History Main / EveryoneOwnsAMac

22nd Apr '16 10:41:39 PM aye_amber
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* Everyone in ''{{Kingdom}}'' uses a Mac. This may be due to star Creator/StephenFry's well-known real life love for Apple products and his status as the UK's second-ever Mac owner (Douglas Adams was first.)

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* Everyone in ''{{Kingdom}}'' ''Series/{{Kingdom}}'' uses a Mac. This may be due to star Creator/StephenFry's well-known real life love for Apple products and his status as the UK's second-ever Mac owner (Douglas Adams was first.)
16th Apr '16 3:28:42 PM rjd1922
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* If a computer appears in the Anime/{{Pokemon}} world (for example, in ''Anime/ThePowerOfOne'' and also in at least a few TV episodes), chances are it's running the Pokéverse equivalent of Mac OS.

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* If a computer appears in the Anime/{{Pokemon}} world (for example, in ''Anime/ThePowerOfOne'' ''Anime/Pokemon2000'' and also in at least a few TV episodes), chances are it's running the Pokéverse equivalent of Mac OS.
28th Mar '16 2:34:45 PM nombretomado
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** As do all of the other shows created by Dan Schneider. But it originated on "DrakeAndJosh"

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** As do all of the other shows created by Dan Schneider. But it originated on "DrakeAndJosh"''Series/DrakeAndJosh''
19th Mar '16 10:27:55 PM RAMChYLD
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* Played straight with Creator/{{Google}}: apparently employees who needs laptops are issued a Macbook Pro, and employees who need desktops are either issued a Mac or a PC preloaded with a [[UsefulNotes/{{Unix}} Linux distribution]]. [=PCs=] running Windows are rare and an employee needing a Windows PC will need to provide a strong reason before the management will issue one.

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* Played straight with Creator/{{Google}}: Website/{{Google}}: apparently employees who needs laptops are issued a Macbook Pro, and employees who need desktops are either issued a Mac or a PC preloaded with a [[UsefulNotes/{{Unix}} Linux distribution]]. [=PCs=] running Windows are rare and an employee needing a Windows PC will need to provide a strong reason before the management will issue one.
19th Mar '16 8:56:08 PM RAMChYLD
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* In the finale of ''Film/{{Antitrust}}'', [[spoiler:the Synapse broadcast]] is done with a [=PowerBook=] G3. It's fitting when you consider how the movie is a feature-length TakeThat at [[{{Microsoft}} Apple's chief rival]], but it makes less sense when you remember that the film is about computer hackers (who, as stated above, don't use Macs), and that the ProductPlacement goes against the film's pro-open source message (Mac OS is hardly open source software). On the other hand, Apple does support open-source development from time to time (it released it's Darwin kernel and Swift compilers as open-source, as well as it's CUPS printing system, which has become the new standard on Linux and BSD machines), and several Mac OS X components (ie Perl, emacs) originated from the open-source community.

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* In the finale of ''Film/{{Antitrust}}'', [[spoiler:the Synapse broadcast]] is done with a [=PowerBook=] G3. It's fitting when you consider how the movie is a feature-length TakeThat at [[{{Microsoft}} [[{{Creator/Microsoft}} Apple's chief rival]], but it makes less sense when you remember that the film is about computer hackers (who, as stated above, don't use Macs), and that the ProductPlacement goes against the film's pro-open source message (Mac OS is hardly open source software). On the other hand, Apple does support open-source development from time to time (it released it's Darwin kernel and Swift compilers as open-source, as well as it's CUPS printing system, which has become the new standard on Linux and BSD machines), and several Mac OS X components (ie Perl, emacs) originated from the open-source community.
19th Mar '16 8:55:37 PM RAMChYLD
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* In the finale of ''Film/{{Antitrust}}'', [[spoiler:the Synapse broadcast]] is done with a [=PowerBook=] G3. It's fitting when you consider how the movie is a feature-length TakeThat at [[{{Microsoft}} Apple's chief rival]], but it makes less sense when you remember that the film is about computer hackers (who, as stated above, don't use Macs), and that the ProductPlacement goes against the film's pro-open source message (Mac OS is hardly open source software).

to:

* In the finale of ''Film/{{Antitrust}}'', [[spoiler:the Synapse broadcast]] is done with a [=PowerBook=] G3. It's fitting when you consider how the movie is a feature-length TakeThat at [[{{Microsoft}} Apple's chief rival]], but it makes less sense when you remember that the film is about computer hackers (who, as stated above, don't use Macs), and that the ProductPlacement goes against the film's pro-open source message (Mac OS is hardly open source software). On the other hand, Apple does support open-source development from time to time (it released it's Darwin kernel and Swift compilers as open-source, as well as it's CUPS printing system, which has become the new standard on Linux and BSD machines), and several Mac OS X components (ie Perl, emacs) originated from the open-source community.
19th Mar '16 2:29:29 AM Hossmeister
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15th Mar '16 10:43:45 PM RAMChYLD
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*** Averted in the late 80s to early 90s. In that period, the go-to video production machine was the UsefulNotes/{{Amiga}} due to its killer app, Video Toaster (that, and the Amiga had some pretty slick video capabilities built-in, and that Macs only started getting color displays and video capture abilities in the early 90s). Once the Amiga died out, Macs quickly claimed the crown since Macs from that period also had onboard video capture - it's just that video editing software were hard to come by in that era and only basic video capture software was available, which was remedied when Adobe introduced the Adobe Premiere video editing suite became available on the Mac at around the same time. The main music machine during the same period was the UsefulNotes/AtariST, which had built-in MIDI ports. A number of major music programs still in use today on the Mac, including Cubase and Logic, started life as Atari ST programs and migrated over when Atari discontinued the ST line.

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*** Averted in the late 80s to early 90s. In that period, the go-to video production machine was the UsefulNotes/{{Amiga}} due to its killer app, Video Toaster (that, and the Amiga had some pretty slick video capabilities built-in, and that Macs only started getting color displays and video capture abilities in the early 90s). Once the Amiga died out, Macs quickly claimed the crown since Macs from that period also had onboard video capture - it's just that video editing software were hard to come by in that era and only basic video capture software was available, which was remedied when Adobe introduced the Adobe Premiere video editing suite became available on the Mac at around the same time. The main music machine during the same period was the UsefulNotes/AtariST, which had built-in MIDI ports. A number of major music programs still in use today on the Mac, including Cubase and Logic, started life as Atari ST programs and migrated over when Atari discontinued the ST line.
15th Mar '16 10:42:29 PM RAMChYLD
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*** Averted in the late 80s to early 90s. In that period, the go-to video production machine was the UsefulNotes/{{Amiga}} due to its killer app, Video Toaster (that, and the Amiga had some pretty slick video capabilities built-in, and that Macs only started getting color displays and video capture abilities in the early 90s). Once the Amiga died out, Macs quickly claimed the crown since Macs from that period also had onboard video capture - it's just that video editing software were hard to come by in that era and only basic video capture software was available, which was remedied when Adobe introduced the Adobe Premiere video editing suite at around the same time. The main music machine during the same period was the UsefulNotes/AtariST, which had built-in MIDI ports. A number of major music programs still in use today on the Mac, including Cubase and Logic, started life as Atari ST programs and migrated over when Atari discontinued the ST line.

to:

*** Averted in the late 80s to early 90s. In that period, the go-to video production machine was the UsefulNotes/{{Amiga}} due to its killer app, Video Toaster (that, and the Amiga had some pretty slick video capabilities built-in, and that Macs only started getting color displays and video capture abilities in the early 90s). Once the Amiga died out, Macs quickly claimed the crown since Macs from that period also had onboard video capture - it's just that video editing software were hard to come by in that era and only basic video capture software was available, which was remedied when Adobe introduced the Adobe Premiere video editing suite became available on the Mac at around the same time. The main music machine during the same period was the UsefulNotes/AtariST, which had built-in MIDI ports. A number of major music programs still in use today on the Mac, including Cubase and Logic, started life as Atari ST programs and migrated over when Atari discontinued the ST line.



** Averted in the earlier years, when gaming on a Mac was a viable option, though DOS and Windows quickly gained ground after better driver and API support.

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** Averted in the earlier years, when gaming on a Mac was a viable option, though DOS and Windows quickly gained ground after better driver and API support.support, not to mention a larger market share.
15th Mar '16 10:39:01 PM RAMChYLD
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* In contrast, one market that has never widely adopted the Macintosh are PC gamers, for two significant reasons. One, other than the tower-style Mac Pros, which are prohibitively expensive to begin with even at the lowest hardware specs, Macs can't be upgraded beyond replacing the RAM or hard drive, one of the main motivations of using a PC for gaming. The other is relatively poor driver support from AMD and Nvidia, at least when it comes to the real-time rendering that games do--something Valve learned the hard way when they committed to supporting the Mac, though it seems to have improved in recent years.

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* In contrast, one market that has never widely adopted the Macintosh are PC gamers, for two significant reasons. One, other than the tower-style Mac Pros, which are prohibitively expensive to begin with even at the lowest hardware specs, Macs can't be upgraded beyond replacing the RAM (and you can't upgrade the RAM on many new lower-end Macs either) or hard drive, one of the main motivations of using a PC for gaming. The other is relatively poor driver support from AMD and Nvidia, at least when it comes to the real-time rendering that games do--something Valve learned the hard way when they committed to supporting the Mac, though it seems to have improved in recent years.
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