History Main / EmergencyBroadcast

10th Apr '17 1:35:58 PM Lirodon
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Emergency broadcasting has also firmly entered the 21st century with Wireless Mobile Alerts, which send weather warnings, Amber Alerts and other emergency information as SMS-like messages to most newer cellphones.

A technical note: producers who are required to deliver a film or television product for air or cable distribution in the United States are mandated, as part of their audio specifications, to never insert a true EAS audio recording into their program, as the EAS signal will automatically cause subscriber cable boxes and transmission gear to switch over to emergency mode. Radio ads with EAS tones added to grab the listener's attention have caused like incidents, and the FCC levies fines upon broadcasters who transmit programs with spurious EAS signals.

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Emergency broadcasting has also firmly entered the 21st century with two developments; the Integrated Public Alert and Warning System modernized the infrastructure to allow alerts to be distributed over an IP network using the open, XML-based "Common Alerting Protocol". This also enabled Wireless Mobile Emergency Alerts, which send weather warnings, Amber Alerts and other emergency information as SMS-like messages to most newer cellphones.

A technical note: producers who are required to deliver a film or television product for air or cable distribution in the United States are mandated, as part of their audio specifications, to never insert a true EAS audio recording into their program, as the EAS signal will automatically cause subscriber cable boxes and transmission gear to switch over to emergency mode. sound can trigger the system's associated hardware. Radio ads with EAS tones added to grab the listener's attention have caused like incidents, and the FCC levies fines upon broadcasters who transmit programs with spurious EAS signals.



After years of regulatory prodding to even get the CRTC to allow such an idea on a voluntary basis, the owners of The Weather Network (the Canadian version of Creator/TheWeatherChannel), in exchange for forcing all TV providers to carry its network, developed a system of their own, based on the open, XML-based "Common Alerting Protocol". As work on the infrastructure began, Alberta re-launched its system under the same protocol as [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0tIS9BRoTss Alberta Emergency Alert,]] with a focus on multi-platform availability of alerts on the internet and its mobile app. The CRTC eventually mandated that all broadcasters and television providers implement TWN's system, later branded as "Alert Ready", by March 31, 2015.

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After years of regulatory prodding to even get the CRTC to allow such an idea on a voluntary basis, the owners of The Weather Network (the Canadian version of Creator/TheWeatherChannel), in exchange for forcing all TV providers to carry its network, developed a system of their own, based on the open, XML-based "Common Alerting Protocol".CAP. As work on the infrastructure began, Alberta re-launched its system under the same protocol as [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0tIS9BRoTss Alberta Emergency Alert,]] with a focus on multi-platform availability of alerts on the internet and its mobile app. The CRTC eventually mandated that all broadcasters and television providers implement TWN's system, later branded as "Alert Ready", by March 31, 2015.
2015. In 2018, it will also begin pushing to smartphones using a similar framework to the U.S. Wireless Emergency Alerts.



'''United Kingdom:''' [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_minute_warning The Four-Minute Warning,]] an emergency broadcast ''only'' to be used in the case of AtomicHate. (This system was dismantled in 1992). Weather warnings and other emergency messages such as the death of someone in the royal family are done through news special reports.

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'''United Kingdom:''' [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_minute_warning The Four-Minute Warning,]] an emergency broadcast ''only'' to be used in the case of AtomicHate. (This system was dismantled in 1992). Weather warnings and other emergency messages such as the death of someone in the royal family are done through news special reports.
reports, and the government and broadcasters have a [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_London_Bridge detailed plan]] for how they will go about things if the Queen dies.
6th Apr '17 3:08:17 PM bwburke94
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One event where the EAS was ''not'' activated was, oddly enough, September 11, 2001. Within minutes of the first plane hitting the World Trade Center, every radio/TV station and network capable of it (outside of kids' networks, who carried on as normal as a safe haven for children who might be traumatized by the news) had suspended its normal programming and was already broadcasting round-the-clock news on the attacks. The EAS administrators quickly realized that they had been outstripped by the news media and stepped out of the way.

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One event where the EAS was ''not'' activated was, oddly enough, September 11, 2001. Within minutes of the first plane hitting the World Trade Center, every radio/TV station and network capable of it (outside of kids' networks, who carried on as normal as a safe haven for children who might be traumatized by the news) had suspended its normal programming and was already broadcasting round-the-clock news on the attacks. The EAS administrators quickly realized that they had been outstripped beaten to the punch by the news media and stepped out of the way.



On occasion, computer glitches or human error resulted in incidents where emergency alerts were issued accidentally. One egregious example occurred with the older Emergency Broadcast System in 1971, when a clerk intending to send out a routine test alert to all radio stations in the network accidentally loaded a Telex program tape that included the codeword "hatefulness," which was the code signal to the stations that a nuclear attack or other catastrophic emergency had been confirmed and that they were to immediately issue an on-air alert and suspend operations or remain on the air, but broadcasting only important news or survival information pertaining to the emergency. Even worse, a retraction message sent shortly after ALSO used "hatefulness" as the codeword, leading to more confusion. It wasn't until sometime after when a message using the correct codeword, "Impish," was issued that the matter was cleared up. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1B1EAeh6H_I You can listen to recordings from two Midwest radio stations during the incident here.]]

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On occasion, computer glitches or human error resulted in incidents where emergency alerts were issued accidentally. One egregious {{egregious}} example occurred with the older Emergency Broadcast System in 1971, when a clerk intending to send out a routine test alert to all radio stations in the network accidentally loaded a Telex program tape that included the codeword "hatefulness," which was the code signal to the stations that a nuclear attack or other catastrophic emergency had been confirmed and that they were to immediately issue an on-air alert and suspend operations or remain on the air, but broadcasting only important news or survival information pertaining to the emergency. Even worse, a retraction message sent shortly after ALSO used "hatefulness" as the codeword, leading to more confusion. It wasn't until sometime after when a message using the correct codeword, "Impish," was issued that the matter was cleared up. [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1B1EAeh6H_I You can listen to recordings from two Midwest radio stations during the incident here.]]



'''Canada:''' For many years, only one province, Alberta, has an emergency warning system. [[http://youtu.be/zo6081Wg3IE The Alberta Emergency Public Warning System]] was planned after an F5 tornado tore through Edmonton, but was only picked up by all broadcasters after a F3 tornado destroyed a campground at Pine Lake. The EPWS serves to advise the public of imminent threats such as severe summer weather (tornadoes, thunderstorms, and floods) and civil emergencies, and also broadcasts AMBER Alerts. It generally is not used to disseminate less emergent weather alerts such as snowfall or blizzard warnings, as those are considered relatively common events during most of the winter (and spring, and...).

After years of regulatory prodding to even get the CRTC to allow such an idea on a voluntary basis, the owners of The Weather Network (the Canadian version of {{The Weather Channel}}), in exchange for forcing all TV providers to carry its network, developed a system of their own, based on the open, XML-based "Common Alerting Protocol". As work on the infrastructure began, Alberta re-launched its system under the same protocol as [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0tIS9BRoTss Alberta Emergency Alert,]] with a focus on multi-platform availability of alerts on the internet and its mobile app. The CRTC eventually mandated that all broadcasters and television providers implement TWN's system, later branded as "Alert Ready", by March 31, 2015.

to:

'''Canada:''' For many years, only one province, Alberta, has had an emergency warning system. [[http://youtu.be/zo6081Wg3IE The Alberta Emergency Public Warning System]] was planned after an F5 tornado tore through Edmonton, but was only picked up by all broadcasters after a F3 tornado destroyed a campground at Pine Lake. The EPWS serves to advise the public of imminent threats such as severe summer weather (tornadoes, thunderstorms, and floods) and civil emergencies, and also broadcasts AMBER Alerts. It generally is not used to disseminate less emergent weather alerts such as snowfall or blizzard warnings, as those are considered relatively common events during most of the winter (and spring, and...).

After years of regulatory prodding to even get the CRTC to allow such an idea on a voluntary basis, the owners of The Weather Network (the Canadian version of {{The Weather Channel}}), Creator/TheWeatherChannel), in exchange for forcing all TV providers to carry its network, developed a system of their own, based on the open, XML-based "Common Alerting Protocol". As work on the infrastructure began, Alberta re-launched its system under the same protocol as [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0tIS9BRoTss Alberta Emergency Alert,]] with a focus on multi-platform availability of alerts on the internet and its mobile app. The CRTC eventually mandated that all broadcasters and television providers implement TWN's system, later branded as "Alert Ready", by March 31, 2015.
7th Mar '17 5:01:01 PM SparkPlugTheTroper
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[[caption-width-right:350:OhCrap! DeathFromAbove!]]

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[[caption-width-right:350:OhCrap! [[caption-width-right:350:OhCrap DeathFromAbove!]]



* ''WesterAnimation/TheSimpsons'': In the episode "Homer Defined," when Homer's inattention to warnings that the core temperature is nearing dangerous levels results in a near meltdown, Channel 5 immediately goes on air with a news flash alerting residents to the situation and that only a couple of minutes remain before a sure nuclear explosion. Kent Brockman interviews Mr. Burns, who despite the wail of the sirens and the imminent danger to Springfield hides his nervousness as he nonchalantly assures the public that the problem will quickly be resolved and that there is no danger to the town. Reaction around Springfield is, of course, varied (for instance, the students at Springfield Elementary are huddled under their desks in anticipation of a powerful explosion while the residents at Springfield Retirement Castle turn the channel to watch ''WheelOfFortune'' (and a humorous missolve of "THREE COINS IN THE FOUNTAIN")).

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* ''WesterAnimation/TheSimpsons'': In the episode "Homer Defined," when Homer's inattention to warnings that the core temperature is nearing dangerous levels results in a near meltdown, Channel 5 immediately goes on air with a news flash alerting residents to the situation and that only a couple of minutes remain before a sure nuclear explosion. Kent Brockman interviews Mr. Burns, who despite the wail of the sirens and the imminent danger to Springfield hides his nervousness as he nonchalantly assures the public that the problem will quickly be resolved and that there is no danger to the town. Reaction around Springfield is, of course, varied (for instance, the students at Springfield Elementary are huddled under their desks in anticipation of a powerful explosion while the residents at Springfield Retirement Castle turn the channel to watch ''WheelOfFortune'' (and [and a humorous missolve of "THREE COINS IN THE FOUNTAIN")).FOUNTAIN"]).
11th Feb '17 9:42:48 PM StevieC
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All TV and radio stations are required to test their EAS systems at least once a month, with weekly tests required for feeder stations. Of course these tests usually warn that there's no actual emergency going on first. This has resulted in the phrase "This is a test. This is only a test" and the old two-tone EBS attention beep [[MemeticMutation becoming a part of popular culture]]. The new EAS alerts may or may not include a two-tone attention beep but always include an encoded ASCII string, repeated three times, which sounds like an old-school modem and is called a "chirp" or "duck farts" in the business, and Main/NightmareFuel-incarnate by viewers. The string contains specific information as to the type of alert (or test) and the location of the emergency. Some modern weather radios can be programmed to only activate the alarm for alerts that apply to where the radio's installed and only for hazards that would actually be of concern to the area. In some areas the EAS test is unannounced and contains only the three ASCII chirps.

to:

All TV and radio stations are required to test their EAS systems at least once a month, with weekly tests required for feeder stations. Of course these tests usually warn that there's no actual emergency going on first. This has resulted in the phrase "This is a test. This is only ''only'' a test" and the old two-tone EBS attention beep [[MemeticMutation becoming a part of popular culture]]. The new EAS alerts may or may not include a two-tone attention beep but always include an encoded ASCII string, repeated three times, which sounds like an old-school modem and is called a "chirp" or "duck farts" in the business, and Main/NightmareFuel-incarnate by viewers. The string contains specific information as to the type of alert (or test) and the location of the emergency. Some modern weather radios can be programmed to only activate the alarm for alerts that apply to where the radio's installed and only for hazards that would actually be of concern to the area. In some areas the EAS test is unannounced and contains only the three ASCII chirps.
11th Feb '17 7:08:25 AM jto5334t
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* ''WesterAnimation/TheSimpsons'': In the episode "Homer Defined," when Homer's inattention to warnings that the core temperature is nearing dangerous levels results in a near meltdown, Channel 5 immediately goes on air with a news flash alerting residents to the situation and that only a couple of minutes remain before a sure nuclear explosion. Kent Brockman interviews Mr. Burns, who despite the wail of the sirens and the imminent danger to Springfield hides his nervousness as he nonchalantly assures the public that the problem will quickly be resolved and that there is no danger to the town. Reaction around Springfield is, of course, varied (for instance, the students at Springfield Elementary are huddled under their desks in anticipation of a powerful explosion) while the residents at Springfield Retirement Castle turn the channel to watch ''WheelOfFortune'' (and a humorous missolve of "THREE COINS IN THE FOUNTAIN").

to:

* ''WesterAnimation/TheSimpsons'': In the episode "Homer Defined," when Homer's inattention to warnings that the core temperature is nearing dangerous levels results in a near meltdown, Channel 5 immediately goes on air with a news flash alerting residents to the situation and that only a couple of minutes remain before a sure nuclear explosion. Kent Brockman interviews Mr. Burns, who despite the wail of the sirens and the imminent danger to Springfield hides his nervousness as he nonchalantly assures the public that the problem will quickly be resolved and that there is no danger to the town. Reaction around Springfield is, of course, varied (for instance, the students at Springfield Elementary are huddled under their desks in anticipation of a powerful explosion) explosion while the residents at Springfield Retirement Castle turn the channel to watch ''WheelOfFortune'' (and a humorous missolve of "THREE COINS IN THE FOUNTAIN").FOUNTAIN")).
4th Jan '17 6:47:35 AM Ccook1956
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Added DiffLines:

* The ''WoodyWoodpecker'' cartoon "Termites From Mars" invokes this. Woody's TV show is interrupted for a flash that, as the title implies, termites are invading. In a scene later, a termite attaches two electric wires to Woody's beak and turns a pupil in his eyes. Woody's eyes suddenly show the guy from TV who interrupted for the news flash.
21st Dec '16 8:25:05 AM DavidDelony
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Tornado-prone areas of the U.S., as wells as areas near chemical or nuclear power plants, are also typically covered by a network of outdoor sirens that sound during tornado warnings or chemical releases, another vestige of the old civil defense system. Many of them actually are repurposed air raid sirens dating back to UsefulNotes/TheColdWar.

to:

Tornado-prone areas of the U.S., as wells as areas near chemical or nuclear power plants, are also typically covered by a network of outdoor sirens that sound during tornado warnings or chemical releases, another vestige of the old civil defense system. Many of them actually are repurposed air raid sirens dating back to UsefulNotes/TheColdWar.
the UsefulNotes/ColdWar era.
20th Dec '16 8:52:46 PM DavidDelony
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Tornado-prone areas of the U.S., as wells as areas near chemical or nuclear power plants, are also typically covered by a network of outdoor sirens that sound during tornado warnings or chemical releases, another vestige of the old civil defense system. Many of them actually are repurposed air raid sirens.

to:

Tornado-prone areas of the U.S., as wells as areas near chemical or nuclear power plants, are also typically covered by a network of outdoor sirens that sound during tornado warnings or chemical releases, another vestige of the old civil defense system. Many of them actually are repurposed air raid sirens.
sirens dating back to UsefulNotes/TheColdWar.
20th Dec '16 8:52:15 PM DavidDelony
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Tornado-prone areas of the U.S., as wells as areas near chemical or nuclear power plants, are also typically covered by a network of outdoor sirens that sound during tornado warnings or chemical releases, another vestige of the old civil defense system.

to:

Tornado-prone areas of the U.S., as wells as areas near chemical or nuclear power plants, are also typically covered by a network of outdoor sirens that sound during tornado warnings or chemical releases, another vestige of the old civil defense system.
system. Many of them actually are repurposed air raid sirens.
20th Dec '16 5:07:25 PM iluvcapra
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Added DiffLines:

A technical note: producers who are required to deliver a film or television product for air or cable distribution in the United States are mandated, as part of their audio specifications, to never insert a true EAS audio recording into their program, as the EAS signal will automatically cause subscriber cable boxes and transmission gear to switch over to emergency mode. Radio ads with EAS tones added to grab the listener's attention have caused like incidents, and the FCC levies fines upon broadcasters who transmit programs with spurious EAS signals.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.EmergencyBroadcast