History Main / EmergencyBroadcast

21st Jul '16 1:18:25 AM portaljumper339
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--> ''[[ThisIsNotADrill This is not a test.]] This is your emergency broadcast system announcing the commencement of the Annual Purge sanctioned by the U.S. Government. Weapons of class 4 and lower have been authorized for use during the Purge. All other weapons are restricted. Government officials of ranking 10 have been granted immunity from the Purge and shall not be harmed. Commencing at the siren, any and all crime, including murder, will be legal for 12 continuous hours. Police, fire, and emergency medical services will be unavailable until tomorrow morning until 7 a.m., when The Purge concludes. Blessed be our New Founding Fathers and America, a nation reborn. [[GodHelpUsAll May God be]] [[ThisIsGonnaSuck with you all.'']]

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--> ''[[ThisIsNotADrill This is not a test.]] This is your emergency broadcast system announcing the commencement of the Annual Purge sanctioned by the U.S. Government. Weapons of class 4 and lower have been authorized for use during the Purge. All other weapons are restricted. Government officials of ranking 10 have been granted immunity from the Purge and shall not be harmed. Commencing at the siren, any and all crime, including murder, will be legal for 12 continuous hours. Police, fire, and emergency medical services will be unavailable until tomorrow morning until 7 a.m., when The Purge concludes. Blessed be our New Founding Fathers and America, a nation reborn. [[GodHelpUsAll May God be]] [[ThisIsGonnaSuck with you all.'']]'']] ''[[HellIsThatNoise *cue]] [[VideoGame/SilentHill Silent Hill-esque]] [[HellIsThatNoise air raid siren*]]''
20th Jul '16 6:12:38 PM DavidDelony
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The National Weather Service also operates an extensive [[http://www.nws.noaa.gov/nwr/ weather radio]] network that covers all 50 states as well as overseas territories. Typically, these broadcasts consist of computerized voices reading local weather conditions and forecasts, as well as severe weather warnings in a continuous loop updated after several hours.[[note]]Prior to 1997, these were done by live NWS meteorologists.[[/note]] Some weather radio receivers can be activated automatically when severe weather or other emergencies threaten and some higher-end models allow users to filter warnings by geographical area and type, eliminating the problem of irrelevant warnings mentioned in the page intro. These are useful in tornado-prone areas, especially at night when people are sleeping. The NWS' goal is for weather radios to become as common in homes as smoke detectors. TV and radio stations typically simulcast weather radio alerts for their EAS weather warnings. Warnings are typically issued by county, though lately the NWS has started to mention specific communities because people in tornado-prone areas got into the habit of ignoring warnings unless they could see or hear the tornado themselves, which lead to a lot of deaths. In addition to weather warnings, these stations also broadcast warnings for other civil emergencies such as chemical spills and Amber Alerts, which is why weather radio is called "All Hazards Radio".

to:

The National Weather Service also operates an extensive [[http://www.nws.noaa.gov/nwr/ weather radio]] network that covers all 50 states as well as overseas territories. Typically, these broadcasts consist of computerized voices reading local weather conditions and forecasts, as well as severe weather warnings in a continuous loop updated after several hours.[[note]]Prior to 1997, these were done by live NWS meteorologists.[[/note]] Some weather radio receivers can be activated automatically when severe weather or other emergencies threaten and some higher-end models allow users to filter warnings by geographical area and type, eliminating the problem of irrelevant warnings mentioned in the page intro. These are useful in tornado-prone areas, especially at night when people are sleeping. The NWS' goal is for weather radios to become as common in homes as smoke detectors. TV and radio stations typically simulcast weather radio alerts for their EAS weather warnings. Warnings are typically issued by county, though lately the NWS has started to mention specific communities because people in tornado-prone areas got into the habit of ignoring warnings unless they could see or hear the tornado themselves, which lead to a lot of deaths. In addition to weather warnings, these stations also broadcast warnings for other civil emergencies such as chemical spills and Amber Alerts, which is why weather radio is called "All Hazards Radio".
20th Jul '16 5:08:58 PM LordKaarvani
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Because a lot of these sirens date from World War II, many of these, not well-maintained enough, became dysfunctional. In 2009, the French government launched the SAIP project (SAIP standing for ''Système d'Alerte et d'Information des Populations''), which aims to create a more efficient alert network. Many sirens are being renovated or replaced. The SAIP will also include alerts via SMS, radio stations, and variable message signs.

Dams use specific tones in case of failure.


to:

Because a lot of these sirens date from World War II, many of these, not well-maintained enough, became dysfunctional. In 2009, the French government launched the SAIP project (SAIP standing for ''Système d'Alerte et d'Information des Populations''), Populations'', ''Populations' Alert and Information System''), which aims to create a more efficient alert network.network in case of terrorist attacks or nuclear/biological/chemical disasters. Many sirens are being renovated or replaced. The SAIP will also include alerts via a smartphone application, SMS, radio stations, and variable message signs.

Dams use Dam failure uses a specific tones in case of failure.

tone.

19th Jul '16 1:59:09 PM DavidDelony
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Tornado-prone areas of the U.S., as wells as areas near chemical or nuclear power plants, are also typically covered by a network of outdoor sirens that sound during tornado warnings, or chemical releases, another vestige of the old civil defense system.

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Tornado-prone areas of the U.S., as wells as areas near chemical or nuclear power plants, are also typically covered by a network of outdoor sirens that sound during tornado warnings, warnings or chemical releases, another vestige of the old civil defense system.
28th Jun '16 11:15:01 AM ElfinKeet
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Added DiffLines:

* Main/{{Deathcore}} band ''Traitors'' made an album named ''The Hate Campaign'' about civil disobedience, which featured a song simulating a realistic Emergency Alert called ''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bMHC-g6gNec Curfew]]''.
24th Jun '16 5:47:23 PM WillKeaton
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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Freakazoid}}'' parodied the EBS in an episode shown in [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HfgZnBaHbt8 this clip]].

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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Freakazoid}}'' parodied the EBS in an episode shown in [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HfgZnBaHbt8 this clip]].clip.]]
24th Jun '16 5:46:55 PM WillKeaton
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As a part of the national rollout of the "Tseva Adom" system, the Israel Broadcast Authority established 531 [=KHz=] (in the Israeli/Middle Eastern AM band) as the national channel for announcing of Tseva Adom alerts and civil defense alerts; per [[http://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/162157 this link]], the station--normally the main channel of Israel's national broadcast company--goes silent during the Jewish Sabbath (Friday evening through Saturday evening) with the exception of announcing Tseva Adom warnings so that observant Orthodox and Hasidic Jews are not forced to turn on an emergency radio or tune to a frequency to get civil defense alerts (which would normally be a violation of religious law).

to:

As a part of the national rollout of the "Tseva Adom" system, the Israel Broadcast Authority established 531 [=KHz=] (in the Israeli/Middle Eastern AM band) as the national channel for announcing of Tseva Adom alerts and civil defense alerts; per [[http://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/162157 this link]], link,]] the station--normally the main channel of Israel's national broadcast company--goes silent during the Jewish Sabbath (Friday evening through Saturday evening) with the exception of announcing Tseva Adom warnings so that observant Orthodox and Hasidic Jews are not forced to turn on an emergency radio or tune to a frequency to get civil defense alerts (which would normally be a violation of religious law).
24th Jun '16 5:46:33 PM WillKeaton
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'''United Kingdom:''' [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_minute_warning The Four-Minute Warning]], an emergency broadcast ''only'' to be used in the case of AtomicHate. (This system was dismantled in 1992). Weather warnings and other emergency messages such as the death of someone in the royal family are done through news special reports.

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'''United Kingdom:''' [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Four_minute_warning The Four-Minute Warning]], Warning,]] an emergency broadcast ''only'' to be used in the case of AtomicHate. (This system was dismantled in 1992). Weather warnings and other emergency messages such as the death of someone in the royal family are done through news special reports.



'''UsefulNotes/{{Australia}}:''' [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jM4gPCLzLO8 The Standard Emergency Warning Signal]], used primarily in Queensland to warn of cyclones, but now being expanded for bushfires and terror threats in the rest of the country. Possibly, along with Japan's EWS and Alberta's EPWS, one of the few Emergency Broadcast systems to originally be developed specifically for a weather/geological hazard rather than AtomicHate. Many find the tone used by the SEWS much less scary than the American EAS, with some even joking that it sounds like something from a game show.

to:

'''UsefulNotes/{{Australia}}:''' [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jM4gPCLzLO8 The Standard Emergency Warning Signal]], Signal,]] used primarily in Queensland to warn of cyclones, but now being expanded for bushfires and terror threats in the rest of the country. Possibly, along with Japan's EWS and Alberta's EPWS, one of the few Emergency Broadcast systems to originally be developed specifically for a weather/geological hazard rather than AtomicHate. Many find the tone used by the SEWS much less scary than the American EAS, with some even joking that it sounds like something from a game show.
24th Jun '16 5:45:51 PM WillKeaton
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After years of regulatory prodding to even get the CRTC to allow such an idea on a voluntary basis, the owners of The Weather Network (the Canadian version of {{The Weather Channel}}), in exchange for forcing all TV providers to carry its network, developed a system of their own, based on the open, XML-based "Common Alerting Protocol". As work on the infrastructure began, Alberta re-launched its system under the same protocol as [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0tIS9BRoTss Alberta Emergency Alert]], with a focus on multi-platform availability of alerts on the internet and its mobile app. The CRTC eventually mandated that all broadcasters and television providers implement TWN's system, later branded as "Alert Ready", by March 31, 2015.

to:

After years of regulatory prodding to even get the CRTC to allow such an idea on a voluntary basis, the owners of The Weather Network (the Canadian version of {{The Weather Channel}}), in exchange for forcing all TV providers to carry its network, developed a system of their own, based on the open, XML-based "Common Alerting Protocol". As work on the infrastructure began, Alberta re-launched its system under the same protocol as [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0tIS9BRoTss Alberta Emergency Alert]], Alert,]] with a focus on multi-platform availability of alerts on the internet and its mobile app. The CRTC eventually mandated that all broadcasters and television providers implement TWN's system, later branded as "Alert Ready", by March 31, 2015.



'''Japan:''' [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qqgAgJODgho The Emergency Warning System or "J-Alert" system]] is used primarily as a very short-fuse warning on earthquakes (e.g. 10 seconds or so between warning and quake at best) and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QTBzHak-4mY to warn for imminent evacuation due to tsunamis]]. The tone will almost immediately be followed up with a broadcast alert from the NHK in both Japanese and English audio or subtitles. The more bells/more urgent the tone, the more urgent or severe the threat is, and its use is reserved for imminent danger such as the aforementioned quake and tsunami warnings or an attack/incoming missile from UsefulNotes/NorthKorea and breaking national tragedies such as the death of someone in the Imperial family, and some "types" of the tone are retired. (For example, the tone that was used to indicate the start of WWII has yet to be used again.)[[note]]If you want to hear the message and tone used when WWII began, watch the movie Japan's Longest Day, specifically the first 5 minutes.[[/note]] The sorts of tones typically used by NHK's "J-Alert" system can be found [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hrt26UfL13I here]] including some types that have never been used for public broadcast[[note]] alert tones being for earthquake early warning; seismic intensity bulletin for strong earthquakes (above 7 on Japanese intensity scale); severe tsunami warning (over 5m); tsunami warning; tsunami advisory message; earthquake prediction info; earthquake warning/caution info; earthquake observation/information statements; severe weather warnings; volcanic eruption alert (for risk of imminent volcanic eruption); incoming ballistic missile alert; incoming air raid; guerilla attack/limited terrorist attack or land invasion; large-scale terrorism alerts; and cancellation of alerts[[/note]] and modern and historical broadcast alert bells from NHK [[https://youtu.be/wLVhx_dRjeY here].][[note]]Bell 1 being for natural disasters and local civil defense warnings, bell 2 for large scale disasters and for the death of the Emperor, and bell 3 is the now disused alert for declaration of war or national emergency.[[/note]]

to:

'''Japan:''' [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qqgAgJODgho The Emergency Warning System or "J-Alert" system]] is used primarily as a very short-fuse warning on earthquakes (e.g. 10 seconds or so between warning and quake at best) and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QTBzHak-4mY to warn for imminent evacuation due to tsunamis]]. tsunamis.]] The tone will almost immediately be followed up with a broadcast alert from the NHK in both Japanese and English audio or subtitles. The more bells/more urgent the tone, the more urgent or severe the threat is, and its use is reserved for imminent danger such as the aforementioned quake and tsunami warnings or an attack/incoming missile from UsefulNotes/NorthKorea and breaking national tragedies such as the death of someone in the Imperial family, and some "types" of the tone are retired. (For example, the tone that was used to indicate the start of WWII has yet to be used again.)[[note]]If you want to hear the message and tone used when WWII began, watch the movie Japan's Longest Day, specifically the first 5 minutes.[[/note]] The sorts of tones typically used by NHK's "J-Alert" system can be found [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hrt26UfL13I here]] including some types that have never been used for public broadcast[[note]] alert tones being for earthquake early warning; seismic intensity bulletin for strong earthquakes (above 7 on Japanese intensity scale); severe tsunami warning (over 5m); tsunami warning; tsunami advisory message; earthquake prediction info; earthquake warning/caution info; earthquake observation/information statements; severe weather warnings; volcanic eruption alert (for risk of imminent volcanic eruption); incoming ballistic missile alert; incoming air raid; guerilla attack/limited terrorist attack or land invasion; large-scale terrorism alerts; and cancellation of alerts[[/note]] and modern and historical broadcast alert bells from NHK [[https://youtu.be/wLVhx_dRjeY here].][[note]]Bell here.]][[note]]Bell 1 being for natural disasters and local civil defense warnings, bell 2 for large scale disasters and for the death of the Emperor, and bell 3 is the now disused alert for declaration of war or national emergency.[[/note]]
24th Jun '16 5:45:02 PM WillKeaton
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The National Weather Service also operates an extensive [[http://www.nws.noaa.gov/nwr/ weather radio]] network that covers all 50 states as well as overseas territories. Typically, these broadcasts consist of computerized voices reading local weather conditions and forecasts, as well as severe weather warnings in a continuous loop updated after several hours[[note]]Prior to 1997, these were done by live NWS meteorologists[[/note]]. Some weather radio receivers can be activated automatically when severe weather or other emergencies threaten and some higher-end models allow users to filter warnings by geographical area and type, eliminating the problem of irrelevant warnings mentioned in the page intro. These are useful in tornado-prone areas, especially at night when people are sleeping. The NWS' goal is for weather radios to become as common in homes as smoke detectors. TV and radio stations typically simulcast weather radio alerts for their EAS weather warnings. Warnings are typically issued by county, though lately the NWS has started to mention specific communities because people in tornado-prone areas got into the habit of ignoring warnings unless they could see or hear the tornado themselves, which lead to a lot of deaths. In addition to weather warnings, these stations also broadcast warnings for other civil emergencies such as chemical spills and Amber Alerts, which is why weather radio is called "All Hazards Radio".

to:

The National Weather Service also operates an extensive [[http://www.nws.noaa.gov/nwr/ weather radio]] network that covers all 50 states as well as overseas territories. Typically, these broadcasts consist of computerized voices reading local weather conditions and forecasts, as well as severe weather warnings in a continuous loop updated after several hours[[note]]Prior hours.[[note]]Prior to 1997, these were done by live NWS meteorologists[[/note]]. meteorologists.[[/note]] Some weather radio receivers can be activated automatically when severe weather or other emergencies threaten and some higher-end models allow users to filter warnings by geographical area and type, eliminating the problem of irrelevant warnings mentioned in the page intro. These are useful in tornado-prone areas, especially at night when people are sleeping. The NWS' goal is for weather radios to become as common in homes as smoke detectors. TV and radio stations typically simulcast weather radio alerts for their EAS weather warnings. Warnings are typically issued by county, though lately the NWS has started to mention specific communities because people in tornado-prone areas got into the habit of ignoring warnings unless they could see or hear the tornado themselves, which lead to a lot of deaths. In addition to weather warnings, these stations also broadcast warnings for other civil emergencies such as chemical spills and Amber Alerts, which is why weather radio is called "All Hazards Radio".



'''Japan:''' [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qqgAgJODgho The Emergency Warning System or "J-Alert" system]] is used primarily as a very short-fuse warning on earthquakes (e.g. 10 seconds or so between warning and quake at best) and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QTBzHak-4mY to warn for imminent evacuation due to tsunamis]]. The tone will almost immediately be followed up with a broadcast alert from the NHK in both Japanese and English audio or subtitles. The more bells/more urgent the tone, the more urgent or severe the threat is, and its use is reserved for imminent danger such as the aforementioned quake and tsunami warnings or an attack/incoming missile from UsefulNotes/NorthKorea and breaking national tragedies such as the death of someone in the Imperial family, and some "types" of the tone are retired. (For example, the tone that was used to indicate the start of WWII has yet to be used again)[[note]] If you want to hear the message and tone used when WWII began, watch the movie Japan's Longest Day, specifically the first 5 minutes.[[/note]]. The sorts of tones typically used by NHK's "J-Alert" system can be found [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hrt26UfL13I here]] including some types that have never been used for public broadcast [[note]] alert tones being for earthquake early warning; seismic intensity bulletin for strong earthquakes (above 7 on Japanese intensity scale); severe tsunami warning (over 5m); tsunami warning; tsunami advisory message; earthquake prediction info; earthquake warning/caution info; earthquake observation/information statements; severe weather warnings; volcanic eruption alert (for risk of imminent volcanic eruption); incoming ballistic missile alert; incoming air raid; guerilla attack/limited terrorist attack or land invasion; large-scale terrorism alerts; and cancellation of alerts[[/note]] and modern and historical broadcast alert bells from NHK [[https://youtu.be/wLVhx_dRjeY here]] [[note]]bell 1 being for natural disasters and local civil defense warnings, bell 2 for large scale disasters and for the death of the Emperor, and bell 3 is the now disused alert for declaration of war or national emergency[[/note]].

to:

'''Japan:''' [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qqgAgJODgho The Emergency Warning System or "J-Alert" system]] is used primarily as a very short-fuse warning on earthquakes (e.g. 10 seconds or so between warning and quake at best) and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QTBzHak-4mY to warn for imminent evacuation due to tsunamis]]. The tone will almost immediately be followed up with a broadcast alert from the NHK in both Japanese and English audio or subtitles. The more bells/more urgent the tone, the more urgent or severe the threat is, and its use is reserved for imminent danger such as the aforementioned quake and tsunami warnings or an attack/incoming missile from UsefulNotes/NorthKorea and breaking national tragedies such as the death of someone in the Imperial family, and some "types" of the tone are retired. (For example, the tone that was used to indicate the start of WWII has yet to be used again)[[note]] If again.)[[note]]If you want to hear the message and tone used when WWII began, watch the movie Japan's Longest Day, specifically the first 5 minutes.[[/note]]. [[/note]] The sorts of tones typically used by NHK's "J-Alert" system can be found [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hrt26UfL13I here]] including some types that have never been used for public broadcast [[note]] broadcast[[note]] alert tones being for earthquake early warning; seismic intensity bulletin for strong earthquakes (above 7 on Japanese intensity scale); severe tsunami warning (over 5m); tsunami warning; tsunami advisory message; earthquake prediction info; earthquake warning/caution info; earthquake observation/information statements; severe weather warnings; volcanic eruption alert (for risk of imminent volcanic eruption); incoming ballistic missile alert; incoming air raid; guerilla attack/limited terrorist attack or land invasion; large-scale terrorism alerts; and cancellation of alerts[[/note]] and modern and historical broadcast alert bells from NHK [[https://youtu.be/wLVhx_dRjeY here]] [[note]]bell here].][[note]]Bell 1 being for natural disasters and local civil defense warnings, bell 2 for large scale disasters and for the death of the Emperor, and bell 3 is the now disused alert for declaration of war or national emergency[[/note]].
emergency.[[/note]]
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.EmergencyBroadcast