History Main / Emergency

18th Nov '14 9:58:20 AM MarkLungo
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* If you want the 1969 debut of the The Tony Williams Lifetime jazz rock band, Music/{{Emergency}} is your target.

to:

* If you want the 1969 debut of the The Tony Williams Lifetime jazz rock band, Music/{{Emergency}} ''Music/{{Emergency}}'' is your target.
15th Sep '14 5:03:56 AM SeptimusHeap
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to:

* If you want the 1969 debut of the The Tony Williams Lifetime jazz rock band, Music/{{Emergency}} is your target.
10th Jul '14 1:37:10 AM StFan
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* If you're looking for the American MedicalDrama[=/=]{{Rescue}} series from the 1970s, respond to ''Franchise/{{Emergency}}.''

to:

* If you're looking for the American MedicalDrama[=/=]{{Rescue}} series from the 1970s, respond to ''Franchise/{{Emergency}}.''''Series/{{Emergency}}''


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2nd Jul '13 8:13:52 AM MarkLungo
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* If you want the series of German-developed real-time strategy games, ''VideoGame/{{Emergency}}'' is where you need to be.

to:

* If you want the series of German-developed real-time strategy games, ''VideoGame/{{Emergency}}'' is where you need to be.be.
----
1st Jul '13 11:39:25 PM Tarlonniel
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[[quoteright:300:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/emergencycast_7499.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:300:The core cast of ''Emergency!'']]

The first TV show to show the lives of paramedics, this was a very well done and medically accurate show which inspired countless children to want to be in Squad 51, and supposedly many communities to get their own paramedics. An hour-long drama, it had elements of comedy, drama, angst, and many other things in its episodes, and though it had a shorter run, could be said to be a domestic version of one of the best shows ever in the field, ''Series/{{Mash}}''. It was also responsible for popularizing nationwide the concept of paramedics.

The origin of the show was when TV producer Robert A. Cinader came to Los Angeles to look into creating a standard MedicalDrama. Once there, he learned of the paramedic program, which was just getting started, and realized it was a dynamite idea to create a show based around brave firefighters going about their duties. Thus the first and most famous live-action {{Rescue}} TV show was born.

Even today, the show inspires many, many people to become [=EMTs=] and Paramedics.

Followed/accompanied -- as was virtually standard practice in the 1970s -- by an [[AnimatedAdaptation animated]] Saturday morning series, ''Emergency +4'', in which the ''Emergency'' paramedics were saddled with the requisite four kids and dog. The live-action series was also followed by six made-for-TV movies.

Currently airing reruns on MeTV, an over-the-air network that is usually on the .2 signal of a network affiliate (Example: KAKE Ch. 10.2 in Wichita, Kansas.).

----
!!This show provides examples of:
* SeventiesHair: The show is a vertiable time capsule of 70s hair styles: sideburns (Dr. Brackett and [=DeSoto=]), feathered mullets (Gage), {{Pornstache}} (Kelly and Marco), and The Afro (Dr. Morton)
* {{Actor Allusion}}: In the episode "Firehouse Four" (4x11), Johnny asks Dixie if she knows anything about singing. The actress who plays Dixie, Julie London, was a singer in real life. Also in the pilot, when Dr. Joe Early, while playing piano at a party, greets Dr. Brackett with an impromptu song. Early was played by Jazz Singer and Songwriter Bobby Troup, most famous for Nat King Cole's hit song 'Route 66.'
* AlwaysOnDuty: Carefully averted. Likewise averts TheMainCharactersDoEverything. The engine and squad get called out separately quite often, and the paramedics usually stop active involvement in cases at the hospital doors.
* AnimatedAdaptation
* AuthorAvatar: In the pilot - which was directed by Jack Webb - [=DeSoto=] gives Gage a very [[Franchise/{{Dragnet}} Joe Friday]]ish dressing down on the importance of the Paramedic training program.
* BechdelTest: Passes surprisingly often for a show with only one regular female character, usually via Dixie talking to a nurse or patient's relative about a patient. (And in one episode, talking to a guest female doctor about said doctor's drug problem.)
* BusmansHoliday: Several of the movies. Also occasionally happens during the show, including one instance where a man had a heart attack on a plane they were flying in. Conveniently, they have all their equipment with them on the plane.
* ButtMonkey: Gage always seems to come out on the wrong end of ''anything'' that's going to go wrong.
* CarpetOfVirility: Chet Kelly
* CasanovaWannabe: Gage. Rarely do we see him actually have a ''successful'' date.
* {{Crossover}}: Two difficult-to-reconcile crossovers with ''Series/AdamTwelve'':
** One episode involves Gage and [=DeSoto=] trying to find out [[MindScrew how an episode of]] ''[[MindScrew Adam-12]]'' ended.
** They could have just ''asked'' Reed and Malloy, as they all showed up in an ''Adam-12'' episode in which the officers bring an injured criminal to Rampart General Hospital (though they don't actually meet).[[note]]Rampart, in fact, would have been out of Reed and Malloy's jurisdiction, which extended ONLY to the city, and not the county of Los Angeles. However, it could have been that Rampart was the closest hospital to their incident.[[/note]]
* CowboyBeBopAtHisComputer: Gage and [=DeSoto=] aren't Squad 51. The truck is. Whenever they needed something from the truck, they'd refer to it as "The Squad." This is often highlighted when we see a second group of paramedics using Squad 51 during a shift change.
* CryingWolf: Two instances in the season three episode, "Messin' Around." First, there's the case of "Old Bill" who likes to hang around the ER because he's lonely. He complains of false symptoms but he's harmless and usually entertains children. One night, his back gives him problems and Dr. Brackett sees what happens. Brackett says he wants to examine Bill when he has a moment but Bill leaves. [=DeSoto=] and Gage are later called to his house, where they find him struggling to breathe. By the time he gets to the hospital, he's in a coma. Dr. Early muses that Bill had complained of the same symptoms many times over the past few weeks, but given his history and how vague his descriptions of his discomfort were, there was no way to be sure he actually had a problem. Later in the same episode, Squad 51 is called to a house to look at a child who's swallowed ant poison. The mother stops them from entering the house because the boy has called the gas company to report a false gas leak and the sheriff to make a false report of a python in the house. A sheriff's officer comes by and advises the woman to let the paramedics enter. Turns out this time, the boy really is in trouble.
* TheDanza: Firemen Marco Lopez, Mike Stoker and Capt. Dick Hammer, played by...Marco Lopez, Mike Stoker and Dick Hammer. The latter two were both RealLife firefighters, too. Hammer's character becomes TheOtherDarrin for at least one episode during season one. The real Hammer decided to go back into full-time firefighting and another actor, credited as "John Smith", took over the role. During the end credits of Smith's first episode, "Hang Up," he's billed as Captain Hammer. For the next episode, "Crash," Smith is credited simply as "Captain." Later on, his character becomes "Captain Stanley".
* {{Defictionalization}}:
** The Squad 51 rescue truck was built by the Universal props department to specs provided to them by the Los Angeles County Fire Department. They did such a good job that when the series was finished, the truck was donated to the [=LACoFD=], where it put in another 20 years of service, before being retired to the Los Angeles County Fire Museum.
** There was no Station 51 in the [=LACoFD=] at the time of the series, but in 1994 Station 60, which is located on the Universal Lot, was renamed Station 51.
** Most people in the 70s hadn't even heard of the term "paramedic," but this show demonstrated what paramedics do and their value in real life, allowing the idea to propagate throughout jurisdictions in the United States. Modern prehospital medicine hence evolved from "throwing a patient into an ambulance and hauling ass to the hospital," to "treating the patient on scene and providing stabilizing treatment en route," hence ensuring patient survival. Nowadays, few people bat an eyelash at modern emergency medical services.
* DoingItForTheArt: The stars playing the paramedics, Tighe and Mantooth, took the regular paramedic training regime, and apart from skipping the final certification exam, were otherwise fully qualified as the real thing.
* DoomItYourself: One episode had the paramedics try to fix their malfunctioning truck themselves. The regular Fire Department mechanic is annoyed at them doing his job and the truck keeps breaking down even more. Eventually, the mechanic fixes the problem and the station captain tells the paramedics to leave vehicle maintenance to the professionals.
* DrJerk:
** Doctor Morton had no bedside manner whatsoever.
** In Season 3 Episode 17, "Fools", there is an intern named Donaldson, whose [[InsufferableGenius arrogance]] makes Dr. Morton look a lot ''[[JerkWithAHeartOfGold friendlier]]''.
* DrunkDriver: Sometimes causes the accidents the paramedics respond to; they use it as an opportunity to remind the audience about the hazards of drunk driving.
* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: Dixie and Dr. Brackett kiss in the pilot, and there are a couple of scenes in early episodes where he goes to her apartment to angst about his job. After season one their romantic relationship is never referenced again.
* HarpoDoesSomethingFunny: It's obvious that many of the scenes involving Gage and [=DeSoto=] working on a victim were simply the director setting up the scene and telling the actors to do what paramedics would do in that situation. This is especially noticeable when they're talking quietly and one reminds the other of an overlooked (or about to be overlooked) step in a procedure or requests assistance in doing something that needs an extra set of hands.
* HeterosexualLifePartners: Gage and [=DeSoto=].
* HospitalHottie: Julie London as Dixie [=McCall=]. Cool, compassionate, professional...and yet still as sexy as she was in her torch singing days.
* InsomniaEpisode: The aptly titled episode "Insomnia", where John just can't get to sleep during a run of night shifts, and becomes convinced he'll be able to sleep after they get a nighttime call. At the end of the episode, the station ''does'' get a nighttime call, but not for the rescue squad. Not to be discouraged, John grabs onto the rear handhold of the leaving fire engine and falls asleep on his feet.
* IronicEcho: In Season 2 Episode 1, "Problem", Roy is put on the spot by a doctor who tells him that the patient he brought in would have been better off being "in an ideal hospital setting" instead of treating him en route to it; the patient died four hours later. Later, said doctor tries to resuscitate a patient that collapses ''in said ideal hospital setting'' and dies after throwing in every effort to revive him.
* {{Irony}}: The occasional instances where they set something on fire in the station, especially the time they were trying to come up with firefighting inventions. [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] by Johnny the first time it happens, when Chet sets his skis on fire: "Cap, we've got a fire in the station! Call dispatch!"
* LampshadeHanging: In the first episode of season 4, "The Screenwriter," a man comes to the station to prepare for a film he wants to make about the paramedic program. He's seated in the middle in the squad as the paramedics answer a call. He exclaims, "This is fantastic! This is dynamite! We could mount the camera right on the hood of the truck!" Of course, you're looking at this scene through the viewpoint of the camera mounted on the hood of the truck. Heck, pretty much that entire episode is LampshadeHanging of one sort or another.
* LimitedAdvancementOpportunities: Dealt with when Roy passes the engineer's exam. He can't take the promotion without giving up being a paramedic, and he decides he likes being a paramedic too much to give it up. In the last movie, when they finally get promoted to captain, they mention having given the department years to change the rules about paramedics holding rank, implying that the reason they stayed the lowest rank in the department the whole show really was for love of the work.
* MagicalDefibrillator: Usually averted - the portable defibrillator was used primarily when it would have worked in real life.
* MagicalNativeAmerican: Averted/subverted. Johnny's Native American heritage comes up, but he never displays any magic powers, and when he decides he's going to get into a rodeo and use his Native American riding skills, he winds up so sore he can barely walk the next day.
* MedicalDrama
* MessOnAPlate: In one episode the heroes save the life of a celebrity chef, who rewards them with an autographed copy of his latest book. When they later try to put together a dinner for the rest of the crew at their station using the book, they swiftly realize that they did something wrong and that dinner is ruined. They dump everything they were cooking into a single pot in order to hide the evidence. Just as they're taking it out back to dump it, the fire crew comes back and assumes dinner is ready. Despite having an odd gray color and the consistency of paper mache paste, the "stew" is universally deemed fantastically delicious by the other fire fighters, and the crew expects it to be made again in the future.
* MissionControl: Rampart has a radio desk and, eventually, a separate communications room for the doctors and nurses to communicate with the paramedics to hear their description and vitals about the patient and give instructions to deal with the medical situation before they are transported.
* MixAndMatch: MedicalDrama + {{Rescue}}
* MrFanservice: Hey there Johnny. You should take your shirt off more often.
* OnlySaneMan: Among the fire station crew, Roy frequently comes off as one.
* PoorlyDisguisedPilot: A Season 4 episode titled 905-Wild was intended as a spinoff involving a WhiteDudeBlackDude duo of Animal Control officers played by ''Film/DirtyHarry'' co-star Albert Popwell and future ''StElsewhere'' (and much later, ''Series/{{NCIS}}'') star Mark Harmon. It wasn't picked up.
* PunnyName: Mike Stoker, a fireman both in the show and RealLife.
* TheRedStapler: The show is popularly thought to be the best advertisement about the merits of the paramedic program ever and lots of cities and counties started setting up their own. Pretty much {{lampshaded}} in one episode when Gage and [=DeSoto=], after being involved in a rescue in a rural area outside their jurisdiction and which couldn't afford to run its own paramedics even after seeing their value, described a system of volunteer emergency medical responders such a region could set up to the local sheriff.
* {{Rescue}}
* RippedFromTheHeadlines: Some of the episodes dealt with real issues being faced by the still-new paramedic program such as distrust and second-guessing of paramedics by doctors, and response delays due to units responding to non-emergency situations.
* ShoutOut: In a reversal of the usual, LA County Fire Station 127 (the real-life fire station that played the part of Station 51) was renamed the Robert A. Cinader Memorial Fire Station in honor of one of the show's producers.
* ShownTheirWork: Aside from when the demands of the plot required a change, the vast majority of the procedures carried out by the firefighters and paramedics were faithful to what real firefighters and paramedics did at the time. This is mainly due to Tighe and Mantooth having actually trained as paramedics, a paramedic advisor being on set, and, in many of the larger incident scenes, actual firefighters acting as extras.
* SpiritualSuccessor: To executive producer Jack Webb's other shows, ''Franchise/{{Dragnet}}'' and ''Series/AdamTwelve''.
* StockSoundEffect: Watch episodes one after another on DVD and you'll quickly notice that the show uses the exact same "sound of equipment and people shouting" background during major emergency scenes. Even worse, if the scene goes on long enough you'll notice that it's looped, so that one man's indistinct (but recognizable) shout is the show's WilhelmScream. And the call alarm sound (two short tones, then a loud buzzer), was used in the ''Series/{{Monk}}'' episode "Mr. Monk Can't See a Thing".
* SyndicationTitle: ''Emergency One''
* TheVoice: Real life LA County Fire Dispatcher Sam Lanier, who filled this role for all of the show's six regular seasons, plus the various TV Movies which were actually set in LA. Somewhat averted when, in a few later season episodes, Sam actually appeared on screen.
* ToTheBatpole: Averted most of the time since Station 51 is a one storey building, but occasionally the paramedics are assigned to other stations that have multiple floors with firepoles.
* TokenMinority: Dr. Morton, who started as an intern in the Emergency Room, but was pretty regularly the third doctor by the second season.
* UnintentionalPeriodPiece: Due to trying to be very state-of-the-art for its time
* VitriolicBestBuds: Most of the firefighters, but especially Gage and Chet.
* WomenDrivers: Comes up in "To Buy or Not to Buy," during a collision between two driving school vehicles. In the aftermath, it comes out that one of the women needs glasses to see anything, absolutely shocking the driving instructor -- which implies she's such a ditz that she didn't realize driving requires sight.
* YouLookFamiliar:
** In the ''Franchise/{{Dragnet}}''/''Series/AdamTwelve''/''{{Emergency}}'' SharedUniverse, Tim Donnelly appeared in 5 different roles in ''Dragnet'' and 2 roles in ''Adam-12'' before landing his regular role as Firefighter Chet Kelly in ''Emergency''.
** Randolph Mantooth appeared as a ranch hand in an episode of ''Adam-12''.
** Bobby Troup appeared in several different roles on ''Dragnet'' and ''Adam-12''.
** Another actor, Gary Crosby, was a part-time regular as Officer Ed Wells on ''Adam-12'' and appeared in two different roles (the first time as a firefighter, the second time as a publicity-happy paramedic) in season one of ''Emergency!''
----

<<|{{Series}}|>>

to:

[[quoteright:300:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/emergencycast_7499.jpg]]
[[caption-width-right:300:The core cast of ''Emergency!'']]

The first TV show to show the lives of paramedics, this was a very well done and medically accurate show which inspired countless children to want to be in Squad 51, and supposedly many communities to get their own paramedics. An hour-long drama, it had elements of comedy, drama, angst, and many other things in its episodes, and though it had a shorter run, could be said to be a domestic version of one of the best shows ever in the field, ''Series/{{Mash}}''. It was also responsible for popularizing nationwide the concept of paramedics.

The origin of the show was when TV producer Robert A. Cinader came to Los Angeles to look into creating a standard MedicalDrama. Once there, he learned of the paramedic program, which was just getting started, and realized it was a dynamite idea to create a show based around brave firefighters going about their duties. Thus the first and most famous live-action {{Rescue}} TV show was born.

Even today, the show inspires many, many people to become [=EMTs=] and Paramedics.

Followed/accompanied -- as was virtually standard practice in the 1970s -- by an [[AnimatedAdaptation animated]] Saturday morning series, ''Emergency +4'', in which the ''Emergency'' paramedics were saddled with the requisite four kids and dog. The live-action series was also followed by six made-for-TV movies.

Currently airing reruns on MeTV, an over-the-air network that is usually on the .2 signal of a network affiliate (Example: KAKE Ch. 10.2 in Wichita, Kansas.).

----
!!This show provides examples of:
* SeventiesHair: The show is a vertiable time capsule of 70s hair styles: sideburns (Dr. Brackett and [=DeSoto=]), feathered mullets (Gage), {{Pornstache}} (Kelly and Marco), and The Afro (Dr. Morton)
* {{Actor Allusion}}: In the episode "Firehouse Four" (4x11), Johnny asks Dixie if she knows anything about singing. The actress who plays Dixie, Julie London, was a singer in real life. Also in the pilot, when Dr. Joe Early, while playing piano at a party, greets Dr. Brackett with an impromptu song. Early was played by Jazz Singer and Songwriter Bobby Troup, most famous for Nat King Cole's hit song 'Route 66.'
* AlwaysOnDuty: Carefully averted. Likewise averts TheMainCharactersDoEverything. The engine and squad get called out separately quite often, and the paramedics usually stop active involvement in cases at the hospital doors.
* AnimatedAdaptation
* AuthorAvatar: In the pilot - which was directed by Jack Webb - [=DeSoto=] gives Gage a very [[Franchise/{{Dragnet}} Joe Friday]]ish dressing down on the importance of the Paramedic training program.
* BechdelTest: Passes surprisingly often for a show with only one regular female character, usually via Dixie talking to a nurse or patient's relative about a patient. (And in one episode, talking to a guest female doctor about said doctor's drug problem.)
* BusmansHoliday: Several of the movies. Also occasionally happens during the show, including one instance where a man had a heart attack on a plane they were flying in. Conveniently, they have all their equipment with them on the plane.
* ButtMonkey: Gage always seems to come out on the wrong end of ''anything'' that's going to go wrong.
* CarpetOfVirility: Chet Kelly
* CasanovaWannabe: Gage. Rarely do we see him actually have a ''successful'' date.
* {{Crossover}}: Two difficult-to-reconcile crossovers with ''Series/AdamTwelve'':
** One episode involves Gage and [=DeSoto=] trying to find out [[MindScrew how an episode of]] ''[[MindScrew Adam-12]]'' ended.
** They could have just ''asked'' Reed and Malloy, as they all showed up in an ''Adam-12'' episode in which the officers bring an injured criminal to Rampart General Hospital (though they don't actually meet).[[note]]Rampart, in fact, would have been out of Reed and Malloy's jurisdiction, which extended ONLY to the city, and not the county of Los Angeles. However, it could have been that Rampart was the closest hospital to their incident.[[/note]]
* CowboyBeBopAtHisComputer: Gage and [=DeSoto=] aren't Squad 51. The truck is. Whenever they needed something from the truck, they'd refer to it as "The Squad." This is often highlighted when we see a second group of paramedics using Squad 51 during a shift change.
* CryingWolf: Two instances in the season three episode, "Messin' Around." First, there's the case of "Old Bill" who likes to hang around the ER because he's lonely. He complains of false symptoms but he's harmless and usually entertains children. One night, his back gives him problems and Dr. Brackett sees what happens. Brackett says he wants to examine Bill when he has a moment but Bill leaves. [=DeSoto=] and Gage are later called to his house, where they find him struggling to breathe. By the time he gets to the hospital, he's in a coma. Dr. Early muses that Bill had complained of the same symptoms many times over the past few weeks, but given his history and how vague his descriptions of his discomfort were, there was no way to be sure he actually had a problem. Later in the same episode, Squad 51 is called to a house to look at a child who's swallowed ant poison. The mother stops them from entering the house because the boy has called the gas company to report a false gas leak and the sheriff to make a false report of a python in the house. A sheriff's officer comes by and advises the woman to let the paramedics enter. Turns out this time, the boy really is in trouble.
* TheDanza: Firemen Marco Lopez, Mike Stoker and Capt. Dick Hammer, played by...Marco Lopez, Mike Stoker and Dick Hammer. The latter two were both RealLife firefighters, too. Hammer's character becomes TheOtherDarrin for at least one episode during season one. The real Hammer decided to go back into full-time firefighting and another actor, credited as "John Smith", took over the role. During the end credits of Smith's first episode, "Hang Up," he's billed as Captain Hammer. For the next episode, "Crash," Smith is credited simply as "Captain." Later on, his character becomes "Captain Stanley".
* {{Defictionalization}}:
** The Squad 51 rescue truck was built by the Universal props department to specs provided to them by the Los Angeles County Fire Department. They did such a good job that when the series was finished, the truck was donated to the [=LACoFD=], where it put in another 20 years of service, before being retired to the Los Angeles County Fire Museum.
** There was no Station 51 in the [=LACoFD=] at the time of the series, but in 1994 Station 60, which is located on the Universal Lot, was renamed Station 51.
** Most people in the 70s hadn't even heard of the term "paramedic," but this show demonstrated what paramedics do and their value in real life, allowing the idea to propagate throughout jurisdictions in the United States. Modern prehospital medicine hence evolved from "throwing a patient into an ambulance and hauling ass to the hospital," to "treating the patient on scene and providing stabilizing treatment en route," hence ensuring patient survival. Nowadays, few people bat an eyelash at modern emergency medical services.
* DoingItForTheArt: The stars playing the paramedics, Tighe and Mantooth, took the regular paramedic training regime, and apart from skipping the final certification exam, were otherwise fully qualified as the real thing.
* DoomItYourself: One episode had the paramedics try to fix their malfunctioning truck themselves. The regular Fire Department mechanic is annoyed at them doing his job and the truck keeps breaking down even more. Eventually, the mechanic fixes the problem and the station captain tells the paramedics to leave vehicle maintenance to the professionals.
* DrJerk:
** Doctor Morton had no bedside manner whatsoever.
** In Season 3 Episode 17, "Fools", there is an intern named Donaldson, whose [[InsufferableGenius arrogance]] makes Dr. Morton look a lot ''[[JerkWithAHeartOfGold friendlier]]''.
* DrunkDriver: Sometimes causes the accidents the paramedics respond to; they use it as an opportunity to remind the audience about the hazards of drunk driving.
* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: Dixie and Dr. Brackett kiss in the pilot, and there are a couple of scenes in early episodes where he goes to her apartment to angst about his job. After season one their romantic relationship is never referenced again.
* HarpoDoesSomethingFunny: It's obvious that many of the scenes involving Gage and [=DeSoto=] working on a victim were simply the director setting up the scene and telling the actors to do what paramedics would do in that situation. This is especially noticeable when they're talking quietly and one reminds the other of an overlooked (or about to be overlooked) step in a procedure or requests assistance in doing something that needs an extra set of hands.
* HeterosexualLifePartners: Gage and [=DeSoto=].
* HospitalHottie: Julie London as Dixie [=McCall=]. Cool, compassionate, professional...and yet still as sexy as she was in her torch singing days.
* InsomniaEpisode: The aptly titled episode "Insomnia", where John just can't get to sleep during a run of night shifts, and becomes convinced he'll be able to sleep after they get a nighttime call. At the end of the episode, the station ''does'' get a nighttime call, but not for the rescue squad. Not to be discouraged, John grabs onto the rear handhold of the leaving fire engine and falls asleep on his feet.
* IronicEcho: In Season 2 Episode 1, "Problem", Roy is put on the spot by a doctor who tells him that the patient he brought in would have been better off being "in an ideal hospital setting" instead of treating him en route to it; the patient died four hours later. Later, said doctor tries to resuscitate a patient that collapses ''in said ideal hospital setting'' and dies after throwing in every effort to revive him.
* {{Irony}}: The occasional instances where they set something on fire in the station, especially the time they were trying to come up with firefighting inventions. [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] by Johnny the first time it happens, when Chet sets his skis on fire: "Cap, we've got a fire in the station! Call dispatch!"
* LampshadeHanging: In the first episode of season 4, "The Screenwriter," a man comes to the station to prepare for a film he wants to make about the paramedic program. He's seated in the middle in the squad as the paramedics answer a call. He exclaims, "This is fantastic! This is dynamite! We could mount the camera right on the hood of the truck!" Of course,
If you're looking at this scene through for the viewpoint of the camera mounted on the hood of the truck. Heck, pretty much that entire episode is LampshadeHanging of one sort or another.
* LimitedAdvancementOpportunities: Dealt with when Roy passes the engineer's exam. He can't take the promotion without giving up being a paramedic, and he decides he likes being a paramedic too much to give it up. In the last movie, when they finally get promoted to captain, they mention having given the department years to change the rules about paramedics holding rank, implying that the reason they stayed the lowest rank in the department the whole show really was for love of the work.
* MagicalDefibrillator: Usually averted - the portable defibrillator was used primarily when it would have worked in real life.
* MagicalNativeAmerican: Averted/subverted. Johnny's Native
American heritage comes up, but he never displays any magic powers, and when he decides he's going to get into a rodeo and use his Native American riding skills, he winds up so sore he can barely walk the next day.
* MedicalDrama
* MessOnAPlate: In one episode the heroes save the life of a celebrity chef, who rewards them with an autographed copy of his latest book. When they later try to put together a dinner for the rest of the crew at their station using the book, they swiftly realize that they did something wrong and that dinner is ruined. They dump everything they were cooking into a single pot in order to hide the evidence. Just as they're taking it out back to dump it, the fire crew comes back and assumes dinner is ready. Despite having an odd gray color and the consistency of paper mache paste, the "stew" is universally deemed fantastically delicious by the other fire fighters, and the crew expects it to be made again in the future.
* MissionControl: Rampart has a radio desk and, eventually, a separate communications room for the doctors and nurses to communicate with the paramedics to hear their description and vitals about the patient and give instructions to deal with the medical situation before they are transported.
* MixAndMatch: MedicalDrama + {{Rescue}}
* MrFanservice: Hey there Johnny. You should take your shirt off more often.
* OnlySaneMan: Among the fire station crew, Roy frequently comes off as one.
* PoorlyDisguisedPilot: A Season 4 episode titled 905-Wild was intended as a spinoff involving a WhiteDudeBlackDude duo of Animal Control officers played by ''Film/DirtyHarry'' co-star Albert Popwell and future ''StElsewhere'' (and much later, ''Series/{{NCIS}}'') star Mark Harmon. It wasn't picked up.
* PunnyName: Mike Stoker, a fireman both in the show and RealLife.
* TheRedStapler: The show is popularly thought to be the best advertisement about the merits of the paramedic program ever and lots of cities and counties started setting up their own. Pretty much {{lampshaded}} in one episode when Gage and [=DeSoto=], after being involved in a rescue in a rural area outside their jurisdiction and which couldn't afford to run its own paramedics even after seeing their value, described a system of volunteer emergency medical responders such a region could set up to the local sheriff.
* {{Rescue}}
* RippedFromTheHeadlines: Some of the episodes dealt with real issues being faced by the still-new paramedic program such as distrust and second-guessing of paramedics by doctors, and response delays due to units responding to non-emergency situations.
* ShoutOut: In a reversal of the usual, LA County Fire Station 127 (the real-life fire station that played the part of Station 51) was renamed the Robert A. Cinader Memorial Fire Station in honor of one of the show's producers.
* ShownTheirWork: Aside
MedicalDrama[=/=]{{Rescue}} series from when the demands of 1970s, respond to ''Franchise/{{Emergency}}.''
* If you want
the plot required a change, the vast majority series of the procedures carried out by the firefighters and paramedics were faithful German-developed real-time strategy games, ''VideoGame/{{Emergency}}'' is where you need to what real firefighters and paramedics did at the time. This is mainly due to Tighe and Mantooth having actually trained as paramedics, a paramedic advisor being on set, and, in many of the larger incident scenes, actual firefighters acting as extras.
* SpiritualSuccessor: To executive producer Jack Webb's other shows, ''Franchise/{{Dragnet}}'' and ''Series/AdamTwelve''.
* StockSoundEffect: Watch episodes one after another on DVD and you'll quickly notice that the show uses the exact same "sound of equipment and people shouting" background during major emergency scenes. Even worse, if the scene goes on long enough you'll notice that it's looped, so that one man's indistinct (but recognizable) shout is the show's WilhelmScream. And the call alarm sound (two short tones, then a loud buzzer), was used in the ''Series/{{Monk}}'' episode "Mr. Monk Can't See a Thing".
* SyndicationTitle: ''Emergency One''
* TheVoice: Real life LA County Fire Dispatcher Sam Lanier, who filled this role for all of the show's six regular seasons, plus the various TV Movies which were actually set in LA. Somewhat averted when, in a few later season episodes, Sam actually appeared on screen.
* ToTheBatpole: Averted most of the time since Station 51 is a one storey building, but occasionally the paramedics are assigned to other stations that have multiple floors with firepoles.
* TokenMinority: Dr. Morton, who started as an intern in the Emergency Room, but was pretty regularly the third doctor by the second season.
* UnintentionalPeriodPiece: Due to trying to be very state-of-the-art for its time
* VitriolicBestBuds: Most of the firefighters, but especially Gage and Chet.
* WomenDrivers: Comes up in "To Buy or Not to Buy," during a collision between two driving school vehicles. In the aftermath, it comes out that one of the women needs glasses to see anything, absolutely shocking the driving instructor -- which implies she's such a ditz that she didn't realize driving requires sight.
* YouLookFamiliar:
** In the ''Franchise/{{Dragnet}}''/''Series/AdamTwelve''/''{{Emergency}}'' SharedUniverse, Tim Donnelly appeared in 5 different roles in ''Dragnet'' and 2 roles in ''Adam-12'' before landing his regular role as Firefighter Chet Kelly in ''Emergency''.
** Randolph Mantooth appeared as a ranch hand in an episode of ''Adam-12''.
** Bobby Troup appeared in several different roles on ''Dragnet'' and ''Adam-12''.
** Another actor, Gary Crosby, was a part-time regular as Officer Ed Wells on ''Adam-12'' and appeared in two different roles (the first time as a firefighter, the second time as a publicity-happy paramedic) in season one of ''Emergency!''
----

<<|{{Series}}|>>
be.
1st Jul '13 9:38:32 PM Tarlonniel
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Followed/accompanied -- as was virtually standard practice in the 1970s -- by an [[AnimatedAdaptation animated]] Saturday morning series, ''Emergency +4'', in which the ''Emergency'' paramedics were saddled with the requisite four kids and dog.

to:

Followed/accompanied -- as was virtually standard practice in the 1970s -- by an [[AnimatedAdaptation animated]] Saturday morning series, ''Emergency +4'', in which the ''Emergency'' paramedics were saddled with the requisite four kids and dog.
dog. The live-action series was also followed by six made-for-TV movies.
1st Jul '13 9:11:24 PM Tarlonniel
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* AuthorAvatar: In the pilot [=DeSoto=] gives Gage a very Joe Fridayish dressing down on the importance of the Paramedic training program.

to:

* AuthorAvatar: In the pilot - which was directed by Jack Webb - [=DeSoto=] gives Gage a very [[Franchise/{{Dragnet}} Joe Fridayish Friday]]ish dressing down on the importance of the Paramedic training program.



** They could have just ''asked'' Reed and Malloy, as they actually showed up in another episode, bringing an injured criminal to Rampart General Hospital.[[note]]Which in fact would have been out of Reed and Malloy's jurisdiction, which extended ONLY to the city, and not the county of Los Angeles. However, it could have been that Rampart was the closest hospital to their incident.[[/note]]
** Reed and Malloy meet the staff of Rampart's Emergency Room in an ''Series/AdamTwelve'' episode but don't actually run into [=DeSoto=] and Gage, so the paramedics didn't get the chance to ask.
* CowboyBeBopAtHisComputer: Gage and [=DeSoto=] aren't Squad 51. The truck is. Whenever they needed something from the truck, they'd refer to it as "The Squad." This is specifically highlighted in the Made-for-TV movie finale: we see a second group of paramedics using Squad 51, and a shift change.
* [[{{Funny/OtherLiveActionShows}} Crowning Moment Of Funny]]: In the season 2 episode, "Peace Pipe", Gage and [=DeSoto=] had to save a woman who's having breathing difficulties because her girdle was too tight. After Gage cut through the woman's girdle, it snapped in his face.

to:

** They could have just ''asked'' Reed and Malloy, as they actually all showed up in another episode, bringing an ''Adam-12'' episode in which the officers bring an injured criminal to Rampart General Hospital.[[note]]Which Hospital (though they don't actually meet).[[note]]Rampart, in fact fact, would have been out of Reed and Malloy's jurisdiction, which extended ONLY to the city, and not the county of Los Angeles. However, it could have been that Rampart was the closest hospital to their incident.[[/note]]
** Reed and Malloy meet the staff of Rampart's Emergency Room in an ''Series/AdamTwelve'' episode but don't actually run into [=DeSoto=] and Gage, so the paramedics didn't get the chance to ask.
* CowboyBeBopAtHisComputer: Gage and [=DeSoto=] aren't Squad 51. The truck is. Whenever they needed something from the truck, they'd refer to it as "The Squad." This is specifically often highlighted in the Made-for-TV movie finale: when we see a second group of paramedics using Squad 51, and 51 during a shift change.
* [[{{Funny/OtherLiveActionShows}} Crowning Moment Of Funny]]: In the season 2 episode, "Peace Pipe", Gage and [=DeSoto=] had to save a woman who's having breathing difficulties because her girdle was too tight. After Gage cut through the woman's girdle, it snapped in his face.
change.



** Most people in the 70s hadn't even heard of the term "paramedic," but this show demonstrated what paramedics do and their value in real life, allowing the idea to propagate throughout jurisdictions in the United States. Modern prehospital medicine hence evolved from "throwing a patient into an ambulance and hauling ass to the hospital," to "treating the patient on scene and providing stabilizing treatment en route," hence ensuring patient survival. Nowadays, few people bat an eyelash to modern emergency medical services.

to:

** Most people in the 70s hadn't even heard of the term "paramedic," but this show demonstrated what paramedics do and their value in real life, allowing the idea to propagate throughout jurisdictions in the United States. Modern prehospital medicine hence evolved from "throwing a patient into an ambulance and hauling ass to the hospital," to "treating the patient on scene and providing stabilizing treatment en route," hence ensuring patient survival. Nowadays, few people bat an eyelash to at modern emergency medical services.



** In Season 3 Episode 17 "Fools", there is an intern named Donaldson, whose [[InsufferableGenius arrogance]] makes Dr. Morton look a lot ''[[JerkWithAHeartOfGold friendlier]]''.

to:

** In Season 3 Episode 17 17, "Fools", there is an intern named Donaldson, whose [[InsufferableGenius arrogance]] makes Dr. Morton look a lot ''[[JerkWithAHeartOfGold friendlier]]''.



* LampshadeHanging: In the first episode of season 4, "The Screenwriter," a man comes to the station to prepare for a film he wants to make about the paramedic program. He's seated in the middle in the squad as the paramedics answer a call. He exclaims, "This is fantastic! This is dynamite! We could mount the camera right on the hood of the truck!" Of course, you're looking at this scene through the viewpoint of the camera mounted on the hood of the truck.
** Heck, pretty much that entire episode is LampshadeHanging of one sort or another.

to:

* LampshadeHanging: In the first episode of season 4, "The Screenwriter," a man comes to the station to prepare for a film he wants to make about the paramedic program. He's seated in the middle in the squad as the paramedics answer a call. He exclaims, "This is fantastic! This is dynamite! We could mount the camera right on the hood of the truck!" Of course, you're looking at this scene through the viewpoint of the camera mounted on the hood of the truck.
**
truck. Heck, pretty much that entire episode is LampshadeHanging of one sort or another.



* MrFanservice: Hey there Johnny. You should take your shirt off more often.
* MagicalDefibrillator: Partially averted - the portable defibrillator was used primarily when it would have worked in real life.

to:

* MrFanservice: Hey there Johnny. You should take your shirt off more often.
* MagicalDefibrillator: Partially Usually averted - the portable defibrillator was used primarily when it would have worked in real life.



* MissionControl: Rampart has a radio desk and a separate communications room for the doctors and nurses to communicate with the paramedics to hear their description and vitals about the patient and give instructions to deal with the medical situation before they are transported.

to:

* MissionControl: Rampart has a radio desk and and, eventually, a separate communications room for the doctors and nurses to communicate with the paramedics to hear their description and vitals about the patient and give instructions to deal with the medical situation before they are transported.



* MrFanservice: Hey there Johnny. You should take your shirt off more often.



* ShownTheirWork: aside when the demands of the plot required a change, the vast majority of the procedures carried out by the firefighters and paramedics were faithful to what real firefighters and paramedics did at the time. This is mainly due to Tighe and Mantooth having actually trained as paramedics and, in many of the larger incident scenes, actual firefighters acting as extras.

to:

* ShownTheirWork: aside Aside from when the demands of the plot required a change, the vast majority of the procedures carried out by the firefighters and paramedics were faithful to what real firefighters and paramedics did at the time. This is mainly due to Tighe and Mantooth having actually trained as paramedics paramedics, a paramedic advisor being on set, and, in many of the larger incident scenes, actual firefighters acting as extras.



* StockSoundEffect: watch episodes one after another on DVD and you'll quickly notice that the show uses the exact same "sound of equipment and people shouting" background during major emergency scenes. Even worse, if the scene goes on long enough you'll notice that it's looped, so that one man's indistinct (but recognizable) shout is the show's WilhelmScream. And the call alarm sound (two short tones, then a loud buzzer), was used in the ''Series/{{Monk}}'' episode "Mr. Monk Can't See a Thing".

to:

* StockSoundEffect: watch Watch episodes one after another on DVD and you'll quickly notice that the show uses the exact same "sound of equipment and people shouting" background during major emergency scenes. Even worse, if the scene goes on long enough you'll notice that it's looped, so that one man's indistinct (but recognizable) shout is the show's WilhelmScream. And the call alarm sound (two short tones, then a loud buzzer), was used in the ''Series/{{Monk}}'' episode "Mr. Monk Can't See a Thing".



* UnintentionalPeriodPiece: due to trying to be very State-Of-The-Art for its time

to:

* UnintentionalPeriodPiece: due Due to trying to be very State-Of-The-Art state-of-the-art for its time



* WomenDrivers: Comes up in "To Buy or Not to Buy," during a collision between two driving school vehicles. In the aftermath, it comes out that one of the women needs glasses to see anything, absolutely shocking the driving instructor-- which implies she's such a ditz that she didn't realize driving requires sight.

to:

* WomenDrivers: Comes up in "To Buy or Not to Buy," during a collision between two driving school vehicles. In the aftermath, it comes out that one of the women needs glasses to see anything, absolutely shocking the driving instructor-- instructor -- which implies she's such a ditz that she didn't realize driving requires sight.



** Bobby Troup appeared as a hotel bartender in ''Dragnet''.

to:

** Bobby Troup appeared as a hotel bartender in ''Dragnet''.several different roles on ''Dragnet'' and ''Adam-12''.
1st Jul '13 8:46:28 PM Tarlonniel
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The first TV show to show the lives of paramedics, it was a very well done and medically accurate show which inspired countless children to want to be in Squad 51, and supposedly many communities to get their own paramedics. An hour-long drama, it had elements of comedy, drama, angst, and many other things in its episodes, and though it had a shorter run, could be said to be a domestic version of one of the best shows ever in range, ''Series/{{Mash}}''. It was also responsible for popularizing nationwide the concept of paramedics.

The origin of the show was when TV producer Robert A. Cinader, was in Los Angeles looking into creating a standard MedicalDrama. Once there, he learned of the paramedic program, which was just getting started, and realized it was a dynamite idea for a show of brave firefighters rushing about in their duties. And thus the first and most famous live-action {{Rescue}} TV show was born.

to:

The first TV show to show the lives of paramedics, it this was a very well done and medically accurate show which inspired countless children to want to be in Squad 51, and supposedly many communities to get their own paramedics. An hour-long drama, it had elements of comedy, drama, angst, and many other things in its episodes, and though it had a shorter run, could be said to be a domestic version of one of the best shows ever in range, the field, ''Series/{{Mash}}''. It was also responsible for popularizing nationwide the concept of paramedics.

The origin of the show was when TV producer Robert A. Cinader, was in Cinader came to Los Angeles looking to look into creating a standard MedicalDrama. Once there, he learned of the paramedic program, which was just getting started, and realized it was a dynamite idea for to create a show of based around brave firefighters rushing going about in their duties. And thus Thus the first and most famous live-action {{Rescue}} TV show was born.
1st Jul '13 8:42:51 PM Tarlonniel
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The first TV show to show the lives of paramedics, it was a very well done and medically accurate show which inspired countless children to want to be in Squad 51, and supposedly many communities to get their own paramedics. An hour-long drama, it had elements of comedy, drama, angst, and many other things in its episodes, and though it had a shorter run, could be said to be a domestic version of one of the best shows ever in range, ''Series/{{Mash}}''. It was also responsible for popularizing nationwide the concept of paramedics, which were an innovation of the Los Angeles County Fire Department at the time.

The origin of the show was when TV producer, Robert A. Cinader, was in Los Angeles looking into creating a standard MedicalDrama. Once there, he learned of the paramedic program, which was just getting started, and realized it was a dynamite idea for a show of brave firefighters rushing about in their duties. And thus the first and most famous live-action {{Rescue}} TV show was born.

to:

The first TV show to show the lives of paramedics, it was a very well done and medically accurate show which inspired countless children to want to be in Squad 51, and supposedly many communities to get their own paramedics. An hour-long drama, it had elements of comedy, drama, angst, and many other things in its episodes, and though it had a shorter run, could be said to be a domestic version of one of the best shows ever in range, ''Series/{{Mash}}''. It was also responsible for popularizing nationwide the concept of paramedics, which were an innovation of the Los Angeles County Fire Department at the time.paramedics.

The origin of the show was when TV producer, producer Robert A. Cinader, was in Los Angeles looking into creating a standard MedicalDrama. Once there, he learned of the paramedic program, which was just getting started, and realized it was a dynamite idea for a show of brave firefighters rushing about in their duties. And thus the first and most famous live-action {{Rescue}} TV show was born.



* WhatAnIdiot: An early season 5 episode features a woman whose son is displaying early signs of polio. She at first insisted it had to be something else then said that she hadn't gotten him the vaccine because she thought it had been controlled to the point where it was impossible to contract the disease any more.
26th Jun '13 7:46:09 PM FastEddie
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* {{Actor Allusion}}: In the episode "Firehouse Four" (4x11), Johnny asks Dixie if she knows anything about singing. The actress who plays Dixie, Julie London, was a singer in real life.
** Also in the pilot, when Dr. Joe Early, while playing piano at a party, greets Dr. Brackett with an impromptu song. Early was played by Jazz Singer and Songwriter Bobby Troup, most famous for Nat King Cole's hit song 'Route 66.'
* AlwaysOnDuty: Carefully averted.
** Likewise averts TheMainCharactersDoEverything. The engine and squad get called out separately quite often, and the paramedics usually stop active involvement in cases at the hospital doors.

to:

* {{Actor Allusion}}: In the episode "Firehouse Four" (4x11), Johnny asks Dixie if she knows anything about singing. The actress who plays Dixie, Julie London, was a singer in real life.
**
life. Also in the pilot, when Dr. Joe Early, while playing piano at a party, greets Dr. Brackett with an impromptu song. Early was played by Jazz Singer and Songwriter Bobby Troup, most famous for Nat King Cole's hit song 'Route 66.'
* AlwaysOnDuty: Carefully averted.
**
averted. Likewise averts TheMainCharactersDoEverything. The engine and squad get called out separately quite often, and the paramedics usually stop active involvement in cases at the hospital doors.



* CowboyBeBopAtHisComputer: Gage and [=DeSoto=] aren't Squad 51. The truck is. Whenever they needed something from the truck, they'd refer to it as "The Squad."
** This is specifically highlighted in the Made-for-TV movie finale: we see a second group of paramedics using Squad 51, and a shift change.

to:

* CowboyBeBopAtHisComputer: Gage and [=DeSoto=] aren't Squad 51. The truck is. Whenever they needed something from the truck, they'd refer to it as "The Squad."
**
" This is specifically highlighted in the Made-for-TV movie finale: we see a second group of paramedics using Squad 51, and a shift change.



** Bill's disease is caught in time. The little boy dies.
* TheDanza: Firemen Marco Lopez, Mike Stoker and Capt. Dick Hammer, played by...Marco Lopez, Mike Stoker and Dick Hammer. The latter two were both RealLife firefighters, too.
** Hammer's character becomes TheOtherDarrin for at least one episode during season one. The real Hammer decided to go back into full-time firefighting and another actor, credited as "John Smith", took over the role. During the end credits of Smith's first episode, "Hang Up," he's billed as Captain Hammer. For the next episode, "Crash," Smith is credited simply as "Captain." Later on, his character becomes "Captain Stanley".

to:

** Bill's disease is caught in time. The little boy dies.
* TheDanza: Firemen Marco Lopez, Mike Stoker and Capt. Dick Hammer, played by...Marco Lopez, Mike Stoker and Dick Hammer. The latter two were both RealLife firefighters, too.
**
too. Hammer's character becomes TheOtherDarrin for at least one episode during season one. The real Hammer decided to go back into full-time firefighting and another actor, credited as "John Smith", took over the role. During the end credits of Smith's first episode, "Hang Up," he's billed as Captain Hammer. For the next episode, "Crash," Smith is credited simply as "Captain." Later on, his character becomes "Captain Stanley".



* DrJerk: Doctor Morton had no bedside manner whatsoever.
** And in Season 3 Episode 17 "Fools", there is an intern named Donaldson, whose [[InsufferableGenius arrogance]] makes Dr. Morton look a lot ''[[JerkWithAHeartOfGold friendlier]]''.

to:

* DrJerk: DrJerk:
**
Doctor Morton had no bedside manner whatsoever.
** And in In Season 3 Episode 17 "Fools", there is an intern named Donaldson, whose [[InsufferableGenius arrogance]] makes Dr. Morton look a lot ''[[JerkWithAHeartOfGold friendlier]]''.



** TruthInTelevision for paramedic programs at the time, which required online medical direction for most (if not all) prehospital procedures. This is referred to as a "Mother May I" system, still in use today in California and other places. Nowadays EMS has mostly standing orders, allowing the paramedic to use their own judgment, but at the time this system was the only way to gain the trust of the public and the medical community. Some episodes deal with the frustration of the paramedics and their inability to receive orders from the hospital due to a doctor's lack of trust or the radio being tied up by another unit.



* RealLifeRelative: Julie London, playing Dixie [=McCall=], was the real-life wife of Bobby Troup (playing Dr. Joe Early).
** It's even a bit more complex than that: before marrying Troup, Julie was married to executive producer Jack Webb.
* TheRedStapler: The show is popularly thought to be the best advertisement about the merits of the paramedic program ever and lots of cities and counties started setting up their own.
** Pretty much {{lampshaded}} in one episode when Gage and [=DeSoto=], after being involved in a rescue in a rural area outside their jurisdiction and which couldn't afford to run its own paramedics even after seeing their value, described a system of volunteer emergency medical responders such a region could set up to the local sheriff.

to:

* RealLifeRelative: Julie London, playing Dixie [=McCall=], was the real-life wife of Bobby Troup (playing Dr. Joe Early).
** It's even a bit more complex than that: before marrying Troup, Julie was married to executive producer Jack Webb.
* TheRedStapler: The show is popularly thought to be the best advertisement about the merits of the paramedic program ever and lots of cities and counties started setting up their own.
**
own. Pretty much {{lampshaded}} in one episode when Gage and [=DeSoto=], after being involved in a rescue in a rural area outside their jurisdiction and which couldn't afford to run its own paramedics even after seeing their value, described a system of volunteer emergency medical responders such a region could set up to the local sheriff.



* StockSoundEffect: watch episodes one after another on DVD and you'll quickly notice that the show uses the exact same "sound of equipment and people shouting" background during major emergency scenes. Even worse, if the scene goes on long enough you'll notice that it's looped, so that one man's indistinct (but recognizable) shout is the show's WilhelmScream.
** And the call alarm sound (two short tones, then a loud buzzer), was used in the ''Series/{{Monk}}'' episode "Mr. Monk Can't See a Thing".

to:

* StockSoundEffect: watch episodes one after another on DVD and you'll quickly notice that the show uses the exact same "sound of equipment and people shouting" background during major emergency scenes. Even worse, if the scene goes on long enough you'll notice that it's looped, so that one man's indistinct (but recognizable) shout is the show's WilhelmScream.
**
WilhelmScream. And the call alarm sound (two short tones, then a loud buzzer), was used in the ''Series/{{Monk}}'' episode "Mr. Monk Can't See a Thing".
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.Emergency