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History Main / EmergencyBroadcast

18th May '16 6:37:47 AM DeepRed
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Obviously a major source of NightmareFuel. Needless to say, TruthInTelevision.



to:

Obviously a major source of NightmareFuel. Needless to say, TruthInTelevision.


TruthInTelevision. See also WeAreExperiencingTechnicalDifficulties.


4th May '16 3:41:58 PM DavidDelony
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Tornado-prone areas of the U.S. are also typically covered by a network of outdoor sirens that sound during tornado warnings, another vestige of the old civil defense system.

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Tornado-prone areas of the U.S. , as wells as areas near chemical or nuclear power plants, are also typically covered by a network of outdoor sirens that sound during tornado warnings, or chemical releases, another vestige of the old civil defense system.
3rd May '16 10:31:39 PM Lirodon
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After years of regulatory prodding to even get the CRTC to allow such an idea on a voluntary basis, the owners of The Weather Network (the Canadian version of {{The Weather Channel}}), in exchange for forcing all TV providers to carry its network, developed a system of their own, based on the open, XML-based "Common Alerting Protocol". As work on the infrastructure began, Alberta re-launched its system under the same protocol as Alberta Emergency Alert, with a focus on multi-platform availability of alerta on the internet and its mobile app. The CRTC eventually mandated that all broadcasters and television providers implement TWN's system, later branded as "Alert Ready", by March 31, 2016.

to:

After years of regulatory prodding to even get the CRTC to allow such an idea on a voluntary basis, the owners of The Weather Network (the Canadian version of {{The Weather Channel}}), in exchange for forcing all TV providers to carry its network, developed a system of their own, based on the open, XML-based "Common Alerting Protocol". As work on the infrastructure began, Alberta re-launched its system under the same protocol as [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0tIS9BRoTss Alberta Emergency Alert, Alert]], with a focus on multi-platform availability of alerta alerts on the internet and its mobile app. The CRTC eventually mandated that all broadcasters and television providers implement TWN's system, later branded as "Alert Ready", by March 31, 2016.
2015.
3rd May '16 10:27:53 PM Lirodon
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'''Canada:''' For many years, only one province, Alberta, has an emergency warning system. [[http://youtu.be/zo6081Wg3IE The Alberta Emergency Public Warning System]] was planned after an F5 tornado tore through Edmonton, but was only picked up by all broadcasters after a F3 tornado destroyed a campground at Pine Lake. The EPWS serves to advise the public of imminent threats such as severe summer weather (tornadoes, thunderstorms, and floods) and civil emergencies, and also broadcasts AMBER Alerts. It generally is not used to disseminate less emergent weather alerts such as snowfall or blizzard warnings, as those are considered relatively common events during most of the winter (and spring, and...). The system was modified and re-branded as AlertReady by The Weather Network, the Canadian version of {{The Weather Channel}}, and sold to the government as a nationwide alert system. Despite resistance from telecom companies over costs, the system was mostly implemented as of 2014. Alert Ready was initially rolled out in 2013 in Alberta as Alberta Emergency Alert, directly supplanting the EPWS.

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'''Canada:''' For many years, only one province, Alberta, has an emergency warning system. [[http://youtu.be/zo6081Wg3IE The Alberta Emergency Public Warning System]] was planned after an F5 tornado tore through Edmonton, but was only picked up by all broadcasters after a F3 tornado destroyed a campground at Pine Lake. The EPWS serves to advise the public of imminent threats such as severe summer weather (tornadoes, thunderstorms, and floods) and civil emergencies, and also broadcasts AMBER Alerts. It generally is not used to disseminate less emergent weather alerts such as snowfall or blizzard warnings, as those are considered relatively common events during most of the winter (and spring, and...). The system was modified and re-branded as AlertReady by

After years of regulatory prodding to even get the CRTC to allow such an idea on a voluntary basis, the owners of
The Weather Network, the Network (the Canadian version of {{The Weather Channel}}, and sold Channel}}), in exchange for forcing all TV providers to the government as carry its network, developed a nationwide alert system. Despite resistance from telecom companies over costs, the system was mostly implemented as of 2014. Alert Ready was initially rolled out in 2013 in their own, based on the open, XML-based "Common Alerting Protocol". As work on the infrastructure began, Alberta re-launched its system under the same protocol as Alberta Emergency Alert, directly supplanting with a focus on multi-platform availability of alerta on the EPWS.
internet and its mobile app. The CRTC eventually mandated that all broadcasters and television providers implement TWN's system, later branded as "Alert Ready", by March 31, 2016.
16th Mar '16 12:10:30 PM DavidDelony
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Added DiffLines:

Tornado-prone areas of the U.S. are also typically covered by a network of outdoor sirens that sound during tornado warnings, another vestige of the old civil defense system.
3rd Mar '16 8:42:24 AM Sonic5421
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--> '''Aunt Meg:''' "Jo, it's got to stop. I didn't have any warning. The sirens sounded a few seconds before it hit. I didn't even have time to get down the stairs."
2nd Mar '16 2:58:15 PM KiwiNeko14
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'''France:''' The alert system is made of a network of approximately 4,500 air raid sirens called the ''Réseau National d'Alerte''. This system is tested every first Wednesday of the month, at midday. The test tones last shorter than the actual tones used for real emergencies.

Because a lot of these sirens date from World War II, many of these, not well-maintained enough, became dysfunctional. In 2009, the French government launched the SAIP project (SAIP standing for ''Système d'Alerte et d'Information des Populations''), which aims to create a more efficient alert network. Many sirens are being renovated or replaced. The SAIP will also include alerts via SMS, radio stations, and variable message signs.

Dams use specific tones in case of failure.

29th Feb '16 1:25:54 PM RevolutionStone
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* In a possible coincidence, the intro to ''Stab Me In The Back'' by Music/XJapan sounds ''very much'' like the now-disused NHK war bells signal (3 from the link listed above) converted to a guitar solo.
28th Feb '16 1:14:24 PM notahandle
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'''Japan:''' [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A_8ZkBXVvMw The Emergency Warning System or "J-Alert" system]] is used primarily as a very short-fuse warning on earthquakes (e.g. 10 seconds or so between warning and quake at best) and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QTBzHak-4mY to warn for imminent evacuation due to tsunamis]]. The tone will almost immediately be followed up with a broadcast alert from the NHK in both Japanese and English audio or subtitles. The more bells/more urgent the tone, the more urgent or severe the threat is, and its use is reserved for imminent danger such as the aforementioned quake and tsunami warnings or an attack/incoming missile from UsefulNotes/NorthKorea and breaking national tragedies such as the death of someone in the Imperial family, and some "types" of the tone are retired. (For example, the tone that was used to indicate the start of WWII has yet to be used again)[[note]] If you want to hear the message and tone used when WWII began, watch the movie Japan's Longest Day, specifically the first 5 minutes.[[/note]]. The sorts of tones typically used by NHK's "J-Alert" system can be found [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hrt26UfL13I here]] including some types that have never been used for public broadcast [[note]] alert tones being for earthquake early warning; seismic intensity bulletin for strong earthquakes (above 7 on Japanese intensity scale); severe tsunami warning (over 5m); tsunami warning; tsunami advisory message; earthquake prediction info; earthquake warning/caution info; earthquake observation/information statements; severe weather warnings; volcanic eruption alert (for risk of imminent volcanic eruption); incoming ballistic missile alert; incoming air raid; guerilla attack/limited terrorist attack or land invasion; large-scale terrorism alerts; and cancellation of alerts[[/note]] and modern and historical broadcast alert bells from NHK [[https://youtu.be/wLVhx_dRjeY here]] [[note]]bell 1 being for natural disasters and local civil defense warnings, bell 2 for large scale disasters and for the death of the Emperor, and bell 3 is the now disused alert for declaration of war or national emergency[[/note]].

to:

'''Japan:''' [[http://www.[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A_8ZkBXVvMw com/watch?v=qqgAgJODgho The Emergency Warning System or "J-Alert" system]] is used primarily as a very short-fuse warning on earthquakes (e.g. 10 seconds or so between warning and quake at best) and [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QTBzHak-4mY to warn for imminent evacuation due to tsunamis]]. The tone will almost immediately be followed up with a broadcast alert from the NHK in both Japanese and English audio or subtitles. The more bells/more urgent the tone, the more urgent or severe the threat is, and its use is reserved for imminent danger such as the aforementioned quake and tsunami warnings or an attack/incoming missile from UsefulNotes/NorthKorea and breaking national tragedies such as the death of someone in the Imperial family, and some "types" of the tone are retired. (For example, the tone that was used to indicate the start of WWII has yet to be used again)[[note]] If you want to hear the message and tone used when WWII began, watch the movie Japan's Longest Day, specifically the first 5 minutes.[[/note]]. The sorts of tones typically used by NHK's "J-Alert" system can be found [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hrt26UfL13I here]] including some types that have never been used for public broadcast [[note]] alert tones being for earthquake early warning; seismic intensity bulletin for strong earthquakes (above 7 on Japanese intensity scale); severe tsunami warning (over 5m); tsunami warning; tsunami advisory message; earthquake prediction info; earthquake warning/caution info; earthquake observation/information statements; severe weather warnings; volcanic eruption alert (for risk of imminent volcanic eruption); incoming ballistic missile alert; incoming air raid; guerilla attack/limited terrorist attack or land invasion; large-scale terrorism alerts; and cancellation of alerts[[/note]] and modern and historical broadcast alert bells from NHK [[https://youtu.be/wLVhx_dRjeY here]] [[note]]bell 1 being for natural disasters and local civil defense warnings, bell 2 for large scale disasters and for the death of the Emperor, and bell 3 is the now disused alert for declaration of war or national emergency[[/note]].
28th Feb '16 1:54:21 AM danixdefcon5
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* As of 2014, a public megaphone system has indeed been installed throughout most of Mexico City proper.
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