History Main / DuelingDubs

19th Apr '18 9:23:43 AM MarioandSmurfs
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* ''WesternAnimation/BobTheBuilder'' is broadcast in America with a different American voice cast for each of the three eras instead of the original British cast for the whole show.

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* ''WesternAnimation/BobTheBuilder'' is broadcast in America with a different American voice cast for each era of the three eras instead show, as opposed to the original British version which used the same cast throughout most of the show. The original British cast for was eventually replaced beginning with the whole show.2015 reboot series.
19th Apr '18 9:02:46 AM MarioandSmurfs
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* ''WesternAnimation/TheMagicRoundabout'' movie got re-dubbed in North America as ''Doogal'' which, not coincidentally, also stripped out a lot of the British humour of the original dub. The American version is [[IncrediblyLamePun roundly]] hated.

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* The 2005 CGI film adaptation of ''WesternAnimation/TheMagicRoundabout'' movie got was re-dubbed and edited in North America as ''Doogal'' which, not coincidentally, also stripped out a lot of the British humour of the original dub. The American version is [[IncrediblyLamePun roundly]] hated.
19th Apr '18 8:43:24 AM MarioandSmurfs
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* The British version of the French cartoon ''WesternAnimation/TheMagicRoundabout'' has received three different narrations: the original BBC dub by Eric Thompson, the second by Nigel Planer, and the third by Jimmy Hibbert. The second dub by Nigel Planer was made for Channel 4 in 1991 to cover 52 additional episodes, which have not yet received an English translation. Reruns of the show on Creator/CartoonNetwork and Creator/Boomerang randomly switched between the two re-dubs, although a majority of episodes during this run included Planer's narration.
** The show also received an American dub, renamed "The Magic Carousel", which was featured in ''Series/Pinwheel'' on Creator/Nickelodeon. It was a more faithful word-to-word adaptation of the original French dub, with the characters having their own voices (as opposed to the British version which featured a narrator voicing all of the characters), and at least two characters (Dylan and Mr. Rusty) keeping their original French names (Flappy and Mr. McHenry respectively). Aside from that, most of the characters retain their names from the British version.

to:

* The British version of the French cartoon ''WesternAnimation/TheMagicRoundabout'' has received three different narrations: the original BBC dub by Eric Thompson, the second by Nigel Planer, and the third by Jimmy Hibbert. The second dub by Nigel Planer was made for Channel 4 in 1991 to cover 52 additional episodes, which have not yet received an English translation. Reruns of the show on Creator/CartoonNetwork and Creator/Boomerang Creator/{{Boomerang}} randomly switched between the two re-dubs, although a majority of episodes during this run included Planer's narration.
** The show also received an American dub, renamed "The Magic Carousel", which was featured in ''Series/Pinwheel'' ''Series/{{Pinwheel}}'' on Creator/Nickelodeon.Creator/{{Nickelodeon}}. It was a more faithful word-to-word adaptation of the original French dub, with the characters having their own voices (as opposed to the British version which featured a narrator voicing all of the characters), and at least two characters (Dylan and Mr. Rusty) keeping their original French names (Flappy and Mr. McHenry [=McHenry=] respectively). Aside from that, most of the characters retain their names from the British version.
19th Apr '18 8:35:29 AM MarioandSmurfs
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Added DiffLines:

* The British version of the French cartoon ''WesternAnimation/TheMagicRoundabout'' has received three different narrations: the original BBC dub by Eric Thompson, the second by Nigel Planer, and the third by Jimmy Hibbert. The second dub by Nigel Planer was made for Channel 4 in 1991 to cover 52 additional episodes, which have not yet received an English translation. Reruns of the show on Creator/CartoonNetwork and Creator/Boomerang randomly switched between the two re-dubs, although a majority of episodes during this run included Planer's narration.
** The show also received an American dub, renamed "The Magic Carousel", which was featured in ''Series/Pinwheel'' on Creator/Nickelodeon. It was a more faithful word-to-word adaptation of the original French dub, with the characters having their own voices (as opposed to the British version which featured a narrator voicing all of the characters), and at least two characters (Dylan and Mr. Rusty) keeping their original French names (Flappy and Mr. McHenry respectively). Aside from that, most of the characters retain their names from the British version.
17th Apr '18 9:49:27 PM Kelothan
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** The ''Digimon'' series has its Saban (season 1-3, 6), Disney (season 4) and Studiopolis (season 5) versions as well as Filipino and Singapore dubs.

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** The ''Digimon'' series has its Saban (season 1-3, 6), Disney 1-3)/Disney (season 4) and Studiopolis (season 5) versions version as well as Filipino and Singapore dubs.



* ''Anime/MobileSuitGundam'' was dubbed dubbed in Italian twice. The first one aired on television in the 80s and was changed quite a bit from the original Japanese version. For example, Ray Amuro was renamed Peter Ray and Char was called Scia. The second dub was by d/visual and released on DVD. This dub was more faithful to the Japanese version.

to:

* ''Anime/MobileSuitGundam'' was dubbed dubbed in Italian twice. The first one aired on television in the 80s and was changed quite a bit from the original Japanese version. For example, Ray Amuro Ray was renamed Peter Ray and Char was called Scia. The second dub was by d/visual and released on DVD. This dub was more faithful to the Japanese version.


Added DiffLines:

* ''Anime/SaintSeiya'': The Hades Saga [=OVA=]s have two Latin Spanish dubs, one produce d by Toei's Latin American division for television, and one produced by Tower Entertainment for [=DVD=] release. The tv dub generally used newer actors, while the [=DVD=] dub go t as much of the original cast as they could.
17th Apr '18 6:46:54 PM AreYouTyler
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* In Latin America, some productions have multiple dubs because of different distributors. These dubs may be made in different ''countries'' (most often Mexico, but sometimes the USA, Venezuela, Argentina, Chile or Colombia). One wiki has a category [[http://es.doblaje.wikia.com/wiki/Categoría:Doblajes_simultáneos describing the Dueling Dubs trope]], as well as another category for [[http://es.doblaje.wikia.com/wiki/Categoría:Redoblajes redubs]].
* In Brazilian Portuguese, some TV shows and movies have separate dubs made by different distributors. Most of these dubs are produced in different cities (usually Sao Paulo or Rio de Janeiro). Most older productions have at least two dubs because the original audio no longer exists in most cases.



* Most movies made after 1994 have two French dubs: one for Canada, and another for Europe. However, most TV shows have a single French dub (most of times it would be made in Europe - either in France or Belgium, though most of recent Canadian shows have a single French dub done in Canada instead).

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* Most movies made after films since 1994 have two French dubs: one for Canada, and another for Europe. However, most TV shows have a single French dub (most of times it would be (usually made in Europe - either in France or Belgium, though Belgium). However, most of recent Canadian shows have a single French dub done in Canada instead).instead (Canadian broadcasters must air a certain amount of Canadian-certified programming).
* Whenever a movie (animated or live action) is released in Japan, each broadcaster produces its own dub of said movie. Some Japanese dubs may be released direct to video or theatrically. Older movies tend to have more existing dubs.
** Similarly, in South Korea, the three main broadcasters (KBS, MBC, and SBS) own their respective dubs, which may not air on a competitor's channel.
* Since Chinese is a language with many dialects, most productions have dubs made in Taiwan, China (Mandarin) and/or Hong Kong (Cantonese).



** A Italian redub of the first 10 seasons is in the works since 2009, when the ChannelHop of the series happened for Season 11. The first 3 seasons aired in 2014, and many inconsistencies in the old dub were fixed (Kanto towns kept their English names during Seasons 1-2 and various attacks were translated differently than the games up until halfway Season 7 - except Thunderbolt which was corrected only in Season 11), they gave consistent [=VAs=] to the characters (Not counting various [[TheOtherDarrin voice changes]] like Brock, Gary and Meowth, in the older dub every Officer Jenny/Nurse Joy had a different voice while now every Jenny has the same voice as the others, same for Joy), replaced the Italian openings with translated versions of the English ones and gave completely new voice actors to Misty and Giovanni (who now has ''six'' different Italian voices as a result). But on the other hand, this dub has some issues (like Cubone being called "Orphon", the name it had ''in the Beta translation of Red/Blue'', for some reason).
** It also has two Hindi dubs. The first and more well known dub produced by Creator/CrestAnimationProductions[[note]]First four seasons only.[[/note]] and Sound & Vision India for Cartoon Network and another one produced in-house by UTV Software Communications for Hungama TV. Some Indian fans were not happy that when the re-runs of the older episodes came, the voices have changed, much to their surprise. Also, Nachiket Dighe, who dubbed Tracey Sketchit, Chili and Reggie in the 2003 dub, returned in the 2014 dub as Ash Ketchum.

to:

** A Italian redub of the first 10 seasons is entered production in the works since 2009, when the ChannelHop of the series happened for Season 11. The first 3 seasons aired in 2014, and many inconsistencies in the old dub were fixed (Kanto towns kept their English names during Seasons 1-2 and various attacks were translated differently than the games up until halfway Season 7 - except Thunderbolt which was corrected only in Season 11), they gave consistent [=VAs=] to the characters (Not counting various [[TheOtherDarrin voice changes]] like Brock, Gary and Meowth, in the older dub every Officer Jenny/Nurse Joy had a different voice while now every Jenny has the same voice as the others, same for Joy), replaced the Italian openings with translated versions of the English ones and gave completely new voice actors to Misty and Giovanni (who now has ''six'' different Italian voices as a result). But on the other hand, this dub has some issues (like Cubone being called "Orphon", the name it had ''in the Beta translation of Red/Blue'', for some reason).
reason). Bizarrely, while Alessandra Karpoff (Misty) was replaced by Benedetta Ponticelli in the redub, Karpoff returned for her cameo in ''Sun & Moon''.
** It also has two Hindi dubs. The first and more well known best-known dub produced by Creator/CrestAnimationProductions[[note]]First four seasons only.[[/note]] Creator/CrestAnimationProductions and later Sound & Vision India for Cartoon Network Network, and another one produced in-house by UTV Software Communications for Hungama TV. Some Indian fans were not happy that when the re-runs of the older episodes came, the voices have changed, much to their surprise. Also, Nachiket Dighe, who dubbed Tracey Sketchit, Chili and Reggie in the 2003 dub, returned in the 2014 dub as Ash Ketchum.



** There are four Japanese dubs: one in 1958, the second 1983, and the third in 1986. The "fourth" dub from 1995 is the same as the second dub from 1983; only Pinocchio's voice is changed.

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** There are four three Japanese dubs: one in 1958, the second in 1983, and the third in 1986. The "fourth" dub from 1995 is the same as the second dub from 1983; only was revised in 1995, replacing Pinocchio's voice is changed.actor.



** There are also two French dubs; one in 1946 and one in 1975. The 1975 version received partial re-dubs in 1995 (to revert the original French name of Jiminy "Grillon" ("Cricket" in French) to Jiminy Cricket as the original) and 2003.

to:

** There are also two French dubs; one in 1946 and one in 1975. The 1975 version received partial re-dubs revisions in 1995 (to revert the original French name of Jiminy "Grillon" ("Cricket" in French) to Jiminy Cricket as the original) and 2003.



** The 1947 Italian version of the film was given a partial re-dub in 1963 to the song "When You Wish Upon a Star" due to the previous version being in low quality. Subsequent releases, since 1993, retain the original 1947 version, therefore making ''Pinocchio'' the oldest Disney film to not be re-dubbed in Italian.

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** The 1947 Italian version of the film was given a partial re-dub redub in 1963 to the song "When You Wish Upon a Star" due to the previous version being in low quality. Subsequent releases, since 1993, retain the original 1947 version, therefore making ''Pinocchio'' the oldest Disney film to not be re-dubbed in Italian.



** It was given two French dubs as well; once in 1947 and again in 1980. Canadian VHS releases used the original 1947 dub until 2001, while European VHS releases began using the re-dub beginning in 1991.

to:

** It was given two French dubs as well; once in 1947 and again in 1980. Canadian VHS releases used the original 1947 dub until 2001, while European VHS releases began using the re-dub redub beginning in 1991.



** It also received two Hindi dubs; the first one was made produced by Main Frame Software Communications for Disney Channel India and the other for another channel by Sound & Vision India. The latter dub was included on home video.

to:

** It also received two Hindi dubs; the first one was made produced by Main Frame Software Communications for Disney Channel India and the other for another channel and home video by Sound & Vision India. The latter dub was included on home video.India.



** It also received a Swedish re-dub in 1989. Interestingly, Olof Thunberg participated in both dubs as Trusty.

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** It also received a Swedish re-dub redub in 1989. Interestingly, Olof Thunberg participated in both dubs as Trusty.



** There are two Brazilian Portuguese dubs; the first was done in 1968, while the second was done for its 2014 Blu-Ray release. Ednaldo Lucena (Bagheera), Alexandre Moreno (Kaa) and José Santanna (Shere Khan) reprised their roles from the 2003 sequel in the redub. Also, all of the songs have been oddly [[AutoTune autotuned]] in the redub.

to:

** There are two Brazilian Portuguese dubs; the first was done in 1968, while the second was done for its 2014 Blu-Ray release. Ednaldo Lucena (Bagheera), Alexandre Moreno (Kaa) Bagheera, Kaa and José Santanna (Shere Khan) Shere Khan's voice actors reprised their roles from the 2003 sequel in the redub. Also, all of the songs have been oddly [[AutoTune autotuned]] in the redub.



** The Japanese version had the title character replaced in 2008 because his original voice actor was arrested in 2007 for fraud and extortion.

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** The Japanese version had the title character replaced was re-recorded by Creator/ShinichiroMiki in 2008 2004, because his Aladdin's original voice actor (Kenji Haga) was arrested in 2007 for and convicted of fraud and extortion.



* Brazilian dubs are egregious regarding to this trope. Most films have two or even three dubs often made in different states by different studios with completely different casts. ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'' for example has three different dubs: the first one made in São Paulo which was used for the theatrical release and home video, a second dub made in Rio de Janeiro that was used for airplane flights (yeah, really) and a third one also made in Rio for TV broadcast. Animations are not safe from this either, ''ComicStrip/{{Peanuts}}'' has no less than 7 different dubs [[http://www.interney.net/blogs/melhoresdomundo/2008/05/29/title_1189/]].
** [[http://dublanet.com.br/forum1/showthread.php?15775-Alguns-recordes-na-dublagem According to this forum]], ''Film/FromDuskTillDawn'' and ''Film/KingKong1976'' have had '''five''' dubs each.
** ''Film/{{Confidence}}'' has four dubs made by the following studios: Lipsync (DVD/cable), Audiocorp (unknown medium), Cinevideo (airing on Record and Band), and Wood Video (Telecine).
** ''Film/ShesAllThat'' has four dubs: Studio Gabia (DVD and TV), Dublamix (another TV dub), Bravo Estudios (Telecine), and Sigma (Netflix/Sony Channel).
** ''Film/{{Spawn}}'' has four dubs in Brazilian Portuguese made at the following studios: Clone (VHS/DVD), Marshmallow (TNT), Wan Macher (SBT/Blu-Ray), and a later Wan Macher dub (Paramount Channel/HBO). Maralise Tartarine dubbed over Melinda Clarke in Clone and Marshmallow's versions; while both of Wan Macher's casts have many of the same voice actors.
* It's not uncommon for films to have multiple dubs in Latin American Spanish either, especially with independent movie studios. Some dubs are exclusive for the United States because the film rights are divided between regions. A Spanish dubbing wiki has a category completely [[http://es.doblaje.wikia.com/wiki/Categoría:Doblajes_simultáneos describing the Dueling Dubs trope]], as well as another category for [[http://es.doblaje.wikia.com/wiki/Categoría:Redoblajes redubs]].
** ''Film/AmericanPsycho'' has four dubs: one in Mexico City, one in Venezuela, one in Argentina, and one in Cuernavaca, Mexico.
** ''Film/CloudAtlas'' has four dubs: two in Mexico, one in Venezuela, and another in Argentina.
** ''Film/AlphaDog'' has three dubs: one in Mexico, one in Argentina, and another in Chile. The Mexican dub has aired on several TV channels.
** ''Film/EternalSunshineOfTheSpotlessMind'' has three Mexican Spanish dubs: one for Universal's DVD release, another for TV airings and Netflix, and a third for another medium.
** ''Film/{{Monster}}'' has three Latin Spanish dubs: one in Mexico, one in Venezuela, and another in Miami.
** ''Film/JohnWick'' has three Latin Spanish dubs: one in Chile, one in Argentina, and one in Mexico. The Mexican cast returned for the sequel.
** ''Film/AustinPowersInternationalManOfMystery'' has four Latin Spanish dubs: two in Mexico, and two in Argentina.
* This happens with almost every Japanese dub of a live action English-speaking movie, since they usually have two different dubs- one for TV broadcast and one for home media releases (since different companies handle each release). This gets even more complicated when a new edition DVD/Blu-ray release may add yet another dub for the movie, and when a different TV station also gains rights to air the movie. Generally, the older and more famous movie is, the more dubs it'll have.
** ''Film/BramStokersDracula'' has been dubbed in Japanese three times. One for the VHS release which was carried over to the initial DVD release. Then, TV Asahi broadcasted a different dub in 1995. In 2007, a 15th anniversary DVD edition was released that featured a third dub.
** ''Film/SpiderMan3'' has been dubbed in Japanese twice. There's the theatrical dub and the Nippon TV dub. Except for Hiroke Oka as Mary Jane Watson (who was replaced by Kie Kitano for the TV dub), both dubs have most of the same voice actors.
** ''Film/DrDolittle 2'' has been dubbed in Japanese three times. The first dub was released on DVD. The second dub was made for airing on TV Tokyo. The third dub was also made for airing on TV Asahi.
** ''Film/RobinHoodPrinceOfThieves'' has been dubbed in Japanese three times. The first dub was released on VHS and later, DVD. In 1993, a second aired on Fuji TV. Then, in 2004, 10 years after the second dub had aired, a third premiered on TV Tokyo. Masane Tsukayama voiced the titular character in the first and third dubs.
** ''Film/{{Dragonheart}}'' has been dubbed in Japanese twice. The first dub released on home video, while the second dub aired on Nippon TV. Genzo Wakayama and Akio Otsuka voiced Creator/SeanConnery and Dennis Quaid's characters in both versions, respectively.
** ''Film/{{Zathura}}'' has been dubbed in Japanese twice. The first dub was released on DVD. In 2008, a second dub aired on Nippon TV.
** ''Film/{{XXx}}'' has been dubbed in Japanese twice. The first dub was released on DVD. In 2009, a second dub aired on Nippon TV.
** ''Film/CasualtiesOfWar'' has been dubbed in Japanese twice. The first was released on VHS and DVD. In 1996, a second dub was aired on Fuji TV.
** ''Film/CitySlickers'' has been dubbed in Japanese twice. The first was released on VHS. The second dub was made for airing.
** ''Film/SingleWhiteFemale'' has been dubbed in Japanese twice. The first dub was featured on home video and the second dub was made for airing on television.
** ''Film/AbsolutePower'' has been dubbed in Japanese twice. The first dub was featured on VHS and Blu-Ray, while the second was made for airing. Taro Ishida dubbed over Creator/GeneHackman in both dubs.
** ''Film/TradingPlaces'' has been dubbed in Japanese three times for airing. The first dub aired on Nippon TV. The second dub aired on Fuji TV and was carried over on the DVD release. The third dub aired on TV Asahi. Keiko Toda and Akira Kume remained consistent in voicing Jamie Lee Curtis and Creator/RalphBellamy's characters in the first two dubs, respectively.
** ''Film/CrocodileDundee'' has been dubbed in Japanese for airing twice. The first dub was made for Fuji TV and the other was made for TV Asahi.
** ''Film/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory'' has been dubbed in Japanese twice. There's the theatrical dub and the other made for television viewing.
** ''Film/TheSoundOfMusic'' has been dubbed into Japanese six times. The first and second dubs were made for the TV Asahi and Fuji TV airings in 1976 and 1978 receptively. The third dub was made for the VHS release, while the fourth dub was made for the DVD release. The fifth dub aired on TV Tokyo in 2011, while the sixth dub was made for the DVD and Blu-ray re-release, which was released on May 2, 2015. Only Maria's first voice actor, Reiko Mutou, stayed consistent for the first three dubs.
** ''Film/RomanHoliday'' was dubbed into Japanese a whopping seven times. You can see a comparison video [[http://nicoviewer.net/sm5465122 here]].
** Many of Creator/MarilynMonroe's movies have been dubbed into Japanese more than once, but Mariko Mukai is usually her voice actress in any dub of her films, even when the rest of the cast changes.
* Most movies have alternate Korean dubs because the dubs are owned by different broadcasters. Most of these alternate dubs are broadcast on Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation (MBC), Seoul Broadcasting System (SBS), or Korean Broadcasting System (KBS).
** ''Film/BramStokersDracula'' has been dubbed in Korean two times for broadcast. The first one for KBS and other for MBC.
** ''Film/TrueLies'' has been dubbed in Korean for airing twice. One for KBS and the for MBC. Lee Jeong-gu voiced Creator/ArnoldSchwarzenegger in both dubs.
** ''Film/AFewGoodMen'' has been dubbed in Korean for airing twice. One for KBS and the other for MBC.
** ''Film/VerticalLimit'' has been dubbed in Korean twice for airing. One for MBC and the other for SBS.
** ''Film/StuartLittle'' has been dubbed in Korean twice for airing. One for KBS and the other for MBC.
** ''Film/BadBoys'' has been dubbed in Korean twice for airing. One for KBS and the other for MBC.
** ''Film/{{Paddington}}'' has two Korean dubs: one for theatrical release, and another for KBS.

to:

* Brazilian dubs are egregious regarding to this trope. Most films have two or even three dubs often made in different states by different studios with completely different casts. ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'' for example has three different dubs: the first one made in São Paulo which was used for the theatrical release and home video, a second dub made in Rio de Janeiro that was used for airplane flights (yeah, really) and a third one also made in Rio for TV broadcast. Animations are not safe from this either, ''ComicStrip/{{Peanuts}}'' has no less than 7 different dubs been dubbed into Brazilian Portuguese [[http://www.interney.net/blogs/melhoresdomundo/2008/05/29/title_1189/]].
**
net/blogs/melhoresdomundo/2008/05/29/title_1189 7 different times]].
*
[[http://dublanet.com.br/forum1/showthread.php?15775-Alguns-recordes-na-dublagem According to this forum]], ''Film/FromDuskTillDawn'' and ''Film/KingKong1976'' have had been dubbed into Brazilian Portuguese '''five''' dubs times each.
** * ''Film/{{Confidence}}'' has four Brazilian Portuguese dubs made by the following studios: Lipsync (DVD/cable), Audiocorp (unknown medium), Cinevideo (airing on Record and Band), and Wood Video (Telecine).
** * ''Film/ShesAllThat'' has four Brazilian Portuguese dubs: Studio Gabia (DVD and TV), Dublamix (another TV dub), Bravo Estudios (Telecine), and Sigma (Netflix/Sony Channel).
** * ''Film/{{Spawn}}'' has four dubs in Brazilian Portuguese made at the following studios: Clone (VHS/DVD), Marshmallow (TNT), Wan Macher (SBT/Blu-Ray), and a later Wan Macher dub (Paramount Channel/HBO). Maralise Tartarine dubbed over Melinda Clarke in Clone and Marshmallow's versions; while both of Wan Macher's casts have many of the same voice actors.
* It's not uncommon for films to have multiple dubs in Latin American Spanish either, especially with independent movie studios. Some dubs are exclusive for the United States because the film rights are divided between regions. A Spanish dubbing wiki has a category completely [[http://es.doblaje.wikia.com/wiki/Categoría:Doblajes_simultáneos describing the Dueling Dubs trope]], as well as another category for [[http://es.doblaje.wikia.com/wiki/Categoría:Redoblajes redubs]].
**
''Film/AmericanPsycho'' has four Latin Spanish dubs: one in Mexico City, one in Venezuela, one in Argentina, and one in Cuernavaca, Mexico.
** * ''Film/CloudAtlas'' has four Latin Spanish dubs: two in Mexico, one in Venezuela, and another in Argentina.
** * ''Film/AlphaDog'' has three Latin Spanish dubs: one in Mexico, one in Argentina, and another in Chile. The Mexican dub has aired on several TV channels.
** * ''Film/EternalSunshineOfTheSpotlessMind'' has three Mexican Spanish dubs: one for Universal's DVD release, another for TV airings and Netflix, and a third for another medium.
** * ''Film/{{Monster}}'' has three Latin Spanish dubs: one in Mexico, one in Venezuela, and another in Miami.
** * ''Film/JohnWick'' has three Latin Spanish dubs: one in Chile, one in Argentina, and one in Mexico. The Mexican cast returned for the sequel.
** * ''Film/AustinPowersInternationalManOfMystery'' has four Latin Spanish dubs: two in Mexico, and two in Argentina.
* This happens with almost every Japanese
Argentina. The cast of the second Mexican dub of a live action English-speaking movie, since they usually have two different dubs- one for TV broadcast and one for home media releases (since different companies handle each release). This gets even more complicated when a new edition DVD/Blu-ray release may add yet another dub returned for the movie, and when a different TV station also gains rights to air the movie. Generally, the older and more famous movie is, the more dubs it'll have.
**
sequels.
*
''Film/BramStokersDracula'' has been dubbed in Japanese three times. One for the VHS release which was carried over to the initial DVD release. Then, TV Asahi broadcasted a different dub in 1995. In 2007, a 15th anniversary DVD edition was released that featured a third dub.
** The film has two Korean dubs: one that aired on KBS, and another for MBC.
*
''Film/SpiderMan3'' has been dubbed in Japanese twice. There's the theatrical dub and the Nippon TV dub. Except for Hiroke Oka as Mary Jane Watson (who was replaced by Kie Kitano for the TV dub), both dubs have most of the same voice actors.
** * ''Film/DrDolittle 2'' has been dubbed in Japanese three times. The first dub was released on DVD. The second dub was made for airing on TV Tokyo. The third dub was also made for airing on TV Asahi.
** * ''Film/RobinHoodPrinceOfThieves'' has been dubbed in Japanese three times. The first dub was released on VHS and later, DVD. In 1993, a second aired on Fuji TV. Then, in 2004, 10 years after the second dub had aired, a third premiered on TV Tokyo. Masane Tsukayama voiced the titular character in the first and third dubs.
** * ''Film/{{Dragonheart}}'' has been dubbed in Japanese twice. The first dub released on home video, while the second dub aired on Nippon TV. Genzo Wakayama and Akio Otsuka voiced Creator/SeanConnery and Dennis Quaid's characters in both versions, respectively.
** * ''Film/{{Zathura}}'' has been dubbed in Japanese twice. The first dub was released on DVD. In 2008, a second dub aired on Nippon TV.
** * ''Film/{{XXx}}'' has been dubbed in Japanese twice. The first dub was released on DVD. In 2009, a second dub aired on Nippon TV.
** * ''Film/CasualtiesOfWar'' has been dubbed in Japanese twice. The first was released on VHS and DVD. In 1996, a second dub was aired on Fuji TV.
** * ''Film/CitySlickers'' has been dubbed in Japanese twice. The first was released on VHS. The second dub was made for airing.
** * ''Film/SingleWhiteFemale'' has been dubbed in Japanese twice. The first dub was featured on home video and the second dub was made for airing on television.
** * ''Film/AbsolutePower'' has been dubbed in Japanese twice. The first dub was featured on VHS and Blu-Ray, while the second was made for airing. Taro Ishida dubbed over Creator/GeneHackman in both dubs.
** * ''Film/TradingPlaces'' has been dubbed in Japanese three times for airing. The first dub aired on Nippon TV. The second dub aired on Fuji TV and was carried over on the DVD release. The third dub aired on TV Asahi. Keiko Toda and Akira Kume remained consistent in voicing Jamie Lee Curtis and Creator/RalphBellamy's characters in the first two dubs, respectively.
** * ''Film/CrocodileDundee'' has been dubbed in Japanese for airing twice. The first dub was made for Fuji TV and the other was made for TV Asahi.
** * ''Film/CharlieAndTheChocolateFactory'' has been dubbed in Japanese twice. There's the theatrical dub and the other made for television viewing.
** * ''Film/TheSoundOfMusic'' has been dubbed into Japanese six times. The first and second dubs were made for the TV Asahi and Fuji TV airings in 1976 and 1978 receptively. The third dub was made for the VHS release, while the fourth dub was made for the DVD release. The fifth dub aired on TV Tokyo in 2011, while the sixth dub was made for the DVD and Blu-ray re-release, which was released on May 2, 2015. Only Maria's first voice actor, Reiko Mutou, stayed consistent for the first three dubs.
** * ''Film/RomanHoliday'' was dubbed into Japanese a whopping seven times. You can see a comparison video [[http://nicoviewer.net/sm5465122 here]].
** * Many of Creator/MarilynMonroe's movies have been dubbed into Japanese more than once, but Mariko Mukai is usually her voice actress in any dub of her films, even when the rest of the cast changes.
* Most movies have alternate Korean dubs because the dubs are owned by different broadcasters. Most of these alternate dubs are broadcast on Munhwa Broadcasting Corporation (MBC), Seoul Broadcasting System (SBS), or Korean Broadcasting System (KBS).
** ''Film/BramStokersDracula'' has been dubbed in Korean two times for broadcast. The first one for KBS and other for MBC.
**
''Film/TrueLies'' has been dubbed in Korean for airing twice. One for KBS and the for MBC. Lee Jeong-gu voiced Creator/ArnoldSchwarzenegger in both dubs.
** * ''Film/AFewGoodMen'' has been dubbed in Korean for airing twice. One for KBS and the other for MBC.
** * ''Film/VerticalLimit'' has been dubbed in Korean twice for airing. One for MBC and the other for SBS.
** * ''Film/StuartLittle'' has been dubbed in Korean twice for airing. One for KBS and the other for MBC.
** * ''Film/BadBoys'' has been dubbed in Korean twice for airing. One for KBS and the other for MBC.
** The film has two Mexican Spanish dubs: one for TV and DVD, and another for Blu-Ray.
*
''Film/{{Paddington}}'' has two Korean dubs: one for theatrical release, and another for KBS.KBS.
** The film in Latin Spanish has two dubs: one in Mexico, and another in Argentina.
** ''Film/Paddington2'' was released in Latin America with a Mexican dub. However, only Paddington's voice was replaced in the Argentinian dub.



** The film has two Korean dubs: one for KBA, and another for SBS. Yang Ji-un voiced Creator/RobertDeNiro in both versions.

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** The film has two Korean dubs: one for KBA, KBS, and another for SBS. Yang Ji-un voiced Creator/RobertDeNiro in both versions.



* ''Film/TheDefiantOnes'' has been dubbed in Czech three times. The first Czech dub was produced in-house for Czechoslovak Television in 1965. In 2006, a second dub was produced in-house for Czech Television. In 2009, a third dub produced by Studio Bär aired on MGM Channel.

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* ''Film/TheDefiantOnes'' has been dubbed in Czech three times. The first Czech dub was produced in-house for Czechoslovak Television ČST in 1965. In 2006, a second dub was produced in-house for Czech Television.ČT. In 2009, a third dub produced by Studio Bär aired on MGM Channel.



* ''Film/LeMans'' has been dubbed in Czech twice. The first dub was released on VHS in 2004. In 2009, a second dub was produced in-house for Czech Television.

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* ''Film/LeMans'' has been dubbed in Czech twice. The first dub was released on VHS in 2004. In 2009, a second dub was produced in-house for Czech Television.ČT.



** It also has two Hungarian dubs. Some of the voices from the former dub reprised their roles in the latter.

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** It also has All three movies have two Hungarian dubs. Some dubs apiece: the first for theaters, home video and TV; and a second for TV2. György Dörner voiced Eddie Murphy in all six dubs, while several other original voice actors returned for TV2's versions. As of 2015, TV2 is now broadcasting the original dubs of the voices from the former dub reprised their roles in the latter.sequels.



** The film has been dubbed in Japanese twice. The first dub aired on NHK and other aired on TV Tokyo.

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** The film has been dubbed in Japanese twice. The first dub aired on NHK and the other aired on TV Tokyo.



* ''Literature/{{Twilight}}'' has three Brazilian Portuguese dubs: one for theatrical release, one as an in-flight movie, and another for TV broadcasts.



** However there are reportedly more shows that, when having aired on [=KidsCo=], received fully new dubbings, confusing many kids in the process.

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** *** However there are reportedly more shows that, when having aired on [=KidsCo=], received fully new dubbings, confusing many kids in the process.



** There exist two French versions of ''The Fairly Oddparents''. The first dub was recorded in Belgium at Made in Europe for broadcast on Télétoon. After Nickelodeon acquired the international rights to the series from Creator/{{Nelvana}}, they took the dub to France at Dôme Productions, recasting every actor and ignoring the Belgian {{Dub Name Change}}s.
** It was also dubbed in Czech three times. The first dub was made for Supermax, the second for Disney Channel, and a third by SDI Media for Nickelodeon.

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** There exist two French versions of ''The Fairly Oddparents''. The first dub was recorded in Belgium at Made in Europe for broadcast on Télétoon. After Nickelodeon acquired the international rights to the series from Creator/{{Nelvana}}, they took the dub to France at Dôme Productions, recasting every actor and ignoring the Belgian {{Dub Name Change}}s.
** It was also dubbed in Czech three times. The first dub was made for Supermax, Supermax (which is now lost), the second for Disney Channel, and a third by SDI Media for Nickelodeon.



** The Latin American Spanish dub was originally done in Venezuela in 2006 for Boomerang. When Discovery Kids acquired the rights to ''Peppa'', they redubbed the whole series in Mexico. By pure luck, Anabell Silva voiced Emily Elephant in both dubs because she had moved to Mexico sometime ago.

to:

** The Latin American Spanish dub was originally done in Venezuela in 2006 for Boomerang. When Discovery Kids acquired the rights to ''Peppa'', they redubbed the whole series in Mexico. By pure luck, Anabell Silva voiced Emily Elephant in both dubs because she had moved to Mexico sometime ago.


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** The series has two Turkish dubs: one for CNBC-e, and another for Nickelodeon. Oya Prosçiler voiced Sandy Cheeks in both dubs, while some of CNBC's voice actors returned for the first movie.
17th Apr '18 12:15:09 PM MarioandSmurfs
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** There are two Brazilian Portuguese dubs; the first was done in 1968, while the second was done for its 2014 Blu-Ray release. Ednaldo Lucena (Bagheera), Alexandre Moreno (Kaa) and José Santanna (Shere Khan) reprised their roles from the 2003 sequel in the redub.

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** There are two Brazilian Portuguese dubs; the first was done in 1968, while the second was done for its 2014 Blu-Ray release. Ednaldo Lucena (Bagheera), Alexandre Moreno (Kaa) and José Santanna (Shere Khan) reprised their roles from the 2003 sequel in the redub. Also, all of the songs have been oddly [[AutoTune autotuned]] in the redub.
16th Apr '18 11:17:11 PM AreYouTyler
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** ''Film/IndependenceDay'' has been dubbed in Japanese three times. The first dub was released on home video. In 1999, a second dub aired on TV Asahi. The third dub was made as an in-flight movie. Creator/KoichiYamadera was consistent in voicing Creator/WillSmith's character between the first two dubs.



** ''Film/IndependenceDay'' has been dubbed in Korean twice for airing. One for MBC and the other for SBS.


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** The film has four Japanese dubs: one by Soft, one for Nippon TV, a third for Japan Airlines, and a fourth for All Nippon Airlines.


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** The film has two Korean dubs: one for KBA, and another for SBS. Yang Ji-un voiced Creator/RobertDeNiro in both versions.


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** The film has three Latin Spanish dubs: one in Mexico, one in Venzuela from 2013, and one from Chile.


Added DiffLines:

* ''Film/IndependenceDay'' has been dubbed in Japanese three times. The first dub was released on home video. In 1999, a second dub aired on TV Asahi. The third dub was made as an in-flight movie. Creator/KoichiYamadera was consistent in voicing Creator/WillSmith's character between the first two dubs.
*** It also has two Korean dubs: One for MBC and the other for SBS.


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** Both movies have three Japanese dubs: one for Soft, one for Fuji TV, and one for TV Tokyo
15th Apr '18 9:20:55 PM AreYouTyler
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* ''Manga/{{Whistle}}'' is being streamed in Japan with an entirely different Japanese vocal track with a totally new cast. It's speculated this was done so that the original voice actors wouldn't be paid royalties, and also because the original lead voice actress has been busted for drug possession.

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* ''Manga/{{Whistle}}'' is being streamed in Japan with an entirely different Japanese vocal track with a totally new cast. It's speculated this was done so that the original voice actors wouldn't be paid royalties, and also because the original lead voice actress has been busted was arrested for drug possession.



** ''Dragon Ball'' first aired in Italy in 1989, with a completely different cast than the movies and the redub.



** When ''Dragon Ball'' first aired in Italy in 1989, with a completely different cast than the movies and the redub.



* ''Manga/OnePiece'' has two French dubs. The first dub only covered the first 52 episodes, while the second dub (made in Belgium) covers the whole series.



** It also has four Brazilian Portuguese dubs: the first from 1949, the second by Herbert Richers from the 1980s, the third by S&C Produções Artísticas from 1993, and the fourth by Double Sound in 1999. Interestingly, the 1980s re-dub re-uses the songs from the original 1949 version, which currently remains lost. The 1993 dub was made to the Ludwig Von Drake "Mickey and the Beanstalk" segment only.

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** It also has four Brazilian Portuguese dubs: the first from 1949, the second by Herbert Richers from the 1980s, the third by S&C Produções Artísticas from 1993, and the fourth by Double Sound in 1999. Interestingly, all that remains of the 1980s re-dub re-uses 1949 dub are the songs from the original 1949 version, which currently remains lost.(which appeared in Richers' version). The 1993 dub was made to the Ludwig Von Drake "Mickey and the Beanstalk" segment only.



** The French version of "My Own Home" was re-recorded in 1997 with Claire Guyot (the voice of Ariel) replacing Lucie Dolène who had sued Disney France for the copyrights on her voice, and won. Guyot, who was unaware of this at first, later told that she would've have never agreed to do so knowingly. Subsequent releases, since 2007, retain the original 1968 version, though North American releases still use the 1997 re-dub.

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** The French version of "My Own Home" was re-recorded in 1997 with Claire Guyot (the voice of Ariel) replacing Lucie Dolène who had sued Disney France for the copyrights on her voice, and won. Guyot, who was unaware of this at first, later told that she would've have never agreed to do so knowingly. Subsequent releases, since 2007, retain the original 1968 version, though North American releases still use the 1997 re-dub.Guyot's version.



* ''WesternAnimation/SharkTale'' was voiced in Italian twice. The most known one, which was released at cinemas and on [=DVD=], is actually the ''second'' one, and it's filled with {{Celebrity Voice Actor}}s as the characters. The first dub, with regular voice actors, was originally aired at the Venice Movie Festival in 2004. TV airings randomly switch between the two dubs.

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* ''WesternAnimation/SharkTale'' was voiced in has two Italian twice.dubs. The most known one, which was released at cinemas and on [=DVD=], is actually the ''second'' one, and it's filled with {{Celebrity Voice Actor}}s as the characters. The first dub, with regular voice actors, was originally aired at the Venice Movie Festival in 2004. TV airings randomly switch between the two dubs.
15th Apr '18 9:01:31 PM AreYouTyler
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** ''The Incredibles'', ''WesternAnimation/{{Cars}}'' and ''WesternAnimation/{{Ratatouille}}'' each have two Latin Spanish dubs: one in Mexico, and another in Argentina.

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** ''The Incredibles'', ''WesternAnimation/{{Cars}}'' ''WesternAnimation/{{Cars}}'', ''Disney/ChickenLittle'' and ''WesternAnimation/{{Ratatouille}}'' each have two Latin Spanish dubs: one in Mexico, and another in Argentina.



* ''WesternAnimation/{{Valiant}}'' has two Latin Spanish dubs: a Mexican dub (for theaters), and a Chilean dub (for Disney).
* ''WesternAnimation/RockDog'' has ''four'' Latin Spanish dubs: three in Chile, and a fourth in Mexico. Interestingly, the Chilean voice cast is the same in all three versions except for main character Bodi.



** ''Film/{{Confidence}}'' has four dubs made by the following studios: Lipsync (DVD/cable), Audiocorp (unknown medium), Cinevideo (airing on Record and Band), and Wood Video (Telecine).
** ''Film/ShesAllThat'' has four dubs: Studio Gabia (DVD and TV), Dublamix (another TV dub), Bravo Estudios (Telecine), and Sigma (Netflix/Sony Channel).



** ''Film/EternalSunshineOfTheSpotlessMind'' has three Mexican Spanish dubs: one for Universal's DVD release, another for TV airings and Netflix, and a third for another medium.
** ''Film/{{Monster}}'' has three Latin Spanish dubs: one in Mexico, one in Venezuela, and another in Miami.
** ''Film/JohnWick'' has three Latin Spanish dubs: one in Chile, one in Argentina, and one in Mexico. The Mexican cast returned for the sequel.
** ''Film/AustinPowersInternationalManOfMystery'' has four Latin Spanish dubs: two in Mexico, and two in Argentina.



** Latin Spanish: Both movies have four dubs (three in Mexico (classic TV broadcasts, DVD and Blu-Ray, and a TV re-release), and one in Argentina). The first movie's Argentinian dub aired on FOX, while the second movie's dub was released on VHS in Argentina. TV airings have mostly switched between the three Mexican dubs.



** ''Film/TheTerminator'' has three Brazilian Portuguese dubs: one for TV (made by Croma), one for MGM's DVD release (Alamo), and a third for Flashstar's DVD release (Dublavideo). MGM's dub is now the most-circulated version.



* ''Film/{{Scream}}'' has three Latin Spanish dubs, as does ''Scream 2'': two in Mexico, and one in Argentina. The second Mexican dub is the most circulated version.
** The first movie also has three Brazilian Portuguese dubs: Cinevideo (unknown medium), Clone (DVD/Internet sreaming/cable TV), and Marshmallow (VHS and TV)
** ''Scream 2'' has four Brazilian Portuguese dubs: Cinevideo (TV), Studio Gabia (DVD), Herbert Richers (in-flight movie/Internet streaming/cable), and Drei Marc (Telecine).



** The Latin Spanish dub is even more complicated, with the original series being dubbed in Panama, Chile and Venezuela; while the movies were dubbed in Mexico.



* In Spain and Latin America, it is common to find a different Spanish dub for pretty much every show that airs in both areas, but when ''WesternAnimation/HeManAndTheMastersOfTheUniverse1983'' aired on TVE in Spain, it did (if not accidentally) used the Latin American version, which was dubbed in Mexico, although it does have a Castillian Spanish dub for Home Media releases.

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* In Spain and Latin America, it is common to find a different Spanish dub for pretty much every show or movie that airs in both areas, but when ''WesternAnimation/HeManAndTheMastersOfTheUniverse1983'' aired on TVE in Spain, it did (if not accidentally) used the Latin American version, which was dubbed in Mexico, although it does have a Castillian Spanish dub for Home Media releases.


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* ''WesternAnimation/TheLittleLuluShow'' has two Mexican Spanish dubs: one that aired on HBO in the United States, and another for Cartoon Network Latin America. Creator/EduardoGarza appeared in both dubs, but never as the same character.
** The show also has two Greek dubs.
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