History Main / EarlyBirdBoss

17th Aug '16 11:12:08 PM AnotherDuck
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** ''VideoGame/BioShock2'' averts this a bit by giving you Trap Rivets for the Rivet Gun—which function like weaker versions of the previous game's Trap Bolts—at the beginning of the level where you first encounter enemy Big Daddies.
* ''VideoGame/SkiesOfArcadia'' uses this trope in the ship battle against [[LadyOfWar Admiral Belleza.]] There are only two ship fights (both of them easy as hell and meant for figuring out the system) up to this point, along with little ship weapons and armor available to buy; this fight is tough because beforehand, there is a required HopelessBossFight against [[HumongousMecha Recumen]] that can leave your items and healing magic depleted and your health dwindled. As if those weren't enough, Belleza's ship has high health, is evasive, and can cast attack magic, which the player cannot do at that point in the game.

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** * ''VideoGame/BioShock2'' averts this a bit by giving you Trap Rivets for the Rivet Gun—which function like weaker versions of the previous game's Trap Bolts—at the beginning of the level where you first encounter enemy Big Daddies.
* ''VideoGame/SkiesOfArcadia'' uses this trope in the ''VideoGame/SkiesOfArcadia''
** The
ship battle against [[LadyOfWar Admiral Belleza.]] There are only two ship fights (both of them easy as hell and meant for figuring out the system) up to this point, along with little ship weapons and armor available to buy; this fight is tough because beforehand, there is a required HopelessBossFight against [[HumongousMecha Recumen]] that can leave your items and healing magic depleted and your health dwindled. As if those weren't enough, Belleza's ship has high health, is evasive, and can cast attack magic, which the player cannot do at that point in the game.



* The Shadow Yukiko battle in ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}'' qualifies in a few ways. Decent Persona at this point require a good amount of metaknowledge (that is, GuideDangIt or previous experience with SMT games) to gain. You cannot [[LevelGrinding level up efficiently]] because you can't heal SP outside of rare items and Arcana Chance events without wasting a day (a finite resource in the entire game) at this point in the game. You have no real healer yet unless you know what you're doing and get the MC a Persona able to do it[[note]]A player who knows what they are doing can get a Slime, keep it active so it levels up and learns both Resist Physical and Red Wall, then fuse it into an Archangel or Senri (latter preferred due to negating Fire) and level that up a few times for Media (mass heal spell). In other words, knowing exactly what you are doing from the very start of the game proper.[[/note]]. Unfortunately, doing this also relegates your most potent damage dealer to pure support. Also, she turns into [[VisualPun a bird]], making this a literal example of an [[JustForPun early]] '''''[[JustForPun bird]]''''' [[JustForPun boss]].
** Another good example of this trope, also from ''Persona 4'', is the optional boss for Yukiko's Castle, the Contrarian King. If you, as many players do, attempt this boss directly after beating the dungeon for the first time, the combination of your relatively low party level, his high HP, and, most importantly, his usage of the ([[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard heavily overpowered]]) Rampage physical attack (hits whole party, three times, for a ton of damage) will generally lead to you being [[TotalPartyKill hideously maimed]]. On the other hand, if you come back after completing the next dungeon, he's a good deal more manageable, though you're still basically fighting the RandomNumberGod and hoping he doesn't Rampage twice.
*** Pretty much any BonusBoss that shows up at the end of a dungeon qualifies as this if you don't wait to clear the dungeon afterward before taking on that boss.

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* The Shadow Yukiko battle in ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}'' 4}}'':
** The Shadow Yukiko battle
qualifies in a few ways. Decent Persona at this point require a good amount of metaknowledge (that is, GuideDangIt or previous experience with SMT games) to gain. You cannot [[LevelGrinding level up efficiently]] because you can't heal SP outside of rare items and Arcana Chance events without wasting a day (a finite resource in the entire game) at this point in the game. You have no real healer yet unless you know what you're doing and get the MC a Persona able to do it[[note]]A player who knows what they are doing can get a Slime, keep it active so it levels up and learns both Resist Physical and Red Wall, then fuse it into an Archangel or Senri (latter preferred due to negating Fire) and level that up a few times for Media (mass heal spell). In other words, knowing exactly what you are doing from the very start of the game proper.[[/note]]. Unfortunately, doing this also relegates your most potent damage dealer to pure support. Also, she turns into [[VisualPun a bird]], making this a literal example of an [[JustForPun early]] '''''[[JustForPun bird]]''''' [[JustForPun boss]].
** Another good example of this trope, also from ''Persona 4'', trope is the optional boss for Yukiko's Castle, the Contrarian King. If you, as many players do, attempt this boss directly after beating the dungeon for the first time, the combination of your relatively low party level, his high HP, and, most importantly, his usage of the ([[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard heavily overpowered]]) Rampage physical attack (hits whole party, three times, for a ton of damage) will generally lead to you being [[TotalPartyKill hideously maimed]]. On the other hand, if you come back after completing the next dungeon, he's a good deal more manageable, though you're still basically fighting the RandomNumberGod and hoping he doesn't Rampage twice.
*** Pretty much any BonusBoss that shows up at the end of a dungeon qualifies as this if you don't wait to clear the dungeon afterward before taking on that boss.
twice.



* In the initial versions of ''VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue'', Brock can turn into this, especially for players who pick Charmander as their starter, as you have very few options as far as your Pokémon go (your starter and ComMons for the most part), and even fewer able to exploit his weakness. Yellow and Fire Red/Leaf Green both fix this with new additions, such as Mankey, to be found earlier in the game.

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* ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'':
**
In the initial versions of ''VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue'', Brock can turn into this, especially for players who pick Charmander as their starter, as you have very few options as far as your Pokémon go (your starter and ComMons for the most part), and even fewer able to exploit his weakness. Yellow and Fire Red/Leaf Green both fix this with new additions, such as Mankey, to be found earlier in the game.



*** And he's still that way in the Gen IV remakes, particularly if you start with Chikorita, which is weak to Flying-types. Then he hauls out his Pidgeotto with constant use of Roost to heal half of his current health points, which makes things even harder. It definitely pays to get the aforementioned Geodude or Onix.

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*** ** And he's still that way in the Gen IV remakes, particularly if you start with Chikorita, which is weak to Flying-types. Then he hauls out his Pidgeotto with constant use of Roost to heal half of his current health points, which makes things even harder. It definitely pays to get the aforementioned Geodude or Onix.



** ''VideoGame/ChildrenOfMana'' is a cakewalk with only two parts that are remotely challenging, but those can be very tough. Which ones? The last boss and... the first.

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** * ''VideoGame/ChildrenOfMana'' is a cakewalk with only two parts that are remotely challenging, but those can be very tough. Which ones? The last boss and... the first.



** The first fight with [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII Leon]] in ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts'' comes right before Sora gets the [[UnnecessaryCombatRoll Dodge Roll]] ability that lets the player evade most physical attacks with proper timing. Naturally, most of Leon's arsenal would be ''much'' easier to avoid by rolling than by running around.
*** Depending on your weapon choices at the beginning of the game, the player is most likely not going to have Guard (and Counterattack) at their disposal unless they grinded something fierce back on Destiny Islands. Thus, the player will need to [[FearfulSymmetry rely on well-timed attacks to parry/redirect Leon's]] (a skill that helped during the sparring matches on the Islands), all the while employing hit-and-run tactics to prevent themselves from being on the receiving end of his Gunblade: Leon isn't particularly aggressive and [[TheSlowWalk moves around with the urgency of a sloth]], but when he connects, you ''will'' feel it.

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** The first fight with [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII Leon]] in ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts'' comes right before Sora gets the [[UnnecessaryCombatRoll Dodge Roll]] ability that lets the player evade most physical attacks with proper timing. Naturally, most of Leon's arsenal would be ''much'' easier to avoid by rolling than by running around.
***
around. Depending on your weapon choices at the beginning of the game, the player is most likely not going to have Guard (and Counterattack) at their disposal unless they grinded something fierce back on Destiny Islands. Thus, the player will need to [[FearfulSymmetry rely on well-timed attacks to parry/redirect Leon's]] (a skill that helped during the sparring matches on the Islands), all the while employing hit-and-run tactics to prevent themselves from being on the receiving end of his Gunblade: Leon isn't particularly aggressive and [[TheSlowWalk moves around with the urgency of a sloth]], but when he connects, you ''will'' feel it.



*** However, if you take even a small amount of time fighting mooks and grinding the job level of the starting job, they become very manageable. And considering job levels are grinded by the amount of battle moves used, you can simply sit in a fight against a weak single enemy and just keep guarding it's attacks over and over to bump up that job level quick.



** More generally, the final opponent of any low-level D&D module will be this trope, due to the fact that most classes will not have much in the way of advanced equipment or class abilities.



** Its UpdatedRerelease ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaLegacyOfDarkness Legacy of Darkness]]'' is even more guilty. The first boss is a hydra which has attacks that are very difficult to avoid, even if you know what to do. The next few bosses are a lot easier.

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** Its UpdatedRerelease ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaLegacyOfDarkness Legacy of Darkness]]'' is even more guilty. The * In ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaLegacyOfDarkness'' the first boss is a hydra which has attacks that are very difficult to avoid, even if you know what to do. The next few bosses are a lot easier.



* ''VideoGame/SuperMetroid'' starts with some empty corridors, followed by a boss battle against Ridley using a portion of his standard attack patterns. You don't have any beams, energy tanks, or even your trusty Morph Ball at this point. While defeating him isn't necessary, trying to dodge his attacks is good practice, [[ThatOneBoss which you'll really need when you go up against him again]].

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* ''VideoGame/SuperMetroid'' starts with some empty corridors, followed by a boss battle against Ridley using a portion of his standard attack patterns. You don't have any beams, energy tanks, or even your trusty Morph Ball at this point. While defeating him isn't necessary, trying to dodge his attacks is good practice, [[ThatOneBoss which you'll really need when you go up against him again]].''Franchise/{{Metroid}}'':



** Made even worse by that fight being preceded with a long elevator ride and then an unskippable cutscene, which you have to replay every time you fail to kill the Krogan Battlemaster.



* ''VideoGame/HalfLife2'': the Hunter-Chopper is a somewhat easier fight than a Gunship by the numbers, but your encounter with it limits you to only the airboat gun to kill it, and the airboat is tough to maneuver and offers no cover.

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* ''VideoGame/HalfLife2'': the ''VideoGame/HalfLife2'':
** The
Hunter-Chopper is a somewhat easier fight than a Gunship by the numbers, but your encounter with it limits you to only the airboat gun to kill it, and the airboat is tough to maneuver and offers no cover.



** The Butcher in the first ''Diablo'' counts as this. Early level players ''will'' get, well, butchered the first time they fight the dude, although fortunately you don't actually have to kill him the first moment you see [[BossRoom his lair]] and you can wait until you're [[LevelGrinding some levels higher]]. He can even be [[HopelessBossFight literally impossible]] for some characters when they first meet him, as he regenerates health too fast to kill.

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** The Butcher in the first ''Diablo'' counts as this. Early level players ''will'' get, well, butchered the first time they fight the dude, although fortunately you don't actually have to kill him the first moment you see [[BossRoom his lair]] and you can wait until you're [[LevelGrinding some levels higher]]. He can even be [[HopelessBossFight literally impossible]] impossible for some characters when they first meet him, as he regenerates health too fast to kill.



*** Speaking of the first two dungeons, The Cave in the Cold Plains (not Blood Moor once the Den Of Evil is done) contains a Super Unique archer pack that's Cold Enchanted. Archers generally cause a lot of grief because of their ranged capabilities, but this monster pack multiplies the damage of an already damage-enhanced monster through the use of minions. The Cold Enchanted property further acts as some sort of a force multiplier by allowing all in the pack to deal additional cold damage AND slow their target's movements. This combination makes for an encounter that makes Blood Raven seem like a cakewalk.
*** The super unique monster is called Coldcrow. [[TakingYouWithMe Upon death]], she flips you the finger like all Cold Enchanted monsters do, by casting a frost nova that's VERY damaging to characters who haven't been investing significantly in their vitality attribute. Woe to the one who doesn't replenish their HP right before they deal her the death blow.



* ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 2}}'' opens with a series of headaches: in order to prove yourself worthy of searching for the GECK, not only do you have to make it through a very tough dungeon, filled with enemies that can poison you with a very limited amount of healing items at your disposal, but then you have to defeat a local tough guy at the end. Make it past that? Well congratulations, now you get to go fight geckos... which are no pushovers either.
** However, a pacifist can talk their way into being given the key for the door without a fight, though starting as a pacifist out of the gate makes the ''rest'' of the opening this...

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* ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 2}}'' 2}}'':
** The game
opens with a series of headaches: in order to prove yourself worthy of searching for the GECK, not only do you have to make it through a very tough dungeon, filled with enemies that can poison you with a very limited amount of healing items at your disposal, but then you have to defeat a local tough guy at the end. Make it past that? Well congratulations, now you get to go fight geckos... which are no pushovers either.
**
either. However, a pacifist can talk their way into being given the key for the door without a fight, though starting as a pacifist out of the gate makes the ''rest'' of the opening this...



* Fighting Skelter Helter in ''VideoGame/NoMoreHeroes2DesperateStruggle'' is literally the first thing you do after the opening cutscene. Hell, the game even tries to ''teach you the controls'' mid-fight. Fortunately, if you've played the first game already and have a good handle on the controls, he shouldn't be too hard...[[ThatOneBoss unless you're fighting on Bitter Mode.]]
** The game still goes through the tutorial, even on Bitter, though. This can actually mess players up...

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* Fighting Skelter Helter in ''VideoGame/NoMoreHeroes2DesperateStruggle'' is literally the first thing you do after the opening cutscene. Hell, the game even tries to ''teach you the controls'' mid-fight. Fortunately, if you've played the first game already and have a good handle on the controls, he shouldn't be too hard...[[ThatOneBoss unless you're fighting on Bitter Mode.]]
**
]] The game still goes through the tutorial, even on Bitter, though. This can actually mess players up...



** Defeating a boss often nets you a bonus item or completes a secondary objective for unlocking a secret. This would be easy except that they also tend to flee when their health gets low. Early in the game, most pilots lack the Valor/Hot Blood spirit, which doubles the next hit's damage, so this ends up being quite tricky.
9th Aug '16 1:21:23 PM REV6Pilot
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* [[RecurringBoss Nemesis]], TheHeavy of ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil3''. [[LightningBruiser He's the toughest son of a bitch in the whole game relative to speed and attack power]]. He takes 30 handgun shots per half of each tussle, and he can down Jill to orange health in three strikes. The first time you get to face him, you have at best 70 pistol bullets, 12 shotgun shells, a first aid spray and three herbs total, and that makes him one of the top 3 toughest boss fights ''in the entire '''series'''''. As early as the second encounter, when you have access to a lot more supplies plus the GrenadeLauncher or the [[{{BFG}} Magnum]], he's a great deal more manageable. Sure, you can run from him and avoid most of the pain, but aside from him dropping some ''outrageously'' good items, where's the fun in that?
17th Jul '16 1:09:54 PM MrUnderhill
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* Unless you choose Chill Penguin's stage for your first area in ''VideoGame/MegaManX1'', you'll have to fight at least one boss without the dash ability. Not a pleasant experience.

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* Unless you choose Chill Penguin's stage for your first area in ''VideoGame/MegaManX1'', you'll have to fight at least one boss without the dash ability. Not a pleasant experience.experience, especially if that boss happens to be [[BlowYouAway Storm Eagle]], who has a wind gust attack that can blow you off the stage to your death if you can't dash through it.
9th Jul '16 2:28:00 PM babyhenchy1
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* ''VideoGame/SuperMetroid'' starts with some empty corridors, followed by a boss battle against Ridley using a portion of his standard attack patterns. You don't have any beams, energy tanks, or even your trusty Morph Ball at this point. While defeating him isn't necessary, trying to dodge his attacks is good practice.

to:

* ''VideoGame/SuperMetroid'' starts with some empty corridors, followed by a boss battle against Ridley using a portion of his standard attack patterns. You don't have any beams, energy tanks, or even your trusty Morph Ball at this point. While defeating him isn't necessary, trying to dodge his attacks is good practice.practice, [[ThatOneBoss which you'll really need when you go up against him again]].
12th Jun '16 2:34:18 PM MegaMarioMan
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* In ''VideoGame//{{Fallout 4]}'', the first boss fight of the game is against a Deathclaw. You'll have access to a suit of power armour and a minigun by this point, but the armour is damaged and of poor quality, and the minigun is simply not up to the task of killing it, requiring a minute or so of sustained ScratchDamage to bring it down. Most Deathclaws are in the southern part of the map, and by the time you get down there you should have vastly superior gear and perks needed to take them on properly.

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* In ''VideoGame//{{Fallout 4]}'', ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 4}}'', the first boss fight of the game is against a Deathclaw. You'll have access to a suit of power armour and a minigun by this point, but the armour is damaged and of poor quality, and the minigun is simply not up to the task of killing it, requiring a minute or so of sustained ScratchDamage to bring it down. Most Deathclaws are in the southern part of the map, and by the time you get down there you should have vastly superior gear and perks needed to take them on properly.



* ''Videogame/DonkeyKong64'' has Army Dillo the first boss. Sure, he's not exactly difficult but given that you only have one melon of health, and this is your first boss battle of any kind (there are no mini-bosses you face beforehand, you need Lanky to fight the level's only mini-boss), this battle can definitely feel like this. He's much easier in the world 6 rematch despite learning new movies because you have three melons and can take 12 hits instead of 4.

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* ''Videogame/DonkeyKong64'' has Army Dillo the first boss. Sure, he's not exactly difficult but given that you only have one melon of health, and this is your first boss battle of any kind (there are no mini-bosses you face beforehand, you need Lanky to fight the level's only mini-boss), this battle can definitely feel like this. He's much easier in the world 6 rematch despite learning new movies moves because you have three melons and can take 12 hits instead of 4.
1st Jun '16 8:19:22 PM MattDruzian
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** Dreamy Mario is this [[TheSmaeButMore even more so]], you have no real opportunities to level grind so you'll at most be fighting him at a single level higher than when you faced Smouldergeist. However, unlike the first boss which has simple, easy to dodge patterns so you can get used to the controls, Dreamy Mario doesn't hold back. He has seven times the HP that Smouldergeist had and hits harder, he created a bunch of clones of himself, and you have to hit the real one. Hit a clone and it'll fly up and launch at you with a meteorite attack that is fairly difficult to dodge. You also have to only jump on the real one when they ZergRush you, and avoid them entirely during the GetBackHereBoss segment since they're invincible (while not getting confused by the purple cloud created to obscure vision). And just like in the previous boss battle, you have no weapons except the basic jump attack. He also serves as a WakeUpCallBoss, letting you know you're in for a NintendoHard world of hurt if you don't master the gameplay. This battle would be made much easier with a Luiginary attack where you could hit both the clones and the original at the same time, as well as deal tremendous damage, but all you have to rely on are jumps.

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** Dreamy Mario is this [[TheSmaeButMore [[TheSameButMore even more so]], you have no real opportunities to level grind so you'll at most be fighting him at a single level higher than when you faced Smouldergeist. However, unlike the first boss which has simple, easy to dodge patterns so you can get used to the controls, Dreamy Mario doesn't hold back. He has seven times the HP that Smouldergeist had and hits harder, he created a bunch of clones of himself, and you have to hit the real one. Hit a clone and it'll fly up and launch at you with a meteorite attack that is fairly difficult to dodge. You also have to only jump on the real one when they ZergRush you, and avoid them entirely during the GetBackHereBoss segment since they're invincible (while not getting confused by the purple cloud created to obscure vision). And just like in the previous boss battle, you have no weapons except the basic jump attack. He also serves as a WakeUpCallBoss, letting you know you're in for a NintendoHard world of hurt if you don't master the gameplay. This battle would be made much easier with a Luiginary attack where you could hit both the clones and the original at the same time, as well as deal tremendous damage, but all you have to rely on are jumps.
21st May '16 9:21:37 PM nombretomado
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* ''VideoGame/NinjaGaiden Sigma'' on PS3 has Doku in chapter 2, who is also a HopelessBossFight. Apart from the fact he wields the [[ArtifactOfDoom Black]] [[{{BFS}} Dragon Sword]], he is more or less the same boss you fight ten chapters later, except you have only a level 1 Dragon Sword and a ''very small'' lifebar at this point, making him extremely difficult (though not impossible) to beat.

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* ''VideoGame/NinjaGaiden Sigma'' on PS3 [=PS3=] has Doku in chapter 2, who is also a HopelessBossFight. Apart from the fact he wields the [[ArtifactOfDoom Black]] [[{{BFS}} Dragon Sword]], he is more or less the same boss you fight ten chapters later, except you have only a level 1 Dragon Sword and a ''very small'' lifebar at this point, making him extremely difficult (though not impossible) to beat.
2nd May '16 4:30:12 PM supergod
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* Tarnesh in ''VideoGame/BaldursGate'' is a level 5 mage you fight at a point in the game where you, barring SequenceBreaking, are still level 1 and therefore guaranteed to die to his third spell (a triple magic missile), have never fought a mage before, and have at most four party members with their starting equipment. You meet more higher-level mages with scarier spells scant hours later, but beating Tarnesh at that stage of development is more or less a LuckBasedMission: If he gets to this third spell (which he will always aim at the main character), you're dead.

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* Tarnesh in ''VideoGame/BaldursGate'' is a level 5 mage you fight at a point in the game where you, barring SequenceBreaking, if sticking closely to the main questline, are likely still level 1 and therefore almost guaranteed to die to his third spell (a triple magic missile), have never fought a mage before, and have at most four party members with their starting equipment. You meet more higher-level mages with scarier spells scant hours later, but beating Tarnesh at that stage of development is more or less a LuckBasedMission: If he gets to this third spell (which he will always aim at the main character), you're dead.
2nd May '16 4:02:43 PM supergod
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* In the ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' module ''Keep on the Shadowfell'', Irontooth definitely falls into this category. The fight here is the first experience players have with "waves" of monsters, as to get to Irontooth you need to fight a whole encounter's worth of monsters to get into the lair, and then another whole encounter's worth once there. Parties who know how to marshal their tactics and conserve their resources find this a tough but beatable encounter. Those who just rushed into the lair without taking a short rest or who blow all their abilities before Irontooth shows up 3 rounds in will take a brutal beating, and this is where the majority of [[TotalPartyKill TPKs]] for new parties happen in this module.

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* In ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons''
**
In the ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' module ''Keep on the Shadowfell'', Irontooth definitely falls into this category. The fight here is the first experience players have with "waves" of monsters, as to get to Irontooth you need to fight a whole encounter's worth of monsters to get into the lair, and then another whole encounter's worth once there. Parties who know how to marshal their tactics and conserve their resources find this a tough but beatable encounter. Those who just rushed into the lair without taking a short rest or who blow all their abilities before Irontooth shows up 3 rounds in will take a brutal beating, and this is where the majority of [[TotalPartyKill TPKs]] for new parties happen in this module.
** More generally, the final opponent of any low-level D&D module will be this trope, due to the fact that most classes will not have much in the way of advanced equipment or class abilities.



* Infamously, ''house cats'' in ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' 3.5. They are small with high dexterity, thus hard to hit, particularly with a base to hit bonus of one or zero. They pack a decent hide modifier, improved further by the mentioned size and dexterity, meaning they attack first. The high dex then gets them the initiative after the first round when the bastards sneak up on you and you can't attack (so they have 2 free rounds on you). Unless you get max HP at first level, you have little HP and cats (thanks to the rules for natural attacks) get 3 attacks a round, each dealing ScratchDamage (no pun intended) of at least 1 point in a game where commoners with 3 HP at level 1 are lucky and wizards, rogues, and other non-fighter types have barely more than that at level 1.
** House cats aside, generally the final opponent of any low-level D&D module will be this trope, due to the fact that most classes will not have much in the way of advanced equipment or class abilities.
** House cats are fine for killing off commoners (they have a slight edge on them), but the effect on [=PCs=] is greatly exaggerated. During a surprise round they can only attack once, and their to-hit is, while not bad by any means, in no way guaranteed to hit even a commoner, let alone a PC (even one in basic gear). The only player character they pose a significant threat to is a level 1 wizard (or other very squishy class) with a negative con and dex modifier; even then, if the cat doesn't hit every attack (only about a 30% chance at best), the wizard can still kill it in one hit. It would take incredibly bad luck to die to a housecat at level 1 as any reasonable PC.
27th Apr '16 10:07:06 AM thatmadork
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* In ''VideoGame//{{Fallout 4]}'', the first boss fight of the game is against a Deathclaw. You'll have access to a suit of power armour and a minigun by this point, but the armour is damaged and of poor quality, and the minigun is simply not up to the task of killing it, requiring a minute or so of sustained ScratchDamage to bring it down. Most Deathclaws are in the southern part of the map, and by the time you get down there you should have vastly superior gear and perks needed to take them on properly.
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