History Main / ElectiveMonarchy

28th May '16 5:49:05 PM karstovich2
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** Note that in practice, the Imperial title became hereditary within the House of Habsburg towards the end of the 15th century, and that the Electors generally did not keep the "obvious" heir from the throne until the UsefulNotes/WarOfTheAustrianSuccession. But before that there was a period when the Electors voted for the candidates of the Houses of Wittelsbach, Luxemburg and Habsburg in alternation.

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** Note that in practice, the Imperial title became hereditary within the House of Habsburg towards the end of the 15th century, and that the Electors generally did not keep the "obvious" heir from the throne until the UsefulNotes/WarOfTheAustrianSuccession. But UsefulNotes/WarOfTheAustrianSuccession (although even before that then the "obvious" heir would usually make a point of doing favors for the electors to keep them from holding up the vote when the time came). Before the 15th century, there was a period when the Electors voted for the candidates of the Houses of Wittelsbach, Luxemburg and Habsburg in alternation.
28th May '16 5:46:47 PM karstovich2
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** Usually, anyway-the claim to the electorate of the Wittelsbach dynasty was split in between the Count Palatine and the Duke of Bavaria, and sometimes Bavaria stepped in for the Palatinate (when the Bavarian Wittlesbachs' scheming against their cousins was particularly successful) or Bohemia (when the rival Wittelsbach branches took a break from messing with each other and instead conspired with each other to exclude Bohemia on the grounds that he wasn't German). After the Reformation, the Palatinate Wittelsbachs were Protestants and the Bavarian ones Catholics, so early in the UsefulNotes/ThirtyYearsWar the electoral title was given to the Bavarians, but in the Peace of Westphalia it was decided that both would get to be electors, bringing the total to eight.

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** Usually, anyway-the claim to the electorate of the Wittelsbach dynasty was split in between the Count Palatine and the Duke of Bavaria, and sometimes Bavaria stepped in for the Palatinate (when the Bavarian Wittlesbachs' scheming against their cousins was particularly successful) or Bohemia (when the rival Wittelsbach branches took a break from messing with each other and instead conspired with each other to exclude Bohemia on the grounds that he wasn't German). After the Reformation, the Palatinate Wittelsbachs were Protestants and the Bavarian ones Catholics, so early in the UsefulNotes/ThirtyYearsWar the electoral title was given to the Bavarians, but in the Peace of Westphalia it was decided that both would get to be electors, electors (to keep the peace between Catholics and Protestants) bringing the total to eight.
28th May '16 5:46:06 PM karstovich2
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** Usually, anyway-the claim to the electorate of the Wittelsbach dynasty was split in between the Count Palatine and the Duke of Bavaria, and sometimes Bavaria stepped in for the Palatinate or Bohemia (when the rival Wittelsbachs conspired with each other to exclude him on the grounds that he wasn't German). After the Reformation, the Palatinate Wittelsbachs were Protestants and the Bavarian ones Catholics, so early in the UsefulNotes/ThirtyYearsWar the electoral title was given to the Bavarians, but in the Peace of Westphalia it was decided that both would get to be electors, bringing the total to eight.

to:

** Usually, anyway-the claim to the electorate of the Wittelsbach dynasty was split in between the Count Palatine and the Duke of Bavaria, and sometimes Bavaria stepped in for the Palatinate (when the Bavarian Wittlesbachs' scheming against their cousins was particularly successful) or Bohemia (when the rival Wittelsbachs Wittelsbach branches took a break from messing with each other and instead conspired with each other to exclude him Bohemia on the grounds that he wasn't German). After the Reformation, the Palatinate Wittelsbachs were Protestants and the Bavarian ones Catholics, so early in the UsefulNotes/ThirtyYearsWar the electoral title was given to the Bavarians, but in the Peace of Westphalia it was decided that both would get to be electors, bringing the total to eight.
23rd May '16 8:38:31 AM Jhonny
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** While every free man (or at least everyone who belonging to the higher estates plus landowning farmers) technically could vote, the electorate usually consisted of the nobles, the bishops, their private armies, and assorted peasant revolts with a grudge.

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** While every free man (or at least everyone who belonging to the higher estates plus landowning farmers) technically could vote, the electorate usually consisted of the nobles, the bishops, their private armies, and assorted peasant revolts with a grudge.
22nd May '16 6:39:19 PM Fireblood
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** The Romans did it even when they were ruled by kings, in a rather complicated way: once the reigning king was dead, the Senate would nominate an ''interrex'' (king ad interim) for five days (after which he had to name a successor with the Senate's approval), who would choose a candidate for kingship and present it to the Senate for approval; if the Senate approved, the nominee would be brought before the Curiate Assembly (the assembly of ''all'' Roman citizens, even if only patricians could actually vote), presided by the ''interrex'' for the occasion, for approval; if the Curiate Assembly approved, the nominee became king, but, the king also being the high priest, an augur (a priest tasked with interpreting the will of the gods by observing the flight of birds) would have to give his own approval; ''if'' the augur announced that the gods approved, the king was finally king, but to actually have the power he would have to summon the Curiate Assembly and propose a law in which he was given the ''imperium'' (absolute power), and if the bill passed he would ''finally'' be the king.

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** The Romans did it even when they were ruled by kings, in a rather complicated way: once the reigning king was dead, the Senate would nominate an ''interrex'' (king ad interim) for five days (after which he had to name a successor with the Senate's approval), who would choose a candidate for kingship and present it to the Senate for approval; if the Senate approved, the nominee would be brought before the Curiate Assembly (the assembly of ''all'' Roman citizens, even if only patricians could actually vote), presided over by the ''interrex'' for the occasion, for approval; if the Curiate Assembly approved, the nominee became king, but, the king also being the high priest, an augur (a priest tasked with interpreting the will of the gods by observing the flight of birds) would have to give his own approval; ''if'' the augur announced that the gods approved, the king was finally king, but to actually have the power he would have to summon the Curiate Assembly and propose a law in which he was given the ''imperium'' (absolute power), and if the bill passed he would ''finally'' be the king.


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* Many Native American tribes had elected rulers (who Europeans invariably called "kings" though in many cases they probably didn't qualify), such as the Iroquois, where chiefs were chosen by clan elders (both male and female). However, the position was still mostly {{always male}}.
22nd May '16 6:32:09 PM Fireblood
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** The royalty of the Seven Kingdoms of Westeros is normally hereditary, but a hundred years before the series takes place, the Blackfyre Rebellion occurred because the king legitimized his bastard sons on his deathbed and in so doing created a ''massive'' SuccessionCrisis (there were rumours that the trueborn brother, who was also the eldest, was actually the king's brother's son, and the eldest bastard, Daemon Blackfyre, believing them, rose up against him). Several years and a few thousand bodies later, the only Targaryen heirs left were either children or mentally unstable. A Great Council was formed from many of the ruling lords to choose the next king. They passed through many candidates in the Targaryen family tree before settling on Aegon V, a fourth son of a fourth son, hereafter known as Aegon "The Unlikely". After choosing the next king, the Great Council dissolved and the crown passed on through the family, though in the prelude to the War of the Five Kings, the possibility of another Great Council being formed is brought up due to the disputed heritage and validity of nearly all the contenders' claims to the throne.

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** The royalty of the Seven Kingdoms of Westeros is normally hereditary, but a hundred years before the series takes place, the Blackfyre Rebellion occurred because the king legitimized his bastard sons on his deathbed and in so doing created a ''massive'' SuccessionCrisis (there were rumours rumors that the trueborn brother, who was also the eldest, was actually the king's brother's son, and the eldest bastard, Daemon Blackfyre, believing them, rose up against him). Several years and a few thousand bodies later, the only Targaryen heirs left were either children or mentally unstable. A Great Council was formed from many of the ruling lords to choose the next king. They passed through many candidates in the Targaryen family tree before settling on Aegon V, a fourth son of a fourth son, hereafter known as Aegon "The Unlikely". After choosing the next king, the Great Council dissolved and the crown passed on through the family, though in the prelude to the War of the Five Kings, the possibility of another Great Council being formed is brought up due to the disputed heritage and validity of nearly all the contenders' claims to the throne.



* ''Series/GameOfThrones'': See ''A Song of Ice and Fire'' above.

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* ''Series/GameOfThrones'': See ''A Song of Ice Just as in [[Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire the books]], the Ironborn and Fire'' above.wildlings elect their kings. There is no sign yet of whether Pentos elects a prince too.
16th May '16 6:13:52 PM zarpaulus
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* ''Series/GameOfThrones'': The King-Beyond-The-Wall is apparently elected by the wildlings he gathers as followers. Ironborn kings are chosen by the kingsmoot, an assembly of ship captains and lords. There has been no formal kingsmoot in thousands of years by the time of the series.

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* ''Series/GameOfThrones'': The King-Beyond-The-Wall is apparently elected by the wildlings he gathers as followers. Ironborn kings are chosen by the kingsmoot, an assembly See ''A Song of ship captains Ice and lords. There has been no formal kingsmoot in thousands of years by the time of the series. Fire'' above.



* In {{Traveller}} one of the two main ''official'' powers the Imperial Moot (all the nobles in the Imperium who have the time to show up) has is to veto or confirm the Emperor's choice of succession and to dissolve the Imperium. The second power was given as a "mutual assured destruction" should one noble house become too overbearing. But the first makes the Third Imperium a sort of hereditary/elective monarchy. In practice the moot has a lot of other powers because they have the interests of eleven thousand planets to juggle and even TheEmperor's exalted status does not give him more than twenty four hours a day to go through all that paperwork.

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* In {{Traveller}} ''TabletopGame/{{Traveller}}'' one of the two main ''official'' powers the Imperial Moot (all the nobles in the Imperium who have the time to show up) has is to veto or confirm the Emperor's choice of succession and to dissolve the Imperium. The second power was given as a "mutual assured destruction" should one noble house become too overbearing. But the first makes the Third Imperium a sort of hereditary/elective monarchy. In practice the moot has a lot of other powers because they have the interests of eleven thousand planets to juggle and even TheEmperor's exalted status does not give him more than twenty four hours a day to go through all that paperwork.
16th May '16 6:05:53 PM Fireblood
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[[folder: Live Action TV]]
* ''Series/GameOfThrones'': The King-Beyond-The-Wall is apparently elected by the wildlings he gathers as followers. Ironborn kings are chosen by the kingsmoot, an assembly of ship captains and lords. There has been no formal kingsmoot in thousands of years by the time of the series.
[[/folder]]
16th May '16 1:50:48 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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16th May '16 1:50:39 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* In Fiona Patton's TalesOfTheBranionRealm, Gwyneth, an [[FantasyCounterpartCulture expy]] of Wales, is independent for part of the series, and the Princes of Gwyneth are elected. This ends when a grandson of the current Prince becomes monarch of nearby Branion-other books make it clear that Gwyneth was subsumed and its Prince is now the heir to the Branion throne. Since the series was written in chronological reverse, this [[DoomedByCanon foredooms]] one character's intent to keep Gwyneth independent.

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* In Fiona Patton's TalesOfTheBranionRealm, ''Literature/TalesOfTheBranionRealm'', Gwyneth, an [[FantasyCounterpartCulture expy]] of Wales, is independent for part of the series, and the Princes of Gwyneth are elected. This ends when a grandson of the current Prince becomes monarch of nearby Branion-other books make it clear that Gwyneth was subsumed and its Prince is now the heir to the Branion throne. Since the series was written in chronological reverse, this [[DoomedByCanon foredooms]] one character's intent to keep Gwyneth independent.
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