History Main / DynamicDifficulty

19th Apr '16 10:28:22 AM case
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** ''Series/PressYourLuck'' would switch to easier-than-usual questions if not enough spins were being earned. For the audience at home, there was a tell for when this happened; the light bulb on the host's podium would blink to prompt him.
19th Apr '16 8:48:25 AM case
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Other human players won't adjust themselves, which sometimes results in a MultiplayerDifficultySpike, though this is sometimes lessened by matchmaking that groups together players of the same skill level.

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Other human players won't adjust themselves, which sometimes results in a MultiplayerDifficultySpike, though this is sometimes can be lessened by with matchmaking that groups together players of the same skill level.
level together.
19th Apr '16 8:46:50 AM case
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A certain measure of Dynamic Difficulty is considered good design practice in tabletop (particularly board) games, as major principles of design are "Don't make a player think they're definitely going to lose" and "Don't make a player ''wish'' they'd lose ''as long as it happens right now and this stupid game is finally over''". As it is very easy to create an UnstableEquilibrium where gathering ressources leads to being able to gather more ressources later on, many games consciously employ a headwind effect that subtly slows down the leading player by having them auto-targeted by certain attacks or by awarding benefits according to reverse placement.

This is very similar to RubberBandAI. Can cause problems such as EmptyLevels. The opposite of UnstableEquilibrium, where the game gets harder if the player is doing badly. Not to be confused with SchizophrenicDifficulty, where the difficulty goes up and down at random, regardless of the player's performance.

When this trope is played in a multiplayer mode, it's MultiplayerDifficultySpike.

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A certain measure of Dynamic Difficulty is considered good design practice in tabletop (particularly board) games, as major principles of design are "Don't make a player think they're definitely going to lose" and "Don't make a player ''wish'' they'd lose ''as long as it happens right now and this stupid game is finally over''". As it is very easy to create an UnstableEquilibrium where gathering ressources leads to being able to gather more ressources resources later on, many games consciously employ a headwind effect that subtly slows down the leading player by having them auto-targeted by certain attacks or by awarding benefits according to reverse placement.

This is very similar to RubberBandAI. Can cause problems such as EmptyLevels. The opposite of UnstableEquilibrium, where the game gets harder if the player is doing badly. Not to be confused with SchizophrenicDifficulty, where the difficulty goes up and down at random, unpredictably, regardless of the player's performance.

When Other human players won't adjust themselves, which sometimes results in a MultiplayerDifficultySpike, though this trope is played in a multiplayer mode, it's MultiplayerDifficultySpike.
sometimes lessened by matchmaking that groups together players of the same skill level.
5th Apr '16 10:30:01 AM RisefromYourGrave
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* This shows up in ''VideoGame/ForzaMotorsport 4'''s World Tour. The AI starts ridiculous easy, but the more events you win, the harder they become.

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* This shows up in ''VideoGame/ForzaMotorsport 4'''s ''[[VideoGame/{{Forza}} Forza Motorsport 4]]''[='=]s World Tour. The AI starts ridiculous easy, but the more events you win, the harder they become.



* Apart from the notorious RubberbandAI, MarioKart implements certain headwind effects by designing power-ups to be more useful when you're in the back - shells are more powerful than banana peels, but shells only work against opponents in front of you while peels are only useful against those in the back.

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* Apart from the notorious RubberbandAI, MarioKart ''VideoGame/MarioKart'' implements certain headwind effects by designing power-ups to be more useful when you're in the back - shells are more powerful than banana peels, but shells only work against opponents in front of you while peels are only useful against those in the back.
17th Mar '16 1:07:16 PM GunarmDyne
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* ''VideoGame/EiyuuSenkiTheWorldConquest'' rewards the player for conquering regions outside of the game's recommended order with unique and useful accessories while also raising the strength of the remaining regions as a result.
27th Dec '15 12:31:44 PM Cifer
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to:

* Apart from the notorious RubberbandAI, MarioKart implements certain headwind effects by designing power-ups to be more useful when you're in the back - shells are more powerful than banana peels, but shells only work against opponents in front of you while peels are only useful against those in the back.
27th Dec '15 12:26:09 PM Cifer
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Added DiffLines:

A certain measure of Dynamic Difficulty is considered good design practice in tabletop (particularly board) games, as major principles of design are "Don't make a player think they're definitely going to lose" and "Don't make a player ''wish'' they'd lose ''as long as it happens right now and this stupid game is finally over''". As it is very easy to create an UnstableEquilibrium where gathering ressources leads to being able to gather more ressources later on, many games consciously employ a headwind effect that subtly slows down the leading player by having them auto-targeted by certain attacks or by awarding benefits according to reverse placement.
2nd Dec '15 5:05:20 AM DarkHunter
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* ''VideoGame/TheBindingOfIsaac'' does a variation on this. While playing through the game more and more times unlocks more items to use, it also inevitably unlocks more bosses to have to fight (including stronger versions of previous bosses) and more levels to have to clear, making the game harder and longer the more you play it and beat it. One achievement even blatantly makes the game harder (increasing the likelihood of [[EliteMook champion enemies]] and curses,) and beating [[spoiler: Isaac in the Cathedral]] for the first time increases the likelihood of a curse even further.

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* ''VideoGame/TheBindingOfIsaac'' ''VideoGame/TheBindingOfIsaac'':
** The game
does a variation on this. While playing through the game more and more times unlocks more items to use, it also inevitably unlocks more bosses to have to fight (including stronger versions of previous bosses) and more levels to have to clear, making the game harder and longer the more you play it and beat it. One achievement even blatantly makes the game harder (increasing the likelihood of [[EliteMook champion enemies]] and curses,) and beating [[spoiler: Isaac in the Cathedral]] for the first time increases the likelihood of a curse even further.
** The two new bosses added in the ''Afterbirth'' DLC to ''Rebirth'' are designed to counter players who increase their damage so high that even bosses fall in seconds to the onslaught. That is to say, each of them gauges a player's attack power and scales their health to match it. At least one of them even has a hard cap on how much damage the player can do to it. This ensures that no matter how powerful you made yourself in a given run, these bosses will take you some time to defeat.
30th Aug '15 12:37:44 AM RisefromYourGrave
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* This shows up in ''[[VideoGame/ForzaMotorsport Forza Motorsport 4]]'''s World Tour. The AI starts ridiculous easy, but the more events you win, the harder they become.
* The ''[[VideoGame/NeedForSpeed Need for Speed Underground]]'' series utilizes dynamic difficulty in two ways: first, the more you tune your car, the faster the other cars will be; second, the "Catch Up" feature causes competing cars to go faster as you pass them, and slower as they pass you. In theory, the latter makes the game more balanced; in practice, it's nothing but FakeDifficulty. With regards to the former, one of the recommended strategies if you're having difficulty is to remove all your upgrades, as the lower speed makes it much easier for you to react to obstacles and avoid mistakes. It's like playing in slow-mo.
* ''[[VideoGame/GranTurismo Gran Turismo 4]]'' uses "[[BraggingRightsReward A-Spec Points]]" to encourage you to choose slower, less powerful cars to win the race: the more powerful your car is, the smaller your score will be. If, for example, you manage to win against a squad of sleek German machines with a puny little Pontiac Sunfire, you'll win 200 points; but if you win the race with the superpowered Polyphony Formula Gran Turismo, you'll win 1 single point. However, A-Spec points aren't a reliable method of judging difficulty, as the game seems to mainly base the point levels on your car's specs relative to the AI, and it's possible to get easy 200 point races in vehicles such as the Suzuki GSX-R/4, which much less powerful than most supercars but is good handling and very light.

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* This shows up in ''[[VideoGame/ForzaMotorsport Forza Motorsport 4]]'''s ''VideoGame/ForzaMotorsport 4'''s World Tour. The AI starts ridiculous easy, but the more events you win, the harder they become.
* The ''[[VideoGame/NeedForSpeed Need for Speed ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeed: [[VideoGame/NeedForSpeedUnderground Underground]]'' series utilizes dynamic difficulty in two ways: first, the more you tune your car, the faster the other cars will be; second, the "Catch Up" feature causes competing cars to go faster as you pass them, and slower as they pass you. In theory, the latter makes the game more balanced; in practice, it's nothing but FakeDifficulty. With regards to the former, one of the recommended strategies if you're having difficulty is to remove all your upgrades, as the lower speed makes it much easier for you to react to obstacles and avoid mistakes. It's like playing in slow-mo.
* ''[[VideoGame/GranTurismo Gran Turismo 4]]'' ''VideoGame/GranTurismo 4'' uses "[[BraggingRightsReward A-Spec Points]]" to encourage you to choose slower, less powerful cars to win the race: the more powerful your car is, the smaller your score will be. If, for example, you manage to win against a squad of sleek German machines with a puny little Pontiac Sunfire, you'll win 200 points; but if you win the race with the superpowered Polyphony Formula Gran Turismo, you'll win 1 single point. However, A-Spec points aren't a reliable method of judging difficulty, as the game seems to mainly base the point levels on your car's specs relative to the AI, and it's possible to get easy 200 point races in vehicles such as the Suzuki GSX-R/4, which much less powerful than most supercars but is good handling and very light.
20th Aug '15 2:57:19 AM Nirual
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* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIV'' has many FATE events spawn more and more enemies the more players participate in them, making it easier for everyone to contribute enough, but not overwhelming smaller groups of players. FATES and dungeons also have sort of a reverse version of this in the form of Level-Synch, which temporarily lowers the players level to the intended level range.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.DynamicDifficulty