History Main / EjectionSeat

21st Feb '18 8:15:41 PM HeraldAlberich
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A SubTrope of AbandonShip; rather than just getting the heck out of (the) Dodge, the seat is helping you out (the door). See also EjectEjectEject.

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A SubTrope of AbandonShip; rather than just getting the heck out of (the) Dodge, the seat is helping you out (the door). When the pilot nears the ground, he may find himself hanging from a ParachuteInATree. See also EjectEjectEject.
29th Jan '18 7:43:29 PM nombretomado
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* An Australian beer ad had a yobbo tourist taking one of those "Fly a Russian Mig" tours.

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* An Australian beer ad had a yobbo tourist taking one of those "Fly a Russian Mig" [=MiG=]" tours.



* A rather obscure Sega Mega Drive game called ''MiG-29 Fighter Pilot'' has an Eject Function. Ejecting before your plane crashes lets you continue the mission as is, but not ejecting will boot you back to the first mission. Amusingly you cannot simply eject without any need or you will be disciplined. This is because you can actually eject at any time, even while your plane is ready for take off, that is to say, seconds after starting a mission.

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* A rather obscure Sega Mega Drive game called ''MiG-29 ''[=MiG=]-29 Fighter Pilot'' has an Eject Function. Ejecting before your plane crashes lets you continue the mission as is, but not ejecting will boot you back to the first mission. Amusingly you cannot simply eject without any need or you will be disciplined. This is because you can actually eject at any time, even while your plane is ready for take off, that is to say, seconds after starting a mission.
9th Jan '18 7:30:40 PM Xtifr
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* Averted in ''Literature/TheJenniferMorgue'' by Creator/CharlesStross, which goes into some detail as to why an ejection seat in a car is an insanely bad idea; when Bob Howard presses the eject button on his CoolCar, the ''entire car ejects'', which is only slightly less so. It's made clear that only time you should press the button is if ''not'' pressing it is ''definitely'' going to kill you. The explanation also deflates the idea of the "easy eject"; Bob describes how, due to the G-forces involved, the pilot is likely looking at weeks in traction ''at best''.

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* Averted Discussed in ''Literature/TheJenniferMorgue'' by Creator/CharlesStross, which goes into some detail as to why an ejection seat in a car is an insanely bad idea; when Bob Howard presses the eject button on his CoolCar, the ''entire car ejects'', which is only slightly less so. It's made clear that only time you should press the button is if ''not'' pressing it is ''definitely'' going to kill you. The explanation also deflates the idea of the "easy eject"; Bob describes how, due to the G-forces involved, the pilot is likely looking at weeks in traction ''at best''.
8th Jan '18 8:14:34 PM maxwellsilver
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It should be pointed out that shooting an airman after he or she's ejected is a war crime, though this is a relatively recent idea and wasn't in force until 1977.[[note]]This seems counterintuitive, especially since you could still shoot at paratroopers, or a tank crew abandoning their vehicle. The long and short of it was that the airmen are now considered ''hors de combat'', or "outside of the fight" (that is, no longer a combatant) -- somewhat justified, as pilots are rarely armed with anything more than a pistol for self-defense, and not trained to be a OneManArmy, at least not without their plane. Plus, if you shot at the enemy's downed airmen, ''they'' may start shooting at ''yours''..[[/note]]

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It should be pointed out that shooting an airman after he or she's ejected is a war crime, though this is a relatively recent idea and wasn't in force until 1977.[[note]]This seems counterintuitive, especially since you could still shoot at paratroopers, or a tank crew abandoning their vehicle. The long and short of it was that the airmen are now considered ''hors de combat'', or "outside of the fight" (that is, no longer a combatant) -- somewhat justified, as pilots are rarely armed with anything more than a pistol for self-defense, and not trained to be a OneManArmy, at least not without their plane. Plus, if you shot at the enemy's downed airmen, ''they'' may start shooting at ''yours''..''yours''...[[/note]]



* An [[INeedAFreakingDrink Australian beer ad]] had a yobbo tourist taking one of those "Fly a Russian Mig" tours.

to:

* An [[INeedAFreakingDrink Australian beer ad]] ad had a yobbo tourist taking one of those "Fly a Russian Mig" tours.



* The original ''Film/BehindEnemyLines'' film shows an ejection sequence in quite a bit of detail: once the handle is pulled, straps pull the pilot and [=RIO's=] legs tight against their seats (to avoid anything getting caught on anything), charges go off, igniting the rockets, and when their parachutes pop, the chairs themselves fall away, broadcasting a distress signal back to home base. The pilot is seriously injured from the ejection and the landing, and the RIO is suitably exhausted and has minor injuries himself., but they were flying at relatively slow speeds[[labelnote:*]]Despite trying to dodge a missile, they weren't flying very fast: they were trying to outmanuever it, and the aerial acrobatics required relatively low speed to limit G force[[/labelnote]].

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* The original ''Film/BehindEnemyLines'' film shows an ejection sequence in quite a bit of detail: once the handle is pulled, straps pull the pilot and [=RIO's=] legs tight against their seats (to avoid anything getting caught on anything), charges go off, igniting the rockets, and when their parachutes pop, the chairs themselves fall away, broadcasting a distress signal back to home base. The pilot is seriously injured from the ejection and the landing, and the RIO is suitably exhausted and has minor injuries himself., but himself, even though they were flying at relatively slow speeds[[labelnote:*]]Despite speeds[[note]]Despite trying to dodge a missile, they weren't flying very fast: they were trying to outmanuever outmaneuver it, and the aerial acrobatics required relatively low speed to limit G force[[/labelnote]].force[[/note]].
* In ''Film/DieHard2'', John [=McClane=] is cornered in the cockpit of a cargo plane by terrorists who start tossing in grenades (with absurdly long fuses). Acting quickly, he straps himself into the pilot's seat and activates the ejector seat. It should be noted cargo planes generally don't have ejector seats.



* The Lockheed P-38 Lightning, likewise, had a nasty habit of killing or permanently injuring anybody attempting to bail out of it. The plane basically had 2 fuselages, with a boomlike horizontal stabilizer stretching the entire width between them. Bailing out of the cockpit (located in the middle between the 2 fuselages) would likely slam you into the boom, whether you curled into a fetal position or not.
* The first generation of fighter jets such as the F-80 Shooting Star and F-84 Thunderjet made ejection seats indispensible. Pilots attempting to bail out now had a very significant chance of being unable to get out of the way before the plane would catch up with them. In fact, on faster airplanes, the slipstream, the layer of air traveling around the plane's body, could actually pull the pilot up against the plane once he left the cockpit (the same problem also applies to things like missiles or bombs, requiring a bit of engineering on how to get them to ''leave'' the plane once you dropped them).

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* The Lockheed P-38 Lightning, likewise, had a nasty habit of killing or permanently injuring anybody attempting to bail out of it. The plane basically had 2 fuselages, with a boomlike boom-like horizontal stabilizer stretching the entire width between them. Bailing out of the cockpit (located in the middle between the 2 fuselages) would likely slam you into the boom, whether you curled into a fetal position or not.
* The B-24 Liberator heavy bomber was virtually impossible to bail out. It had only one door, at the tail, and the catwalk was too narrow to even walk through while wearing a parachute, much less run while the plane is going down. It also had a tendency to break up on hitting water due to the design of the wing.
* The first generation of fighter jets such as the F-80 Shooting Star and F-84 Thunderjet made ejection seats indispensible.indispensable. Pilots attempting to bail out now had a very significant chance of being unable to get out of the way before the plane would catch up with them. In fact, on faster airplanes, the slipstream, the layer of air traveling around the plane's body, could actually pull the pilot up against the plane once he left the cockpit (the same problem also applies to things like missiles or bombs, requiring a bit of engineering on how to get them to ''leave'' the plane once you dropped them).
30th Dec '17 8:37:47 PM FordPrefect
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* In real life, 20% of aircraft ejections result in the pilot sustaining career-ending injuries, such as death. Also, 100% of aircraft ejections result in the pilot losing several inches of height, due to the sudden compression of being flung out of your plane at anywhere from 12 to 22 Gs (depending on what ejection seat your plane was equipped with). Most air forces impose a career limit on the number of ejections permissible (and that limit is usually one) before it's desk job city for you. Indeed pilots don't eject at the first hint of trouble, either. Considerable effort is first put into ''slowing the aircraft'' because at supersonic or just plain fast speeds the wind the pilot is slamming into could possibly rip the mask off of a pilot's face and ram air down his esophagus, [[{{Squick}} inflating his stomach like a balloon]], which makes simply impacting the ground sans parachute sound like a better option. Slowing down to a more reasonable speed to eject into is a good idea, if you can do it. A 200 mph wind is about the fastest nature throws at us. 600 mph is ''unnatural''. The conventional wisdom among pilots is to eject only if not ejecting ''will'' kill you.
* Note that in one extraordinary case, not only the pilot survived the ejection, but so did the aircraft, as it managed to land sans pilot, and sustained so little damage that it was returned to service. (See [[http://www.nationalmuseum.af.mil/factsheets/factsheet.asp?id=4085 here]] for more details). Even more [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cornfield_Bomber here]] Definitely a "Truth is stranger than fiction" moment.
* There were also downward firing ejection seats which were fitted due to fears of seats not being fast enough to clear the tailplane of some jets. Naturally this made low altitude ejections a bit of a hazard requiring the pilot to roll his aircraft before ejecting. And when these were replaced by improved seats which fired upwards, they forgot to tell the pilots leading to a few cases where the pilot would correctly roll the aircraft and eject straight into the ground.

to:

* In real life, 20% of aircraft ejections result in the pilot sustaining career-ending injuries, such as death.[[{{Understatement}} death]]. Also, 100% of aircraft ejections result in the pilot losing several inches of height, due to the sudden compression of being flung out of your plane at anywhere from 12 to 22 Gs (depending on what ejection seat your plane was equipped with). Most air forces impose a career limit on the number of ejections permissible (and that limit is usually one) before it's desk job city for you. Indeed pilots don't eject at the first hint of trouble, either. Considerable effort is first put into ''slowing the aircraft'' because at supersonic or just plain fast speeds the wind the pilot is slamming into could possibly rip the mask off of a pilot's face and ram air down his esophagus, [[{{Squick}} inflating his stomach like a balloon]], which makes simply impacting the ground sans parachute sound like a better option. Slowing down to a more reasonable speed to eject into is a good idea, if you can do it. A 200 mph wind is about the fastest nature throws at us. 600 mph is ''unnatural''. The conventional wisdom among pilots is to eject [[GodzillaThreshold only if if]] not ejecting ''will'' kill you.
* Note that in one extraordinary case, not only the pilot survived the ejection, but so did the aircraft, as it managed to land sans pilot, and sustained so little damage that it was returned to service. (See [[http://www.nationalmuseum.af.mil/factsheets/factsheet.asp?id=4085 here]] for more details). Even more [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cornfield_Bomber here]] here]]. Definitely a "Truth is stranger than fiction" moment.
* There were also downward firing ejection seats which were fitted due to fears of seats not being fast enough to clear the tailplane of some jets. Naturally this made low altitude ejections a bit of a hazard requiring the pilot to roll his aircraft before ejecting. And when these were replaced by improved seats which fired upwards, they forgot to tell the pilots pilots, leading to a few cases where the pilot would correctly roll the aircraft and eject straight into the ground.
5th Dec '17 12:05:29 PM Xtifr
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* Averted in ''[[Literature/TheLaundrySeries The Jennifer Morgue]]'' by Creator/CharlesStross, which goes into some detail as to why an ejection seat in a car is an insanely bad idea; when Bob Howard presses the eject button on his CoolCar, the ''entire car ejects'', which is only slightly less so. It's made clear that only time you should press the button is if ''not'' pressing it is ''definitely'' going to kill you. The explanation also deflates the idea of the "easy eject"; Bob describes how, due to the G-forces involved, the pilot is likely looking at weeks in traction ''at best''.

to:

* Averted in ''[[Literature/TheLaundrySeries The Jennifer Morgue]]'' ''Literature/TheJenniferMorgue'' by Creator/CharlesStross, which goes into some detail as to why an ejection seat in a car is an insanely bad idea; when Bob Howard presses the eject button on his CoolCar, the ''entire car ejects'', which is only slightly less so. It's made clear that only time you should press the button is if ''not'' pressing it is ''definitely'' going to kill you. The explanation also deflates the idea of the "easy eject"; Bob describes how, due to the G-forces involved, the pilot is likely looking at weeks in traction ''at best''.
28th Nov '17 2:10:18 PM RedScharlach
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* In ''Film/BigGame'', Oskari and Moore eject themselves from Air Force One cocpit to escape the explosion that's just about to blow submerged Air Force One to bits.

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* In ''Film/BigGame'', Oskari and Moore eject themselves from Air Force One cocpit cockpit to escape the explosion that's just about to blow submerged Air Force One to bits.



* In the ''WesternAnimation/DuckTales1987'' episode ''All Ducks on Deck'', Launchpad accidently pushes the ejector seat button in the invisible jet.

to:

* In the ''WesternAnimation/DuckTales1987'' episode ''All Ducks on Deck'', Launchpad accidently accidentally pushes the ejector seat button in the invisible jet.



** The Japanese had no such compunctions against such actions, however, and were known to regularly gun down Allied pilots in their chutes. In at least one case, an American fighter came across one such Japanese pilot and, after engaging him in a brief fight, sufficiently crippled the aircraft that the Japanese pilot tried to bail out, but as payback for the helpless aircrew gunned down in their chutes the American fired a warning shot into the wing as he started to climb out of his cockpit. The Japanese pilot got the message, climbed back into his seat, and rode the plane the rest of the way down.

to:

** The Japanese had no such compunctions against such actions, however, and were known to regularly gun down Allied pilots in their chutes. In at least one case, an American fighter came across one such a Japanese pilot and, after engaging him in a brief fight, sufficiently crippled the aircraft that the Japanese pilot tried to bail out, but as payback for the helpless aircrew gunned down in their chutes the American fired a warning shot into the wing as he started to climb out of his cockpit. The Japanese pilot got the message, climbed back into his seat, and rode the plane the rest of the way down.
30th Aug '17 1:03:24 PM MBG
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Added DiffLines:

** The OSI flashback scene features a parody of the above ''WesternAnimation/GIJoe'' example, where the ejecting pilot is shot seconds later.
16th Jul '17 10:29:33 PM HeroGal2347
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* In the ''WesternAnimation/DuckTales'' episode ''All Ducks on Deck'', Launchpad accidently pushes the ejector seat button in the invisible jet.

to:

* In the ''WesternAnimation/DuckTales'' ''WesternAnimation/DuckTales1987'' episode ''All Ducks on Deck'', Launchpad accidently pushes the ejector seat button in the invisible jet.
4th Jul '17 10:35:01 PM JackG
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Literature/TheWarAgainstTheChtorr''. 'Lizard' Tirelli has to eject after the engines on her helicopter gunship are clogged and explode in a dust storm. The rotors and tail are blown off and the fuselage drifts down to the ground on a parachute.
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