History Main / EveryoneIsJesusInPurgatory

22nd Apr '16 10:31:41 AM twilicorn
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* ''WesternAnimation/TheLandBeforeTime'': In a particularly horrifying interpretation of the film. [[labelnote:Click if you want to never be able to watch this movie again]]The earthquake near the beginning was a result of the Cretaceous–Tertiary extinction event, AKA the extinction of the dinosaurs. Meaning everyone was DeadAllAlong. The film is their journey through purgatory towards heaven, represented by the Great Valley. The dinosaur that comforts Littlefoot directly after his mother's death is an angel trying to get him to overcome his anger over his mother's death, for which he blames both her and (secretly) himself. The lava field is where Cera overcomes her sin of excessive pride, and where the rest of the group learns that there are no "shortcuts" to heaven, and that they must go on the path set for them, and have faith in it, or they'll never get there. The Sharptooth is representative of the kids' fear of their own mortality, and by killing him, they have finally let go of all of their earthly attachments, aside from Littlefoot, who still has guilt for the death of his mother. When he finally accepts her death, he finds the Great Valley, along with everyone else, where the rest of their families are waiting for them in the afterlife.[[/labelnote]]

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* ''WesternAnimation/TheLandBeforeTime'': In a ''WesternAnimation/TheLandBeforeTime'' has one particularly horrifying interpretation of the film. [[labelnote:Click if you want to never be able to watch this movie again]]The film: [[spoiler:The earthquake near the beginning was a result of the Cretaceous–Tertiary extinction event, AKA the extinction of the dinosaurs. Meaning everyone was DeadAllAlong. The film is their journey through purgatory towards heaven, represented by the Great Valley. The dinosaur that comforts Littlefoot directly after his mother's death is an angel trying to get him to overcome his anger over his mother's death, for which he blames both her and (secretly) himself. The lava field is where Cera overcomes her sin of excessive pride, and where the rest of the group learns that there are no "shortcuts" to heaven, and that they must go on the path set for them, and have faith in it, or they'll never get there. The Sharptooth is representative of the kids' fear of their own mortality, and by killing him, they have finally let go of all of their earthly attachments, aside from Littlefoot, who still has guilt for the death of his mother. When he finally accepts her death, he finds the Great Valley, along with everyone else, where the rest of their families are waiting for them in the afterlife.[[/labelnote]]]]
29th Mar '16 8:00:04 AM YT45
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** Tarantino [[WordOfGod once stated in an interview]] that he saw it as an allegory to the Arthurian Legend, with Wallace as King Arthur, Vince as Lancelot, Jules as Galahad, Butch as Mordred, and The Wolf as Merlin.

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** Tarantino [[WordOfGod once stated in an interview]] that he saw it as an allegory to the Arthurian Legend, with Wallace as King Arthur, Vince as Lancelot, Jules as Galahad, Butch as Mordred, and The Wolf as Merlin.Merlin, and the briefcase containing the Holy Grail.
29th Mar '16 7:59:05 AM YT45
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Added DiffLines:

** Tarantino [[WordOfGod once stated in an interview]] that he saw it as an allegory to the Arthurian Legend, with Wallace as King Arthur, Vince as Lancelot, Jules as Galahad, Butch as Mordred, and The Wolf as Merlin.
27th Mar '16 9:51:09 PM Onlythrice
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** There are still people who purport a metaphorical "Giygas is a fetus" theory, despite the fact that ''Mother 1'' clearly shows his origins (which many are unfamiliar with due to the game's NoExportForYou status).

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** There are still people who purport a metaphorical "Giygas is a fetus" theory, despite the fact that ''Mother 1'' clearly shows his origins (which many are unfamiliar with due to the game's NoExportForYou status).status up until 2015).
25th Mar '16 6:57:26 PM Doug86
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* It's even more pronounced with the Franchise/{{X-Men}}. Over the years it became so common to see Marvels mutants as a metaphor for Blacks (with Charles Xavier and Magneto as stand-ins for UsefulNotes/MartinLutherKingJr and UsefulNotes/MalcolmX, respectively), gays, or other specific or non-specific minorities, that some fans see it as a "violation" of what the story is supposedly about when a particular plot or character's behaviour does not fit in with their interpretation of choice. Some writers consciously or subconsciously fed this by modeling the mutants' plight in particular storylines on that of real-life minorities, which also led to fans squabbling amongst themselves as to whether the X-Men are more a metaphor for race or for homosexuality, and also to the tendency among some fans to consider "ugly" mutants "truer" mutants than "pretty" mutants. All this often loses sight of the fact that Marvel's mutants started out as a fairly standard science-fiction "super-race" melded with the standard Silver Age superhero conventions. Thus during the first two decades of the X-Men's existence the default was to maintain a SecretIdentity and hide that one was a mutant from the public, which would have some rather UnfortunateImplications if the feature had been intended as a metaphor of or a comment on the situation of a minority within society in the real world.

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* It's even more pronounced with the Franchise/{{X-Men}}. Franchise/XMen. Over the years it became so common to see Marvels Marvel's mutants as a metaphor for Blacks (with Charles Xavier and Magneto as stand-ins for UsefulNotes/MartinLutherKingJr and UsefulNotes/MalcolmX, respectively), gays, or other specific or non-specific minorities, that some fans see it as a "violation" of what the story is supposedly about when a particular plot or character's behaviour does not fit in with their interpretation of choice. Some writers consciously or subconsciously fed this by modeling the mutants' plight in particular storylines on that of real-life minorities, which also led to fans squabbling amongst themselves as to whether the X-Men are more a metaphor for race or for homosexuality, and also to the tendency among some fans to consider "ugly" mutants "truer" mutants than "pretty" mutants. All this often loses sight of the fact that Marvel's mutants started out as a fairly standard science-fiction "super-race" melded with the standard Silver Age superhero conventions. Thus during the first two decades of the X-Men's existence the default was to maintain a SecretIdentity and hide that one was a mutant from the public, which would have some rather UnfortunateImplications if the feature had been intended as a metaphor of or a comment on the situation of a minority within society in the real world.
14th Mar '16 12:55:05 PM SickBoy
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* An in-universe example occurs in ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'', where [[UnknownRival Ulysses]]' obsession with the Courier revolves around finding a deeper meaning if everything they've done, due to his belief that the destruction of the Divide (which they were [[MikeNelsonDestroyerOfWorlds indirectly responsible for]]) simply ''couldn't'' have been just an accident.

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* An in-universe example occurs in ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'', where [[UnknownRival Ulysses]]' obsession with the Courier revolves around finding a deeper meaning if in everything they've done, due to his belief that the destruction of the Divide (which they were [[MikeNelsonDestroyerOfWorlds indirectly responsible for]]) simply ''couldn't'' have been just an accident.
10th Mar '16 7:46:37 PM MyFinalEdits
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* Speaking of nursery rhymes, these have been a fertile field for folklorists, especially with regard to the events in history that supposedly inspired them. If one reads ''The Annotated Mother Goose'' by W. S. and L. M. Baring-Gould, which makes mention of some of the more elaborate theories, one gets the impression that whenever a nursery rhyme mentions a "little man", some folklorist will rise up and state that this is clearly and unambiguously a reference to king Philip II of Spain.

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* Speaking of nursery rhymes, these Nursery rhymes have been a fertile field for folklorists, especially with regard to the events in history that supposedly inspired them. If one reads ''The Annotated Mother Goose'' by W. S. and L. M. Baring-Gould, which makes mention of some of the more elaborate theories, one gets the impression that whenever a nursery rhyme mentions a "little man", some folklorist will rise up and state that this is clearly and unambiguously a reference to king Philip II of Spain.
10th Mar '16 1:19:49 AM Menshevik
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Added DiffLines:

* Speaking of nursery rhymes, these have been a fertile field for folklorists, especially with regard to the events in history that supposedly inspired them. If one reads ''The Annotated Mother Goose'' by W. S. and L. M. Baring-Gould, which makes mention of some of the more elaborate theories, one gets the impression that whenever a nursery rhyme mentions a "little man", some folklorist will rise up and state that this is clearly and unambiguously a reference to king Philip II of Spain.
10th Mar '16 12:53:11 AM Menshevik
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Added DiffLines:

* It's even more pronounced with the Franchise/{{X-Men}}. Over the years it became so common to see Marvels mutants as a metaphor for Blacks (with Charles Xavier and Magneto as stand-ins for UsefulNotes/MartinLutherKingJr and UsefulNotes/MalcolmX, respectively), gays, or other specific or non-specific minorities, that some fans see it as a "violation" of what the story is supposedly about when a particular plot or character's behaviour does not fit in with their interpretation of choice. Some writers consciously or subconsciously fed this by modeling the mutants' plight in particular storylines on that of real-life minorities, which also led to fans squabbling amongst themselves as to whether the X-Men are more a metaphor for race or for homosexuality, and also to the tendency among some fans to consider "ugly" mutants "truer" mutants than "pretty" mutants. All this often loses sight of the fact that Marvel's mutants started out as a fairly standard science-fiction "super-race" melded with the standard Silver Age superhero conventions. Thus during the first two decades of the X-Men's existence the default was to maintain a SecretIdentity and hide that one was a mutant from the public, which would have some rather UnfortunateImplications if the feature had been intended as a metaphor of or a comment on the situation of a minority within society in the real world.
7th Mar '16 10:10:44 AM AnotherGuy
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* A ''{{ComicStrip/Garfield}}'' [[http://www.retrojunk.com/article/show/417/the-death-of-garfield Halloween storyline]] in 1989 depicted Garfield waking up and finding everyone and everything he knew to be gone and broken down. The storyline ended with Garfield embracing denial and suddenly Jon and Odie are back in front of him. A fan theory began on the Internet suggesting that every strip since that point has been Garfield slowly starving to death in his delusions or already dead. (Of course, if the former's the case, it's taking him a good goddamn long time to die.) Davis was made aware of those theories in 2006 and is reported to have laughed about them. In any case, if you read the postscript of the last strip in this series, it's pretty clear that the nightmare about Garfield being alone forever was just that - a nightmare, a product of his imagination. And his only escape was to embrace the hope that he would wake up, and thus shift his mental state back to normal, in a combination of YourMindMakesItReal and ClapYourHandsIfYouBelieve.

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* * A ''{{ComicStrip/Garfield}}'' [[http://www.retrojunk.com/article/show/417/the-death-of-garfield Halloween storyline]] in 1989 depicted Garfield waking up and finding everyone and everything he knew to be gone and broken down. The storyline ended with Garfield embracing denial and suddenly Jon and Odie are back in front of him. A fan theory began on the Internet suggesting that every strip since that point has been Garfield slowly starving to death in his delusions or already dead. (Of course, if the former's the case, it's taking him a good goddamn long time to die.) Davis was made aware of those theories in 2006 and is reported to have laughed about them. In any case, if you read the postscript of the last strip in this series, it's pretty clear that the nightmare about Garfield being alone forever was just that - a nightmare, a product of his imagination. And his only escape was to embrace the hope that he would wake up, and thus shift his mental state back to normal, in a combination of YourMindMakesItReal and ClapYourHandsIfYouBelieve.



* George Carlin abhorred this trope. Quoth Carlin: "I leave symbols for the symbolminded."

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* George Carlin Creator/GeorgeCarlin abhorred this trope. Quoth Carlin: "I leave symbols for the symbolminded."
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