History Main / ElectronicMusic

17th Mar '17 1:41:58 PM KizunaTallis
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Arguably, pure electronic (pop) music can be traced back to ''{{Music/Kraftwerk}}'', who made SynthPop music that deliberately exploited its synthetic origins. Kraftwerk was one of the first acts, if not ''the'' first, that ''exclusively'' used electronic instruments (though not exclusively synthesizers) to generate their output. Electronic music itself dates back much further than the 1970s, though; the theremin was invented ca.1920, the "croix sonore" in 1926, the ondes Martenot in 1928, and all of these were written for by avant-garde classical composers like Nikolai Obukhov, Music/OlivierMessiaen, and Joseph Schillinger. (For an example, see Obukhov's ''The Third and Last Testament'', composed in 1946.) The synthesizer itself dates back to 1895 (the Teleharmonium), although modern voltage-controlled synths (along with the name "synthesizer") were first devised by a team at RCA in the 1950s, and didn't enter popular consciousness ontil Robert Moog left that team to found his own company. In addition to writing for physical instruments that were powered by electricity, as early as the 1920s some composers were making use of 'found sounds' generated by radios, sometimes making longer works largely using collage and even going as far as manipulating them directly (see Dziga Vertov's ''Enthusiasm! The Dombass Symphony''). This technique, reasonably popular among the Italian and Russian Futurists, strongly foreshadowed the later "musique concrete" movement, kicked off by radio engineer Pierre Schaeffer in the late 1940s with works like "Etude aux chemins de fer" (1948), which was created by manipulating the taped sound of a [[CaptainObvious train]].

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Arguably, pure electronic (pop) music can be traced back to ''{{Music/Kraftwerk}}'', who made SynthPop music that deliberately exploited its synthetic origins. Kraftwerk was one of the first acts, if not ''the'' first, that ''exclusively'' used electronic instruments (though not exclusively synthesizers) to generate their output. Electronic music itself dates back much further than the 1970s, though; the theremin was invented ca.1920, the "croix sonore" in 1926, the ondes Martenot in 1928, and all of these were written for by avant-garde classical composers like Nikolai Obukhov, Music/OlivierMessiaen, and Joseph Schillinger. (For an example, see Obukhov's ''The Third and Last Testament'', composed in 1946.) The synthesizer itself dates back to 1895 (the Teleharmonium), although modern voltage-controlled synths (along with the name "synthesizer") were first devised by a team at RCA in the 1950s, and didn't enter popular consciousness ontil until Robert Moog left that team to found his own company. In addition to writing for physical instruments that were powered by electricity, as early as the 1920s some composers were making use of 'found sounds' generated by radios, sometimes making longer works largely using collage and even going as far as manipulating them directly (see Dziga Vertov's ''Enthusiasm! The Dombass Symphony''). This technique, reasonably popular among the Italian and Russian Futurists, strongly foreshadowed the later "musique concrete" movement, kicked off by radio engineer Pierre Schaeffer in the late 1940s with works like "Etude aux chemins de fer" (1948), which was created by manipulating the taped sound of a [[CaptainObvious train]].
30th Nov '16 3:45:07 AM Trueman001
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Arguably, pure electronic (pop) music can be traced back to ''{{Music/Kraftwerk}}'', who made SynthPop music that deliberately exploited its synthetic origins. Kraftwerk was one of the first acts, if not ''the'' first, that ''exclusively'' used electronic instruments (though not exclusively synthesizers) to generate their output. Electronic music itself dates back much further than the 1970s, though; the theremin was invented ca.1920, the "croix sonore" in 1926, the ondes Martenot in 1928, and all of these were written for by avant-garde classical composers like Nikolai Obukhov, Music/OlivierMessiaen, and Joseph Schillinger. (For an example, see Obukhov's ''The Third and Last Testament'', composed in 1946.) In addition to writing for physical instruments that were powered by electricity, as early as the 1920s some composers were making use of 'found sounds' generated by radios, sometimes making longer works largely using collage and even going as far as manipulating them directly (see Dziga Vertov's ''Enthusiasm! The Dombass Symphony''). This technique, reasonably popular among the Italian and Russian Futurists, strongly foreshadowed the later "musique concrete" movement, kicked off by radio engineer Pierre Schaeffer in the late 1940s with works like "Etude aux chemins de fer" (1948), which was created by manipulating the taped sound of a [[CaptainObvious train]].

to:

Arguably, pure electronic (pop) music can be traced back to ''{{Music/Kraftwerk}}'', who made SynthPop music that deliberately exploited its synthetic origins. Kraftwerk was one of the first acts, if not ''the'' first, that ''exclusively'' used electronic instruments (though not exclusively synthesizers) to generate their output. Electronic music itself dates back much further than the 1970s, though; the theremin was invented ca.1920, the "croix sonore" in 1926, the ondes Martenot in 1928, and all of these were written for by avant-garde classical composers like Nikolai Obukhov, Music/OlivierMessiaen, and Joseph Schillinger. (For an example, see Obukhov's ''The Third and Last Testament'', composed in 1946.) The synthesizer itself dates back to 1895 (the Teleharmonium), although modern voltage-controlled synths (along with the name "synthesizer") were first devised by a team at RCA in the 1950s, and didn't enter popular consciousness ontil Robert Moog left that team to found his own company. In addition to writing for physical instruments that were powered by electricity, as early as the 1920s some composers were making use of 'found sounds' generated by radios, sometimes making longer works largely using collage and even going as far as manipulating them directly (see Dziga Vertov's ''Enthusiasm! The Dombass Symphony''). This technique, reasonably popular among the Italian and Russian Futurists, strongly foreshadowed the later "musique concrete" movement, kicked off by radio engineer Pierre Schaeffer in the late 1940s with works like "Etude aux chemins de fer" (1948), which was created by manipulating the taped sound of a [[CaptainObvious train]].
3rd Jun '16 9:47:15 AM mjlush
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* Classical Electronic or AvantGardeMusic (experimental electronic music from the 1940s-1960s. Includes early synthesiser works like Wendy Carlos' "Switched-On Bach" and most tape manipulation music such as that of Delia Derbyshire (best known for producing the original ''Series/DoctorWho'' theme at the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BBC_Radiophonic_Workshop BBC Radiophonic Workshop]])).

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* Classical Electronic or AvantGardeMusic (experimental electronic music from the 1940s-1960s. Includes early synthesiser works like Wendy Carlos' "Switched-On Bach" and most tape manipulation music such as that of Delia Derbyshire (best known for producing the original ''Series/DoctorWho'' theme at the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BBC_Radiophonic_Workshop BBC Radiophonic Workshop]])).Workshop]]).
3rd Jun '16 9:46:40 AM mjlush
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* Classical Electronic or AvantGardeMusic (experimental electronic music from the 1940s-1960s. Includes early synthesiser works like Wendy Carlos' "Switched-On Bach" and most tape manipulation music such as that of Delia Derbyshire (best known for producing the original ''Series/DoctorWho'' theme at the {{https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BBC_Radiophonic_Workshop BBC Radiophonic Workshop}})).

to:

* Classical Electronic or AvantGardeMusic (experimental electronic music from the 1940s-1960s. Includes early synthesiser works like Wendy Carlos' "Switched-On Bach" and most tape manipulation music such as that of Delia Derbyshire (best known for producing the original ''Series/DoctorWho'' theme at the {{https://en.[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BBC_Radiophonic_Workshop BBC Radiophonic Workshop}})).Workshop]])).
3rd Jun '16 9:45:48 AM mjlush
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* Classical Electronic or AvantGardeMusic (experimental electronic music from the 1940s-1960s. Includes early synthesiser works like Wendy Carlos' "Switched-On Bach" and most tape manipulation music such as that of Delia Derbyshire (best known for producing the original ''Series/DoctorWho'' theme)).

to:

* Classical Electronic or AvantGardeMusic (experimental electronic music from the 1940s-1960s. Includes early synthesiser works like Wendy Carlos' "Switched-On Bach" and most tape manipulation music such as that of Delia Derbyshire (best known for producing the original ''Series/DoctorWho'' theme)).theme at the {{https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BBC_Radiophonic_Workshop BBC Radiophonic Workshop}})).
17th May '16 1:15:51 AM Waddle
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Added DiffLines:

* FreakyElectronicMusic (a trope for electronic music used to symbolize villainy)
17th Apr '16 1:38:05 PM aye_amber
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Added DiffLines:

14th Feb '16 2:32:34 PM PhysicalStamina
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* [[http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/UsefulNotes/Synthwave Synthwave]] (a {{Retraux}} throwback to the 80s in every sense of the phrase; also sometimes known as New Italo Disco)

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* [[http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/UsefulNotes/Synthwave Synthwave]] UsefulNotes/{{Synthwave}} (a {{Retraux}} throwback to the 80s in every sense of the phrase; also sometimes known as New Italo Disco)



* {{Vaporwave}}: A [[{{Sampling}} sample-based]] genre that takes smooth jazz songs from the mid-80's to early 90's or contemporary pop songs, slows them down and gives them EchoingAcoustics.

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* {{Vaporwave}}: A genre that originated from UsefulNote/TheInternet that once mainly relied on [[{{Sampling}} sample-based]] genre that takes smooth jazz songs slowed-down samples of music]] from the mid-80's TheEighties or TheNineties, but has grown to early 90's or contemporary pop songs, slows them down and gives them EchoingAcoustics.take on many different forms since then.
11th Feb '16 8:55:39 PM FlashSteps
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* [[UsefulNotes/Synthwave Synthwave]] (a {{Retraux}} throwback to the 80s in every sense of the phrase; also sometimes known as New Italo Disco)

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* [[UsefulNotes/Synthwave [[http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/UsefulNotes/Synthwave Synthwave]] (a {{Retraux}} throwback to the 80s in every sense of the phrase; also sometimes known as New Italo Disco)
11th Feb '16 8:53:57 PM FlashSteps
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* {{Synthwave}} (a {{Retraux}} throwback to the 80s in every sense of the phrase; also sometimes known as New Italo Disco)

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* {{Synthwave}} [[UsefulNotes/Synthwave Synthwave]] (a {{Retraux}} throwback to the 80s in every sense of the phrase; also sometimes known as New Italo Disco)
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ElectronicMusic