where they speak to [[TheFaceless Mr. Administrator]] is full of Mac desktops.

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* In the TVTropes Wiki/TVTropes original Web series ''WebVideo/EchoChamber'', [[InsufferableGenius Tom]] and [[DeadpanSnarker Dana]] have both been shown using Mac laptops, and the room where they speak to [[TheFaceless Mr. Administrator]] is full of Mac desktops.
27th May '17 11:05:02 AM nombretomado
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* In both the film and the book of ''[[TheMillenniumTrilogy The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo]]'', both Lisbeth and Mikael both use [=MacBooks=]. Their expensive prices are part of a plot point.

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* In both the film and the book of ''[[TheMillenniumTrilogy ''[[Literature/TheMillenniumTrilogy The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo]]'', both Lisbeth and Mikael both use [=MacBooks=]. Their expensive prices are part of a plot point.
15th May '17 8:11:11 PM nombretomado
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* In ''TrueBlood'', all the Chancellors of the Authority use Macbooks. Given that they're hundreds or thousands of years old, and all rich and decadent, it makes a sort of sense, but these are basically almost the only computers ever seen in the show.

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* In ''TrueBlood'', ''Series/TrueBlood'', all the Chancellors of the Authority use Macbooks. Given that they're hundreds or thousands of years old, and all rich and decadent, it makes a sort of sense, but these are basically almost the only computers ever seen in the show.
3rd May '17 8:24:26 PM PaulA
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** ''Pattern Recognition'' has a character who owns an antique Mac G4 Cube. The gentle pulsating of the power lamp when the computer is in sleep mode is apparently quite soothing.
** ''Zero History'' is awash with iPhones, and a character refers to them as "the default platform."

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** ''Pattern Recognition'' ''Literature/PatternRecognition'' has a character who owns an antique Mac G4 Cube. The gentle pulsating of the power lamp when the computer is in sleep mode is apparently quite soothing.
** ''Zero History'' ''Literature/ZeroHistory'' is awash with iPhones, and a character refers to them as "the default platform."
29th Apr '17 11:37:45 AM nombretomado
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* Everyone on ''Series/ThirtyRock'' uses Apple products. Jack has an iMac on his desk most of the time and seemingly all the characters carry iPhones. With the possible exception of Jack--who is a high-powered business executive--this makes a certain amount of sense, as (again) ''30 Rock'' is set in the creative industry (specifically television production, and even more specifically Creator/{{NBC}}. Since the whole series is TinaFey [[WriteWhatYouKnow writing what she knows]], it might actually be realistic.
* Many Macs on'' TheOffice'' (at least the US version). One episode's b-plot revolved around the receptionist desk getting a new computer (an iMac), and video conferencing via [=MacBook=] Pro has happened too many times to count. On the other hand, Dunder-Mifflin desk computers all seem to be [=PCs=].

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* Everyone on ''Series/ThirtyRock'' uses Apple products. Jack has an iMac on his desk most of the time and seemingly all the characters carry iPhones. With the possible exception of Jack--who is a high-powered business executive--this makes a certain amount of sense, as (again) ''30 Rock'' is set in the creative industry (specifically television production, and even more specifically Creator/{{NBC}}. Since the whole series is TinaFey Creator/TinaFey [[WriteWhatYouKnow writing what she knows]], it might actually be realistic.
* Many Macs on'' TheOffice'' (at least the US version).on ''Series/TheOfficeUS''. One episode's b-plot revolved around the receptionist desk getting a new computer (an iMac), and video conferencing via [=MacBook=] Pro has happened too many times to count. On the other hand, Dunder-Mifflin desk computers all seem to be [=PCs=].
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