History Main / EquivalentExchange

2nd Jun '16 1:11:21 PM Morgenthaler
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* In {{Euripides}}'s ''Theatre/{{Alcestis}}'', Admetus' wife, Alcestis, offered to [[BalancingDeathsBooks die in his place]]. And then [[DeusExMachina Heracles showed up]] and ''[[DidYouJustPunchOutCthulhu beat up]]'' ''[[TheGrimReaper Death]]'' to save her so that there could be a happy ending. Honestly, didn't these Greeks read Orpheus?

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* In {{Euripides}}'s Creator/{{Euripides}}'s ''Theatre/{{Alcestis}}'', Admetus' wife, Alcestis, offered to [[BalancingDeathsBooks die in his place]]. And then [[DeusExMachina Heracles showed up]] and ''[[DidYouJustPunchOutCthulhu beat up]]'' ''[[TheGrimReaper Death]]'' to save her so that there could be a happy ending. Honestly, didn't these Greeks read Orpheus?
28th May '16 7:32:40 PM Discar
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** Alphonse makes a crucial logical conclusion about the principle near the very end of the series. If A equals the cost of B, then the reverse should hold true: [[NowDoItAgainBackwards you can exchange B back for A]]. [[spoiler:Once he figures it out, Al gives his soul ''back'' to Truth so Ed can have his right arm again and defeat Father once and for all. Ed does not take this development well.]]
*** After it happens, however, [[spoiler:Edward is able to top Alphonse by offering up the very truth of alchemy he received when they tried to bring their mother back as payment for Al's return]]. It's not quite an even equation, however [[spoiler:as Ed ends up loosing not only his circle-free alchemy but his entire ability to perform alchemy, though it's later revealed he gave up his alchemy for his brother's soul, either way it's such a clever exchange that even Truth itself is floored]].

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** Alphonse makes a crucial logical conclusion about the principle near the very end of the series. If A equals the cost of B, then the reverse should hold true: [[NowDoItAgainBackwards you can exchange B back for A]]. [[spoiler:Once he figures it out, Al gives his soul ''back'' to Truth so Ed can have his right arm again and defeat Father once and for all. Ed does not take this development well.]]
***
]] After it happens, however, [[spoiler:Edward is able to top Alphonse by offering up the very truth of alchemy he received when they tried to bring their mother back as payment for Al's return]]. It's not quite an even equation, however [[spoiler:as Ed ends up loosing not only his circle-free alchemy but his entire ability to perform alchemy, though it's later revealed he gave up his alchemy for his brother's soul, either way it's such a clever exchange that even Truth itself is floored]].



* In ''LightNovel/ACertainMagicalIndex'', once one becomes an [[PsychicPowers esper]], they can never use magic, and vice-versa, without suffering extreme damage to their bodies.

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* In ''LightNovel/ACertainMagicalIndex'', once ''LightNovel/ACertainMagicalIndex'':
** Once
one becomes an [[PsychicPowers esper]], they can never use magic, and vice-versa, without suffering extreme damage to their bodies.



* ''VisualNovel/FateStayNight'' (and its [[Franchise/{{Nasuverse}} multiverse]]) contains this -- energy must be taken from somewhere before it runs through the [[FunctionalMagic Magic Circuit]], though in most cases, Prana is either generated by the magus ([[LifeEnergy Od]]) or taken from the environment ({{Mana}}). Rin can launch A-rank attacks in seconds because she taps directly into her jewels (where she has been saving [[{{Mana}} Prana]] for ten years) instead of gathering it slowly for a minute or three.

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* ''VisualNovel/FateStayNight'' (and ''VisualNovel/FateStayNight'':
** As with the rest of
its [[Franchise/{{Nasuverse}} multiverse]]) multiverse]], the series contains this -- energy must be taken from somewhere before it runs through the [[FunctionalMagic Magic Circuit]], though in most cases, Prana is either generated by the magus ([[LifeEnergy Od]]) or taken from the environment ({{Mana}}). Rin can launch A-rank attacks in seconds because she taps directly into her jewels (where she has been saving [[{{Mana}} Prana]] for ten years) instead of gathering it slowly for a minute or three.



** One exception is Rinís Jewel Sword Zelretch, which lets her use strong attacks indefinitely by absorbing mana from alternate realities. The sword is explicitly made with "True Magic", which breaks the usual rules of Equivalent Exchange, and which only about five people in the world are capable of using.

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** One exception is Rinís Rin's Jewel Sword Zelretch, which lets her use strong attacks indefinitely by absorbing mana from alternate realities. The sword is explicitly made with "True Magic", which breaks the usual rules of Equivalent Exchange, and which only about five people in the world are capable of using.



* ''Manga/HunterXHunter'' has Nen abilities. It's a special ability invented by a user by using Nen, and it can range from simple super strength to shrinking cloths to memory reading to [[ImprobableWeaponUser vacuum cleaners and books and bank accounts]]. Each of these abilities have unique powers that the user make up in his mind during conception. The more powerful you are, the more powerful ability you can create. The thing is, the more powerful the ability is, the more restrictions the user must needs impose on it as well. Examples are:

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* ''Manga/HunterXHunter'' has ''Manga/HunterXHunter'':
**
Nen abilities. It's a special ability invented by a user by using Nen, and it can range from simple super strength to shrinking cloths to memory reading to [[ImprobableWeaponUser vacuum cleaners and books and bank accounts]]. Each of these abilities have unique powers that the user make up in his mind during conception. The more powerful you are, the more powerful ability you can create. The thing is, the more powerful the ability is, the more restrictions the user must needs impose on it as well. Examples are:



* The second arc of ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'' started off with Gaara dying, but he was an immensely popular and critical character so he needed to be revived. Enter Chiyo, who has a ninjutsu capable of reviving the dead. To avoid this being used to prevent every death in-series, the jutsu was equivalent exchange: the user sacrifices their own life to resurrect another.

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* ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'':
**
The second arc of ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'' started off with Gaara dying, but he was an immensely popular and critical character so he needed to be revived. Enter Chiyo, who has a ninjutsu capable of reviving the dead. To avoid this being used to prevent every death in-series, the jutsu was equivalent exchange: the user sacrifices their own life to resurrect another.



* ''Anime/PuellaMagiMadokaMagica''

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* ''Anime/PuellaMagiMadokaMagica''''Anime/PuellaMagiMadokaMagica'':



* In the multiverse of ''Manga/TsubasaReservoirChronicle'' and ''Manga/{{xxxHOLiC}}'', the price for wishes granted by Yuuko works this way. Some characters are much more wary of the possible implications of this than others. In particular, Kurogane and Doumeki will only ask for Yuuko's help if it is flat-out impossible for them to solve the problem under their own power. This is prudent, as false-hearted or impulsive wishes usually result in nasty karmic payback. Yuuko also has rules about not dealing in wishes of value equal to a human life, as that would implicate the wish-granter in murder.

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* In the The multiverse of ''Manga/TsubasaReservoirChronicle'' and ''Manga/{{xxxHOLiC}}'', the ''Manga/{{xxxHOLiC}}'':
** The
price for wishes granted by Yuuko works this way. Some characters are much more wary of the possible implications of this than others. In particular, Kurogane and Doumeki will only ask for Yuuko's help if it is flat-out impossible for them to solve the problem under their own power. This is prudent, as false-hearted or impulsive wishes usually result in nasty karmic payback. Yuuko also has rules about not dealing in wishes of value equal to a human life, as that would implicate the wish-granter in murder.



* Christopher Paolini's ''Literature/InheritanceCycle'': The ''[[FunctionalMagic entire magic system]]'' of the series is wrapped up in this. Doing something with magic takes the same amount of energy as doing it without magic would have done. And if you try casting a spell that takes up more energy than you have, you die.
** This is what he says, but at one point, Eragon breaks the calves of dozens (maybe hundreds) of soldiers and doesn't die. And how much energy does it take to make a blue fireball without magic?
*** The color of the fireball doesn't indicate how hot it is, it just means his dragon is blue. Brom says it out right in the first book, for dragon riders their magic will be the color of their dragon. So it would take no more energy then a fireball that would "naturally" burn red.
** And certain spells are just flat-out impossible, presumably because they take far too much energy, or simply cannot be done. For example: Eragon is warned to never try to bring people back from the dead; beyond death, there's just something that magic has no effect on; an attempt would drain the mage of all his life in one go and accomplish nothing. Trying to see the future or the past is a bad idea as well.
*** It's actually explained in the books that if you're trying to see the future, it's a lot like scrying, in that you need to know exactly what's going to happen, down to the last detail. But if you already know what's going to happen, then scrying the future is functionally pointless.

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* Christopher Paolini's ''Literature/InheritanceCycle'': ''Literature/InheritanceCycle'':
**
The ''[[FunctionalMagic entire magic system]]'' of the series is wrapped up in this. Doing something with magic takes the same amount of energy as doing it without magic would have done. And if you try casting a spell that takes up more energy than you have, you die.
** This is what he says, but at one point, Eragon breaks the calves of dozens (maybe hundreds) of soldiers and doesn't die. And how much energy does it take to make a blue fireball without magic?
*** The color of the fireball doesn't indicate how hot it is, it just means his dragon is blue. Brom says it out right in the first book, for dragon riders their magic will be the color of their dragon. So it would take no more energy then a fireball that would "naturally" burn red.
die.
** And certain spells are just flat-out impossible, presumably because they take far too much energy, or simply cannot be done. For example: Eragon is warned to never try to bring people back from the dead; beyond death, there's just something that magic has no effect on; an attempt would drain the mage of all his life in one go and accomplish nothing. Trying to see the future or the past is a bad idea as well.
***
well. It's actually explained in the books that if you're trying to see the future, it's a lot like scrying, in that you need to know exactly what's going to happen, down to the last detail. But if you already know what's going to happen, then scrying the future is functionally pointless.



* This also comes up a lot with magic in the ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' books, where it is referred to as the Law of Conservation of Reality. For example, to teleport someone from one side of the disc to another, you may need to have an equivalent weight to teleport back to where they came from. This is mainly to deal with conservation of momentum; because the Disc rotates, different points on its surface move at different velocities relative to the Hub. Teleporting without such a counterweight means that if you move very far, your velocity relative to your immediate surroundings tends to kill you. But you can do it!

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* ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'':
**
This also comes up a lot with magic in the ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' books, where it is referred to as the Law of Conservation of Reality. For example, to teleport someone from one side of the disc to another, you may need to have an equivalent weight to teleport back to where they came from. This is mainly to deal with conservation of momentum; because the Disc rotates, different points on its surface move at different velocities relative to the Hub. Teleporting without such a counterweight means that if you move very far, your velocity relative to your immediate surroundings tends to kill you. But you can do it!



*** Another anecdote describes how using magic to levitate a book from a high shelf to lay it down in front of you will fatigue you as much as actually climbing a ladder to take the book directly.

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*** ** Another anecdote describes how using magic to levitate a book from a high shelf to lay it down in front of you will fatigue you as much as actually climbing a ladder to take the book directly.



-->''Esk: I don't think magic works like that. You can't just make things happen, there's sort of- like a seesaw thing, if you push one end up, the other goes down.''
-->''Gulta: I can't see Granny on a seesaw.''

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-->''Esk: --->'''Esk:''' I don't think magic works like that. You can't just make things happen, there's sort of- like a seesaw thing, if you push one end up, the other goes down.''
-->''Gulta:
\\
'''Gulta:'''
I can't see Granny on a seesaw.''



* Blood-magic in George Martin's ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' works this way;

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* Blood-magic in George Martin's ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' works this way;way:



* ''Literature/TheSagaOfRecluce'' series by L. E. Modesitt Jr. is set in a world of Chaos and Order Magic, both of which must be carefully balanced--at times, overuse of either, or just too much Order or Chaos concentrated in one area, has shifted the entire planet's weather patterns, caused volcanic eruptions, and other disasters.
** Despite that the balance is well-known in-universe, it didn't stop people from trying to cheat. Recluce itself, for example, was protected by a navy of Order-infused ships...and every time they replaced one, it was with a larger, more powerful ship that required more Order.

to:

* ''Literature/TheSagaOfRecluce'' series by L. E. Modesitt Jr. is set in a world of Chaos and Order Magic, both of which must be carefully balanced--at times, overuse of either, or just too much Order or Chaos concentrated in one area, has shifted the entire planet's weather patterns, caused volcanic eruptions, and other disasters.
**
disasters. Despite that the balance is well-known in-universe, it didn't stop people from trying to cheat. Recluce itself, for example, was protected by a navy of Order-infused ships...and every time they replaced one, it was with a larger, more powerful ship that required more Order.



* In the ''Literature/ColdFireTrilogy'', magical energy is released by sacrifice. The amount of energy gained is directly proportional to how much the sacrificed object was worth to the sorcerer. This is one of the facts used to show the {{Magnificent Bastard}}ness of Gerald Tarrent, who sacrificed his entire family to gain immortality. The spell wouldn't have worked if he hadn't loved his wife and children very, very much - and he killed them ''anyway''.
** It's later explained that the sacrifice which made him immortal wasn't actually his wife and children. It was ''his own humanity'', which he lost through the expedient of killing his wife and children.
*** And if he ever tried to act like a compassionate human being again by engaging in an act of life or Healing, his immortality would be forfeit.

to:

* In the ''Literature/ColdFireTrilogy'', magical ''Literature/ColdFireTrilogy'':
** Magical
energy is released by sacrifice. The amount of energy gained is directly proportional to how much the sacrificed object was worth to the sorcerer. This is one of the facts used to show the {{Magnificent Bastard}}ness of Gerald Tarrent, who sacrificed his entire family to gain immortality. The spell wouldn't have worked if he hadn't loved his wife and children very, very much - and he killed them ''anyway''.
** It's later explained that the sacrifice which made him immortal wasn't actually his wife and children. It was ''his own humanity'', which he lost through the expedient of killing his wife and children.
***
children. And if he ever tried to act like a compassionate human being again by engaging in an act of life or Healing, his immortality would be forfeit.



** Surgebinding produces various effects (from flight to trasmutation to healing), consuming the stormlight infused in gems in exchange

to:

** Surgebinding produces various effects (from flight to trasmutation to healing), consuming the stormlight infused in gems in exchangeexchange.



* Stephen Donaldson's second ''Literature/TheChroniclesOfThomasCovenant'' has the mere mortals of the land required to shed blood (both their own and the blood of others is used) in order to manipulate the Sunbane.
** The first chronicles has Mhoram realizing [[spoiler:the key to power is despair, which will lead to the destruction of the Land]].

to:

* Stephen Donaldson's second ''Literature/TheChroniclesOfThomasCovenant'' has the mere mortals of the land required to shed blood (both their own and the blood of others is used) in order to manipulate the Sunbane.
**
Sunbane. The first chronicles chronicle has Mhoram realizing [[spoiler:the key to power is despair, which will lead to the destruction of the Land]].



* The Defilers in the ''TabletopGame/DarkSun'' setting for ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons''. Both Defilers and Preservers need to drain life forces in order to power arcane magic, but defilers drain it away without worrying about the consequences, while Preservers are careful not to drain enough to kill the plants and animals nearby that are contributing.
** Considering that Athas is a gigantic desert world, it's not hard to deduce the popularity of defiler magic.

to:

* The Defilers in the ''TabletopGame/DarkSun'' setting for ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons''. Both Defilers and Preservers need to drain life forces in order to power arcane magic, but defilers drain it away without worrying about the consequences, while Preservers are careful not to drain enough to kill the plants and animals nearby that are contributing.
**
contributing. Considering that Athas is a gigantic desert world, it's not hard to deduce the popularity of defiler magic.



* Most magick in ''TabletopGame/UnknownArmies'' works this way. The "value" of certain actions varies based on what kind of adept you are. Typically an adept gets a "minor charge" for some kind of ritual that's easy enough to be performed every day or so, a "significant charge" for doing something very difficult and painful, and a "major charge" for doing something nigh-impossible. And even the magick that seems to be free usually isn't. In TabletopGame/UnknownArmies, ain't nothin' come for free.
** There's even an in-game term for the concept in UA: The Law of Transaction.

to:

* Most magick in ''TabletopGame/UnknownArmies'' works this way. The "value" of certain actions varies based on what kind of adept you are. Typically an adept gets a "minor charge" for some kind of ritual that's easy enough to be performed every day or so, a "significant charge" for doing something very difficult and painful, and a "major charge" for doing something nigh-impossible. And even the magick that seems to be free usually isn't. In TabletopGame/UnknownArmies, ain't nothin' come for free.
**
free. There's even an in-game term for the concept in UA: The Law of Transaction.



* Present in the TCG ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'' to an extent. Every spell has a cost. Most are simply {{Mana}} drawn from the land, but others require a life (yours or your creatures), the land itself, or even time (skipping a turn). Several cards will actually kill you if the cost is too much for you to afford.
** Perhaps the most famous example of this is Necropotence. You don't draw normally near the beginning of your turn; instead, you may pay X life to draw X cards at the end of your turn. However, this particular exchange turned out not too equivalent: both cards with this effect proved to be broken beyond imagination.
*** For the uninitiated: Unless you know exactly what you are doing and have built your deck specifically to respond to various threats, playing Necropotence is pretty much suicide.

to:

* Present in the TCG ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'' to an extent. Every spell has a cost. Most are simply {{Mana}} drawn from the land, but others require a life (yours or your creatures), the land itself, or even time (skipping a turn). Several cards will actually kill you if the cost is too much for you to afford.
**
afford. Perhaps the most famous example of this is Necropotence. You don't draw normally near the beginning of your turn; instead, you may pay X life to draw X cards at the end of your turn. However, this particular exchange turned out not too equivalent: both cards with this effect proved to be broken beyond imagination.
***
imagination. For the uninitiated: Unless you know exactly what you are doing and have built your deck specifically to respond to various threats, playing Necropotence is pretty much suicide.



* In ''TabletopGame/{{Exalted}}'', the Sidereal Exalted have the charm called Of Things Desired and Feared, which uses astrology to provide an infallible way to achieve ''any'' objective you can state... for an appropriate price. If what you want to achieve is small, it is likely the price will be something you are willing to pay (a few bruises, the lost of an item, etc.). But if you ask for a Fate-proven way to defeat BigBad or otherway break the game, the price will be something like "your life, the lives of everyone in your Circle, and the complete destruction of all the thing you value and care for".

to:

* In ''TabletopGame/{{Exalted}}'', the ''TabletopGame/{{Exalted}}'':
** The
Sidereal Exalted have the charm called Of Things Desired and Feared, which uses astrology to provide an infallible way to achieve ''any'' objective you can state... for an appropriate price. If what you want to achieve is small, it is likely the price will be something you are willing to pay (a few bruises, the lost of an item, etc.). But if you ask for a Fate-proven way to defeat BigBad or otherway break the game, the price will be something like "your life, the lives of everyone in your Circle, and the complete destruction of all the thing you value and care for".



-->''"With hell's fire, you make a bargain. It costs a little of yourself. The warlock's way was quicker, more effective, or so it seemed. But there comes a time when a price must be paid, and sometimes, it is dear indeed."''

to:

-->''"With --->'''Grom:''' With hell's fire, you make a bargain. It costs a little of yourself. The warlock's way was quicker, more effective, or so it seemed. But there comes a time when a price must be paid, and sometimes, it is dear indeed."''



*** Although now, Warlocks have a low-level spell that lets them restore all their soul shards by apparently breaking off little pieces of their OWN SOUL (at no real cost in gameplay terms, though it is interruptible and thus best used out of combat/between fights).
*** Doomguards don't even require the ritual of summoning or sacrifice of health anymore. Just hit a button, and BOOM he's there fighting on your side for 45 seconds.

to:

*** ** Although now, Warlocks have a low-level spell that lets them restore all their soul shards by apparently breaking off little pieces of their OWN SOUL (at no real cost in gameplay terms, though it is interruptible and thus best used out of combat/between fights).
*** ** Doomguards don't even require the ritual of summoning or sacrifice of health anymore. Just hit a button, and BOOM he's there fighting on your side for 45 seconds.



* The various Dark Powersets from ''VideoGame/CityOfHeroes'' tend to work like this, Dark Miasma in particular. Dark Miasma has some highly potent healing spells (Including the only rezz in the game capable of reviving multiple people.) but in order to use them you have to tap into the life force of your enemies. This is just icing on the cake, really...
** The only real downside of these powers was that you had to have an enemy to engage to use them. So you couldn't heal or rezz BETWEEN fights.

to:

* The various Dark Powersets from ''VideoGame/CityOfHeroes'' tend to work like this, Dark Miasma in particular. Dark Miasma has some highly potent healing spells (Including the only rezz in the game capable of reviving multiple people.) but in order to use them you have to tap into the life force of your enemies. This is just icing on the cake, really...
**
really... The only real downside of these powers was that you had to have an enemy to engage to use them. So you couldn't heal or rezz BETWEEN fights.



* In ''Franchise/DragonAge'', Mages can perform magic effortlessly, but more powerful spells and rituals occasionally require the use of [[GreenRocks Lyrium]], distilled into a consumable liquid form for this purpose. [[BloodMagic Blood Mages]] however, can use either their LifeEnergy or another's to perform powerful feats that non-Blood Mages cannot, such as MindControl, as well as ripping the blood out of their opponents pores.
** While one can learn the skills safely through books written on the subject, these are usually restricted for obvious reasons, thus forcing more desperate (or foolhardy) mages to make a bargain with a Demon to gain the power. What the bargain requires changes from person to person, but most cases end with [[GrandTheftMe the Demon possessing the Mage]] and turning them into [[AndIMustScream an Abomination]].

to:

* In ''Franchise/DragonAge'', Mages can perform magic effortlessly, but more powerful spells and rituals occasionally require the use of [[GreenRocks Lyrium]], distilled into a consumable liquid form for this purpose. [[BloodMagic Blood Mages]] however, can use either their LifeEnergy or another's to perform powerful feats that non-Blood Mages cannot, such as MindControl, as well as ripping the blood out of their opponents pores.
**
pores. While one can learn the skills safely through books written on the subject, these are usually restricted for obvious reasons, thus forcing more desperate (or foolhardy) mages to make a bargain with a Demon to gain the power. What the bargain requires changes from person to person, but most cases end with [[GrandTheftMe the Demon possessing the Mage]] and turning them into [[AndIMustScream an Abomination]].
12th May '16 12:10:13 PM rafi
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* ''Manga/AhMyGoddess'' has the Law of Conservation of Happiness.
** Eventually, granting too many wishes within a short period of time means that someone ends up suffering some form of bad luck.
** This is also how wishes granted by demons run. They usually come with a myriad of attached strings that cause grief and misfortune to the person making the wish.
* In ''Manga/{{Bleach}}'', a Hollow can give up his or her HealingFactor in exchange for extra strength.
* In ''LightNovel/ACertainMagicalIndex'', once one becomes an [[PsychicPowers esper]], they can never use magic, and vice-versa, without suffering extreme damage to their bodies.
** To gain the incredible powers of God's Right Seat, a magician must give up his or her ability to use normal spells. [[spoiler: Acqua of the Back gets around this because his Divine Mother's Mercy removes limitations and secondary conditions. Fiamma of the Right gets around this by brainwashing Index to do the spells for him.]]
* ''Manga/{{CMB}}'' has the rather interesting case in which [[CloudCuckooLander Shinya]] requires a price for solving a mystery; luckily he's very easily bought off so long as it is interesting.
* ''Manga/CodeBreaker'': It turns out that [[spoiler: Ogami's powers come from a DealWithTheDevil: for every upgrade he gets, he loses one of his senses. He's already lost his sense of taste, but "fortunately" Code: Emperor has chosen to take his newly acquired sound powers rather than his hearing... although there's still five upgrades to go..]].
* This trope gets applied vaguely in ''Manga/DeathNote'': though no tangible price or punishment exists for a human who uses the [[ArtifactOfDeath Death Note]] (according to Ryuk), those who use it always end up miserable. [[AGodAmI Light]] vows at the beginning of the story to break this pattern; by the end, [[spoiler:he loses everybody who ever cared about him in any way, then dies in a bloody heap as he begs [[HoistByHisOwnPetard Ryuk to spare his life]]]]. Everyone else who writes in the Death Note [[spoiler:also ends up either miserable or dead]].
* In ''Anime/DragonBallGT'', it is eventually revealed that every time the Dragon Balls grant a wish, they accumulate evil energy to balance the good created by the wish. Unless the evil energy is allowed time to dissipate, the ball eventually won't be able to take it anymore and will burst, unleashing the Shadow Dragons.



* In the multiverse of ''Manga/TsubasaReservoirChronicle'' and ''Manga/{{xxxHOLiC}}'', the price for wishes granted by Yuuko works this way. Some characters are much more wary of the possible implications of this than others. In particular, Kurogane and Doumeki will only ask for Yuuko's help if it is flat-out impossible for them to solve the problem under their own power. This is prudent, as false-hearted or impulsive wishes usually result in nasty karmic payback. Yuuko also has rules about not dealing in wishes of value equal to a human life, as that would implicate the wish-granter in murder.
** For the record, Yuuko accepts items or intangibilities that have both real and emotional power, which include both living and non-living: Kurogane's sword is both a precious reminder of his family and a powerful weapon; Fai's tattoo is imbued with powerful magic for his own safety; and Syaoran and Sakura pay by giving up a portion of Sakura's memories - those which contain Syaoran. This means their previous relationship is sacrificed forever. Syaoran has been edited out of the memories the feathers contain. For example, Sakura can remember the events of her last birthday party, but one seat is mysteriously empty, and there's an odd pause in the dialogue whenever someone would have otherwise said Syaoran's name. One time Sakura almost manages to put two and two together, but passes out and loses all memory of her deduction due to this price. It's not flat-out impossible for Sakura and Syaoran to have a relationship after paying the price, but it has to be rebuilt from the ground up.
** Interestingly, you apparently don't need someone to trade with, just need to have a payment to be given in exchange for a desired end. [[spoiler: Clow and Yuko gained entry into the cycle of reincarnation for the clones by giving their lives up to... nothing in particular. Watanuki and Syaoran Jr. escape from a pocket dimension in exchange for the inability to leave The Shop and the inability to remain in one world for very long, respectively, again not actually selling it to anyone in particular.]]
** It eventually is revealed that whoever is the owner of the Wish Shop is essentially contractually bound to live by this principle at all times, lest they risk getting magically induced injuries from the shop itself as compensation. It's sobering when you realize that this is the primary reason for why Yuuko has made payment requests for the slightest things, even to friends, because no matter how much power she has, she ''can't'' give anyone anything without needing something from them in return... Except for feelings, which are explained to be the only things people can give without a price.
* ''Anime/WitchHunterRobin'' had a doctor whose special witch power allowed him to transfer LifeEnergy from one person to another. He used this to heal patients -- and took the necessary energy for his power from mob bosses. [[spoiler:He ultimately decides to save his human partner by sacrificing his own life.]] Considering that the witch hunters kill most witches they go up against, with those captured alive [[spoiler:taken for experimentation]], he definitely made the right decision. Since the STN-J hunts all Witches regardless of whether they can morally justify the use of their powers or not, Robin ends up learning about the holes in her philosophy by going on a less defensible (and fairly nasty) witch hunt.

to:

* In the multiverse of ''Manga/TsubasaReservoirChronicle'' and ''Manga/{{xxxHOLiC}}'', the price for wishes granted by Yuuko works this way. Some characters are Although it's not too much more wary of the possible implications of this than others. In particular, Kurogane and Doumeki will only ask for Yuuko's help if it is flat-out impossible for them to solve the problem under their own power. This is prudent, as false-hearted or impulsive wishes usually result in nasty karmic payback. Yuuko also has rules about not dealing in wishes of value equal to a human life, as that would implicate the wish-granter in murder.
** For the record, Yuuko accepts items or intangibilities that have both real and emotional power, which include both living and non-living: Kurogane's sword is both a precious reminder of his family and a powerful weapon; Fai's tattoo is imbued with powerful
regular magic for his own safety; and Syaoran and Sakura pay by giving up a portion as it's more of Sakura's memories - those which contain Syaoran. This means their previous relationship is sacrificed forever. Syaoran has been edited out of the memories the feathers contain. For example, Sakura can remember the events of her last birthday party, but one seat is mysteriously empty, and there's an odd pause in the dialogue whenever someone would have otherwise said Syaoran's name. One time Sakura almost manages to put two and two together, but passes out and loses all memory of her deduction due to this price. It's not flat-out impossible for Sakura and Syaoran to have a relationship after paying the price, but it has to be rebuilt from the ground up.
** Interestingly, you apparently don't need someone to trade with, just need to have a payment to be given in exchange for a desired end. [[spoiler: Clow and Yuko gained entry into the cycle of reincarnation for the clones by giving their lives up to... nothing in particular. Watanuki and Syaoran Jr. escape from a pocket dimension in exchange for the inability to leave The Shop and the inability to remain in one world for very long, respectively, again not actually selling it to anyone in particular.]]
** It eventually is revealed that whoever is the owner of the Wish Shop is essentially contractually bound to live by this principle at all times, lest they risk getting magically induced injuries from the shop itself as compensation. It's sobering when you realize that this is the primary reason for why Yuuko has made payment requests for the slightest things, even to friends, because no matter how much power she has, she ''can't'' give anyone anything without needing something from them in return... Except for feelings, which are explained to be the only things
one-use, people at ''Anime/HellGirl'' can give without a price.
* ''Anime/WitchHunterRobin'' had a doctor whose special witch power allowed him to transfer LifeEnergy from
send one person to another. He used this to heal patients -- and took the necessary energy for his power from mob bosses. [[spoiler:He ultimately decides to save his human partner by sacrificing his own life.]] Considering that the witch hunters kill most witches they go up against, with those captured alive [[spoiler:taken for experimentation]], he definitely made the right decision. Since the STN-J hunts all Witches regardless of whether they can morally justify the use of dislike immediately to Hell by contracting Enma Ai. The price is their powers or not, Robin ends up learning about the holes in her philosophy by own soul going on to Hell when they die. That's the reason why many people hesitate in first place: going to Hell is a less defensible (and fairly nasty) witch hunt.really high price. Out of spite, they send their victims into Hell anyways. The lesson is to learn to control your emotions and hatred? or YouCantFightFate? [[LostAesop Who knows?]]
* ''Manga/HibikiNoMahou''. If you want to use magic properly, you need to sacrifice an aspect of your being, like ability to dream, age, or memory; no wonder why magic practitioners are declining.



* ''Manga/HibikiNoMahou''. If you want to use magic properly, you need to sacrifice an aspect of your being, like ability to dream, age, or memory; no wonder why magic practitioners are declining.
* Although it's not too much of a regular magic as it's more of a one-use, people at ''Anime/HellGirl'' can send one person they dislike immediately to Hell by contracting Enma Ai. The price is their own soul going to Hell when they die. That's the reason why many people hesitate in first place: going to Hell is a really high price. Out of spite, they send their victims into Hell anyways. The lesson is to learn to control your emotions and hatred? or YouCantFightFate? [[LostAesop Who knows?]]
* It is the premise of ''Manga/TheLawOfUeki''.
* ''Manga/{{CMB}}'' has the rather interesting case in which [[CloudCuckooLander Shinya]] requires a price for solving a mystery; luckily he's very easily bought off so long as it is interesting.
* ''Manga/CodeBreaker'': It turns out that [[spoiler: Ogami's powers come from a DealWithTheDevil: for every upgrade he gets, he loses one of his senses. He's already lost his sense of taste, but "fortunately" Code: Emperor has chosen to take his newly acquired sound powers rather than his hearing... although there's still five upgrades to go..]].

to:

* ''Manga/HibikiNoMahou''. If you want to use magic properly, you need to sacrifice an aspect of your being, like ability to dream, age, or memory; no wonder why magic practitioners The spiky rokakaka fruits that appears in ''Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventure'' Part 8 are declining.
* Although it's not too much of a regular magic as it's more of a one-use, people at ''Anime/HellGirl'' can send one person
basically an HealingPotion. However...[[spoiler:for whatever ailment the fruits cure, they dislike immediately to Hell by contracting Enma Ai. The price is their own soul going to Hell when they die. That's require the reason why many people hesitate subject to "trade" something in first place: going to Hell is a really high price. Out return. An elderly man regrows one of spite, they send their victims into Hell anyways. The lesson is to learn to control your emotions and hatred? or YouCantFightFate? [[LostAesop Who knows?]]
*
his legs at the cost of his eyesight.]]
%%*
It is the premise of ''Manga/TheLawOfUeki''.
* ''Manga/{{CMB}}'' has the rather interesting case in which [[CloudCuckooLander Shinya]] requires a price for solving a mystery; luckily he's very easily bought off so long as it is interesting.
* ''Manga/CodeBreaker'': It turns out that [[spoiler: Ogami's powers come from a DealWithTheDevil: for every upgrade he gets, he loses one of his senses. He's already lost his sense of taste, but "fortunately" Code: Emperor has chosen to take his newly acquired sound powers rather than his hearing... although there's still five upgrades to go..]].
''Manga/TheLawOfUeki''.



* ''Manga/AhMyGoddess'' has the Law of Conservation of Happiness.
** Eventually, granting too many wishes within a short period of time means that someone ends up suffering some form of bad luck.
** This is also how wishes granted by demons run. They usually come with a myriad of attached strings that cause grief and misfortune to the person making the wish.

to:

* ''Manga/AhMyGoddess'' has While most of the Law magic on ''Anime/OjamajoDoremi'' doesn't have this in place (at least for full-fledged witches and wizards), the forbidden types of Conservation magic ([[EmpathicHealer Healing]], MindControl, [[BackFromTheDead Raising the Dead]]) all have this as part of Happiness.
** Eventually, granting too many wishes within a short period of time means that someone ends up suffering some form of bad luck.
why they are forbidden.
** This * One of the more awesome aspects of the Op-Op Fruit, Trafalgar Law's Devil Fruit in ''Manga/OnePiece'', is also how wishes granted by demons run. They usually come with a myriad of attached strings that cause grief and misfortune to the person making user can [[spoiler:[[ImmortalityInducer grant someone eternal youth]]]]. The catch is that the wish.user must sacrifice their own life to do it.



* In ''LightNovel/ACertainMagicalIndex'', once one becomes an [[PsychicPowers esper]], they can never use magic, and vice-versa, without suffering extreme damage to their bodies.
** To gain the incredible powers of God's Right Seat, a magician must give up his or her ability to use normal spells. [[spoiler: Acqua of the Back gets around this because his Divine Mother's Mercy removes limitations and secondary conditions. Fiamma of the Right gets around this by brainwashing Index to do the spells for him.]]
* While most of the magic on ''Anime/OjamajoDoremi'' doesn't have this in place (at least for full-fledged witches and wizards), the forbidden types of magic ([[EmpathicHealer Healing]], MindControl, [[BackFromTheDead Raising the Dead]]) all have this as part of why they are forbidden.
* This trope gets applied vaguely in ''Manga/DeathNote'': though no tangible price or punishment exists for a human who uses the [[ArtifactOfDeath Death Note]] (according to Ryuk), those who use it always end up miserable. [[AGodAmI Light]] vows at the beginning of the story to break this pattern; by the end, [[spoiler:he loses everybody who ever cared about him in any way, then dies in a bloody heap as he begs [[HoistByHisOwnPetard Ryuk to spare his life]]]]. Everyone else who writes in the Death Note [[spoiler:also ends up either miserable or dead]].
* In ''Manga/{{Bleach}}'', a Hollow can give up his or her HealingFactor in exchange for extra strength.
* One of the more awesome aspects of the Op-Op Fruit, Trafalgar Law's Devil Fruit in ''Manga/OnePiece'', is that the user can [[spoiler:[[ImmortalityInducer grant someone eternal youth]]]]. The catch is that the user must sacrifice their own life to do it.
* In ''Anime/DragonBallGT'', it is eventually revealed that every time the Dragon Balls grant a wish, they accumulate evil energy to balance the good created by the wish. Unless the evil energy is allowed time to dissipate, the ball eventually won't be able to take it anymore and will burst, unleashing the Shadow Dragons.

to:

* In ''LightNovel/ACertainMagicalIndex'', once one becomes an [[PsychicPowers esper]], they can never use magic, the multiverse of ''Manga/TsubasaReservoirChronicle'' and vice-versa, without suffering extreme damage ''Manga/{{xxxHOLiC}}'', the price for wishes granted by Yuuko works this way. Some characters are much more wary of the possible implications of this than others. In particular, Kurogane and Doumeki will only ask for Yuuko's help if it is flat-out impossible for them to solve the problem under their bodies.
** To gain
own power. This is prudent, as false-hearted or impulsive wishes usually result in nasty karmic payback. Yuuko also has rules about not dealing in wishes of value equal to a human life, as that would implicate the incredible powers wish-granter in murder.
** For the record, Yuuko accepts items or intangibilities that have both real and emotional power, which include both living and non-living: Kurogane's sword is both a precious reminder
of God's Right Seat, a magician must give up his or family and a powerful weapon; Fai's tattoo is imbued with powerful magic for his own safety; and Syaoran and Sakura pay by giving up a portion of Sakura's memories - those which contain Syaoran. This means their previous relationship is sacrificed forever. Syaoran has been edited out of the memories the feathers contain. For example, Sakura can remember the events of her ability last birthday party, but one seat is mysteriously empty, and there's an odd pause in the dialogue whenever someone would have otherwise said Syaoran's name. One time Sakura almost manages to use normal spells. put two and two together, but passes out and loses all memory of her deduction due to this price. It's not flat-out impossible for Sakura and Syaoran to have a relationship after paying the price, but it has to be rebuilt from the ground up.
** Interestingly, you apparently don't need someone to trade with, just need to have a payment to be given in exchange for a desired end.
[[spoiler: Acqua of Clow and Yuko gained entry into the Back gets around this because his Divine Mother's Mercy removes limitations cycle of reincarnation for the clones by giving their lives up to... nothing in particular. Watanuki and secondary conditions. Fiamma of Syaoran Jr. escape from a pocket dimension in exchange for the Right gets around this by brainwashing Index inability to do leave The Shop and the spells inability to remain in one world for him.very long, respectively, again not actually selling it to anyone in particular.]]
* While most of the magic on ''Anime/OjamajoDoremi'' doesn't have this in place (at least for full-fledged witches and wizards), the forbidden types of magic ([[EmpathicHealer Healing]], MindControl, [[BackFromTheDead Raising the Dead]]) all have this as part of why they are forbidden.
* This trope gets applied vaguely in ''Manga/DeathNote'': though no tangible price or punishment exists for a human who uses the [[ArtifactOfDeath Death Note]] (according to Ryuk), those who use it always end up miserable. [[AGodAmI Light]] vows at the beginning of the story to break this pattern; by the end, [[spoiler:he loses everybody who ever cared about him in any way, then dies in a bloody heap as he begs [[HoistByHisOwnPetard Ryuk to spare his life]]]]. Everyone else who writes in the Death Note [[spoiler:also ends up either miserable or dead]].
* In ''Manga/{{Bleach}}'', a Hollow can give up his or her HealingFactor in exchange for extra strength.
* One of the more awesome aspects of the Op-Op Fruit, Trafalgar Law's Devil Fruit in ''Manga/OnePiece'', is that the user can [[spoiler:[[ImmortalityInducer grant someone eternal youth]]]]. The catch is that the user must sacrifice their own life to do it.
* In ''Anime/DragonBallGT'', it is
** It eventually is revealed that every time whoever is the Dragon Balls grant a wish, owner of the Wish Shop is essentially contractually bound to live by this principle at all times, lest they accumulate evil energy to balance risk getting magically induced injuries from the good created by shop itself as compensation. It's sobering when you realize that this is the wish. Unless primary reason for why Yuuko has made payment requests for the evil energy is slightest things, even to friends, because no matter how much power she has, she ''can't'' give anyone anything without needing something from them in return... Except for feelings, which are explained to be the only things people can give without a price.
* ''Anime/WitchHunterRobin'' had a doctor whose special witch power
allowed time him to dissipate, transfer LifeEnergy from one person to another. He used this to heal patients -- and took the ball eventually won't be able necessary energy for his power from mob bosses. [[spoiler:He ultimately decides to take it anymore and will burst, unleashing save his human partner by sacrificing his own life.]] Considering that the Shadow Dragons.witch hunters kill most witches they go up against, with those captured alive [[spoiler:taken for experimentation]], he definitely made the right decision. Since the STN-J hunts all Witches regardless of whether they can morally justify the use of their powers or not, Robin ends up learning about the holes in her philosophy by going on a less defensible (and fairly nasty) witch hunt.
16th Apr '16 4:56:09 AM JackG
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** One of the ingredients of the spell to resurrect Buffy is the "blood of an innocent", so Willow cuts the throat of a fawn. [[spoiler:However at the end of the season the blood of an InnocentBystander is indeed shed, Willow's lover Tara, making one wonder if this trope wasn't in play.]]
24th Mar '16 1:46:12 PM Willbyr
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* The second arc of ''{{Naruto}}'' started off with Gaara dying, but he was an immensely popular and critical character so he needed to be revived. Enter Chiyo, who has a ninjutsu capable of reviving the dead. To avoid this being used to prevent every death in-series, the jutsu was equivalent exchange: the user sacrifices their own life to resurrect another.

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* The second arc of ''{{Naruto}}'' ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'' started off with Gaara dying, but he was an immensely popular and critical character so he needed to be revived. Enter Chiyo, who has a ninjutsu capable of reviving the dead. To avoid this being used to prevent every death in-series, the jutsu was equivalent exchange: the user sacrifices their own life to resurrect another.



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21st Feb '16 11:28:14 AM merotoker
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->''"Humankind cannot gain anything without first giving something in return. To obtain, something of equal value must be lost. That is alchemy's first law of '''[[TropeNamer Equivalent Exchange]]'''. In those days, we really believed that to be the world's one, and only truth." ''

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->''"Humankind cannot gain anything without first giving something in return. To obtain, something of equal value must be lost. That is alchemy's first law of '''[[TropeNamer Equivalent Exchange]]'''.'''Equivalent Exchange'''. In those days, we really believed that to be the world's one, and only truth." ''



** This franchise serves as the TropeNamer for anime and manga, as it makes a big deal out of the principle in its plot. In regards to alchemical transmutation, the law basically works like the Newtonian law of conservation of matter: matter and energy cannot be created or destroyed in a reaction. (It also helps that IsaacNewton, one of the {{Trope Codifier}}s in Real Life physics, considered himself an alchemist and formulated the basic principles of this trope.) The energy used to perform Amestrian alchemy comes from either tectonic shifts (the manga and ''Brotherhood'' anime) or [[spoiler:the souls of our world's deceased]] ([[Anime/FullmetalAlchemist the 2003 anime version]]). Xingese [[InsistentTerminology alkahestry]] relies on reading and directing the Earth's natural energy through its mantle.

to:

** This franchise serves as the TropeNamer {{Trope Namer|s}} for anime and manga, as it makes a big deal out of the principle in its plot. In regards to alchemical transmutation, the law basically works like the Newtonian law of conservation of matter: matter and energy cannot be created or destroyed in a reaction. (It also helps that IsaacNewton, one of the {{Trope Codifier}}s in Real Life physics, considered himself an alchemist and formulated the basic principles of this trope.) The energy used to perform Amestrian alchemy comes from either tectonic shifts (the manga and ''Brotherhood'' anime) or [[spoiler:the souls of our world's deceased]] ([[Anime/FullmetalAlchemist the 2003 anime version]]). Xingese [[InsistentTerminology alkahestry]] relies on reading and directing the Earth's natural energy through its mantle.



** One of the central tenets of the series -- and a sign of the development of Alphonse and Edward as people -- shows that [[spoiler:no matter how much they try and apply the rule of Equivalent Exchange to their lives, they always find something missing]]. At the end of the manga and ''Brotherhood'', they vow to [[spoiler:give eleven back to every person or thing they take ten from, thus making the world richer.]]

to:

** One of the central tenets of the series -- and a sign of the development of Alphonse and Edward as people -- shows that [[spoiler:no matter how much they try and apply the rule of Equivalent Exchange to their lives, they always find something missing]]. At the end of the manga and ''Brotherhood'', they vow to [[spoiler:give eleven back to every person or thing they take ten from, thus making the world richer.]] richer]].



*** After it happens, however, [[spoiler:Edward is able to top Alphonse by offering up the very truth of alchemy he received when they tried to bring their mother back as payment for Al's return.]] It's not quite an even equation, however [[spoiler:as Ed ends up loosing not only his circle-free alchemy but his entire ability to perform alchemy, though it's later revealed he gave up his alchemy for his brother's soul, either way it's such a clever exchange that even Truth itself is floored.]]

to:

*** After it happens, however, [[spoiler:Edward is able to top Alphonse by offering up the very truth of alchemy he received when they tried to bring their mother back as payment for Al's return.]] return]]. It's not quite an even equation, however [[spoiler:as Ed ends up loosing not only his circle-free alchemy but his entire ability to perform alchemy, though it's later revealed he gave up his alchemy for his brother's soul, either way it's such a clever exchange that even Truth itself is floored.]] floored]].



* ''VisualNovel/FateStayNight'' (and its [[{{Nasuverse}} multiverse]]) contains this -- energy must be taken from somewhere before it runs through the [[FunctionalMagic Magic Circuit]], though in most cases, Prana is either generated by the magus ([[LifeEnergy Od]]) or taken from the environment ({{Mana}}). Rin can launch A-rank attacks in seconds because she taps directly into her jewels (where she has been saving [[{{Mana}} Prana]] for ten years) instead of gathering it slowly for a minute or three.

to:

* ''VisualNovel/FateStayNight'' (and its [[{{Nasuverse}} [[Franchise/{{Nasuverse}} multiverse]]) contains this -- energy must be taken from somewhere before it runs through the [[FunctionalMagic Magic Circuit]], though in most cases, Prana is either generated by the magus ([[LifeEnergy Od]]) or taken from the environment ({{Mana}}). Rin can launch A-rank attacks in seconds because she taps directly into her jewels (where she has been saving [[{{Mana}} Prana]] for ten years) instead of gathering it slowly for a minute or three.



* In the multiverse of ''Manga/TsubasaReservoirChronicle'' and ''XxxHolic'', the price for wishes granted by Yuuko works this way. Some characters are much more wary of the possible implications of this than others. In particular, Kurogane and Doumeki will only ask for Yuuko's help if it is flat-out impossible for them to solve the problem under their own power. This is prudent, as false-hearted or impulsive wishes usually result in nasty karmic payback. Yuuko also has rules about not dealing in wishes of value equal to a human life, as that would implicate the wish-granter in murder.

to:

* In the multiverse of ''Manga/TsubasaReservoirChronicle'' and ''XxxHolic'', ''Manga/{{xxxHOLiC}}'', the price for wishes granted by Yuuko works this way. Some characters are much more wary of the possible implications of this than others. In particular, Kurogane and Doumeki will only ask for Yuuko's help if it is flat-out impossible for them to solve the problem under their own power. This is prudent, as false-hearted or impulsive wishes usually result in nasty karmic payback. Yuuko also has rules about not dealing in wishes of value equal to a human life, as that would implicate the wish-granter in murder.



** Interestingly, you apparently don't need someone to trade with, just need to have a payment to be given in exchange for a desired end. [[spoiler: Clow and Yuko gained entry into the cycle of reincarnation for the clones by giving their lives up to... nothing in particular. Watanuki and Syaoran Jr. escape from a pocket dimension in exchange for the inability to leave The Shop and the inability to remain in one world for very long, respectively, again not actually selling it to anyone in particular]].
** It eventually is revealed that whoever is the owner of the Wish Shop is essentially contractually bound to live by the EquivalentExchange principle at all times, lest they risk getting magically induced injuries from the shop itself as compensation. It's sobering when you realize that this is the primary reason for why Yuuko has made payment requests for the slightest things, even to friends, because no matter how much power she has, she ''can't'' give anyone anything without needing something from them in return... Except for feelings, which are explained to be the only things people can give without a price.

to:

** Interestingly, you apparently don't need someone to trade with, just need to have a payment to be given in exchange for a desired end. [[spoiler: Clow and Yuko gained entry into the cycle of reincarnation for the clones by giving their lives up to... nothing in particular. Watanuki and Syaoran Jr. escape from a pocket dimension in exchange for the inability to leave The Shop and the inability to remain in one world for very long, respectively, again not actually selling it to anyone in particular]].
particular.]]
** It eventually is revealed that whoever is the owner of the Wish Shop is essentially contractually bound to live by the EquivalentExchange this principle at all times, lest they risk getting magically induced injuries from the shop itself as compensation. It's sobering when you realize that this is the primary reason for why Yuuko has made payment requests for the slightest things, even to friends, because no matter how much power she has, she ''can't'' give anyone anything without needing something from them in return... Except for feelings, which are explained to be the only things people can give without a price.



* ''HunterXHunter'' has Nen abilities. It's a special ability invented by a user by using Nen, and it can range from simple super strength to shrinking cloths to memory reading to [[ImprobableWeaponUser vacuum cleaners and books and bank accounts]]. Each of these abilities have unique powers that the user make up in his mind during conception. The more powerful you are, the more powerful ability you can create. The thing is, the more powerful the ability is, the more restrictions the user must needs impose on it as well. Examples are:

to:

* ''HunterXHunter'' ''Manga/HunterXHunter'' has Nen abilities. It's a special ability invented by a user by using Nen, and it can range from simple super strength to shrinking cloths to memory reading to [[ImprobableWeaponUser vacuum cleaners and books and bank accounts]]. Each of these abilities have unique powers that the user make up in his mind during conception. The more powerful you are, the more powerful ability you can create. The thing is, the more powerful the ability is, the more restrictions the user must needs impose on it as well. Examples are:



* ''Manga/CodeBreaker'': It turns out that [[spoiler: Ogami's powers come from a DealWithTheDevil: for every upgrade he gets, he loses one of his senses. He's already lost his sense of taste, but "fortunately" Code: Emperor has chosen to take his newly acquired sound powers rather than his hearing... although there's still five upgrades to go...]]

to:

* ''Manga/CodeBreaker'': It turns out that [[spoiler: Ogami's powers come from a DealWithTheDevil: for every upgrade he gets, he loses one of his senses. He's already lost his sense of taste, but "fortunately" Code: Emperor has chosen to take his newly acquired sound powers rather than his hearing... although there's still five upgrades to go...]]go..]].



** This is also how [[spoiler: Nagato/Pein dies, a man with the bloodline trait giving him magic eyes equal to the strongest ninja ever to exist, it goes to show how powerful he was that he killed ''thousands'' and was able to revive them all to the last one before succumbing to the jutsu.]]

to:

** This is also how [[spoiler: Nagato/Pein dies, a man with the bloodline trait giving him magic eyes equal to the strongest ninja ever to exist, it goes to show how powerful he was that he killed ''thousands'' and was able to revive them all to the last one before succumbing to the jutsu.]]jutsu]].



** Defying this trope [[spoiler:is the true goal of the Incubators. Magic generated through emotion breaks Newtonian Equivalent Exchange, and the Incubators are using the additional energy to offset the death of the universe. However, for the Magical Girls themselves, [[PoweredByAForsakenChild the Equivalent Exchange of hope and despair still remains to screw them over]].]]

to:

** Defying this trope [[spoiler:is the true goal of the Incubators. Magic generated through emotion breaks Newtonian Equivalent Exchange, and the Incubators are using the additional energy to offset the death of the universe. However, for the Magical Girls themselves, [[PoweredByAForsakenChild the Equivalent Exchange of hope and despair still remains to screw them over]].]]over]]]].



* This trope gets applied vaguely in ''Manga/DeathNote'': though no tangible price or punishment exists for a human who uses the [[ArtifactOfDeath Death Note]] (according to Ryuk), those who use it always end up miserable. [[AGodAmI Light]] vows at the beginning of the story to break this pattern; by the end, [[spoiler:he loses everybody who ever cared about him in any way, then dies in a bloody heap as he begs [[HoistByHisOwnPetard Ryuk to spare his life]].]] Everyone else who writes in the Death Note [[spoiler:also ends up either miserable or dead]].

to:

* This trope gets applied vaguely in ''Manga/DeathNote'': though no tangible price or punishment exists for a human who uses the [[ArtifactOfDeath Death Note]] (according to Ryuk), those who use it always end up miserable. [[AGodAmI Light]] vows at the beginning of the story to break this pattern; by the end, [[spoiler:he loses everybody who ever cared about him in any way, then dies in a bloody heap as he begs [[HoistByHisOwnPetard Ryuk to spare his life]].]] life]]]]. Everyone else who writes in the Death Note [[spoiler:also ends up either miserable or dead]].



* In the Pre-Crisis DCU, the Guardians of the Universe purged themselves of evil, only to find that the evil had to go ''somewhere''. They [[SealedEvilInACan sealed it in the same universe where they sent most of the magic]] to ensure that the [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks Golden Age]] GreenLantern would be around to deal with it.
* ComicBook/{{Storm}}'s weather-controlling powers in the ''Comicbook/XMen'' comics are given a similar limit to explain why she can't turn the world into a paradise, or at least bring relief to disaster-stricken areas. The first time she tried that, she successfully ended the drought in her village - only to discover that, since the moisture she'd drawn upon had to come from somewhere, she'd caused even worse droughts to strike the rest of the world.

to:

* In the Pre-Crisis DCU, the Guardians of the Universe purged themselves of evil, only to find that the evil had to go ''somewhere''. They [[SealedEvilInACan sealed it in the same universe where they sent most of the magic]] to ensure that the [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfComicBooks Golden Age]] GreenLantern Franchise/GreenLantern would be around to deal with it.
* ComicBook/{{Storm}}'s weather-controlling powers in the ''Comicbook/XMen'' comics are given a similar limit to explain [[ReedRichardsIsUseless why she can't turn the world into a paradise, or at least bring relief to disaster-stricken areas.areas]]. The first time she tried that, she successfully ended the drought in her village - only to discover that, since the moisture she'd drawn upon had to come from somewhere, she'd caused even worse droughts to strike the rest of the world.



* In ''Film/MenInBlack3'', J goes back in time to prevent [[spoiler: K's death]]. He is told that the event he is trying to avoid is destined to happen, and that "Where there is death, there must always be death.". [[spoiler: Due to J's meddling, K is saved, with J's dad TakingTheBullet.]]

to:

* In ''Film/MenInBlack3'', J goes back in time to prevent [[spoiler: K's death]]. He is told that the event he is trying to avoid is destined to happen, and that "Where there is death, there must always be death.". " [[spoiler: Due to J's meddling, K is saved, with J's dad TakingTheBullet.]]






*** The color of the fireball doesn't indicated how hot it is, it just means his dragon is blue. Brom says it out right in the first book, for dragon riders their magic will be the color of their dragon. So it would take no more energy then a fireball that would "naturally" burn red.

to:

*** The color of the fireball doesn't indicated indicate how hot it is, it just means his dragon is blue. Brom says it out right in the first book, for dragon riders their magic will be the color of their dragon. So it would take no more energy then a fireball that would "naturally" burn red.



* In the non-{{Dragonlance}} book ''Literature/TheDeathGateCycle'' by MargaretWeis and Tracy Hickman, the same problem came up. When you brought someone back to life, be it a full resurrection or just as a zombie, somebody else, somewhere, died. One of the two competing races nearly wiped themselves out this way.
* ''{{Vurt}}''. Things are swapped between the real world and the vurt world on the basis of their value. The characters are keeping a weird tentacled creature because it was somehow switched with the protagonist's sister, and they're trying to figure out how to get her back. At one point, he wants to bring a object back to reality, so he leaves something of sentimental value behind.

to:

* In the non-{{Dragonlance}} non-Literature/{{Dragonlance}} book ''Literature/TheDeathGateCycle'' by MargaretWeis Creator/MargaretWeis and Tracy Hickman, Creator/TracyHickman, the same problem came up. When you brought someone back to life, be it a full resurrection or just as a zombie, somebody else, somewhere, died. One of the two competing races nearly wiped themselves out this way.
* ''{{Vurt}}''.''Literature/{{Vurt}}''. Things are swapped between the real world and the vurt world on the basis of their value. The characters are keeping a weird tentacled creature because it was somehow switched with the protagonist's sister, and they're trying to figure out how to get her back. At one point, he wants to bring a object back to reality, so he leaves something of sentimental value behind.



* The novels in the Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse emphasize that the [[TheDarkSide Sith]] path is one of sacrifice, i.e., ''demolishing'' attachments instead of the Jedi path of ''avoiding'' attachments. Since the Sith draw power from pain and rage, easy or pleasant trade-offs aren't in the picture.
** Which makes the Emperor's plan of either 'Luke kills his father' or 'Anakin kills his son' at the end of ''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi'' make a lot more sense.

to:

* The novels in the Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse emphasize that the [[TheDarkSide Sith]] path is one of sacrifice, i.e., ''demolishing'' attachments instead of the Jedi path of ''avoiding'' attachments. Since the Sith draw power from pain and rage, easy or pleasant trade-offs aren't in the picture.
**
picture. Which makes the Emperor's plan of either 'Luke kills his father' or 'Anakin kills his son' at the end of ''Film/ReturnOfTheJedi'' make a lot more sense.



* In the ''Literature/ColdFireTrilogy'', magical energy is released by sacrifice. The amount of energy gained is directly proportional to how much the sacrificed object was worth to the sorcerer. This is one of the facts used to show the [[MagnificentBastard Magnificent Bastardness]] of Gerald Tarrent, who sacrificed his entire family to gain immortality. The spell wouldn't have worked if he hadn't loved his wife and children very, very much - and he killed them ''anyway''.

to:

* In the ''Literature/ColdFireTrilogy'', magical energy is released by sacrifice. The amount of energy gained is directly proportional to how much the sacrificed object was worth to the sorcerer. This is one of the facts used to show the [[MagnificentBastard Magnificent Bastardness]] {{Magnificent Bastard}}ness of Gerald Tarrent, who sacrificed his entire family to gain immortality. The spell wouldn't have worked if he hadn't loved his wife and children very, very much - and he killed them ''anyway''.



* In the ''YoungWizards'' series, "spells" are essentially equations written in a magical language and equations always have to balance, one way or another. In one book, a character holds off the BigBad with a [[BeehiveBarrier shielding spell]] which is later explained to have been fueled by a year of the character's life per strike. (The Devil hits ''hard''.) In another, that same BigBad is [[SealedEvilInACan sealed away]] by a ritual that requires a willing sacrifice; one character attempts to take the place of the intended victim [[spoiler:and a third actually does]]. It's implied that this event might have come to pass because of events in the prior book: to cast a spell they couldn't have powered alone to seal away an ArtifactOfDoom they used a "blank check" spell in which they essentially promise that the power they use will be repaid at some unknown date in the future.
* The "death magic" in LoisMcMasterBujold's Literature/{{Chalion}} series is like this: it's a way to murder someone at a distance, but as part of the spell's workings, the person casting the spell will die, too. In addition to this little drawback, it's [[spoiler:believed to be]] very difficult, and requires animal sacrifice as well. Plus, the God of Executioners has to be invoked and [[spoiler:he only lets the magic work when the victim ''deserves'' to die.]]
* The ''BarryTrotter'' parody of the ''Literature/HarryPotter'' series mentions this in the sequel, where everyone has graduated and started families [[spoiler: (despite being effectively proven wrong by the final book)]]. It's only then that Barry learns that to summon something with magic is actually just teleportation, thus "created" items always come from somewhere else. This coincidentally results in a poor sap whose possessions always go missing on Barry's birthday.

to:

* In the ''YoungWizards'' ''Literature/YoungWizards'' series, "spells" are essentially equations written in a magical language and equations always have to balance, one way or another. In one book, a character holds off the BigBad with a [[BeehiveBarrier shielding spell]] which is later explained to have been fueled by a year of the character's life per strike. (The Devil hits ''hard''.) In another, that same BigBad is [[SealedEvilInACan sealed away]] by a ritual that requires a willing sacrifice; one character attempts to take the place of the intended victim [[spoiler:and a third actually does]]. It's implied that this event might have come to pass because of events in the prior book: to cast a spell they couldn't have powered alone to seal away an ArtifactOfDoom they used a "blank check" spell in which they essentially promise that the power they use will be repaid at some unknown date in the future.
* The "death magic" in LoisMcMasterBujold's Creator/LoisMcMasterBujold's Literature/{{Chalion}} series is like this: it's a way to murder someone at a distance, but as part of the spell's workings, the person casting the spell will die, too. In addition to this little drawback, it's [[spoiler:believed to be]] very difficult, and requires animal sacrifice as well. Plus, the God of Executioners has to be invoked and [[spoiler:he only lets the magic work when the victim ''deserves'' to die.]]
* The ''BarryTrotter'' ''Literature/BarryTrotter'' parody of the ''Literature/HarryPotter'' series mentions this in the sequel, where everyone has graduated and started families [[spoiler: (despite being effectively proven wrong by the final book)]]. It's only then that Barry learns that to summon something with magic is actually just teleportation, thus "created" items always come from somewhere else. This coincidentally results in a poor sap whose possessions always go missing on Barry's birthday.



** The first chronicles has Mhoram realizing [[spoiler:the key to power is despair, which will lead to the destruction of the Land.]]
* In ChinaMieville's ''Literature/IronCouncil'', a character is beholden to an interesting version of this. They are a monk of the God of Secrets; part of this means that they can ask the god for knowledge about a secret: a secret path, what the enemy is planning, and so on. But they have to give up some of their own knowledge to do so. The character in question lost knowledge of her gender as a result of this.
* Sympathy in ''TheKingkillerChronicle'' follows the actual First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics, so that heat and work applied to a target have to be taken from somewhere and transfer of energy can be rather inefficient. In practice, this means that people have killed themselves trying to raise winds with their diaphragms and light candles with their body heat.

to:

** The first chronicles has Mhoram realizing [[spoiler:the key to power is despair, which will lead to the destruction of the Land.]]
Land]].
* In ChinaMieville's Creator/ChinaMieville's ''Literature/IronCouncil'', a character is beholden to an interesting version of this. They are a monk of the God of Secrets; part of this means that they can ask the god for knowledge about a secret: a secret path, what the enemy is planning, and so on. But they have to give up some of their own knowledge to do so. The character in question lost knowledge of her gender as a result of this.
* Sympathy in ''TheKingkillerChronicle'' ''Literature/TheKingkillerChronicle'' follows the actual First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics, so that heat and work applied to a target have to be taken from somewhere and transfer of energy can be rather inefficient. In practice, this means that people have killed themselves trying to raise winds with their diaphragms and light candles with their body heat.



* The cost for ResurrectiveImmortality in The Night Angel Trilogy. For each resurection of black ka'kari holder, [[spoiler: someone the holder cares about soon dies.]]

to:

* The cost for ResurrectiveImmortality in The Night Angel Trilogy. For each resurection resurrection of black ka'kari holder, [[spoiler: someone the holder cares about soon dies.]]



* Chloe Sullivan on ''Series/{{Smallville}}'' got a similar power in the sixth season finale (in this case, she died and came back to life). In the Seventh season, it is explained that she can heal non-fatal wounds so long as she herself takes on that wound (i.e. to heal a paper cut on Jimmy Olsen's finger, her body compensates by receiving a wound of similar size on the same spot on her body).
* One episode of ''Series/ForeverKnight'' featured a mystic healer that could take darkness out of people. However, said mystic happened to be a novice at her craft, and didn't know that this darkness had to be put somewhere, (usually into an inanimate object of some sort), and wound up absorbing it herself and being overwhelmed by it. The episode had a really sad end to it, [[spoiler: Nick was quite close to becoming human again, with most of his vampiric urges gone. But she herself was absorbing his darkness and becoming a vampire. She died from "OD'ing" on his evil, which he re-absorbed into himself.]] Her grandfather alluded that she might have been capable of fully healing Nick (or at least making his gains permanent) if she had been more skilled.

to:

* Chloe Sullivan on ''Series/{{Smallville}}'' got a similar power in the sixth season finale (in this case, she died and came back to life). In the Seventh seventh season, it is explained that she can heal non-fatal wounds so long as she herself takes on that wound (i.e. to heal a paper cut on Jimmy Olsen's finger, her body compensates by receiving a wound of similar size on the same spot on her body).
* One episode of ''Series/ForeverKnight'' featured a mystic healer that could take darkness out of people. However, said mystic happened to be a novice at her craft, and didn't know that this darkness had to be put somewhere, (usually into an inanimate object of some sort), and wound up absorbing it herself and being overwhelmed by it. The episode had a really sad end to it, [[spoiler: Nick was quite close to becoming human again, with most of his vampiric urges gone. But she herself was absorbing his darkness and becoming a vampire. She died from "OD'ing" on his evil, which he re-absorbed into himself.]] himself]]. Her grandfather alluded that she might have been capable of fully healing Nick (or at least making his gains permanent) if she had been more skilled.



** Similarly, though perhaps a more accurate example of this trope, when Buffy is brought back to life at the start of Season 6, the spell creates a brand new demon through a process Willow calls "Thaumogenesis". As she explains, the universe doesn't like you getting things for free, there has to be a cost and they asked for a huge gift; Buffys life back, so the universe said "Ok, but you have to have this evil demon too". This fits the trope as its a Good Thing/Bad Thing equal parts deal but as Anya rightfully points out "That's not a cost, that's a gift with purchase".

to:

** Similarly, though perhaps a more accurate example of this trope, when Buffy is brought back to life at the start of Season 6, the spell creates a brand new demon through a process Willow calls "Thaumogenesis". As she explains, the universe doesn't like you getting things for free, there has to be a cost and they asked for a huge gift; Buffys Buffy's life back, so the universe said "Ok, but you have to have this evil demon too". This fits the trope as its a Good Thing/Bad Thing equal parts deal but as Anya rightfully points out "That's not a cost, that's a gift with purchase".



** Of course, since Jack has unlimited life force, the whole thing [[GoneHorriblyRight gets turned on its head when he ressurects Owen]] - he's immortal, but unable to eat, heal, get drunk, etc.

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** Of course, since Jack has unlimited life force, the whole thing [[GoneHorriblyRight gets turned on its head when he ressurects resurrects Owen]] - he's immortal, but unable to eat, heal, get drunk, etc.



* In ''Franchise/PowerRangers'' there are some examples of TheSixthRanger being limited due to their awesome power. The most notable were the Green Ranger and the Titanium Ranger. The Green Rangerís powers were damaged, such that every time he used them, they would weaken, putting physical strain on himself. The Titanium Ranger was branded with a cursed tattoo of a cobra on his back. Every time he morphed, the cobra would move up a little. If it got to his neck, he would die.

to:

* In ''Franchise/PowerRangers'' there are some examples of TheSixthRanger the SixthRanger being limited due to their awesome power. The most notable were the Green Ranger and the Titanium Ranger. The Green Rangerís powers were damaged, such that every time he used them, they would weaken, putting physical strain on himself. The Titanium Ranger was branded with a cursed tattoo of a cobra on his back. Every time he morphed, the cobra would move up a little. If it got to his neck, he would die.



** This was also used as a plot point. [[spoiler: Arthur was conceived through the use of magic at the cost of his mother's life; she died during childbirth.]] There was even a reveal in this scene because [[spoiler: Nimueh, a recurring villainess in the series, was the one to use the spell that conceived Arthur in order to grant Uther an heir by his barren wife. She herself knew there would be consequences of this spell, but she didn't know how they would appear.]]
** This reappeared in the season finale, where [[spoiler: Merlin offered [[BalancingDeathsBooks his life in exchange]] for Arthur's, as the prince was being killed by an incurable poison. However, this didn't work as planned, as Nimueh took Merlin's mother's life instead, so his mentor/father figure Gaius offered up his life (confused yet?). The whole saga ended when Merlin killed Nimueh and used her life to save Gaius.]]

to:

** This was also used as a plot point. [[spoiler: Arthur was conceived through the use of magic at the cost of his mother's life; she died during childbirth.]] There was even a reveal in this scene because [[spoiler: Nimueh, a recurring villainess in the series, was the one to use the spell that conceived Arthur in order to grant Uther an heir by his barren wife. She herself knew there would be consequences of this spell, but she didn't know how they would appear.]]
appear]].
** This reappeared in the season finale, where [[spoiler: Merlin offered [[BalancingDeathsBooks his life in exchange]] for Arthur's, as the prince was being killed by an incurable poison. However, this didn't work as planned, as Nimueh took Merlin's mother's life instead, so his mentor/father figure Gaius offered up his life (confused yet?). The whole saga ended when Merlin killed Nimueh and used her life to save Gaius.]]Gaius]].



** The [[SeriesGoal Greatest Treasure in the Universe]] [[spoiler: has the [[RealityWarper power to change history and reality]], and confirms that it could be used to erase TheEmpire from history...but doing so would ''also'' [[RetGone retroactively erase]] all of the SuperSentai from existence. The Gokaiger end up deciding not to do this, since the Sentai mean too much to humanity and it isn't their right to make that call for the entire planet.]]

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** The [[SeriesGoal Greatest Treasure in the Universe]] [[spoiler: has the [[RealityWarper power to change history and reality]], and confirms that it could be used to erase TheEmpire from history...but doing so would ''also'' [[RetGone retroactively erase]] all of the SuperSentai Franchise/SuperSentai from existence. The Gokaiger end up deciding not to do this, since the Sentai mean too much to humanity and it isn't their right to make that call for the entire planet.]]planet]].



* In ''TabletopGame/BattleSpirits'', everything has a cost of core, even if it's just a low amount, though it can be reduced through the cards specificed reductions and other effects. Some double symbol spirits require the tribute of another spirit to summon them.

to:

* In ''TabletopGame/BattleSpirits'', everything has a cost of core, even if it's just a low amount, though it can be reduced through the cards specificed specified reductions and other effects. Some double symbol spirits require the tribute of another spirit to summon them.



* In ''TabletopGame/{{Exalted}}'', the Sidereal Exalted have the charm called Of Things Desired and Feared, which uses astrology to provide an infaillible way to achieve ''any'' objective you can state... for an appropriate price. If what you want to achieve is small, it is likely the price will be something you are willing to pay (a few bruises, the lost of an item, etc.). But if you ask for a Fate-proven way to defeat BigBad or otherway break the game, the price will be something like "your life, the lives of everyone in your Circle, and the complete destruction of all the thing you value and care for".

to:

* In ''TabletopGame/{{Exalted}}'', the Sidereal Exalted have the charm called Of Things Desired and Feared, which uses astrology to provide an infaillible infallible way to achieve ''any'' objective you can state... for an appropriate price. If what you want to achieve is small, it is likely the price will be something you are willing to pay (a few bruises, the lost of an item, etc.). But if you ask for a Fate-proven way to defeat BigBad or otherway break the game, the price will be something like "your life, the lives of everyone in your Circle, and the complete destruction of all the thing you value and care for".



* The world ''[[VideoGame/KartiaTheWordOfFate Kartia]]'' revolves around magical cards, Kartia, that can be used to create basically anything, from living battle-creatures to spells to specific kinds of food and drink. There are a number of Original Kartia (such as "Life" "Death" and "Human"), the use of which is forbidden and will automatically cause the death of the caster. For most of the game, the player and the characters believe that the Kartia creates things from nothingness [[spoiler: but as it turns out, it just takes things from Eden, a parallel world inhabited by Elves and rich with natural magic. In fact, it is theoretically possible to "create" the whole Eden with Original Kartia, something that is half-accomplished twice during the story. It also turns out that Original Kartia doesn't kill the user, but rather transports them to Eden.]]

to:

* The world ''[[VideoGame/KartiaTheWordOfFate Kartia]]'' revolves around magical cards, Kartia, that can be used to create basically anything, from living battle-creatures to spells to specific kinds of food and drink. There are a number of Original Kartia (such as "Life" "Death" and "Human"), the use of which is forbidden and will automatically cause the death of the caster. For most of the game, the player and the characters believe that the Kartia creates things from nothingness [[spoiler: but as it turns out, it just takes things from Eden, a parallel world inhabited by Elves and rich with natural magic. In fact, it is theoretically possible to "create" the whole Eden with Original Kartia, something that is half-accomplished twice during the story. It also turns out that Original Kartia doesn't kill the user, but rather transports them to Eden.]]Eden]].



*** Although now, Warlocks have a low-level spell that lets them restore all their soul shards by apparently breaking off little pieces of their OWN SOUL (at no real cost in gameplay terms, though it is interruptable and thus best used out of combat/between fights).

to:

*** Although now, Warlocks have a low-level spell that lets them restore all their soul shards by apparently breaking off little pieces of their OWN SOUL (at no real cost in gameplay terms, though it is interruptable interruptible and thus best used out of combat/between fights).



** Recarmdra is present in many games in the ''ShinMegamiTensei'' series, where it often does kill the user to fully heal the rest of the party. Because of [[WeCannotGoOnWithoutYou how the games are in general]], only the recruitable demons and not the main character can get it.

to:

** Recarmdra is present in many games in the ''ShinMegamiTensei'' ''Franchise/ShinMegamiTensei'' series, where it often does kill the user to fully heal the rest of the party. Because of [[WeCannotGoOnWithoutYou how the games are in general]], only the recruitable demons and not the main character can get it.



* In ''VideoGame/GuildWars'', many [[{{Necromancy}} Necromancer]] spells, mostly under the BloodMagic attribute, require the Necromancer to sacrifice a certain percentage of their maximum health, in addition to a small amount of MP, to cast. In addition, Necromancers also have many spells that require there to be a fresh corpse somewhere nearby for them to "exploit". These spells include raising undead servants, creating a "well" of energy that performs various effects, [[ImAHumanitarian healing]], or simply making the corpse [[{{Squick}} explode]].

to:

* In ''VideoGame/GuildWars'', many [[{{Necromancy}} Necromancer]] {{Necromancer}} spells, mostly under the BloodMagic attribute, require the Necromancer to sacrifice a certain percentage of their maximum health, in addition to a small amount of MP, to cast. In addition, Necromancers also have many spells that require there to be a fresh corpse somewhere nearby for them to "exploit". These spells include raising undead servants, creating a "well" of energy that performs various effects, [[ImAHumanitarian healing]], or simply making the corpse [[{{Squick}} explode]].



* Equivalent Exchange is one of the major rules of magic in the {{Nasuverse}} both in the practical (a spell needs to take its energy from somewhere else) and the social sense (a magus will never do someone a favor without expecting something in return).

to:

* Equivalent Exchange is one of the major rules of magic in the {{Nasuverse}} Franchise/{{Nasuverse}} both in the practical (a spell needs to take its energy from somewhere else) and the social sense (a magus will never do someone a favor without expecting something in return).



* In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIIRevenantWings'' summoning Yarhi siphons part of your Anima, the part of you that feels, which is why all the Aegyl who regularily use Yarhi to protect them selves for random monsters appear rather emotionless. [[spoiler:Their "god" draining their Anima for himself is a bigger factor in this though.]]
* While Calypso from ''VideoGame/TwistedMetal'' is either a LiteralGenie or a JerkassGenie, the ending for his daughter winds up universally balancing it out, by wishing that [[spoiler: the car crash that killed her mother never happened, the universe balanced things by making the daughter get in the crash herself and put into a coma she probably wouldn't wake up from.]] Even Calypso is genuinely heartbroken about this outcome.
* In ''VideoGame/JunipersKnot'', the rule of [[spoiler:the spell binding the fiend]] is of this type: [[spoiler:a life for a life.]]

to:

* In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIIRevenantWings'' summoning Yarhi siphons part of your Anima, the part of you that feels, which is why all the Aegyl who regularily regularly use Yarhi to protect them selves for random monsters appear rather emotionless. [[spoiler:Their "god" draining their Anima for himself is a bigger factor in this though.]]
* While Calypso from ''VideoGame/TwistedMetal'' is either a LiteralGenie or a JerkassGenie, the ending for his daughter winds up universally balancing it out, by wishing that [[spoiler: the car crash that killed her mother never happened, the universe balanced things by making the daughter get in the crash herself and put into a coma she probably wouldn't wake up from.]] from]]. Even Calypso is genuinely heartbroken about this outcome.
* In ''VideoGame/JunipersKnot'', ''VisualNovel/JunipersKnot'', the rule of [[spoiler:the spell binding the fiend]] is of this type: [[spoiler:a life for a life.]]life]].



* ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' uses this trope when regarding time travel in ''Bender's Big Score'' due to the discovery of a paradox-correcting timecode. The timecode ignores all of the problems that normally arise with time travel as long as the end result is close enough to the main timeline. If there are multiple copies of someone created by time travel, then fate will make those copies exceedingly doomed until all but one are dead and the universe considers that perfectly fine. Somewhat justified as the code functions by drawing time bubbles from a creature previously implied to be God, who assumably would be immune to paradoxes.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' uses this trope when regarding time travel in ''Bender's Big Score'' due to the discovery of a paradox-correcting timecode. The timecode ignores all of the problems that normally arise with time travel as long as the end result is close enough to the main timeline. If there are multiple copies of someone created by time travel, then fate will make those copies exceedingly doomed until all but one are dead and the universe considers that perfectly fine. Somewhat justified as the code functions by drawing time bubbles from a creature previously implied to be God, who assumably assumedly would be immune to paradoxes.



* ''WesternAnimation/KimPossible'' has Monkey Fist, who agreed to walk the path of the Yono in exchange for the Yono's power. It was granted to him...until he lost. [[spoiler:Then he followed the path as agreed, [[PutOnABusToHell petrification being the result]]]].
* The ending of ''WesternAnimation/XMen'' take on ComicBook/TheDarkPhoenixSaga has Jean Grey [[HeroicSacrifice dying to stop the Phoenix threat]] as per source, but since here it was the real Jean posessed by a cosmic force, instead of [[TomatoSurprise the force itself taking her form]], she really does die. The force itself is okay though, but it [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone realises that it was wrong]], and [[MustMakeAmends offers to ressurect Jean]], requiring someone sacrificing their own LifeEnergy. Cyclops and Wolverine have a MoreExpendableThanYou moment before Phoenix informs them that the necessary amount of life energy can be obtained from several donors, without anybody dying.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/KimPossible'' has Monkey Fist, who agreed to walk the path of the Yono in exchange for the Yono's power. It was granted to him...until he lost. [[spoiler:Then he followed the path as agreed, [[PutOnABusToHell petrification being the result]]]].
result.]]]]
* The ending of ''WesternAnimation/XMen'' take on ComicBook/TheDarkPhoenixSaga has Jean Grey ComicBook/JeanGrey [[HeroicSacrifice dying to stop the Phoenix threat]] as per source, but since here it was the real Jean posessed possessed by a cosmic force, instead of [[TomatoSurprise the force itself taking her form]], she really does die. The force itself is okay though, but it [[MyGodWhatHaveIDone realises that it was wrong]], and [[MustMakeAmends offers to ressurect resurrect Jean]], requiring someone sacrificing their own LifeEnergy. Cyclops and Wolverine have a MoreExpendableThanYou moment before Phoenix informs them that the necessary amount of life energy can be obtained from several donors, without anybody dying.



*** C6-H12-O6 + 6O2 -> 6 [=CO2=] + 6H20 + Heat. [[{{QI}} Explosion in a custard factory]].

to:

*** C6-H12-O6 + 6O2 -> 6 [=CO2=] + 6H20 + Heat. [[{{QI}} [[Series/{{QI}} Explosion in a custard factory]].



* Few things in this world are free. [[MoneyDearBoy Money]] being a key thing to get many of the things we desire. You can't get an HDTV or car without having the cash to give in return for ownership.

to:

* Few things in this world are free. [[MoneyDearBoy Money]] {{Money|DearBoy}} being a key thing to get many of the things we desire. You can't get an HDTV or car without having the cash to give in return for ownership.






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13th Feb '16 5:26:37 PM DarkastKiller
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*** After it happens, however, [[spoiler:Edward is able to top Alphonse by offering up the very truth of alchemy he received when they tried to bring their mother back as payment for Al's return.]] It's not quite an even equation, however [[spoiler:as Ed ends up loosing not only his circle-free alchemy but his entire ability to perform alchemy, but it's such a clever exchange that even Truth itself is floored.]]

to:

*** After it happens, however, [[spoiler:Edward is able to top Alphonse by offering up the very truth of alchemy he received when they tried to bring their mother back as payment for Al's return.]] It's not quite an even equation, however [[spoiler:as Ed ends up loosing not only his circle-free alchemy but his entire ability to perform alchemy, but though it's later revealed he gave up his alchemy for his brother's soul, either way it's such a clever exchange that even Truth itself is floored.]]
23rd Jan '16 6:29:00 PM nombretomado
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* {{Storm}}'s weather-controlling powers in the ''Comicbook/{{X-Men}}'' comics are given a similar limit to explain why she can't turn the world into a paradise, or at least bring relief to disaster-stricken areas. The first time she tried that, she successfully ended the drought in her village - only to discover that, since the moisture she'd drawn upon had to come from somewhere, she'd caused even worse droughts to strike the rest of the world.

to:

* {{Storm}}'s ComicBook/{{Storm}}'s weather-controlling powers in the ''Comicbook/{{X-Men}}'' ''Comicbook/XMen'' comics are given a similar limit to explain why she can't turn the world into a paradise, or at least bring relief to disaster-stricken areas. The first time she tried that, she successfully ended the drought in her village - only to discover that, since the moisture she'd drawn upon had to come from somewhere, she'd caused even worse droughts to strike the rest of the world.
22nd Jan '16 6:51:18 PM Godzillawolf
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Added DiffLines:

* In the ''Fanfic/PonyPOVSeries'':
** Most ponies need to use their mana for spells, regardless of species. Changelings have this to a bigger extreme: they will die if they run out of love energy, but need it for their abilities.
** The Alicorns are unique in that they have ThePowerOfCreation and while they still require mana for spells, can literally create new matter, which is how they regenerate. Draconequi, in contrast, require matter to transmute into new things (this includes Discord), but can violate the ''other'' side by being able to ''destroy'' matter and energy completely.
22nd Nov '15 3:41:57 AM Morgenthaler
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* In ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'', when Willow sends Buffy back in time to meet the sages who created the first Slayer, a demon is brought forwards to take her place. Willow says that this is to avoid violating the First Law of Thermodynamics.

to:

* In ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'', when ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'':
** When
Willow sends Buffy back in time to meet the sages who created the first Slayer, a demon is brought forwards to take her place. Willow says that this is to avoid violating the First Law of Thermodynamics.



*** And to get the ingredient [[BloodMagic (blood)]] that Willow needs to cast the spell to bring Buffy back, Willow stabs a cute little fawn with a knife.
*** Same thing happened with Jonathan in "Superstar," although in that case the existence of the demon was required for the spell to keep working.
**** The demon brought forth to take Buffy's place happens once again in the Season 8 comic when Buffy time travels.



* Whenever Frank Parker steps back in time in ''Series/SevenDays'', his self at that time period vanishes from the time stream. It's explained that this is because the same set of molecules cannot exist in two places at the same time.
** This is the sort of thing that makes sense in magic, but not if you try to science it up. His body is ''not'' the same set of molecules that it was last week, so the results ''should'' be a little bit messy.
** This almost blows the secret once, when Parker steals something the first time through, when he's investigating the problem, and takes it back with him. So it 'magically' vanishes from villain out of air-tight security, out of a locked briefcase, and the villain twigs that that shouldn't be possible, and starts investigating this 'Backstep' project.
* In ''PowerRangers'' there are some examples of TheSixthRanger being limited due to their awesome power. The most notable were the Green Ranger and the Titanium Ranger. The Green Rangerís powers were damaged, such that every time he used them, they would weaken, putting physical strain on himself. The Titanium Ranger was branded with a cursed tattoo of a cobra on his back. Every time he morphed, the cobra would move up a little. If it got to his neck, he would die.
* This was also used as a plot point in the BBC Series ''Series/{{Merlin}}''. [[spoiler: Arthur was conceived through the use of magic at the cost of his mother's life; she died during childbirth.]] There was even a reveal in this scene because [[spoiler: Nimueh, a recurring villainess in the series, was the one to use the spell that conceived Arthur in order to grant Uther an heir by his barren wife. She herself knew there would be consequences of this spell, but she didn't know how they would appear.]]

to:

* Whenever Frank Parker steps back in time in ''Series/SevenDays'', his self at that time period vanishes from the time stream. It's explained that this is because the same set of molecules cannot exist in two places at the same time.
** This is the sort of thing that makes sense in magic, but not if you try to science it up. His body is ''not'' the same set of molecules that it was last week, so the results ''should'' be a little bit messy.
**
time. This almost blows the secret once, when Parker steals something the first time through, when he's investigating the problem, and takes it back with him. So it 'magically' vanishes from villain out of air-tight security, out of a locked briefcase, and the villain twigs that that shouldn't be possible, and starts investigating this 'Backstep' project.
* In ''PowerRangers'' ''Franchise/PowerRangers'' there are some examples of TheSixthRanger being limited due to their awesome power. The most notable were the Green Ranger and the Titanium Ranger. The Green Rangerís powers were damaged, such that every time he used them, they would weaken, putting physical strain on himself. The Titanium Ranger was branded with a cursed tattoo of a cobra on his back. Every time he morphed, the cobra would move up a little. If it got to his neck, he would die.
* ''Series/{{Merlin 2008}}'':
**
This was also used as a plot point in the BBC Series ''Series/{{Merlin}}''.point. [[spoiler: Arthur was conceived through the use of magic at the cost of his mother's life; she died during childbirth.]] There was even a reveal in this scene because [[spoiler: Nimueh, a recurring villainess in the series, was the one to use the spell that conceived Arthur in order to grant Uther an heir by his barren wife. She herself knew there would be consequences of this spell, but she didn't know how they would appear.]]



* In the ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' episode "Faith", a Reaper can restore a dying person's life, but only at the cost of another's. The woman who was holding the RestrainingBolt uses this to set her husband up as a faith healer, while using the exchange to murder various of her faith's bugaboos. When the brothers break the leash, she learns the hard way that TrueNeutral [[EvilIsNotAToy is not a toy]].

to:

* ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'':
**
In the ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' episode "Faith", a Reaper can restore a dying person's life, but only at the cost of another's. The woman who was holding the RestrainingBolt uses this to set her husband up as a faith healer, while using the exchange to murder various of her faith's bugaboos. When the brothers break the leash, she learns the hard way that TrueNeutral [[EvilIsNotAToy is not a toy]].



** Almost all the artifacts do something bad as well as something good; that's why they need to be collected in the Warehouse for safekeeping. Whenever the subject of using artifacts for good is brought up, this trope is the rebuttal--no matter how much an artifact seems to be helping people, it's also causing an equal amount of harm somewhere.
* In ''HouseOfAnubis'', the Cup of Ankh will grant immortality to the person who drinks the Elixir of Life out of it, but [[BalancingDeathsBooks someone else will die to replace the life that would otherwise have ended eventually.]]
* In ''Series/KaizokuSentaiGokaiger'', the [[SeriesGoal Greatest Treasure in the Universe]] [[spoiler: has the [[RealityWarper power to change history and reality]], and confirms that it could be used to erase TheEmpire from history...but doing so would ''also'' [[RetGone retroactively erase]] all of the SuperSentai from existence. The Gokaiger end up deciding not to do this, since the Sentai mean too much to humanity and it isn't their right to make that call for the entire planet.]]

to:

** Almost all the artifacts do something bad as well as something good; that's why they need to be collected in the Warehouse for safekeeping. Whenever the subject of using artifacts for good is brought up, this trope is the rebuttal--no matter how much an artifact seems to be helping people, it's also causing an equal amount of harm somewhere.
* In ''HouseOfAnubis'', ''Series/HouseOfAnubis'', the Cup of Ankh will grant immortality to the person who drinks the Elixir of Life out of it, but [[BalancingDeathsBooks someone else will die to replace the life that would otherwise have ended eventually.]]
* In ''Series/KaizokuSentaiGokaiger'', the ''Series/KaizokuSentaiGokaiger'':
** The
[[SeriesGoal Greatest Treasure in the Universe]] [[spoiler: has the [[RealityWarper power to change history and reality]], and confirms that it could be used to erase TheEmpire from history...but doing so would ''also'' [[RetGone retroactively erase]] all of the SuperSentai from existence. The Gokaiger end up deciding not to do this, since the Sentai mean too much to humanity and it isn't their right to make that call for the entire planet.]]



** And then [[spoiler: Bender [[NiceJobBreakingItHero makes an uncorrigible paradox]].]]



** It was still a CrowningMomentOfAwesome, though. Because even when giving up his dignity, Batman's that much of a BadAss.
** Given there didn't seem to be any cost associated with turning WonderWoman ''into'' a pig (or most of the other magic on display) this may have been less about the magic itself having a price, and more about Circe not wanting to undo the spell without getting ''something'' out of it.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.EquivalentExchange