History Main / EgoPolis

18th Mar '17 10:59:23 PM dmcreif
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** As the name would suggest, Neo Bowser City in ''VideoGame/MarioKart 7'' is one.

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** As the name would suggest, Neo Bowser City in ''VideoGame/MarioKart 7'' ''VideoGame/MarioKart7'' is one.
3rd Mar '17 7:18:48 PM Xtifr
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* Non-country example: Roman emperors Creator/GaiusJuliusCaesar and UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}} got their names added to the ''Julian'' Calendar as months (July and August), replacing the previous names (Quintilis and Sextilis respectively).[[note]]Contrary to popular belief, they did ''not'' add new months, thereby "explaining" why September, October, November, and December seem to say "seventh month, eighth month, ninth month, tenth month" when they are months 9, 10, 11, and 12; rather, the Romans changed their New Year from 1 March to 1 January sometime around the beginning of the second century BCE--about 100-150 years before Caesar. The beginning of the civil year--when the term of the consul began--was made 1 January no later than 153 BCE; many historians argue this appears to reflect a previous change in the reckoning of New Year's festivities for social and religious purposes at least a generation earlier, but other historians point to other evidence that the festival and social New Year was moved to 1 January ''after'' the consular New Year did. As for why the consuls took office in January, there are two theories: (1) It was considered auspicious because the month was named after Janus, the god of transitions and beginnings, or (2) It gave the consuls, whose main job was leading armies in war, two or three months to get used to their new positions before campaign season began in the spring. Some records indicate that the Romans did at some point have a ten-month calendar, and that January and February were added to the ''end'' of the year to get it to line up better, but all of ''those'' records claim that was the work of the semi-legendary second King of Rome Numa Pompilius in the seventh century BCE.[[/note]] Subsequent Roman emperors tried to do the same, renaming other months after themselves (and sometimes after previous emperors as well), but no other changes lasted beyond their deaths.

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* Non-country example: Roman emperors Creator/GaiusJuliusCaesar UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar and UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}} got their names added to the ''Julian'' Calendar as months (July and August), replacing the previous names (Quintilis and Sextilis respectively).[[note]]Contrary to popular belief, they did ''not'' add new months, thereby "explaining" why September, October, November, and December seem to say "seventh month, eighth month, ninth month, tenth month" when they are months 9, 10, 11, and 12; rather, the Romans changed their New Year from 1 March to 1 January sometime around the beginning of the second century BCE--about 100-150 years before Caesar. The beginning of the civil year--when the term of the consul began--was made 1 January no later than 153 BCE; many historians argue this appears to reflect a previous change in the reckoning of New Year's festivities for social and religious purposes at least a generation earlier, but other historians point to other evidence that the festival and social New Year was moved to 1 January ''after'' the consular New Year did. As for why the consuls took office in January, there are two theories: (1) It was considered auspicious because the month was named after Janus, the god of transitions and beginnings, or (2) It gave the consuls, whose main job was leading armies in war, two or three months to get used to their new positions before campaign season began in the spring. Some records indicate that the Romans did at some point have a ten-month calendar, and that January and February were added to the ''end'' of the year to get it to line up better, but all of ''those'' records claim that was the work of the semi-legendary second King of Rome Numa Pompilius in the seventh century BCE.[[/note]] Subsequent Roman emperors tried to do the same, renaming other months after themselves (and sometimes after previous emperors as well), but no other changes lasted beyond their deaths.
2nd Mar '17 8:05:41 AM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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[[folder:Mythology and Religion]]
* In some mythologies, the underworld is named after its ruler. For example, Hel in Myth/NorseMythology (which is where the word "{{hell}}" itself comes from) and Hades in Myth/ClassicalMythology.
[[/folder]]
17th Feb '17 6:37:21 PM mrincodi
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* Metapa, in Nicaragua, was renamed to Ciudad Darío, in honor of the great poet Rubén Darío, where he was born.

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* Metapa, in Nicaragua, was renamed to Ciudad Darío, Darío (Darío City), in honor of the great poet Rubén Darío, where he who was born.born there.
17th Feb '17 6:36:13 PM mrincodi
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* Metapa, in Nicaragua, was renamed to Ciudad Darío, in honor of the great poet Rubén Darío.

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* Metapa, in Nicaragua, was renamed to Ciudad Darío, in honor of the great poet Rubén Darío.Darío, where he was born.
17th Feb '17 6:35:27 PM mrincodi
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* Metapa, in Nicaragua, was renamed to Ciudad Darío, in honor of the great poet Rubén Darío.
13th Feb '17 1:49:00 PM ZimFan89
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* Issue 12 of the ''WesternAnimation/InvaderZim'' comics show that after [[BadFuture Zim takes over the world]], he puts up statues and pictures of himself everywhere, renames every street after himself, and lives in a palace designed to look like his own head.
8th Feb '17 5:12:56 PM mirisu92
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* Not necessarily a city example, but politicians in the Philippines are disproportionately fond of affixing their names (or failing that, their initials) to public works projects. It is very common to see street flyers or posters announcing things like "Road Renovation c/o Mayor X" or "This bridge is a project of Congressman Y"—often including the grinning faces of the politicians in question. It gets bad enough that several members of Congress are considering filing a bill to rename EDSA, Manila's main highway, after the late president Cory Aquino.
** In fact just such a fate befell the Manila International Airport—it was named ''Ninoy Aquino International Airport'' after Cory Aquino was installed in power in the 1980s. (In its defence, the man for whom it was named—Cory's husband—was shot dead at the airport itself.)

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* Not necessarily a city example, but politicians in the Philippines are disproportionately fond of affixing their names (or failing that, their initials) to public works projects. It is very common to see street flyers or posters announcing things like "Road Renovation c/o Mayor X" or "This bridge is a project of Congressman Y"—often including the grinning faces of the politicians in question. It gets bad enough that at one point in the early 2010s, several members of Congress are considering filing attempted to file a bill to rename EDSA, Manila's main highway, after the late president Cory Aquino.
Aquino, the central figure of popular anti-dictatorship protests that occurred on the said highway.
** In fact just such a fate befell the Manila International Airport—it was named ''Ninoy Aquino International Airport'' after Cory Aquino was installed in power in the 1980s. (In its defence, the man for whom it was named—Cory's husband—was shot dead at the airport itself.itself, and today an increasing number of people are clamouring for the original name, not the least because of the deteriorating reputation that put the airport frequently in "worst airport in the world" lists, including collapsing ceilings, overcrowding, terminal fees, general decay, and, in the mid-2010s, a scandal involving ''planting bullets in passengers' bags as a form of extortion''.)
15th Jan '17 4:33:48 AM EDP
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* {{Subverted}} with the Italian city of Alessandria (that is Italian for "Alexandria"): born of the union of the towns of Gamondio, Marengo (yes, ''[[NapoleonicWars that]]'' Marengo) and Bergoglio, it was named after then-reigning Pope Alexander III (Alessandro III in Italian) to [[IShallTauntYou remind the Holy Roman Emperor Friedrich Barbarossa that the cities of Northern Italy were effectively independent]], honor the guy who was weakening Barbarossa enough for them to ''stay'' independent in the face of Imperial military superiority, and because, Italians being Italians, aknowledging the union was effectively Bergoglio absorbing the two smaller towns would have broken the union (and Gamondio later returned its own town anyway). It was later briefly renamed Cesarea (after "Cesare", Italian for "Caesar" and another way to say "emperor") as a token act of subservience to the Holy Roman Empire after the Italians had won their effective independence, but the renaming didn't stick.
9th Jan '17 10:37:30 AM drwhom
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* In Argentina, the provinces of El Chaco and La Pampa were for a time renamed Presidente Juan Perón and Eva Perón.
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