History Main / EvenEvilHasStandards

19th May '16 10:17:18 PM Mdjj1996
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Can even involve ConscienceMakesYouGoBack, SuddenPrincipledStand. See also EvilVirtues and VillainousValour, for good traits and virtues that villains commonly practice. The inversions of this trope are WellIntentionedExtremist and UtopiaJustifiesTheMeans, when it turns out that ''goodness'' is willingly crossing the MoralEventHorizon. This trope is a common trait in AffablyEvil characters. A subtrope of EveryoneHasStandards.

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Can even involve ConscienceMakesYouGoBack, SuddenPrincipledStand. See also EvilVirtues and VillainousValour, for good traits and virtues that villains commonly practice. The inversions of this trope are WellIntentionedExtremist and UtopiaJustifiesTheMeans, when it turns out that ''goodness'' is willingly crossing the MoralEventHorizon. This trope is a common trait in AffablyEvil characters. On the other hand, while FauxAffablyEvil villains do not possess much sincerity, even they have their limits. A subtrope of EveryoneHasStandards.
18th May '16 10:43:22 PM hamza678
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[[caption-width-right:350:Because even when [[SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker you're psychotic]], you still have to protect the American way.]]

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[[caption-width-right:350:Because even when [[SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker [[ComicBook/TheJoker you're psychotic]], you still have to protect the American way.]]
1st May '16 10:42:32 PM superboy313
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The CompleteMonster in particular has a tendency to provoke invocations of this trope on the part of other villains, due to being the absolute worst when it comes to villainy.

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The CompleteMonster in particular has a tendency to provoke invocations of this trope on the part of other villains, due to having zero moral standards and generally being the absolute worst when it comes to villainy.
27th Mar '16 2:34:27 AM LondonKdS
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It's often to show that a new villain is ''really'' [[SlidingScaleOfAntagonistVileness bad]] if even [[MorallyAmbiguousDoctorate Doctor]] [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast Annihilation]] shrinks from it. Another way that it's used is to keep a villain safely on the "still sympathetic" side of the MoralEventHorizon; give him something that he simply ''will not do''. It may be specifically invoked to prove that it's OK for our hero to [[EnemyMine work with]] villains who have standards when the need is great enough. This can be strange if handled badly, leading to confusion and unintentionally edge into BlueAndOrangeMorality. Why, after all, should a criminal think shooting a [[NominalImportance particular single orphan]] be worse than killing every single orphan in the ThrowawayCountry, or a serial killer be upset by petty theft, or...? This might be deliberate however, in order to show the MoralMyopia of the villains and make the viewers question what is right what is wrong and if there is more wrong. In AynRand's ''Literature/AtlasShrugged'', Hank Rearden, (one of the good guys) looks at some of the things the bad people in the story do, and seeing some actions of some people who are supposedly decent, or who are, but might have to do despicable things in comparison, wonders if there are degrees of evil.

to:

It's often to show that a new villain is ''really'' [[SlidingScaleOfAntagonistVileness bad]] if even [[MorallyAmbiguousDoctorate Doctor]] [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast Annihilation]] shrinks from it. Another way that it's used is to keep a villain safely on the "still sympathetic" side of the MoralEventHorizon; give him something that he simply ''will not do''. It may be specifically invoked to prove that it's OK for our hero to [[EnemyMine work with]] villains who have standards when the need is great enough. This can be strange if handled badly, leading to confusion and unintentionally edge into BlueAndOrangeMorality. Why, after all, should a criminal think shooting a [[NominalImportance particular single orphan]] be worse than killing every single orphan in the ThrowawayCountry, or a serial killer be upset by petty theft, or...? This might be deliberate however, in order to show the MoralMyopia of the villains and make the viewers question what is right what is wrong and if there is more wrong. In AynRand's ''Literature/AtlasShrugged'', Hank Rearden, (one of the good guys) looks at some of the things the bad people in the story do, and seeing some actions of some people who are supposedly decent, or who are, but might have to do despicable things in comparison, wonders if there are degrees of evil.\n
26th Mar '16 8:37:15 PM Tdarcos
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It's often to show that a new villain is ''really'' [[SlidingScaleOfAntagonistVileness bad]] if even [[MorallyAmbiguousDoctorate Doctor]] [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast Annihilation]] shrinks from it. Another way that it's used is to keep a villain safely on the "still sympathetic" side of the MoralEventHorizon; give him something that he simply ''will not do''. It may be specifically invoked to prove that it's OK for our hero to [[EnemyMine work with]] villains who have standards when the need is great enough. This can be strange if handled badly, leading to confusion and unintentionally edge into BlueAndOrangeMorality. Why, after all, should a criminal think shooting a [[NominalImportance particular single orphan]] be worse than killing every single orphan in the ThrowawayCountry, or a serial killer be upset by petty theft, or...? This might be deliberate however, in order to show the MoralMyopia of the villains and make the viewers question what is right what is wrong and if there is more wrong.

to:

It's often to show that a new villain is ''really'' [[SlidingScaleOfAntagonistVileness bad]] if even [[MorallyAmbiguousDoctorate Doctor]] [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast Annihilation]] shrinks from it. Another way that it's used is to keep a villain safely on the "still sympathetic" side of the MoralEventHorizon; give him something that he simply ''will not do''. It may be specifically invoked to prove that it's OK for our hero to [[EnemyMine work with]] villains who have standards when the need is great enough. This can be strange if handled badly, leading to confusion and unintentionally edge into BlueAndOrangeMorality. Why, after all, should a criminal think shooting a [[NominalImportance particular single orphan]] be worse than killing every single orphan in the ThrowawayCountry, or a serial killer be upset by petty theft, or...? This might be deliberate however, in order to show the MoralMyopia of the villains and make the viewers question what is right what is wrong and if there is more wrong.
wrong. In AynRand's ''Literature/AtlasShrugged'', Hank Rearden, (one of the good guys) looks at some of the things the bad people in the story do, and seeing some actions of some people who are supposedly decent, or who are, but might have to do despicable things in comparison, wonders if there are degrees of evil.
25th Mar '16 3:05:53 PM LondonKdS
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The CompleteMonster in particular has a tendency to invoke this trope, due to being the absolute worst when it comes to villainy.

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The CompleteMonster in particular has a tendency to invoke provoke invocations of this trope, trope on the part of other villains, due to being the absolute worst when it comes to villainy.
25th Mar '16 2:20:31 PM superboy313
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The trope title is frequently spouted by the NobleDemon, in order to justify his evil self-identification. The typical format of their declaration is usually along the lines of "I may be Y, but I am/am not an ''X'' Y!" The offender in particular is often a CompleteMonster, who is so horribly evil that even other villains are disgusted by their actions.

to:

The trope title is frequently spouted by the NobleDemon, in order to justify his evil self-identification. The typical format of their declaration is usually along the lines of "I may be Y, but I am/am not an ''X'' Y!" Y!"

The offender CompleteMonster in particular is often has a CompleteMonster, who is so horribly evil that even other villains are disgusted by their actions.
tendency to invoke this trope, due to being the absolute worst when it comes to villainy.
23rd Mar '16 5:06:19 AM Shadowgazer
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It's often to show that a new villain is ''really'' [[SlidingScaleOfAntagonistVileness bad]] if even [[MorallyAmbiguousDoctorate Doctor]] [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast Annihilation]] shrinks from it. Another way that it's used is to keep a villain safely on the "still sympathetic" side of the MoralEventHorizon; give him something that he simply ''will not do''. It may be specifically invoked to prove that it's OK for our hero to [[EnemyMine work with]] villains who have standards when the need is great enough. This can be strange if handled badly, leading to confusion and unintentionally edge into BlueAndOrangeMorality. Why, after all, should a criminal think shooting a [[NominalImportance particular single orphan]] be worse than killing every single orphan in the ThrowawayCountry, or a serial killer be upset by petty theft, or...?

to:

It's often to show that a new villain is ''really'' [[SlidingScaleOfAntagonistVileness bad]] if even [[MorallyAmbiguousDoctorate Doctor]] [[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast Annihilation]] shrinks from it. Another way that it's used is to keep a villain safely on the "still sympathetic" side of the MoralEventHorizon; give him something that he simply ''will not do''. It may be specifically invoked to prove that it's OK for our hero to [[EnemyMine work with]] villains who have standards when the need is great enough. This can be strange if handled badly, leading to confusion and unintentionally edge into BlueAndOrangeMorality. Why, after all, should a criminal think shooting a [[NominalImportance particular single orphan]] be worse than killing every single orphan in the ThrowawayCountry, or a serial killer be upset by petty theft, or...?
? This might be deliberate however, in order to show the MoralMyopia of the villains and make the viewers question what is right what is wrong and if there is more wrong.



Compare and contrast PragmaticVillainy, when the villain's refusal to partake in the abhorrent act is far more selfish (or in the case of a group of villains against a single one, group-beneficial); EvilerThanThou, where the villain is dismissive of another villain for not being evil ''enough''; EvenMooksHaveLovedOnes, where minions defect to protect a loved one from their boss; DoWrongRight for cases where it's not what is done but rather ''how'' it's done that the villain has standards for; and FamilyValuesVillain for where the standards are very . . . old fashioned. Often the deal with many LawfulEvil villains, but sometimes not. Can occasionally be the cause of a BreakTheBadass moment, when the {{Badass}} in question is the bad guy.

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Compare and contrast PragmaticVillainy, when the villain's refusal to partake in the abhorrent act is far more selfish (or in the case of a group of villains against a single one, group-beneficial); EvilerThanThou, where the villain is dismissive of another villain for not being evil ''enough''; EvenMooksHaveLovedOnes, where minions defect to protect a loved one from their boss; DoWrongRight for cases where it's not what is done but rather ''how'' it's done that the villain has standards for; and FamilyValuesVillain for where the standards are very . . . old fashioned. Often the deal with many LawfulEvil villains, but sometimes not. Can occasionally be the cause of a BreakTheBadass moment, when the {{Badass}} in question is the bad guy.
guy. As said above it may be used by a character who also crossed the MoralEventHorizon and so he may be, in theory (if not wholly) just as evil as the target of this trope.
23rd Feb '16 10:56:28 PM superboy313
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The trope title is frequently spouted by the NobleDemon, in order to justify his evil self-identification. The typical format of their declaration is usually along the lines of "I may be Y, but I am/am not an ''X'' Y!"

to:

The trope title is frequently spouted by the NobleDemon, in order to justify his evil self-identification. The typical format of their declaration is usually along the lines of "I may be Y, but I am/am not an ''X'' Y!"
Y!" The offender in particular is often a CompleteMonster, who is so horribly evil that even other villains are disgusted by their actions.
13th Feb '16 11:56:20 AM Berrenta
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See also HitmanWithAHeart, where this Trope may apply. (Not all characters who fit the ProfessionalKiller Trope are evil, but many are, and a lot do have scruples. They're particularly likely to have the EvenEvilHasStandards variant SelectiveSlaughter.)

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See also HitmanWithAHeart, where this Trope may apply. (Not all characters who fit the ProfessionalKiller Trope are evil, but many are, and a lot do have scruples. They're particularly likely to have the EvenEvilHasStandards Even Evil Has Standards variant SelectiveSlaughter.)
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