History Main / EveryoneIsJesusInPurgatory

10th Apr '17 10:18:28 PM MyFinalEdits
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** Gilligan is the Devil, and the island is Hell, with no escape possible. That's why he [[JustEatGilligan continuously sabotages escape attempts]]. ''Except he really doesn't. Out of 37 episodes where they might really have escaped, it's only his fault 17 times.''

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** Gilligan is the Devil, and the island is Hell, with no escape possible. That's why he [[JustEatGilligan continuously sabotages escape attempts]]. ''Except he really doesn't. Out of 37 episodes where they might really have escaped, it's only his fault 17 times.''
10th Apr '17 9:50:06 PM ABiPolarGuy
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** Gilligan is the Devil, and the island is Hell, with no escape possible. That's why he [[JustEatGilligan continuously sabotages escape attempts]].

to:

** Gilligan is the Devil, and the island is Hell, with no escape possible. That's why he [[JustEatGilligan continuously sabotages escape attempts]]. ''Except he really doesn't. Out of 37 episodes where they might really have escaped, it's only his fault 17 times.''
10th Apr '17 6:00:07 PM DustSnitch
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Memories of that overzealous English teacher, who forced you to accept that every character, every scene and every action had a ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allegory deep inner meaning]]'' have led to widespread fear on the part of readers and viewers everywhere that every tale secretly contains some other story being told in {{subtext}}. The end result of this is a state of mind that interprets every plot as an allegory for the rebuilding of one's soul, every setting as a manifestation of purgatory, and every protagonist as a stand-in for the Christ: [[TitleDrop Everyone Is Jesus In Purgatory]]!

to:

Memories of that overzealous English teacher, who forced you to accept that every character, every scene and every action had a ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allegory deep inner meaning]]'' have led to widespread fear on the part of readers and viewers everywhere that every tale secretly contains some other story being told in {{subtext}}. The end result of this is a state of mind that interprets every plot as an allegory for the rebuilding of one's soul, every setting as a manifestation of purgatory, and every protagonist as a stand-in for [[UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}} the Christ: Christ]]: [[TitleDrop Everyone Is Jesus In Purgatory]]!
9th Apr '17 1:17:06 PM MyFinalEdits
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* Santiago of ''Literature/TheOldManAndTheSea'' is UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}}, though Hemingway stated that the book was just about fishing and old age, nothing else.
** People like to point out that when the eponymous character is carrying his mast and sail back to his home, he falls five times, just like when Jesus when he was carrying the Cross. [[CriticalResearchFailure Too bad the Stations of the Cross state that Jesus fell three times, not five]].

to:

* Santiago of ''Literature/TheOldManAndTheSea'' is UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}}, though Hemingway stated that the book was just about fishing and old age, nothing else.
** People like to point out that
else. It's also noted that, when the eponymous character is carrying his mast and sail back to his home, he falls five times, just like when Jesus when he was carrying the Cross. [[CriticalResearchFailure Too bad the Stations of the Cross state that Jesus fell three times, not five]].



* ''ThePath'' can be (and was intended to be) interpreted in many ways. Is it a cautionary tale about the dangers of temptation in its many forms? Is it a metaphor for life and growing up? Are the girls the memories of the grandmother at different stages in her life?

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* ''ThePath'' ''VideoGame/ThePath'' can be (and was intended to be) interpreted in many ways. Is it a cautionary tale about the dangers of temptation in its many forms? Is it a metaphor for life and growing up? Are the girls the memories of the grandmother at different stages in her life?



** ''VideoGame/{{Mother 3}}'': The [[RunningGag doorknob]] represents happiness. If you ''really'' think about it [[FridgeBrilliance it makes sense]]. Even Itoi liked that one.

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** ''VideoGame/{{Mother 3}}'': The [[RunningGag doorknob]] represents happiness. If you ''really'' think about it [[FridgeBrilliance it makes sense]]. Even Itoi the game's creator, Shigesato Itoi, liked that one.
9th Apr '17 10:20:31 AM CheeseDogX
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** People like to point out that when the eponymous character is carrying his mast and sail back to his home, he falls five times, just like when Jesus when he was carrying the Cross. [[CriticalResearchFailure Too bad the Stations of the Cross state that he fell three times, not five]].

to:

** People like to point out that when the eponymous character is carrying his mast and sail back to his home, he falls five times, just like when Jesus when he was carrying the Cross. [[CriticalResearchFailure Too bad the Stations of the Cross state that he Jesus fell three times, not five]].
9th Apr '17 10:19:53 AM CheeseDogX
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Added DiffLines:

** People like to point out that when the eponymous character is carrying his mast and sail back to his home, he falls five times, just like when Jesus when he was carrying the Cross. [[CriticalResearchFailure Too bad the Stations of the Cross state that he fell three times, not five]].
9th Apr '17 10:12:47 AM CheeseDogX
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* ''[[ViewAskewniverse Dogma]]'': This claim is put forth by Loki, the exiled Angel of Death, in his attempt to convince a nun that God does not exist. He wins and tells her to buy herself a nice dress and go find a man...or woman.



* ''[[ViewAskewniverse Dogma]]'': This claim is put forth by Loki, the exiled Angel of Death, in his attempt to convince a nun that God does not exist. He wins and tells her to buy herself a nice dress and go find a man...or woman.
9th Apr '17 9:54:33 AM CheeseDogX
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* ''Film/PulpFiction'' possesses several plot points that are subject to this; one revolves around the mysterious glowing contents of Marcellus Wallace's briefcase that are never explained (with one popular theory being that it is Wallace's soul, which he bought back from [[{{Satan}} Mr. S.]] and another being the reason for a band-aid that is prominently displayed on Wallace's bald head as it is filmed from the back. The first is merely a plot MacGuffin that Tarantino never bothered to explain; the second is merely a result of actor Ving Rhames (who played Wallace) cutting the back of his head whilst shaving it and requiring a band-aid to stop the bleeding. Let's face it: it's ''cooler'' if you [[WhatDoYouMeanItsNotSymbolic give it cosmic overtones]]. Tarantino's official response about the briefcase was a fairly lackluster "[[ShrugOfGod whatever the audience wants it to be.]]" For the record, it was originally supposed to be the diamonds from ''Film/ReservoirDogs'', but Tarantino decided to leave it deliberately ambiguous for the sake of this type of discussion. Tarantino [[WordOfGod once stated in an interview]] that he saw it as an allegory to the Arthurian Legend, with Wallace as King Arthur, Vince as Lancelot, Jules as Galahad, Butch as Mordred, The Wolf as Merlin, and the briefcase containing the Holy Grail.

to:

* ''Film/PulpFiction'' possesses several plot points that are subject to this; one revolves around the mysterious glowing contents of Marcellus Wallace's briefcase that are never explained (with one popular theory being that it is Wallace's soul, which he bought back from [[{{Satan}} Mr. S.]] ]]) and another being the reason for a band-aid that is prominently displayed on Wallace's bald head as it is filmed from the back. The first is merely a plot MacGuffin that Tarantino never bothered to explain; the second is merely a result of actor Ving Rhames (who played Wallace) cutting the back of his head whilst shaving it and requiring a band-aid to stop the bleeding. Let's face it: it's ''cooler'' if you [[WhatDoYouMeanItsNotSymbolic give it cosmic overtones]]. Tarantino's official response about the briefcase was a fairly lackluster "[[ShrugOfGod whatever the audience wants it to be.]]" For the record, it was originally supposed to be the diamonds from ''Film/ReservoirDogs'', but Tarantino decided to leave it deliberately ambiguous for the sake of this type of discussion. Tarantino [[WordOfGod once stated in an interview]] that he saw it as an allegory to the Arthurian Legend, with Wallace as King Arthur, Vince as Lancelot, Jules as Galahad, Butch as Mordred, The Wolf as Merlin, and the briefcase containing the Holy Grail.
25th Mar '17 3:03:20 AM Morgenthaler
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* François Rabelais's ''{{Gargantua}}'' has a preface that mocks the reader who looks for any hidden meaning, and then encourages them to dig deeper to find the wisdom in the book. The "hidden wisdom" is probably to [[MST3KMantra sit back and enjoy the damn book]].

to:

* François Rabelais's ''{{Gargantua}}'' ''Literature/{{Gargantua}}'' has a preface that mocks the reader who looks for any hidden meaning, and then encourages them to dig deeper to find the wisdom in the book. The "hidden wisdom" is probably to [[MST3KMantra sit back and enjoy the damn book]].



* Joseph Heller's expy in his semi-autobiographical novel argues that people only see a connection between ''{{Ulysses}}'' and ''Literature/TheOdyssey'' because James Joyce personally explained it to everyone who wasn't running away while covering their ears.

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* Joseph Heller's expy in his semi-autobiographical novel argues that people only see a connection between ''{{Ulysses}}'' ''Literature/{{Ulysses}}'' and ''Literature/TheOdyssey'' because James Joyce personally explained it to everyone who wasn't running away while covering their ears.
15th Mar '17 8:55:50 AM MyFinalEdits
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* Most of the works of Creator/{{Shakespeare}}. Try asking your English teacher what Iago's motives are in ''Theatre/{{Othello}}'', and what Iago stands for. The obvious one is that he's {{Satan}}, which has a bit of weight to it. Another is that Iago is [[PostModernism the author, trying to engineer a tragic play]]. Or maybe -- just maybe -- he's an intolerant redneck who has a problem working under a black man and a teetotaller, and suspects both of nailing his wife, like he says in the play.
** Or, he's in love with Othello.

to:

* Most of the works of Creator/{{Shakespeare}}. Try asking your English teacher what Iago's motives are in ''Theatre/{{Othello}}'', and what Iago stands for. The obvious one is that he's {{Satan}}, which has a bit of weight to it. Another is that Iago is [[PostModernism the author, trying to engineer a tragic play]]. Or maybe -- just maybe -- he's an intolerant redneck who has a problem working under a black man and a teetotaller, and suspects both of nailing his wife, like he says in the play.
**
play. Or, he's in love with Othello.
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