History Main / EternalRecurrence

23rd Jun '17 1:32:11 AM ImpudentInfidel
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** The climax of the trilogy states that [[spoiler:the actions of the Reapers are in response to ''another'' EternalRecurrence that they have observed throughout history: The inevitable RobotWar that results when civilizations [[AIIsACrapshoot create AI and it rebels against them]]. To prevent artifical intelligence from wiping out organic life the Catalyst created the Reapers to "preserve" organic races by converting into Reapers as soon as they had the capacity to create AI]]. During the climax, [[spoiler:the Catalyst acknowledges that Shepard actually reaching it is a sign that the Reaper Cycle is breaking down. An organic actually meeting the Catalyst in the heart of the Citadel is the one event that never occurred in any previous Cycle.]]

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** The climax of the trilogy states that [[spoiler:the actions of the Reapers are in response to ''another'' EternalRecurrence that they have observed throughout history: The inevitable RobotWar that results when civilizations [[AIIsACrapshoot create AI and it rebels against them]]. To prevent artifical intelligence from wiping out organic life the Catalyst created the Reapers to "preserve" organic races by converting into Reapers as soon as they had the capacity to create AI]].AI. It isn't clear if this other cycle is natural, or a result of the Reapers subtly guiding the development of each cycle by planting tech for them to find; the Catalyst claims the former, but the Reaper Sovereign boasted of the latter]]. During the climax, [[spoiler:the Catalyst acknowledges that Shepard actually reaching it is a sign that the Reaper Cycle is breaking down. An organic actually meeting the Catalyst in the heart of the Citadel is the one event that never occurred in any previous Cycle.]]
12th May '17 4:23:08 AM jormis29
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* Creator/MilanKundera's ''The Unbearable Lightness of Being'' references Nietzsche's theory of eternal recurrence directly and frequently throughout the novel. Kundera shows the un-recurrent nature of human life as a source of great hopelessness for Tomas and Tereza. The novel describes several character's attempts to subvert this meaninglessness, which is born from the lack of recurrence. This idea of recurrence is tied to Kundera's exploration of lightness and weight--with recurrence as weight, or meaning, and singularity as lightness, or a lack of meaning.

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* Creator/MilanKundera's ''The Unbearable Lightness of Being'' ''Literature/TheUnbearableLightnessOfBeing'' references Nietzsche's theory of eternal recurrence directly and frequently throughout the novel. Kundera shows the un-recurrent nature of human life as a source of great hopelessness for Tomas and Tereza. The novel describes several character's attempts to subvert this meaninglessness, which is born from the lack of recurrence. This idea of recurrence is tied to Kundera's exploration of lightness and weight--with recurrence as weight, or meaning, and singularity as lightness, or a lack of meaning.
15th Apr '17 6:11:01 PM nombretomado
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* EternalRecurrence is a very common element of SoundHorizon albums, starting with their very first (Chronicle).

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* EternalRecurrence is a very common element of SoundHorizon Music/SoundHorizon albums, starting with their very first (Chronicle).
26th Mar '17 5:34:20 PM tatum
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* Milan Kundera's ''The Unbearable Lightness of Being'' references Nietzsche's theory of eternal recurrence directly and frequently throughout the novel. Kundera shows the un-recurrent nature of human life as a source of great hopelessness for Tomas and Tereza. The novel describes several character's attempts to subvert this meaninglessness, which is born from the lack of recurrence. This idea of recurrence is tied to Kundera's exploration of lightness and weight--with recurrence as weight, or meaning, and singularity as lightness, or a lack of meaning.

to:

* Milan Kundera's Creator/MilanKundera's ''The Unbearable Lightness of Being'' references Nietzsche's theory of eternal recurrence directly and frequently throughout the novel. Kundera shows the un-recurrent nature of human life as a source of great hopelessness for Tomas and Tereza. The novel describes several character's attempts to subvert this meaninglessness, which is born from the lack of recurrence. This idea of recurrence is tied to Kundera's exploration of lightness and weight--with recurrence as weight, or meaning, and singularity as lightness, or a lack of meaning.
26th Mar '17 5:31:25 PM tatum
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** Milan Kundera's ''The Unbearable Lightness of Being'' references Nietzsche's theory of eternal recurrence directly and frequently throughout the novel. Kundera shows the un-recurrent nature of human life as a source of great hopelessness for Tomas and Tereza. The novel describes several character's attempts to subvert this meaninglessness, which is born from the lack of recurrence. This idea of recurrence is tied to Kundera's exploration of lightness and weight--with recurrence as weight, or meaning, and singularity as lightness, or a lack of meaning.

to:

** * Milan Kundera's ''The Unbearable Lightness of Being'' references Nietzsche's theory of eternal recurrence directly and frequently throughout the novel. Kundera shows the un-recurrent nature of human life as a source of great hopelessness for Tomas and Tereza. The novel describes several character's attempts to subvert this meaninglessness, which is born from the lack of recurrence. This idea of recurrence is tied to Kundera's exploration of lightness and weight--with recurrence as weight, or meaning, and singularity as lightness, or a lack of meaning.
26th Mar '17 5:30:42 PM tatum
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** Milan Kundera's ''The Unbearable Lightness of Being'' references Nietzsche's theory of eternal recurrence directly and frequently throughout the novel. Kundera shows the un-recurrent nature of human life as a source of great hopelessness for Tomas and Tereza. The novel describes several character's attempts to subvert this meaninglessness, which is born from the lack of recurrence. This idea of recurrence is tied to Kundera's exploration of lightness and weight--with recurrence as weight, or meaning, and singularity as lightness, or a lack of meaning.
3rd Feb '17 6:43:45 PM Psychadelico
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The idea goes back to Hindu and Buddhist traditions. In Hinduism, there is the Maha Yuga concept where the universe is destroyed and recreated by Brahma every 4.32 million years. Buddhism has a similar notion of Kalachakra ("wheel of time"). This is also known as "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eternal_return eternal return]]". Many such systems divide these periods of existence into 'Ages'. The Yuga system, for example, shows the world evolve and devolve within each cycle (see {{Gotterdammerung}}). Of course, a more ThemeParkVersion-esque view on these traditions boils down to "HistoryRepeats."

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The idea goes back to Hindu and Buddhist traditions. In Hinduism, there is the Maha Yuga concept where the universe is destroyed and recreated by Brahma every 4.32 million years. Buddhism has a similar notion of Kalachakra ("wheel of time"). A similar idea, likely developed in parallel (and responsible for the infamous [[MayanDoomsday 2012 apocalypse prediction]]), appears in Southwestern Native American mythologies[[note]]ranging at least from the Hopi and Navajo to the Aztecs and Maya[[/note]], where the world is conceived as having been reborn four or five (depending on the culture) times already, and presumably would be again. This is also known as "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eternal_return eternal return]]". Many such systems divide these periods of existence into 'Ages'. The Yuga system, for example, shows the world evolve and devolve within each cycle (see {{Gotterdammerung}}). Of course, a more ThemeParkVersion-esque view on these traditions boils down to "HistoryRepeats."
16th Jan '17 4:22:44 PM Onlythrice
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* In the final season of ''WesternAnimation/RegularShow'', it's revealed that Pops is an alien and a PhysicalGod, and every 14 billion years the universe is reset during a battle between him and his EvilTwin. [[spoiler: In the SeriesFinale, Pops manages to finally break the cycle by [[HeroicSacrifice killing himself]] [[TakingYouWithMe and his brother]].]]
16th Jan '17 3:06:06 PM DarkHunter
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* The premise of ''VideoGame/DarkSoulsIII'' is that the destruction wrought by the cycles has all but doomed the world. The world is literally running on embers, the Dark is out of control, and even the boundaries of life and death have broken down, with something bringing about the revival of ancient threats like the Everlasting Stone Dragons and the fallen Lords of Cinder. The world may not be able to survive another cycle.

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* The premise of ''VideoGame/DarkSoulsIII'' is that the destruction wrought by the cycles has all but doomed the world. The world is literally running on embers, the Dark is out of control, and even the boundaries of life and death have broken down, with something bringing about down. It's suggested that the revival of ancient threats like the Everlasting Stone Dragons and the fallen Lords of Cinder. The world may not be able to survive another cycle.cycle, [[spoiler:and if you do Link the Fire to continue the cycles, it barely burns at all, a marked contrast to the powerful explosion of fire that happened in the first game, showing that even the linking of the flame that has kept the cycle going is beginning to fail]].
14th Jan '17 6:52:26 PM nombretomado
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* This is the main plotline of the ''Franchise/{{Lufia}}'' series: every hundred years or so, the four Sinistrals appear and attack humanity. Sometimes they succeed in ruining the world, but other times a hero (the protagonist of each game) stops them. In any case, the Sinistrals will inevitably be revived in another century.

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* This is the main plotline of the ''Franchise/{{Lufia}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Lufia}}'' series: every hundred years or so, the four Sinistrals appear and attack humanity. Sometimes they succeed in ruining the world, but other times a hero (the protagonist of each game) stops them. In any case, the Sinistrals will inevitably be revived in another century.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.EternalRecurrence