History Main / EssentialAnime

29th May '16 5:54:55 PM Vicious96
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* ''Anime/Paranoia Agent'': Written and Director by infamous mindfucker Creator/SatoshiKon the series follows the paranormal events of "Lil' Slugger" as a commentary on coping mechanisms and the influence of mass media.

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* ''Anime/Paranoia Agent'': ''Anime/ParanoiaAgent'': Written and Director by infamous mindfucker Creator/SatoshiKon the series follows the paranormal events of "Lil' Slugger" as a commentary on coping mechanisms and the influence of mass media.
29th May '16 5:54:18 PM Vicious96
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to:

* ''Anime/Paranoia Agent'': Written and Director by infamous mindfucker Creator/SatoshiKon the series follows the paranormal events of "Lil' Slugger" as a commentary on coping mechanisms and the influence of mass media.
29th May '16 5:48:25 PM Vicious96
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* ''Anime/ErgoProxy'': was a series produced by Japanese studio {{Creator/Manglobe}} and broadcast in early 2006. Ergo Proxy takes place in a dystopian future where the earth has suffered an immense ecological disaster and the remnants of humanity reside in dome cities. The series also incorporates philosophical and religious themes into its main story.

to:

* ''Anime/ErgoProxy'': was a series produced by Japanese studio {{Creator/Manglobe}} and broadcast in early 2006. Ergo Proxy takes place in a dystopian future where the earth has suffered an immense ecological disaster and the remnants of humanity reside in dome cities. The series also central narrative incorporates theological and philosophical and religious themes such as Gnosticism. Throughout the series certain areas of the narrative venture into its main story.the territory of Postcyberpunk.
29th May '16 5:38:06 PM Vicious96
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* ''Anime/ErgoProxy'': was a series produced by Japanese studio {{Manglobe}} and broadcast in early 2006. Ergo Proxy takes place in a dystopian future where the earth has suffered an immense ecological disaster and the remnants of humanity reside in dome cities. The series also incorporates philosophical and religious themes into its main story.

to:

* ''Anime/ErgoProxy'': was a series produced by Japanese studio {{Manglobe}} {{Creator/Manglobe}} and broadcast in early 2006. Ergo Proxy takes place in a dystopian future where the earth has suffered an immense ecological disaster and the remnants of humanity reside in dome cities. The series also incorporates philosophical and religious themes into its main story.
29th May '16 5:37:39 PM Vicious96
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* ''Anime/ErgoProxy'': was a series produced by Japanese studio Manglobe and broadcast in early 2006. Ergo Proxy takes place in a dystopian future where the earth has suffered an immense ecological disaster and the remnants of humanity reside in dome cities. The series also incorporates philosophical and religious themes into its main story.

to:

* ''Anime/ErgoProxy'': was a series produced by Japanese studio Manglobe {{Manglobe}} and broadcast in early 2006. Ergo Proxy takes place in a dystopian future where the earth has suffered an immense ecological disaster and the remnants of humanity reside in dome cities. The series also incorporates philosophical and religious themes into its main story.
29th May '16 5:36:41 PM Vicious96
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to:

* ''Anime/ErgoProxy'': was a series produced by Japanese studio Manglobe and broadcast in early 2006. Ergo Proxy takes place in a dystopian future where the earth has suffered an immense ecological disaster and the remnants of humanity reside in dome cities. The series also incorporates philosophical and religious themes into its main story.
27th May '16 8:47:45 AM Willbyr
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** TropeCodifiers: ''Anime/SailorMoon''. The first series most anyone thinks of when the words "Magical Girl show" are mentioned, although it is equally a {{sentai}} series. The original series aired in Japan from 1992 to 1993, and was kept alive in direct sequels until early 1997; it was still popular enough over a decade after its premiere that it was given a {{Live Action|Adaptation}} [[Series/PrettyGuardianSailorMoon Adaptation]] in 2003, and ''Anime/SailorMoonCrystal'', a new anime series that follows the manga more closely, started airing in 2014. Its production company terminated all licenses outside of Japan in 2004, but have recently started allowing some foreign companies to get the rights to the series again, and it has been re-released in Italy, Germany, Israel, and Mexico. In 2014, Creator/VizMedia announced their rights acquisition to both ''Crystal'' and the original anime. Under Viz, the entirety of the original anime will be subbed and dubbed unedited, along with ''Crystal''.
** {{Deconstruction}}s: ''Anime/RevolutionaryGirlUtena''. Compared stylistically to ''Rose Of Versailles'', ''Utena'' (''Shoujo Kakumei Utena'') first aired in Japan in 1997. It couples a shojo duelling story with elements of chivalric romance, Jungian psychology, and a surreal thriller. Its post-modern narrative and feminist themes distinguish it from any other anime ever made.

to:

** TropeCodifiers: TropeCodifier: ''Anime/SailorMoon''. The first series most anyone thinks of when the words "Magical Girl show" are mentioned, although it is equally a {{sentai}} series. The original series aired in Japan from 1992 to 1993, and was kept alive in direct sequels until early 1997; it was still popular enough over a decade after its premiere that it was given a {{Live Action|Adaptation}} [[Series/PrettyGuardianSailorMoon Adaptation]] in 2003, and ''Anime/SailorMoonCrystal'', a new anime series that follows the manga more closely, started airing in 2014. Its production company terminated all licenses outside of Japan in 2004, but have recently started allowing some foreign companies to get the rights to the series again, and it has been re-released in Italy, Germany, Israel, and Mexico. In 2014, Creator/VizMedia announced their rights acquisition to both ''Crystal'' and the original anime. Under Viz, the entirety of the original anime will be subbed and dubbed unedited, along with ''Crystal''.
** {{Deconstruction}}s: {{Deconstruction}}: ''Anime/RevolutionaryGirlUtena''. Compared stylistically to ''Rose Of Versailles'', ''Utena'' (''Shoujo Kakumei Utena'') first aired in Japan in 1997. It couples a shojo duelling story with elements of chivalric romance, Jungian psychology, and a surreal thriller. Its post-modern narrative and feminist themes distinguish it from any other anime ever made.
27th May '16 8:47:11 AM Willbyr
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** SuperRobot TropeCodifier: ''Anime/MazingerZ''. Aired in Japan from 1972 to 1974. The show that launched the Super Robot Genre. While ''Tetsujin 28'' was the original giant robot, ''Mazinger'' is probably the most influential and biggest TropeMaker.
** RealRobot TropeCodifier: ''Anime/MobileSuitGundam'': A cultural phenomenon in its own right, ''Mobile Suit Gundam'' (or ''Kidou Senshi Gundam'') aired in Japan from 1979 to 1980. It has survived in several iterations since, most recently as the ongoing ''Anime/MobileSuitGundamUnicorn'' and ''Anime/MobileSuitGundamAGE''. It is notable (at least in its earlier entries) for establishing the RealRobotGenre, grounding the robots somewhere closer to reality (both size- and technology-wise) and focusing more on the life and tribulations of their pilots. The plots of the series are pure military drama, and would work just as well were the robots to be replaced by tanks, ships or any other modern fighting vehicle, with the Gundam taking the role of game changing, cutting edge technology.
** TransformingMecha TropeCodifier: ''Anime/{{Macross}}'' (1982). Best known in North America as the source for the first third of ''Robotech'' (1984), it helped launch the Transforming Robot genre, along with Franchise/{{Transformers}}.
** {{Deconstruction}}: ''Anime/NeonGenesisEvangelion'': The most influential series on the Humongous Mecha genre since Gundam's debut, ''Evangelion'' aired in Japan from 1995 to 1996. In America, it was released commercially into a market prepared by such series as ''Manga/RanmaOneHalf'' and ''Anime/SailorMoon''. While many other series could be called better gateways for people starting out in anime, this is a must for anyone who wants to go further in the mecha genre, or who are interested in dark psychological drama and eschatology. It's also one of anime's most (in)famous examples of MindScrew.
** {{Reconstruction}}: ''Anime/MartianSuccessorNadesico'': Airing in Japan from 1996 to 1997, ''Nadesico'' was a sometimes-humorous, sometimes-serious parody/satire of the HumongousMecha and SpaceOpera genres. Although it was much more popular in Japan than in the west, its deconstructions and reconstructions of the genre influenced many shows to come after.
** GenreThrowback: ''Anime/GaoGaiGar'' aired from 1997-98. Unapologetic of the original HotBlooded-ness and other tropes associated with mecha. When it ended and showed through DVD sales that it was a massive hit with otaku, what followed was a ton of remakes and sequels of old-school Super Robots, from ''Manga/GetterRobo'' to ''Anime/MazingerZ'' to even ''Anime/KotetsuJeeg'', as well as new entries such as ''Anime/TengenToppaGurrenLagann''.


'''MagicalGirl:'''

to:

* {{Trope Codifier}}s:
** SuperRobot TropeCodifier: SuperRobot: ''Anime/MazingerZ''. Aired in Japan from 1972 to 1974. The show that launched the Super Robot Genre. While ''Tetsujin 28'' was the original giant robot, ''Mazinger'' is probably the most influential and biggest TropeMaker.
** RealRobot TropeCodifier: RealRobot: ''Anime/MobileSuitGundam'': A cultural phenomenon in its own right, ''Mobile Suit Gundam'' (or ''Kidou Senshi Gundam'') aired in Japan from 1979 to 1980. It has survived in several iterations since, most recently as the ongoing ''Anime/MobileSuitGundamUnicorn'' and ''Anime/MobileSuitGundamAGE''. It is notable (at least in its earlier entries) for establishing the RealRobotGenre, grounding the robots somewhere closer to reality (both size- and technology-wise) and focusing more on the life and tribulations of their pilots. The plots of the series are pure military drama, and would work just as well were the robots to be replaced by tanks, ships or any other modern fighting vehicle, with the Gundam taking the role of game changing, cutting edge technology.
** TransformingMecha TropeCodifier: TransformingMecha: ''Anime/{{Macross}}'' (1982). Best known in North America as the source for the first third of ''Robotech'' ''Anime/{{Robotech}}'' (1984), it helped launch the Transforming Robot genre, along with Franchise/{{Transformers}}.
** * {{Deconstruction}}: ''Anime/NeonGenesisEvangelion'': The most influential series on the Humongous Mecha genre since Gundam's debut, ''Evangelion'' aired in Japan from 1995 to 1996. In America, it was released commercially into a market prepared by such series as ''Manga/RanmaOneHalf'' and ''Anime/SailorMoon''. While many other series could be called better gateways for people starting out in anime, this is a must for anyone who wants to go further in the mecha genre, or who are interested in dark psychological drama and eschatology. It's also one of anime's most (in)famous examples of MindScrew.
** * {{Reconstruction}}: ''Anime/MartianSuccessorNadesico'': Airing in Japan from 1996 to 1997, ''Nadesico'' was a sometimes-humorous, sometimes-serious parody/satire of the HumongousMecha and SpaceOpera genres. Although it was much more popular in Japan than in the west, its deconstructions and reconstructions of the genre influenced many shows to come after.
** * GenreThrowback: ''Anime/GaoGaiGar'' aired from 1997-98. Unapologetic of the original HotBlooded-ness and other tropes associated with mecha. When it ended and showed through DVD sales that it was a massive hit with otaku, what followed was a ton of remakes and sequels of old-school Super Robots, from ''Manga/GetterRobo'' to ''Anime/MazingerZ'' to even ''Anime/KotetsuJeeg'', as well as new entries such as ''Anime/TengenToppaGurrenLagann''.


'''MagicalGirl:'''
''Anime/TengenToppaGurrenLagann''.

'''MagicalGirl (and subtypes):'''



* General MagicalGirl TropeCodifier: ''Manga/HimitsuNoAkkoChan''. Airing in Japan between 1969 and 1970. One of the first and one of the most defining examples of Magical Girl Anime. Based off a Manga of the same name and sporting two remakes, running from 1988 - 1989 and 1998 - 1999.
* MagicalGirlWarrior TropeMaker: ''Anime/CuteyHoney''. Airing in Japan in 1973 to 1974. What began as the first Shonen program with a female protagonist became the Trope Maker of MagicalGirlWarrior via the PeripheryDemographic the TV series garnered (partly due to the toned down Ecchi elements). It set many of the standards for the genre.
* MagicalGirlWarrior TropeCodifier: ''Anime/SailorMoon''. The first series most anyone thinks of when the words "Magical Girl show" are mentioned, although it is equally a {{sentai}} series. The original series aired in Japan from 1992 to 1993, and was kept alive in direct sequels until early 1997; it was still popular enough over a decade after its premiere that it was given a [[LiveActionAdaptation LiveAction]] [[Series/PrettyGuardianSailorMoon Adaptation]] in 2003, and ''Anime/SailorMoonCrystal'', a new anime series that follows the manga more closely, started airing in 2014. Its production company terminated all licenses outside of Japan in 2004, but have recently started allowing some foreign companies to get the rights to the series again, and it has been re-released in Italy, Germany, Israel, and Mexico. In 2014, Creator/VizMedia announced their rights acquisition to both ''Crystal'' and the original anime. Under Viz, the entirety of the original anime will be subbed and dubbed unedited, along with ''Crystal''.
* MagicalGirlWarrior {{Deconstruction}}s: ''Anime/RevolutionaryGirlUtena''. Compared stylistically to ''Rose Of Versailles'', ''Utena'' (''Shoujo Kakumei Utena'') first aired in Japan in 1997. It couples a shojo duelling story with elements of chivalric romance, Jungian psychology, and a surreal thriller. Its post-modern narrative and feminist themes distinguish it from any other anime ever made.
* MagicalGirl {{Deconstruction}}: ''Anime/PuellaMagiMadokaMagica''. First aired in 2011, the 12-episode series takes the expected traits of the average MagicalGirl show and turns it upside down in a [[DarkerAndEdgier not very happy]], tightly woven plot with acclaimed music and visuals. Generally considered to be a modern classic.
* MagicalGirlWarrior {{Reconstruction}}s[=/=]GenreThrowback: ''Anime/PrettyCure''. The most popular Modern Day magical girl show in japan, playing many tropes straight again, but with a twist in that there's also tons of post Modernism and [=DragonBall=] styled physical fighting.

to:

* General MagicalGirl TropeCodifier: ''Manga/HimitsuNoAkkoChan''. Airing in Japan between 1969 and 1970. One of the first and one of the most defining examples of Magical Girl Anime. Based off a Manga of the same name and sporting two remakes, running from 1988 - 1989 and 1998 - 1999.
* MagicalGirlWarrior {{Deconstruction}}: ''Anime/PuellaMagiMadokaMagica''. First aired in 2011, the 12-episode series takes the expected traits of the average MagicalGirl show and turns it upside down in a [[DarkerAndEdgier not very happy]], tightly woven plot with acclaimed music and visuals. Generally considered to be a modern classic.
* MagicalGirlWarrior:
**
TropeMaker: ''Anime/CuteyHoney''. Airing in Japan in 1973 to 1974. What began as the first Shonen program with a female protagonist became the Trope Maker of MagicalGirlWarrior via the PeripheryDemographic the TV series garnered (partly due to the toned down Ecchi elements). It set many of the standards for the genre.
* MagicalGirlWarrior TropeCodifier: ** TropeCodifiers: ''Anime/SailorMoon''. The first series most anyone thinks of when the words "Magical Girl show" are mentioned, although it is equally a {{sentai}} series. The original series aired in Japan from 1992 to 1993, and was kept alive in direct sequels until early 1997; it was still popular enough over a decade after its premiere that it was given a [[LiveActionAdaptation LiveAction]] {{Live Action|Adaptation}} [[Series/PrettyGuardianSailorMoon Adaptation]] in 2003, and ''Anime/SailorMoonCrystal'', a new anime series that follows the manga more closely, started airing in 2014. Its production company terminated all licenses outside of Japan in 2004, but have recently started allowing some foreign companies to get the rights to the series again, and it has been re-released in Italy, Germany, Israel, and Mexico. In 2014, Creator/VizMedia announced their rights acquisition to both ''Crystal'' and the original anime. Under Viz, the entirety of the original anime will be subbed and dubbed unedited, along with ''Crystal''.
* MagicalGirlWarrior ** {{Deconstruction}}s: ''Anime/RevolutionaryGirlUtena''. Compared stylistically to ''Rose Of Versailles'', ''Utena'' (''Shoujo Kakumei Utena'') first aired in Japan in 1997. It couples a shojo duelling story with elements of chivalric romance, Jungian psychology, and a surreal thriller. Its post-modern narrative and feminist themes distinguish it from any other anime ever made.
* MagicalGirl {{Deconstruction}}: ''Anime/PuellaMagiMadokaMagica''. First aired in 2011, the 12-episode series takes the expected traits of the average MagicalGirl show and turns it upside down in a [[DarkerAndEdgier not very happy]], tightly woven plot with acclaimed music and visuals. Generally considered to be a modern classic.
* MagicalGirlWarrior {{Reconstruction}}s[=/=]GenreThrowback:
** {{Reconstruction}}[=/=]GenreThrowback: ''Anime/PrettyCure''. The most popular Modern Day magical girl show in japan, playing many tropes straight again, but with a twist in that there's also tons of post Modernism and [=DragonBall=] styled Franchise/DragonBall[=-=]styled physical fighting.



* TropeMaker: ''Anime/SpaceBattleshipYamato'' a.k.a ''Anime/StarBlazers''. Aired in Japan from 1974 to 1980. It was the first popular English-translated anime that had an over-arching plot and storyline that required the episodes to be shown in order. Even while being toned down a bit by editing, it also dealt with much more mature themes than any other productions being aimed at the same target audience at the time. As a result, it paved the way for the introduction and popularity of future arc-based, plot-driven anime translations. It also heavily addressed Japanese thoughts about WWII, the nuclear bomb, and so forth.

to:

* TropeMaker: ''Anime/SpaceBattleshipYamato'' a.k.a ''Anime/StarBlazers''.''Star Blazers''. Aired in Japan from 1974 to 1980. It was the first popular English-translated anime that had an over-arching plot and storyline that required the episodes to be shown in order. Even while being toned down a bit by editing, it also dealt with much more mature themes than any other productions being aimed at the same target audience at the time. As a result, it paved the way for the introduction and popularity of future arc-based, plot-driven anime translations. It also heavily addressed Japanese thoughts about WWII, the nuclear bomb, and so forth.






** TropeCodifier: ''Anime/TenchiMuyo'': The first OVA series, along with ''Ranma'', introduced non-Japanese audiences to the unwanted harem genre. Followed by ''Tenchi Universe'', the television continuity, which aired in Japan in 1995 and differs significantly in scope from the original 1992 OVA. ''Tenchi Universe'' was then followed by several other series with (mostly) the same core cast and situations (but with often radically different implementations), as well as three motion pictures. A third OVA series released in 2004 extends the original OVA plotline, but leaves matters just as [[NoRomanticResolution unresolved]] as its predecessors.

to:

** TropeCodifier: ''Anime/TenchiMuyo'': The first OVA series, along with ''Ranma'', introduced non-Japanese audiences to the unwanted harem genre. Followed by ''Tenchi Universe'', ''Anime/TenchiUniverse'', the television continuity, which aired in Japan in 1995 and differs significantly in scope from the original 1992 OVA. ''Tenchi Universe'' was then followed by several other series with (mostly) the same core cast and situations (but with often radically different implementations), as well as three motion pictures. A third OVA series released in 2004 extends the original OVA plotline, but leaves matters just as [[NoRomanticResolution unresolved]] as its predecessors.



*** ''Manga/RanmaOneHalf''. Aired in Japan from 1989 to 1992, and based on the manga of the same name by Creator/RumikoTakahashi, ''Ranma'' is a fusion of romance/comedy and shonen fighting and was, along with ''Anime/SailorMoon'', one of the gateway anime for North American fans in the early/mid-1990s. This series is also the TropeCodifier for the LoveDodecahedron sub-genre, with every member of the UnwantedHarem having his or her own unrequited love interest, and is often considered the best example of BelligerentSexualTension the BelligerentSexualTension trope was once called "Takahashi Couple" or even its TropeCodifier.
*** ''VisualNovel/SchoolDays'' deconstructs the UnwantedHarem trope by going in a completely different direction from ''Ranma 1/2''. ''Ranma'' asks the question "How does an honourable man deal with multiple obligations to marry?" ''VisualNovel/SchoolDays'' asks "What happens if the guy decides to boink ALL the girls?" Answer: Nothing Good. Aired in 2007. Also the source of the "Nice Boat" meme.


to:

*** ''Manga/RanmaOneHalf''. Aired in Japan from 1989 to 1992, and based on the manga of the same name by Creator/RumikoTakahashi, ''Ranma'' is a fusion of romance/comedy and shonen fighting and was, along with ''Anime/SailorMoon'', one of the gateway anime for North American fans in the early/mid-1990s. This series is also the TropeCodifier for the LoveDodecahedron sub-genre, with every member of the UnwantedHarem having his or her own unrequited love interest, and is often considered the best example of BelligerentSexualTension the BelligerentSexualTension (the trope was once called "Takahashi Couple" Couple") or even its TropeCodifier.
*** ''VisualNovel/SchoolDays'' deconstructs the UnwantedHarem trope by going in a completely different direction from ''Ranma 1/2''. ''Ranma'' asks the question "How does an honourable man deal with multiple obligations to marry?" ''VisualNovel/SchoolDays'' asks "What happens if the guy decides to boink ALL the girls?" Answer: Nothing Good.good. Aired in 2007. Also the source of the "Nice Boat" meme.

meme.



** TropeCodifier: ''Anime/RevolutionaryGirlUtena'': Compared stylistically to ''Rose Of Versailles'', ''Utena'' (''Shoujo Kakumei Utena'') aired in Japan in 1997. It couples a shojo dueling story with elements of chivalric romance, Jungian psychology, and a surreal thriller. Its post-modern narrative and feminist themes distinguish it from any other anime ever made.
** TropeCodifier: ''Anime/SerialExperimentsLain'': Starting with ''Lain'' (1998), late night Japanese television became a forum for experimental anime with other shows following it such as ''Anime/BoogiepopPhantom'' (2000), ''Anime/{{Texhnolyze}}'' (2003) and ''Anime/ParanoiaAgent'' (2004).


to:

* {{Trope Codifier}}s:
** TropeCodifier: ''Anime/RevolutionaryGirlUtena'': Compared stylistically to ''Rose Of Versailles'', ''Utena'' (''Shoujo Kakumei Utena'') aired in Japan in 1997. It couples a shojo dueling story with elements of chivalric romance, Jungian psychology, and a surreal thriller. Its post-modern narrative and feminist themes distinguish it from any other anime ever made.
** TropeCodifier: ''Anime/SerialExperimentsLain'': Starting with ''Lain'' (1998), late night Japanese television became a forum for experimental anime with other shows following it such as ''Anime/BoogiepopPhantom'' (2000), ''Anime/{{Texhnolyze}}'' (2003) and ''Anime/ParanoiaAgent'' (2004).

(2004).



** TropeCodifier: ''Manga/AhMyGoddess'' (OVA - 1993; TV - 2005). The standard-bearer for the Magical Girlfriend genre, ''Ah! My Goddess'' (Aa! Megami-sama) is based on a long-running manga, starting in 1988. An OVA adaptation was made in 1993. The OVA had a feature-length movie continuation in 2000, and then a full-scale retelling on television which began in 2005. The manga series is still ongoing.


to:

** * TropeCodifier: ''Manga/AhMyGoddess'' (OVA - 1993; TV - 2005). The standard-bearer for the Magical Girlfriend genre, ''Ah! My Goddess'' (Aa! Megami-sama) is based on a long-running manga, starting in 1988. An OVA adaptation was made in 1993. The OVA had a feature-length movie continuation in 2000, and then a full-scale retelling on television which began in 2005. The manga series is still ongoing.

ongoing.






** TropeMaker: ''Manga/FistOfTheNorthStar'': The anime started in 1984 (the manga in 1983), and a film adaptation was released in 1986. The main series ended in 1988, but material is still produced every so often up to this day. This series featured over-the-top martial arts fighting (which was very gory, but mostly sanitized as shadows or glowing white liquid in the 1984 anime) and pretty much defined the Shonen fighting genre in anime.
*** TropeMaker: ''Kinnikuman'': While people tend to cite ''Fist of the North Star'' as the major defining source for Shonen today, it's ''very'' arguable that Kinnikuman did as much, if not more, for the genre. Predating North Star by 4 years in 1979, it started as a gag-filled parody of UltraMan, but by 1980, CerebusSyndrome had kicked in, and it had started to become a Fighting manga, with ProWrestling as it's major theme. Like any good Fighting Shonen series, the main focus was the fights, and while they mostly revolved around straight-up ProWrestling at first, it wasn't long before more outrageous and outlandish attacks started to become the norm for the series, though wrestling still remained a key part of it. It also kept a decent sense of humor, while still being at least ''semi''-serious. In fact, Kinnikuman might well be like later Shonen then North Star was; whereas North Star took itself as seriously as it possibly could, Kinnikuman, like a number of later Shonen, kept a lighter tone. And like North Star, it [[CashCowFranchise spawned a franchise that's still around today.]] In short, it's just as worthy of being as major a former of Fighting Shonen tropes as FistOfTheNorthStar was, if not more so.
** Trope Codifier: ''Manga/DragonBall'': The first shonen fighting series to get really popular in America. The original manga ran from 1984 to 1995, and Toei's anime adaptation aired in Japan from 1986 to 1996; also became the most popular series in Mexico during the nineties. Like ''Fist of the North Star'', the franchise is still active to this day, despite the original story ending decades ago, with Toei providing numerous non-canon films, two [[Anime/DragonBallZBattleOfGods canon]] [[Anime/DragonBallZResurrectionF films]], two [[Anime/DragonBallGT sequel]] [[Anime/DragonBallSuper shows]], and too many video games to count.
** {{Parody}} Codifier: ''Manga/RanmaOneHalf''. Aired in Japan from 1989 to 1992, and based on the manga of the same name by Takahashi Rumiko, ''Ranma 1/2'' is a fusion of romance/comedy and shonen fighting, and was, along with ''Anime/SailorMoon'', one of the early-1990s gateway anime for North American fans. Codified the MartialArtsAndCrafts form of parody.
** Samurai/weapons variation, TropeCodifier: ''Manga/RurouniKenshin'': Perhaps the most well-known samurai series, ''Rurouni Kenshin'' (also sometimes known as Samurai X outside of Japan due to licensing issues) aired in Japan from 1996 to 1998. A fictionalized look at Japan circa the end of the 19th Century, it blends historical fiction with high-powered shonen fighting. Two OVA series were released as well, the first very well received, the second, not so much.


to:

* {{Trope Maker}}s:
** TropeMaker: ''Manga/FistOfTheNorthStar'': The anime started in 1984 (the manga in 1983), and a film adaptation was released in 1986. The main series ended in 1988, but material is still produced every so often up to this day. This series featured over-the-top martial arts fighting (which was very gory, but mostly sanitized as shadows or glowing white liquid in the 1984 anime) and pretty much defined the Shonen fighting genre in anime.
*** TropeMaker: ''Kinnikuman'': ** ''Manga/{{Kinnikuman}}'': While people tend to cite ''Fist of the North Star'' as the major defining source for Shonen today, it's ''very'' arguable that Kinnikuman ''Kinnikuman'' did as much, if not more, for the genre. Predating North Star by 4 years in 1979, it started as a gag-filled parody of UltraMan, but by 1980, CerebusSyndrome had kicked in, and it had started to become a Fighting manga, with ProWrestling as it's its major theme. Like any good Fighting Shonen series, the main focus was the fights, and while they mostly revolved around straight-up ProWrestling at first, it wasn't long before more outrageous and outlandish attacks started to become the norm for the series, though wrestling still remained a key part of it. It also kept a decent sense of humor, while still being at least ''semi''-serious. In fact, Kinnikuman ''Kinnikuman'' might well be like later Shonen then North Star ''North Star'' was; whereas North Star took itself as seriously as it possibly could, Kinnikuman, ''Kinnikuman'', like a number of later Shonen, kept a lighter tone. And like North Star, ''North Star'', it [[CashCowFranchise spawned a franchise that's still around today.]] today]]. In short, it's just as worthy of being as major a former of Fighting Shonen tropes as FistOfTheNorthStar ''Fist of the North Star'' was, if not more so.
* {{Trope Codifier}}s:
** Trope Codifier: ''Manga/DragonBall'': The first shonen fighting series to get really popular in America. The original manga ran from 1984 to 1995, and Toei's anime adaptation aired in Japan from 1986 to 1996; also became the most popular series in Mexico during the nineties. Like ''Fist of the North Star'', the franchise is still active to this day, despite the original story ending decades ago, with Toei providing numerous non-canon films, two [[Anime/DragonBallZBattleOfGods canon]] [[Anime/DragonBallZResurrectionF films]], two [[Anime/DragonBallGT sequel]] [[Anime/DragonBallSuper shows]], and too many video games to count.
** {{Parody}} Codifier: {{Parody}}: ''Manga/RanmaOneHalf''. Aired in Japan from 1989 to 1992, and based on the manga of the same name by Takahashi Rumiko, ''Ranma 1/2'' is a fusion of romance/comedy and shonen fighting, and was, along with ''Anime/SailorMoon'', one of the early-1990s gateway anime for North American fans. Codified the MartialArtsAndCrafts form of parody.
** Samurai/weapons variation, TropeCodifier: variation: ''Manga/RurouniKenshin'': Perhaps the most well-known samurai series, ''Rurouni Kenshin'' (also sometimes known as Samurai X ''Samurai X'' outside of Japan due to licensing issues) aired in Japan from 1996 to 1998. A fictionalized look at Japan circa the end of the 19th Century, it blends historical fiction with high-powered shonen fighting. Two OVA series were released as well, the first very well received, the second, not so much.

much.



* TropeMaker: ''Manga/PrincessKnight'' (Ribon no Kishi): Aired 1967-68 in Japan. Distributed under the title "Choppy and the Princess" in America, Princess Knight followed the adventures of Princess Sapphire, a young girl who was mistakenly given the heart of a boy and a girl, and how she was raised as a boy in order to inherit the throne of her country in order to thwart the efforts of Duke Duralumon. The story shows Sapphire's interactions and conflicts with people and her own heart, staples of the shoujo genre that still hold to this day.
* TropeCodifier: ''Manga/RoseOfVersailles'': The highly influential 1979 anime/manga that changed {{Shojo}} anime. The historical drama lasted for two years. Notable for being one of the first Shojo anime series. Equally notable for being a hit worldwide ''except'' for English-speaking areas, where it remained stubbornly unavailable until 2013.
* TropeCodifier & Deconstruction: ''Anime/RevolutionaryGirlUtena'' (''Shoujo Kakumei Utena''): Compared stylistically to ''Rose Of Versailles'', Utena first aired in Japan in 1997. Notable for using and deconstructing elements of shojo, fairytales, gender roles, relationships and being possibly one of the most all encompassing (and certainly one of the most Mind-Screwiest) coming of age stories ever.



to:


* TropeMaker: ''Manga/PrincessKnight'' (Ribon no Kishi): Aired 1967-68 in Japan. Distributed under the title "Choppy and the Princess" in America, Princess Knight ''Princess Knight'' followed the adventures of Princess Sapphire, a young girl who was mistakenly given the heart of a boy and a girl, and how she was raised as a boy in order to inherit the throne of her country in order to thwart the efforts of Duke Duralumon. The story shows Sapphire's interactions and conflicts with people and her own heart, staples of the shoujo genre that still hold to this day.
* TropeCodifier: {{Trope Codifier}}s:
**
''Manga/RoseOfVersailles'': The highly influential 1979 anime/manga that changed {{Shojo}} anime. The historical drama lasted for two years. Notable for being one of the first Shojo anime series. Equally notable for being a hit worldwide ''except'' for English-speaking areas, where it remained stubbornly unavailable until 2013.
* TropeCodifier & Deconstruction: ** Also a {{Deconstruction}}: ''Anime/RevolutionaryGirlUtena'' (''Shoujo Kakumei Utena''): Compared stylistically to ''Rose Of Versailles'', Utena ''Utena'' first aired in Japan in 1997. Notable for using and deconstructing elements of shojo, fairytales, gender roles, relationships and being possibly one of the most all encompassing (and certainly one of the most Mind-Screwiest) coming of age stories ever.


ever.



* TropeMaker: ''StarOfTheGiants''. Aired 1968 to 1971. The "star" of the story is Hyuuma Hoshi, a young pitcher dreaming of making it big in the majors like his father had until the older man was injured in WorldWarTwo and had to retire. ''StarOfTheGiants'' established that baseball anime almost always star the pitcher- as opposed to American baseball shows that tend to depict other positions almost as often as the pitcher.
* TropeCodifier: ''CaptainTsubasa''. Many series followed Captain Tsubasa but it did as much as SlamDunk, maybe even more. TheHero is a natural soccer loving boy, but still need others to learn and progress. A lot of {{Shonen}} tropes were used too.
** Modern TropeCodifier: ''Manga/SlamDunk''. While there had been sports anime before it, '"Slam Dunk'' established many of the genre conventions later anime would follow, and distinguished itself as the first sports anime where the main character is not a natural genius of the sport, but a newbie who, while having potential, still has a lot to learn. It also was written with the purpose of educating viewers on the sport: just as Sakuragi is learning the rules and techniques of basketball, so do we by following his progress.
** Shoujo Sports TropeCodifier: ''Manga/AttackNumberOne'', based on the 1968 manga and airing starting in 1969. Kozue Ayuhara comes to college and joins the volleyball team, shows talent that impresses the coach and eventually the other players, and through intense training rises to become one of Japan's Olympic champion volleyball team. TropeMaker for many of the shoujo sports anime tropes, including having a crush on the male coach.
** Romantic Sports TropeCodifier: ''Manga/{{Touch}}''. One of Mitsuru Adachi's first major works. ''Touch'' established him as dominating the subgenre of sports with romance, which he continues to this day with recent works like ''Manga/CrossGame''. It also established as obligatory the tragic background story for the hero and the use of sports as a catharsis for the complications of life and romance.


to:

* TropeMaker: ''StarOfTheGiants''. Aired 1968 to 1971. The "star" of the story is Hyuuma Hoshi, a young pitcher dreaming of making it big in the majors like his father had until the older man was injured in WorldWarTwo and had to retire. ''StarOfTheGiants'' ''Star of the Giants'' established that baseball anime almost always star the pitcher- as opposed to American baseball shows that tend to depict other positions almost as often as the pitcher.
* TropeCodifier: ''CaptainTsubasa''.{{Trope Codifier}}s:
** ''Manga/CaptainTsubasa''.
Many series followed Captain Tsubasa but it did as much as SlamDunk, maybe even more. TheHero is a natural soccer loving boy, but still need others to learn and progress. A lot of {{Shonen}} tropes were used too.
** Modern TropeCodifier: Modern: ''Manga/SlamDunk''. While there had been sports anime before it, '"Slam Dunk'' established many of the genre conventions later anime would follow, and distinguished itself as the first sports anime where the main character is not a natural genius of the sport, but a newbie who, while having potential, still has a lot to learn. It also was written with the purpose of educating viewers on the sport: just as Sakuragi is learning the rules and techniques of basketball, so do we by following his progress.
** Shoujo Sports TropeCodifier: Shoujo: ''Manga/AttackNumberOne'', based on the 1968 manga and airing starting in 1969. Kozue Ayuhara comes to college and joins the volleyball team, shows talent that impresses the coach and eventually the other players, and through intense training rises to become one of Japan's Olympic champion volleyball team. TropeMaker for many of the shoujo sports anime tropes, including having a crush on the male coach.
** Romantic Sports TropeCodifier: Romantic: ''Manga/{{Touch}}''. One of Mitsuru Adachi's first major works. ''Touch'' established him as dominating the subgenre of sports with romance, which he continues to this day with recent works like ''Manga/CrossGame''. It also established as obligatory the tragic background story for the hero and the use of sports as a catharsis for the complications of life and romance.

romance.



** Subgenre: TrappedInAnotherWorld

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* Subgenres:
** Subgenre: TrappedInAnotherWorld



** Subgenre: DarkFantasy
*** TropeCodifier: ''Manga/{{Berserk}}''. Mixing [[TheDungAges Dung Ages]] medievalism with demonic horror, this series is well known for its beautiful story and its utterly nightmarish monsters and violence. It focuses on a one-eyed mercenary {{Badass}} with a giant sword who seeks vengeance against his former commander and best friend for betraying him in one of the most unforgivable manners imaginable, and roams the world killing any demon that comes for him. It takes and [[{{deconstruction}} deconstructs]] many classic tropes of classic fantasy (as well as many tropes of {{Shonen}} series).

to:

** Subgenre: DarkFantasy
*** TropeCodifier: ''Manga/{{Berserk}}''. Mixing [[TheDungAges Dung Ages]] medievalism with demonic horror, this series is well known for its beautiful story and its utterly nightmarish monsters and violence. It focuses on a one-eyed mercenary {{Badass}} with a giant sword who seeks vengeance against his former commander and best friend for betraying him in one of the most unforgivable manners imaginable, and roams the world killing any demon that comes for him. It takes and [[{{deconstruction}} deconstructs]] {{deconstruct|ion}}s many classic tropes of classic fantasy (as well as many tropes of {{Shonen}} series).









** [[MundaneFantastic "Fantasy"]] SliceOfLife TropeCodifier: ''Manga/{{ARIA}}'' aired from Fall of 2005 to 2008. ARIA is often identified as a trope codifier for "pure" Slice of Life anime. Set in a fantastical world, yet there is little or no adventure beyond the typical life issues we see on Earth. For people who like lovely imagery of beautiful girls against a wondrous backdrop, this Slice Of Life series is a nice change of pace from the action and fanservice of most other anime. Known for a slow pace, and beautifully drawn scenery. Often compared with the earlier manga ''Manga/YokohamaKaidashiKikou''.
** 4-koma (i.e sketch comedy) TropeCodifier: ''Manga/AzumangaDaioh'', which can best be described as anime sketch comedy, aired in Japan in 2002. Definitely a schoolyard comedy, but with a scene-based take on it, rather than a more episodic take. Originally aired in five-minute segments during the week, which were then combined on Saturday into a half-hour episode.
** Subculture SliceOfLife Trope Codifier: ''Anime/WelcomeToTheNHK'' aired July to December 2006, and took a look at some of the subcultures of Japan.
** {{Moe}} SliceOfLife TropeCodifier: ''Manga/KOn'' aired from Spring of 2009 to Summer of 2010. Cute highschool girls form a girl band and do cute things together. Surprisingly ''K-On!'' has appealed to a wide demographic swath, including girls. This is generally attributed to the toning down of Otaku elements (such as FanService), and the heavy dependence on nostalgia.

to:

* {{Trope Codifier}}s
** [[MundaneFantastic "Fantasy"]] SliceOfLife TropeCodifier: "Fantasy"]]: ''Manga/{{ARIA}}'' aired from Fall of 2005 to 2008. ARIA is often identified as a trope codifier for "pure" Slice of Life anime. Set in a fantastical world, yet there is little or no adventure beyond the typical life issues we see on Earth. For people who like lovely imagery of beautiful girls against a wondrous backdrop, this Slice Of Life series is a nice change of pace from the action and fanservice of most other anime. Known for a slow pace, and beautifully drawn scenery. Often compared with the earlier manga ''Manga/YokohamaKaidashiKikou''.
** 4-koma (i.e sketch comedy) TropeCodifier: comedy): ''Manga/AzumangaDaioh'', which can best be described as anime sketch comedy, aired in Japan in 2002. Definitely a schoolyard comedy, but with a scene-based take on it, rather than a more episodic take. Originally aired in five-minute segments during the week, which were then combined on Saturday into a half-hour episode.
** Subculture SliceOfLife Trope Codifier: Subculture: ''Anime/WelcomeToTheNHK'' aired July to December 2006, and took a look at some of the subcultures of Japan.
** {{Moe}} SliceOfLife TropeCodifier: {{Moe}}: ''Manga/KOn'' aired from Spring of 2009 to Summer of 2010. Cute highschool girls form a girl band and do cute things together. Surprisingly ''K-On!'' has appealed to a wide demographic swath, including girls. This is generally attributed to the toning down of Otaku elements (such as FanService), and the heavy dependence on nostalgia.
18th Feb '16 9:28:56 PM bowserbros
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** TropeMaker: ''Manga/FistOfTheNorthStar'': The anime started in 1984 (the manga in 1983). The main series ended in 1988, but material is still produced every so often up to this day. This series featured over-the-top martial arts fighting (which was very bloody, but mostly sanitized as shadows or detail-less glow in the anime) and pretty much defined the Shonen fighting genre in anime.

to:

** TropeMaker: ''Manga/FistOfTheNorthStar'': The anime started in 1984 (the manga in 1983).1983), and a film adaptation was released in 1986. The main series ended in 1988, but material is still produced every so often up to this day. This series featured over-the-top martial arts fighting (which was very bloody, gory, but mostly sanitized as shadows or detail-less glow glowing white liquid in the 1984 anime) and pretty much defined the Shonen fighting genre in anime.



** Trope Codifier: ''Manga/DragonBall'': The first shonen fighting series to get really popular in America. Aired in Japan from 1986 to 1996, also became the most popular series in Mexico during the nineties.

to:

** Trope Codifier: ''Manga/DragonBall'': The first shonen fighting series to get really popular in America. Aired The original manga ran from 1984 to 1995, and Toei's anime adaptation aired in Japan from 1986 to 1996, 1996; also became the most popular series in Mexico during the nineties.nineties. Like ''Fist of the North Star'', the franchise is still active to this day, despite the original story ending decades ago, with Toei providing numerous non-canon films, two [[Anime/DragonBallZBattleOfGods canon]] [[Anime/DragonBallZResurrectionF films]], two [[Anime/DragonBallGT sequel]] [[Anime/DragonBallSuper shows]], and too many video games to count.



* TropeMaker: ''Manga/SazaeSan'' has been airing since October of 1969, and is based on the manga which ran from 1946 to 1973. ''Sazae-san'' depicts ordinary life in Japan. When it first started airing, [[FairForItsDay it was considered very liberal and supportive of change in Japanese life]] (particularly supporting strong women). Now it's viewed as enshrining traditional Japanese life. The anime is both the longest-running animated series in the world and the last still-running animated production to utilize traditional animation[[lablenote:Definition]]Animation that is inked & painted on clear acetate sheets and shot on film stock with a rostrum camera; the medium has reached this near-death point due to digital animation being a significantly more efficient alternative, only requiring sufficient technology and computer skills[[/labelnote]].

to:

* TropeMaker: ''Manga/SazaeSan'' has been airing since October of 1969, and is based on the manga of the same name, which ran from 1946 to 1973. ''Sazae-san'' depicts ordinary life in Japan. When it first started airing, [[FairForItsDay it was considered very liberal and supportive of change in Japanese life]] (particularly supporting strong women). Now it's viewed as enshrining traditional Japanese life. The anime is notable amongst animation buffs for being both the longest-running animated series in the world and the last still-running animated production to utilize traditional animation[[lablenote:Definition]]Animation animation[[labelnote:Explanation]]Animation that is inked & painted on clear acetate sheets and shot on film stock with a rostrum camera; the medium has reached this near-death point due to digital animation being a significantly more efficient alternative, only requiring sufficient technology and computer skills[[/labelnote]].



* ''Anime/TheGreatMissionToSavePrincessPeach'' (1986): Despite being incredibly obscure (ranking a 5 out of 6 on the SlidingScaleOfAnimeObscurity), this film is very notable for being the first film adaptation of a video game.

to:

* ''Anime/TheGreatMissionToSavePrincessPeach'' (Japanese title, ''Super Mario Bros.: Peach-hime Kyushutsu Dai Sakusen!'') (1986): Despite being incredibly ''incredibly'' obscure (ranking a 5 out of 6 on the SlidingScaleOfAnimeObscurity), this film is very notable for being the world's first film adaptation of a video game.
18th Feb '16 5:55:51 PM bowserbros
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* TropeMaker: ''Manga/SazaeSan'' aired October 1969 to the present (based on the manga which ran from 1946 to 1973). ''Sazae-san'' depicts ordinary life in Japan. When it first started airing, [[FairForItsDay it was considered very liberal and supportive of change in Japanese life]] (particularly supporting strong women). Now it's viewed as enshrining traditional Japanese life.

to:

* TropeMaker: ''Manga/SazaeSan'' aired has been airing since October 1969 to the present (based of 1969, and is based on the manga which ran from 1946 to 1973).1973. ''Sazae-san'' depicts ordinary life in Japan. When it first started airing, [[FairForItsDay it was considered very liberal and supportive of change in Japanese life]] (particularly supporting strong women). Now it's viewed as enshrining traditional Japanese life. The anime is both the longest-running animated series in the world and the last still-running animated production to utilize traditional animation[[lablenote:Definition]]Animation that is inked & painted on clear acetate sheets and shot on film stock with a rostrum camera; the medium has reached this near-death point due to digital animation being a significantly more efficient alternative, only requiring sufficient technology and computer skills[[/labelnote]].



* ''Anime/TheGreatMissionToSavePrincessPeach'' (1986): Despite being incredibly obscure (ranking a 5 out of 6 on the SlidingScaleOfAnimeObscurity), this film is very notable for being the first film adaptation of a video game.



* ''Manga/{{Akira}}'' (1988): Based on a much longer and even more complicated manga series, this was another of the first anime films to cross the Pacific to any appreciable audience. It shocked many US fans straight out of the AnimationAgeGhetto with its gritty visuals and stark violence.

to:

* ''Manga/{{Akira}}'' (1988): Based on a much longer and even more complicated manga series, this was another of the first anime films to cross the Pacific to any appreciable audience. It shocked many US fans straight out of the AnimationAgeGhetto with its gritty visuals and stark violence.
violence. This film is also notable for its highly fluid & detailed animation, particularly in comparison to most other anime and to animation in general at [[UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfAnimation the time of its release]].
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