History Main / DynamicDifficulty

18th Jun '16 4:08:21 PM TheKaizerreich
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** That said, later games in the series tried to balance themselves a bit better than the original ''SNES'' title. This includes small changes such as being able to shoot the aforementioned shells backwards or catapulting banana peels forward, among other things.
15th Jun '16 12:20:22 PM eliaskelham
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* ''VideoGame/MaxPayne'' claimed to do this. The effect was pretty noticeable on the console versions, but the PC version seemed to be permanently stuck on "as hard as possible". Bear in mind, it had this ''in addition'' to three difficulty modes.

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* ''VideoGame/MaxPayne'' claimed to do this. The effect was pretty noticeable on the console versions, but the PC version seemed to be permanently stuck on "as hard as possible". Bear in mind, it had this ''in addition'' to three difficulty modes.
16th May '16 6:34:08 PM Yalsaris63
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* ''VideoGame/{{Raiden}}'', ''VideoGame/RaidenFighters'' and ''VideoGame/FireShark'' have the tank/gunboat enemies. If you do well enough (survive long enough, amass loads of points, get lots of powerups/bombs), the tanks/gunboats that initially have poor reaction time as well as {{Painfully Slow Projectile}}s start shooting you with faster and more accurate shots ''as soon as they come onscreen''. If you're doing well enough, you'll start meeting up with [[FanNickname so-called]] "[[ImprobableAimingSkills Sniper]] [[DemonicSpiders Tanks]]".

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* ''VideoGame/{{Raiden}}'', ''VideoGame/RaidenFighters'' and ''VideoGame/FireShark'' have are notorious for this, frustrating would-be 1cc players in the form of the tank/gunboat enemies. If you do well enough (survive long enough, amass loads of points, get lots of powerups/bombs), the tanks/gunboats that initially have poor reaction time as well as {{Painfully Slow Projectile}}s start shooting you with faster and more accurate shots ''as soon as they come onscreen''. If you're doing well enough, you'll start meeting up with [[FanNickname so-called]] "[[ImprobableAimingSkills Sniper]] [[DemonicSpiders Tanks]]".
19th Apr '16 10:28:22 AM case
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Added DiffLines:

** ''Series/PressYourLuck'' would switch to easier-than-usual questions if not enough spins were being earned. For the audience at home, there was a tell for when this happened; the light bulb on the host's podium would blink to prompt him.
19th Apr '16 8:48:25 AM case
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Other human players won't adjust themselves, which sometimes results in a MultiplayerDifficultySpike, though this is sometimes lessened by matchmaking that groups together players of the same skill level.

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Other human players won't adjust themselves, which sometimes results in a MultiplayerDifficultySpike, though this is sometimes can be lessened by with matchmaking that groups together players of the same skill level.
level together.
19th Apr '16 8:46:50 AM case
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A certain measure of Dynamic Difficulty is considered good design practice in tabletop (particularly board) games, as major principles of design are "Don't make a player think they're definitely going to lose" and "Don't make a player ''wish'' they'd lose ''as long as it happens right now and this stupid game is finally over''". As it is very easy to create an UnstableEquilibrium where gathering ressources leads to being able to gather more ressources later on, many games consciously employ a headwind effect that subtly slows down the leading player by having them auto-targeted by certain attacks or by awarding benefits according to reverse placement.

This is very similar to RubberBandAI. Can cause problems such as EmptyLevels. The opposite of UnstableEquilibrium, where the game gets harder if the player is doing badly. Not to be confused with SchizophrenicDifficulty, where the difficulty goes up and down at random, regardless of the player's performance.

When this trope is played in a multiplayer mode, it's MultiplayerDifficultySpike.

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A certain measure of Dynamic Difficulty is considered good design practice in tabletop (particularly board) games, as major principles of design are "Don't make a player think they're definitely going to lose" and "Don't make a player ''wish'' they'd lose ''as long as it happens right now and this stupid game is finally over''". As it is very easy to create an UnstableEquilibrium where gathering ressources leads to being able to gather more ressources resources later on, many games consciously employ a headwind effect that subtly slows down the leading player by having them auto-targeted by certain attacks or by awarding benefits according to reverse placement.

This is very similar to RubberBandAI. Can cause problems such as EmptyLevels. The opposite of UnstableEquilibrium, where the game gets harder if the player is doing badly. Not to be confused with SchizophrenicDifficulty, where the difficulty goes up and down at random, unpredictably, regardless of the player's performance.

When Other human players won't adjust themselves, which sometimes results in a MultiplayerDifficultySpike, though this trope is played in a multiplayer mode, it's MultiplayerDifficultySpike.
sometimes lessened by matchmaking that groups together players of the same skill level.
5th Apr '16 10:30:01 AM RisefromYourGrave
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* This shows up in ''VideoGame/ForzaMotorsport 4'''s World Tour. The AI starts ridiculous easy, but the more events you win, the harder they become.

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* This shows up in ''VideoGame/ForzaMotorsport 4'''s ''[[VideoGame/{{Forza}} Forza Motorsport 4]]''[='=]s World Tour. The AI starts ridiculous easy, but the more events you win, the harder they become.



* Apart from the notorious RubberbandAI, MarioKart implements certain headwind effects by designing power-ups to be more useful when you're in the back - shells are more powerful than banana peels, but shells only work against opponents in front of you while peels are only useful against those in the back.

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* Apart from the notorious RubberbandAI, MarioKart ''VideoGame/MarioKart'' implements certain headwind effects by designing power-ups to be more useful when you're in the back - shells are more powerful than banana peels, but shells only work against opponents in front of you while peels are only useful against those in the back.
17th Mar '16 1:07:16 PM GunarmDyne
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* ''VideoGame/EiyuuSenkiTheWorldConquest'' rewards the player for conquering regions outside of the game's recommended order with unique and useful accessories while also raising the strength of the remaining regions as a result.
27th Dec '15 12:31:44 PM Cifer
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* Apart from the notorious RubberbandAI, MarioKart implements certain headwind effects by designing power-ups to be more useful when you're in the back - shells are more powerful than banana peels, but shells only work against opponents in front of you while peels are only useful against those in the back.
27th Dec '15 12:26:09 PM Cifer
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Added DiffLines:

A certain measure of Dynamic Difficulty is considered good design practice in tabletop (particularly board) games, as major principles of design are "Don't make a player think they're definitely going to lose" and "Don't make a player ''wish'' they'd lose ''as long as it happens right now and this stupid game is finally over''". As it is very easy to create an UnstableEquilibrium where gathering ressources leads to being able to gather more ressources later on, many games consciously employ a headwind effect that subtly slows down the leading player by having them auto-targeted by certain attacks or by awarding benefits according to reverse placement.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.DynamicDifficulty