History Main / ElectiveMonarchy

22nd Mar '17 12:49:39 PM gb00393
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** Robb is acclaimed King in the North by his bannermen and the riverlords of the Trident.

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** Robb of House Stark is acclaimed King in the North by his bannermen and the riverlords of the Trident.Trident. This also happens with his successor Jon Snow.
21st Mar '17 5:18:33 PM StarSword
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** Ferelden is a {{downplayed}} example. While on the surface the nation appears to follow a traditional feudal system with primogeniture inheritance, unlike in neighboring Orlais where the nobles believe in rule by divine right, Ferelden has a culture of rule by merit and is more democratic. The banns (the lowest form of titled nobility, sort of like barons) are elected from the local gentry by the Freeholds (free men and women) to protect them in exchange for allegiance. The higher-ranked teyrns (akin to dukes) in turn have the loyalty of banns and arls (earls), and the king is regarded as merely the most powerful of the banns and is elected by them at the Landsmeet (an annual council of the nobles that serves the role of a parliament) if the line of succession is unclear, as in the SuccessionCrisis plot in ''[[VideoGame/DragonAgeOrigins Origins]]''.

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** Ferelden is a {{downplayed}} example. While on the surface the nation appears to follow a traditional feudal system with primogeniture inheritance, unlike in neighboring Orlais where the nobles believe in rule by divine right, Ferelden has a culture of rule by merit and is more democratic. The banns (the lowest form of titled nobility, sort of like barons) are elected from the local gentry by the Freeholds (free men and women) to protect them in exchange for allegiance. The higher-ranked teyrns (akin to dukes) in turn have the loyalty of banns and arls (earls), and the king is regarded as merely the most powerful of the banns teyrn and is elected by them at the Landsmeet (an annual council of the nobles that serves the role of a parliament) if the line of succession is unclear, as in the SuccessionCrisis plot in ''[[VideoGame/DragonAgeOrigins Origins]]''.
21st Mar '17 4:56:51 PM StarSword
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* Ferelden in ''VideoGame/DragonAgeOrigins''. The king is elected by the Landsmeet, a congress of the land's most powerful nobles.
** That's only in extreme cases, when the line of succession isn't clear. The Theirin dynasty has a long history of rule, broken only temporarily during the Orlesian occupation, and restored when Maric Theirin, the grandson of the Theirin king who was too weak to hold off the Orlesians, manages (with some help) to drive off the occupying forces and regains the crown.
** Actually, it was a regular occurrence and the SuccessionCrisis actually emerged because Loghain did not immediately seek legitimacy from the nobility. One of the biggest gripes the Fereldans had against Orlais was that the Landsmeet was not convened, ''ever'', and the Orlesian king was an appointed toady of the Emperor. The King is expected to convene the Landsmeet regularly, SuccessionCrisis or not. While the nobles probably can't actually remove the king with any method short of war, not consulting with them would likely mean they would choose another successor from another family once he had died. The Theirins had a long history of rule because the founder of their line was the FounderOfTheKingdom and, with a few exceptions, they were generally good rulers.
** It goes further down than that. The Banns (the lowest form of titled nobility, sort of like Barons) are elected from the local gentry by the Freeholds (free men and women) to protect them in exchange of allegiance.
** According to Zevran, Antivan kings are also elected -- with the added complication of getting to the election without being assassinated by the Crows. If no-one has the nerve, the Crows go after the people they think should run. "Never let it be said that the Crows are not patriots."

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* ''Franchise/DragonAge'':
**
Ferelden in ''VideoGame/DragonAgeOrigins''. The king is elected by a {{downplayed}} example. While on the Landsmeet, a congress of surface the land's most powerful nobles.
** That's only
nation appears to follow a traditional feudal system with primogeniture inheritance, unlike in extreme cases, when the line of succession isn't clear. The Theirin dynasty has a long history of rule, broken only temporarily during the Orlesian occupation, and restored when Maric Theirin, the grandson of the Theirin king who was too weak to hold off the Orlesians, manages (with some help) to drive off the occupying forces and regains the crown.
** Actually, it was a regular occurrence and the SuccessionCrisis actually emerged because Loghain did not immediately seek legitimacy from the nobility. One of the biggest gripes the Fereldans had against
neighboring Orlais was that the Landsmeet was not convened, ''ever'', and the Orlesian king was an appointed toady of the Emperor. The King is expected to convene the Landsmeet regularly, SuccessionCrisis or not. While where the nobles probably can't actually remove the king with any method short of war, not consulting with them would likely mean they would choose another successor from another family once he had died. The Theirins had believe in rule by divine right, Ferelden has a long history culture of rule because the founder of their line was the FounderOfTheKingdom and, with a few exceptions, they were generally good rulers.
** It goes further down than that.
by merit and is more democratic. The Banns banns (the lowest form of titled nobility, sort of like Barons) barons) are elected from the local gentry by the Freeholds (free men and women) to protect them in exchange for allegiance. The higher-ranked teyrns (akin to dukes) in turn have the loyalty of allegiance.
banns and arls (earls), and the king is regarded as merely the most powerful of the banns and is elected by them at the Landsmeet (an annual council of the nobles that serves the role of a parliament) if the line of succession is unclear, as in the SuccessionCrisis plot in ''[[VideoGame/DragonAgeOrigins Origins]]''.
** According to Zevran, Antivan kings are also elected -- with the added complication of getting to the election without being assassinated by [[MurderInc the Crows.Crows]]. If no-one has the nerve, the Crows go after the people they think should run. "Never let it be said that the Crows are not patriots."
9th Mar '17 12:26:03 AM Fireblood
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* Kings of Arad Doman are chosen by the Council of Merchants from among the nobles, requiring at least eight members for this. The King has absolute power, except for the fact they can be deposed by a three-quarters vote from the Council.

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* ** Kings of Arad Doman are chosen by the Council of Merchants from among the nobles, requiring at least eight members for this. The King has absolute power, except for the fact they can be deposed by a three-quarters vote from the Council.
9th Mar '17 12:20:49 AM Fireblood
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* Kings of Arad Doman are chosen by the Council of Merchants from among the nobles, requiring at least eight members for this. The King has absolute power, except for the fact they can be deposed by a three-quarters vote from the Council.



* In ''Literature/VampireAcademy'', the Moroi have such a monarchy. Candidates must be Royals, have their candidacy supported by at least three other Royals, and must pass three trials before the matter goes to a vote. Then its a matter of votes gathered.

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* In ''Literature/VampireAcademy'', the Moroi have such a monarchy. Candidates must be Royals, have their candidacy supported by at least three other Royals, and must pass three trials before the matter goes to a vote. Then its it's a matter of votes gathered.
4th Mar '17 1:51:11 PM Jhonny
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** The Roman Empire effectively transitioned from HereditaryRepublic into this trope from the reign of Augustus onwards with no clear point in time during which a contemporary could say the transition had taken place. Only very few emperors were "born to the purple" (i.e. presumptive heir upon birth or childhood) as the Juedo-Claudian dynasty never had a straightforward father-son transition, the Flavian dynasty came to power when Vespasian's sons were already men and the "five good emperors" Nerva to Marcus Aurelius had no biological children bar the last one. It says a lot for the little regard the Romans held for the dynastic principle that the fact Marcus Auerlius made his son emperor (who did turn out a terrible ruler) is often seen as an incredible faux-pas and the beginning of the end. Most Emperors did however make their desired heir "co-emperor" during their lifetime and the savier ones tried to get them a military command and have the senate rubber stamp the appointment to have two of the three bases of power (the third being the urban masses in Rome) in their corner from the get-go.

to:

** The Roman Empire effectively transitioned from HereditaryRepublic into this trope from the reign of Augustus onwards with no clear point in time during which a contemporary could say the transition had taken place. Only very few emperors were "born to the purple" (i.e. presumptive heir upon birth or childhood) as the Juedo-Claudian Julio-Claudian dynasty never had a straightforward father-son transition, the Flavian dynasty came to power when Vespasian's sons were already men and the "five good emperors" Nerva to Marcus Aurelius had no biological children bar the last one. It says a lot for the little regard the Romans held for the dynastic principle that the fact Marcus Auerlius made his son emperor (who did turn out a terrible ruler) is often seen as an incredible faux-pas and the beginning of the end. Most Emperors did however make their desired heir "co-emperor" during their lifetime and the savier ones tried to get them a military command and have the senate rubber stamp the appointment to have two of the three bases of power (the third being the urban masses in Rome) in their corner from the get-go.
4th Mar '17 9:18:42 AM zarpaulus
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* ''Series/Babylon5'': The Centauri Republic (which [[NonIndicativeName despite its title]] is really a constitutional monarchy) allows the Centauruum (the Republic's parliament) to elect an Emperor when the line of succession has become unclear.

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* ''Series/Babylon5'': The Centauri Republic (which [[NonIndicativeName despite its title]] is really a constitutional monarchy) allows the Centauruum (the Republic's parliament) to elect an Emperor when the line of succession has become unclear. Though when Cartagia (inherited) is found to have had a son the kid ends up behind Londo's (elected) chosen successor Vir in the line of succession.
21st Feb '17 6:32:31 PM Fireblood
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* Many Native American tribes had elected rulers (who Europeans invariably called "kings" though in many cases they probably didn't qualify), such as the Iroquois, where chiefs were chosen by clan elders (both male and female). However, the position was still mostly {{always male}}.

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* Many Native American tribes had elected rulers (who Europeans invariably called "kings" though in many cases they probably didn't qualify), such as the Iroquois, where chiefs were chosen by clan elders (both male and female). However, the position was still mostly {{always male}}. The Aztec emperors (''Huey Tlatoque'') were not hereditary, but elected by a consensus of the elites.
20th Feb '17 3:09:08 PM Grudgeal
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Added DiffLines:

** The dukes of Bretonnia elect a king from amongst themselves (with the [[TheChooserOfTheOne Grail Enchantress]] having the final word) whenever an old king dies. This is because the king of Bretonnia must be a Grail Knight (a duke, meanwhile, must only be a knight). However, if the king's hereditary heir already ''is'' a Grail Knight he's all but certain to be the next king.
16th Feb '17 2:11:04 PM Jhonny
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Added DiffLines:

** The Roman Empire effectively transitioned from HereditaryRepublic into this trope from the reign of Augustus onwards with no clear point in time during which a contemporary could say the transition had taken place. Only very few emperors were "born to the purple" (i.e. presumptive heir upon birth or childhood) as the Juedo-Claudian dynasty never had a straightforward father-son transition, the Flavian dynasty came to power when Vespasian's sons were already men and the "five good emperors" Nerva to Marcus Aurelius had no biological children bar the last one. It says a lot for the little regard the Romans held for the dynastic principle that the fact Marcus Auerlius made his son emperor (who did turn out a terrible ruler) is often seen as an incredible faux-pas and the beginning of the end. Most Emperors did however make their desired heir "co-emperor" during their lifetime and the savier ones tried to get them a military command and have the senate rubber stamp the appointment to have two of the three bases of power (the third being the urban masses in Rome) in their corner from the get-go.
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