History Main / ElevatorFailure

3rd Aug '17 11:01:05 PM mimitchi33
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* ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitansGo'' had this happen to the boys in "Caged Tiger" when they are called to fight crime.
29th Jul '17 4:50:20 PM eroock
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* In ''Film/LastActionHero'', Slater falls from a [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gzPiBOc_Nfs broken elevator]].
27th Jul '17 12:50:55 PM MasterofGalaxies4628
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[[caption-width-right:284:CaptainObvious would probably say this was not a good place to be in.]]

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[[caption-width-right:284:CaptainObvious would probably say this was is not a good place to be in.in right now.]]



* ''Series/PersonOfInterest''. In "Nothing To Hide" an electrical engineer sabotages the elevator safety systems while the POI is inside. The intent is to scare the hell out of him, not to kill him.

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* ''Series/PersonOfInterest''. In "Nothing "[[Recap/PersonOfInterestS03E02 Nothing To Hide" Hide]]", an electrical engineer sabotages the elevator safety systems while the POI is inside. The intent is to scare the hell out of him rather than kill him, so the brakes kick back in at the last second to give him a painful but not to kill him.severely injuring landing.



* One episode of ''Series/MythBusters'' involved testing the best course of action should an elevator fail as per the trope. In order to do so, they had to disable several of the safety systems on an old elevator (and we do mean ''old'') in a building slated for demolition. Cutting through the support cables for the counterweight took some time. Disabling the other major safety measure, a braking system, proved surprisingly simple:
--> '''Adam:''' Anticlimactically enough, I believe I've disabled the entire mechanism by removing this simple pin.

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* One episode of ''Series/MythBusters'' involved testing the best course of action [[JustForFun/TropesExaminedByTheMythBusters should an elevator fail as per the trope.trope]]. In order to do so, they had to disable several of the safety systems on an old elevator (and we do mean ''old'') in a building slated for demolition. Cutting through the support cables for the counterweight took some time. Disabling the other major safety measure, a braking system, proved surprisingly simple:
--> '''Adam:''' -->'''Adam:''' Anticlimactically enough, I believe I've disabled the entire mechanism by removing this simple pin.pin.
:: :See also the Real Life folder for the specific urban legend they were looking into.



* When this happens in RealLife, it can be pretty [[http://www.snopes.com/horrors/freakish/elevator.asp gruesome]] (the article is completely non-graphic)

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* When this happens in RealLife, it can be pretty [[http://www.snopes.com/horrors/freakish/elevator.asp gruesome]] (the article is completely non-graphic)non-graphic), but in general, engineers are hard at work to make this as much a DiscreditedTrope as possible. Modern elevators have at least 6 cables, and each individual cable can support 150% of the elevator's listed maximum load (though the motor itself [[MaximumCapacityOverload still can't carry that much]]). If all the cables fail, automatic hydraulic brakes and/or springs are there to slow your descent to a non-lethal velocity.
* The ''Series/MythBusters'' episode concerning this trope references a 1945 incident where a woman managed to survive an elevator plunge from the top of the Empire State Building [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1945_Empire_State_Building_B-25_crash after it was accidentally struck by a plane traveling through thick morning fog]]. (In her case, it also helped that the elevator was an airtight fit to its shaft and its cables coiled under it when it landed, absorbing some of the shock.)
* On 9/11, several elevators in the World Trade Center fell down due to cables and safety systems getting melted away by the extreme heat of jet fuel fire. Several people believed there were explosions at the ground lobby level (fueling the conspiracy theories) but it was later revealed to be the elevators crashing down after falling down hundreds of feet. It's unclear if or how many people were riding them at the time. It also showcases one of the big reasons why evacuations procedures always insist on using the stairs.



* In general, engineers are hard at work to make this as much a DiscreditedTrope as possible. Modern elevators have at least 6 cables, and each individual cable can support 150% of the elevator's listed maximum load (though the motor itself [[MaximumCapacityOverload still can't carry that much]]). If all the cables fail, automatic hydraulic brakes and/or springs are there to slow your descent to a non-lethal velocity. This was investigated on ''Series/{{Mythbusters}}'' when they were trying to see how a woman whose elevator ride took a plunge in the Empire State Building several decades ago managed to survive. (In her case, it also helped that the cables coiled under the elevator when it landed, absorbing some of the shock.)
* On 9/11, several elevators in the World Trade Center fell down due to cables and safety systems getting melted away by the extreme heat of Jet Fuel fire. Several people believed there were explosions at the ground lobby level (fueling the conspiracy theories) but it was later revealed to be the elevators crashing down after falling down hundreds of feet. It's unclear if or how many people were riding them at the time. It's one of the reasons why evacuations procedures always insist to use the stairs.



* In the rather chilling story [[http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/woman-dies-in-elevator-china_us_56dd2134e4b0ffe6f8e9d56c seen here]], a woman in China starved to death after being trapped in the elevator of her apartment building for a month after two maintenance workers “improperly” shut down the power.

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* In the rather chilling story [[http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/woman-dies-in-elevator-china_us_56dd2134e4b0ffe6f8e9d56c seen here]], a woman in China starved to death after being trapped in the elevator of her apartment building for a month after two maintenance workers “improperly” "improperly" shut down the power.
28th Jun '17 9:50:38 PM PaulA
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* ''Film/MrAndMrsSmith''. Mrs Smith lures her husband into an elevator on a construction site and places radio-detonated charges on the cables and brakes. The bombs go off and apparently kill him, but Mr Smith was actually in a different elevator.

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* ''Film/MrAndMrsSmith''.''Film/MrAndMrsSmith2005''. Mrs Smith lures her husband into an elevator on a construction site and places radio-detonated charges on the cables and brakes. The bombs go off and apparently kill him, but Mr Smith was actually in a different elevator.
28th Jun '17 12:29:30 PM SLOOGOVS
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[[quoteright:284:[[Film/TheToweringInferno http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/the_towering_inferno_elevator1.jpg]]CaptainObvious would probably say this was not a good place to be in.]]

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[[quoteright:284:[[Film/TheToweringInferno http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/the_towering_inferno_elevator1.jpg]]CaptainObvious jpg]]]]
[[caption-width-right:284:CaptainObvious
would probably say this was not a good place to be in.]]
29th May '17 9:45:47 PM Tdarcos
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In fact, the inspection certificate has to be publicly posted in the elevator itself, usually behind a glass frame, so anyone seeing it can see that it was inspected during the last 12 months. In fact, you should be very wary if you're enter an elevator where you notice the inspection certificate is missing or expired.

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In fact, the inspection certificate has to be publicly posted in the elevator itself, usually behind a glass frame, so anyone seeing it can see that it was inspected during the last 12 months. In fact, you should be very wary if you're enter you've entered an elevator where you notice the inspection certificate is missing or expired.
29th May '17 9:45:02 PM Tdarcos
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In fact, the inspection certificate has to be publicly posted in the elevator itself, usually behind a glass frame, so anyone seeing it can see that it was inspected during the last 12 months. In fact, you should be very wary if you're enter am elevator where you notice the inspection certificate is missing or expired.

to:

In fact, the inspection certificate has to be publicly posted in the elevator itself, usually behind a glass frame, so anyone seeing it can see that it was inspected during the last 12 months. In fact, you should be very wary if you're enter am an elevator where you notice the inspection certificate is missing or expired.
29th May '17 9:43:55 PM Tdarcos
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[[quoteright:284:[[Film/TheToweringInferno http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/the_towering_inferno_elevator1.jpg]]]]

to:

[[quoteright:284:[[Film/TheToweringInferno http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/the_towering_inferno_elevator1.jpg]]]]
jpg]]CaptainObvious would probably say this was not a good place to be in.]]



In fact, the inspection certificate has to be publicly posted in the elevator itself, usually behind a glass frame, so anyone seeing it can see that it was inspected during the last 12 months. In fact, you should be very wary if the elevator's inspection certificate is missing or expired.

to:

In fact, the inspection certificate has to be publicly posted in the elevator itself, usually behind a glass frame, so anyone seeing it can see that it was inspected during the last 12 months. In fact, you should be very wary if you're enter am elevator where you notice the elevator's inspection certificate is missing or expired.
29th May '17 9:39:41 PM Tdarcos
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Elevators (or ''lifts'' as they are called in the UK) are pretty mundane devices. They go up, they go down, and they move people and property vertically. The general rule of the elevator business is that, when their job is done right, you don't even notice the trip. There's a reason for this: because elevators carry people and improper operation can result in injury or death, there are various rules. Elevators have certain codes and requirements, generally have to be inspected every year, and will be ordered out of service if unsafe.

to:

Elevators (or ''lifts'' as they are called in the UK) are pretty mundane devices. They go up, they go down, and they move people and property vertically. The general rule of the elevator business is that, when their job is done right, you don't even notice the trip. There's a reason for this: because elevators carry people and improper operation can result in injury or death, there are various rules. Elevators have certain codes and requirements, generally have to be inspected every year, year,

In fact, the inspection certificate has to be publicly posted in the elevator itself, usually behind a glass frame, so anyone seeing it can see that it was inspected during the last 12 months. In fact, you should be very wary if the elevator's inspection certificate is missing or expired.

If the inspection official with the city or region does an inspection
and it fails, the elevator will be ordered out of service if unsafe.
as unsafe until it is brought back into code.
13th May '17 2:17:44 AM ScorpiusOB1
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* [[http://www.efe.com/efe/english/portada/2-teenagers-killed-in-fall-as-elevator-floor-gives-way-madrid-building/50000260-3261420# Two teenagers]] were killed in Madrid, Spain, as the floor of the elevator failed and both fell from somewhere between the sixth and ninth floor.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ElevatorFailure