History Main / Egopolis

29th Aug '16 11:57:58 AM JulianLapostat
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* The Russian cities St. Petersburg (originally named by Peter The Great not for himself, but for the saint that was his namesake) was renamed Petrograd (during WWI because it sounded too German), aka Leningrad (five days after Lenin's death). After the end of UsefulNotes/ColdWar, it was renamed St. Petersburg again;[[note]]Famous [[RussianHumour Russian joke]] from Soviet times: An old Jew was at some state office, where a bureaucrat was asking him questions for some paperwork. The official asked him, "Where do you live?", to which he replied, "Leningrad." "Where were you born?" "St. Petersburg." "Where did you go to school?" "Petrograd." And then, menacingly, "Where would you like to live?" "St. Petersburg." Now even more HilariousInHindsight.[[/note]]. Then there's Stalingrad (now Volgograd, formerly Tsaritsyn). There's a move to rename it back to Stalingrad, not in honour of Stalin but in honour of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Stalingrad famous victory over Germany]], which coupled with the awful Siege of Leningrad has ensured that these renamings endured in global consciousness.

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* The Russian cities St. Petersburg (originally named by Peter The Great not for himself, but for the saint that was his namesake) was renamed Petrograd (during WWI because it sounded too German), aka then Leningrad (five days after Lenin's death).death to elevate Lenin as OurFounder). After the end of UsefulNotes/ColdWar, it was renamed St. Petersburg again;[[note]]Famous [[RussianHumour Russian joke]] from Soviet times: An old Jew was at some state office, where a bureaucrat was asking him questions for some paperwork. The official asked him, "Where do you live?", to which he replied, "Leningrad." "Where were you born?" "St. Petersburg." "Where did you go to school?" "Petrograd." And then, menacingly, "Where would you like to live?" "St. Petersburg." Now even more HilariousInHindsight.[[/note]]. Then there's Stalingrad (now Volgograd, formerly Tsaritsyn). There's a move to rename it back to Stalingrad, not in honour of Stalin but in honour of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Stalingrad famous victory over Germany]], which coupled with the awful Siege of Leningrad has ensured that these renamings endured in global consciousness.
29th Aug '16 11:56:40 AM JulianLapostat
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* The Russian cities St. Petersburg (originally named by Peter The Great not for himself, but for the saint that was his namesake), aka Petrograd (renamed during WWI because it sounded too German), aka Leningrad (after Lenin), aka St. Petersburg again;[[note]]Famous [[RussianHumour Russian joke]] from Soviet times: An old Jew was at some state office, where a bureaucrat was asking him questions for some paperwork. The official asked him, "Where do you live?", to which he replied, "Leningrad." "Where were you born?" "St. Petersburg." "Where did you go to school?" "Petrograd." And then, menacingly, "Where would you like to live?" "St. Petersburg." Now even more HilariousInHindsight.[[/note]] and Stalingrad (now Volgograd). There's a move to rename it back to Stalingrad, not in honour of Stalin but in honour of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Stalingrad famous victory over Germany]].

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* The Russian cities St. Petersburg (originally named by Peter The Great not for himself, but for the saint that was his namesake), aka namesake) was renamed Petrograd (renamed during (during WWI because it sounded too German), aka Leningrad (after Lenin), aka (five days after Lenin's death). After the end of UsefulNotes/ColdWar, it was renamed St. Petersburg again;[[note]]Famous [[RussianHumour Russian joke]] from Soviet times: An old Jew was at some state office, where a bureaucrat was asking him questions for some paperwork. The official asked him, "Where do you live?", to which he replied, "Leningrad." "Where were you born?" "St. Petersburg." "Where did you go to school?" "Petrograd." And then, menacingly, "Where would you like to live?" "St. Petersburg." Now even more HilariousInHindsight.[[/note]] and [[/note]]. Then there's Stalingrad (now Volgograd).Volgograd, formerly Tsaritsyn). There's a move to rename it back to Stalingrad, not in honour of Stalin but in honour of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Stalingrad famous victory over Germany]].Germany]], which coupled with the awful Siege of Leningrad has ensured that these renamings endured in global consciousness.



** Yekaterinburg was named for Empress Catherine I (Peter the Great's wife, not to be confused with Catherine the Great (II)) in 1723. It was renamed Sverdlovsk from 1924-1991, after Bolshevik leader Yakov Sverdlov--this renaming was posthumous, though, as Sverdlov died in 1919.

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** Yekaterinburg was named for Empress Catherine I (Peter the Great's wife, not to be confused with Catherine the Great (II)) in 1723. It was renamed Sverdlovsk from 1924-1991, after Bolshevik leader Yakov Sverdlov--this Sverdlov, who played a key role in ordering the execution of the Romanovs. This renaming was posthumous, though, as Sverdlov died in 1919. posthumous and definitely intended [[MonumentOfHumiliationAndDefeat to taunt the White Army]] and it was subsequently renamed back to Yekaterinaburg after the Cold War.
21st Aug '16 6:03:51 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''ComicBook/{{Family}}'': The city of Oddyseus is named after the superpowered crime family that runs it.
16th Aug '16 8:40:14 AM TimberRidge
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** In fact, a fair bit of English toponymy not so much in Wales, Ireland north or south, or Scotland is this. There are plenty of "place of So-and-So's People" names: both Gillinghams, Wokingham, Hastings, and the like, for Gylla and Gilla and Wocca and Haesta and their followers. There are a fair few place-names which incorporate an element of ''official,'' of ''ex officio,'' ownership or overlordship: Compton Abbas (the Abbot's or local Abbey's Compton), the obvious Bishop's Stortford, Earls Barton (owned by the Earl of Northampton and then by successive Earls of Huntingdon), Princes Risborough (held by the Black Prince), Tettenhall Regis (held by the Crown directly), Collingbourne Ducis (owned by John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster), and so on. And then there are those named directly for their lords: Compton '''Beauchamp,''' Huish '''Champflower''' (the Bishop's Huish was and is Huish Episcopi), Ewyas '''Lacy,''' Ewyas '''Harold''' (and, indirectly, Teffont ''Evias,'' two counties away, which shared a lord with the latter but took its suffix from the other estate's place-name and not the lord), Sutton '''Waldron,''' Sutton '''Valence,''' Sutton '''Courtenay,''' ''Wooton'' '''Courtenay'''.... Apparently, after ten or so centuries, the actual egotism ceases to operate in accordance with the trope.
11th Aug '16 9:45:27 AM TimberRidge
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* Traces of this remain in place-names in the ''Literature/VillageTales'' novels (reflecting RealLife topography in the UK). Cliff Ambries and Shifford ("Sheep Ford") Ombres are named for the mythic Ambrosius Aurelianus of the Arthurian cycle; Somerford Mally, Semelford Malet, and Chalford Mallet preserve the name of the baronial Malet family, a daughter of which bore James II a bastard son who became the first Duke of Taunton; Pebbury and Pebdown owe their names to a Saxon named Pebba, and Compton Clare was once owned by a lord of the House of Clare; Woolfont Abbas was shown on some ultra-Protestant maps post-Reformation as Woolfont "Ducis," Duke's Woolfont rather than the Abbot's....
7th Aug '16 6:42:37 PM Morgenthaler
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* Mentioned as one of the extremes of political power in JonStewart's ''AmericaTheBook''.

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* Mentioned as one of the extremes of political power in JonStewart's ''AmericaTheBook''.Creator/JonStewart's ''Literature/AmericaTheBook''.
25th Jul '16 3:13:55 PM mrincodi
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* Bolivia, because of UsefulNotes/SimonBolivar.

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* Bolivia, because of UsefulNotes/SimonBolivar.[[UsefulNotes/SimonBolivar Simón Bolívar]].
25th Jul '16 3:13:12 PM mrincodi
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** And Colombia, because of UsefulNotes/ChristopherColumbus.
23rd Jul '16 12:59:27 AM Beatlemania
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* Roman Emperor Commodus, the bad guy from ''Film/{{Gladiator}} was a serial offender. He renamed Rome, the months ('''every''' month[[note]]That doesn't mean he named every month "Commodus"; [[IHaveManyNames he had many names]][[/note]]), the legions, the Senate and even the Roman people after himself. Rome became Commodiana, the Names of the 12 Months was organized around his names and titles [[note]]Lucius, Aelius, Aurelius, Commodus, Augustus, Herculeus, Romanus, Exsuperatorius, Amazonius, Invictus, Felix, Pius[[/note]]. The legions were renamed Commodianae, Commodian Fortunate Senate, his palace and the Roman people themselves were all given the name Commodianus.

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* Roman Emperor Commodus, the bad guy from ''Film/{{Gladiator}} ''Film/{{Gladiator}}" was a serial offender. He renamed Rome, the months ('''every''' month[[note]]That doesn't mean he named every month "Commodus"; [[IHaveManyNames he had many names]][[/note]]), the legions, the Senate and even the Roman people after himself. Rome became Commodiana, the Names of the 12 Months was organized around his names and titles [[note]]Lucius, Aelius, Aurelius, Commodus, Augustus, Herculeus, Romanus, Exsuperatorius, Amazonius, Invictus, Felix, Pius[[/note]]. The legions were renamed Commodianae, Commodian Fortunate Senate, his palace and the Roman people themselves were all given the name Commodianus.


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* UsefulNotes/{{Seoul}} was almost going to be renamed to 'Unam' after a prominent scholar pointed out that since the name literally means 'capital city', it needs to be changed. The name in question, 'Unam', was an [[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Art_name art name]] or pseudonym of the first president of UsefulNotes/{{South Korea}}, [[https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syngman_Rhee Syngman Rhee]] who was a liberator turned dictator. His cronies thought it was a great idea, but the scholar who proposed a name change and the opposition in the assembly fought hard to oppose the name change, until the dictator himself thought that it was a bit too much.
13th Jul '16 7:35:43 PM PrussianInk
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** Pictured above is the capital of Borduria, Szohôd, is not an example, despite the SigilSpam and [[MalevolentMugshot Malevolent Mugshots]] all over the city of its leader Marshal Plekzy-Gladz (Kurvi-Tasch in the English version).

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** Pictured above is the capital of Borduria, Szohôd, which is not an example, despite the SigilSpam and [[MalevolentMugshot Malevolent Mugshots]] all over the city of its leader Marshal Plekzy-Gladz (Kurvi-Tasch in the English version).
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