History Main / DubInducedPlotHole

18th Feb '18 8:23:35 PM MayIncon
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** ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon'' introduces the move Throat Chop. This wasn't a problem in its debut since Incineroar and the Sneasel line were the only ones who can get it (the latter by breeding) and they mainly use their arms to attack. Then ''VideoGame/PokemonUltraSunAndUltraMoon'' made it a tutorable move, and the list of Pokemon who can learn it includes armless Pokemon such as Arbok, Seaking and Corsola. As it turns out, the Japanese name of Throat Chop is actually "Hell Thrust", it's animation also reflects this by showing a single penetrating action instead of some slashing motion, and none of its attack descriptions mentions anything about chopping.

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** ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon'' introduces the move [[ImpromptuTracheotomy Throat Chop. This Chop]]. The translation decision wasn't a problem in its debut since Incineroar and the Sneasel line were the only ones who can get it (the latter by breeding) and they mainly use their arms to attack. Then ''VideoGame/PokemonUltraSunAndUltraMoon'' made it a tutorable move, and the list of Pokemon who can learn it includes armless Pokemon such as Arbok, Seaking and Corsola. As it turns out, the Japanese name of Throat Chop is actually "Hell Thrust", it's animation also reflects this by showing a single penetrating action instead of some slashing motion, and none of its attack descriptions mentions anything about chopping.
18th Feb '18 8:19:06 PM MayIncon
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** The deliberately useless move introduded in Gen I could be translated as either Splash or Hop. Given that, at the time, it was only learnable by [[MagikarpPower Magikarp]], they decided to go with the former. But starting with Gen II, Pokemon like Hoppip and Buneary have been able to learn it. These Pokemon are associated in no way with water, but clearly associated with hopping. The fact that it's not a Water-type move should have clued them in from the start, but then again, even now the animation for the move ''does'' show splashing water underneath the user. ''VideoGame/PokemonMagikarpJump'', a spinoff based on Magikarp jumping contests, which shows Magikarp Jumping very prominently, doesn't even bother trying to localise Jump Power to Splash Power, or the Jump button to Splash.

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** Tail Whip. The name suggests that the user would smack the enemy with their tail to lower their Defense, but it is actually far less hardcore then that. It's original name is actually "Tail Wag", which is apparently used cutely to lower the enemy's guard. It is even considered a "Cute" move in Pokemon contests. Later games would support the original depiction more in its description and animation.
** The deliberately useless move introduded in Gen I could be translated as either Splash or Hop. Given that, at the time, it was only learnable by [[MagikarpPower Magikarp]], the Water-type Magikarp, they decided to go with the former. But starting with Gen II, Pokemon like Hoppip and Buneary have been able to learn it. These Pokemon are associated in no way with water, but clearly associated with hopping. The fact that it's not a Water-type move should have clued them in from the start, but then again, even now the animation for the move ''does'' show splashing water underneath the user. ''VideoGame/PokemonMagikarpJump'', a spinoff based on Magikarp jumping contests, which shows Magikarp Jumping very prominently, doesn't even bother trying to localise Jump Power to Splash Power, or the Jump button to Splash.
18th Feb '18 8:07:28 PM MayIncon
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** ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon'' introduces the move Throat Chop. This wasn't a problem in its debut since Incineroar and the Sneasel line were the only ones who can get it (the latter by breeding) and they mainly use their arms to attack. Then ''VideoGame/PokemonUltraSunAndUltraMoon'' made it a tutorable move, and the list of Pokemon who can learn it includes armless Pokemon such as Arbok, Seaking and Corsola. As it turns out, the Japanese name of Throat Chop is actually "Hell Thrust", it's animation also reflects this by showing a single penetrating action instead of some slashing motion, and none of its attack descriptions mentions anything about chopping.



** Like in ''Manga/PokemonAdventures'' mentioned above, the game translation's renaming of Super and Hyper Balls into Great and Ultra Balls came back to bite them when the consoles became powerful enough to show the balls as more than a simple two-toned circle or a generic Pokeball... and they turned out to have "S" and "H" blatantly stamped on them. And then things got even more awkward with ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon'''s introduction of ''actual'' Ultra Balls, who had to be renamed into Beast Balls.

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** Like in ''Manga/PokemonAdventures'' mentioned above, the game translation's renaming of Super and of Hyper Balls into Great and Ultra Balls came back to bite them when the consoles became powerful enough to show the balls as more than a simple two-toned circle or a generic Pokeball... and they turned out to have "S" and "H" blatantly stamped on them. And then things got even more awkward with ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon'''s introduction of ''actual'' Ultra Balls, who had to be renamed into Beast Balls.
17th Feb '18 10:36:09 AM Gammaween10
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*** Digitamamon's restaurant. The original dub makes it very clear that the main DigiDestined are Japanese, and so are unable to pay because Digitmamon wants US dollars and won't accept Japanese yen in payment. However, Michael, a recurring American character, ''does'' have dollars and is able to pay. The English dub leaves nationality much more vague and ambiguous, and so has Digitamamon demand 'digidollars' to explain why the kids can't pay - but Michael is ''still'' able to pay, without any explanation of how he acquired these digidollars.

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*** Digitamamon's restaurant. The original dub makes it very clear that the main DigiDestined Digidestined are Japanese, and so are unable to pay because Digitmamon wants US dollars and won't accept Japanese yen in payment. However, Michael, a recurring American character, ''does'' have dollars and is able to pay. The English dub leaves nationality much more vague and ambiguous, and so has Digitamamon demand 'digidollars' to explain why the kids can't pay - but Michael is ''still'' able to pay, without any explanation of how he acquired these digidollars.


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** Episode 92 of the original ''Dragon Ball'' in the Latin American dub shows Krillin referring to Jackie Chun as Master Roshi, even though he's not supposed to know Jackie really is Roshi.
*** And in Episode 105, when Cymbal arrives to where Goku and Yajirobe are, Goku asks Cymbal if he knows Tambourine. When Cymbal replies, instead of referring to Tambourine, he's referring to himself.
15th Feb '18 8:55:34 PM Spanks
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** Naturally, this is the case when ''[[WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyEquestriaGirls Equestria Girls]]'' received a Japanese dub that was released on Netflix. Japanese viewers may be confused as to where Twilight suddenly got wings from, and why she suddenly has a crown and is a princess. Of course, since Season 3 of Friendship Is Magic has yet to air in Japan, which [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS3E13MagicalMysteryCure explains everything]], this left a major plot hole in Equestria Girls' Japanese Dub. It got worse when Rainbow Rocks and Friendship Games were quickly and subsequently released in the region. ''Rainbow Rocks'' features [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS4E26TwilightsKingdomPart2 Twilight's new castle]], and ''Friendship Games'' has a scene in its {{Stinger}} mentioning [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS5E26TheCutieRemarkPart2 Twilight's time travelling adventures]]. Naturally, since Seasons 3 and beyond have yet to come to Japan, this turned a mere plot hole, into a plot ''canyon'' for Japanese viewers. Needless to say, many Japanese fans are not happy that the ''Equestria Girls'' films have been dubbed before the rest of ''Friendship Is Magic'' and have even boycotted this move by watching Japanese fansubbed versions of the original show in English online instead. This hasn't deterred anything it seems, as ''Legend Of Everfree'' and the ''Magical Movie Night'' special were still released in Japan, speaking of the latter, it features ''[[SixthRanger Starlight Glimmer]]'', expanding the plotholes even wider.

to:

** Naturally, this is the case when ''[[WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyEquestriaGirls Equestria Girls]]'' received a Japanese dub that was released on Netflix. Japanese viewers may be confused as to where Twilight suddenly got wings from, and why she suddenly has a crown and is a princess. Of course, since Season 3 of Friendship Is Magic has yet to air in Japan, which [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS3E13MagicalMysteryCure explains everything]], this left a major plot hole in Equestria Girls' Japanese Dub. It got worse when Rainbow Rocks and Friendship Games were quickly and subsequently released in the region. ''Rainbow Rocks'' features [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS4E26TwilightsKingdomPart2 Twilight's new castle]], and ''Friendship Games'' has a scene in its {{Stinger}} mentioning [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS5E26TheCutieRemarkPart2 Twilight's time travelling adventures]]. Naturally, since Seasons 3 and beyond have yet to come to Japan, this turned a mere plot hole, into a plot ''canyon'' for Japanese viewers. Needless to say, many Japanese fans are not happy that the ''Equestria Girls'' films have been dubbed before the rest of ''Friendship Is Magic'' and have even boycotted this move by watching Japanese fansubbed versions of the original show in English online instead. This hasn't deterred anything it seems, as ''Legend Of Everfree'' and the ''Magical Movie Night'' special were still released in Japan, speaking of the latter, it features ''[[SixthRanger Starlight Glimmer]]'', [[MarthDebutedInSmashBros effectively making it her debut]] in Japan, and expanding the plotholes even wider.
5th Feb '18 10:26:24 PM Hommeng
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* ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaTheAdventure'': The English manual is pretty ambiguous about the game's setting and the protagonist's identity, never mentioning him by name. The print ads for the American version promoted the game as Simon Belmont's third adventure, following the original ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaI Castlevania]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaIISimonsQuest Simon's Quest]]''. On the other hand, the Japanese manual is pretty clear in identifying the protagonist as Christopher Belmont, Simon's ancestor, who was actually mentioned in the manual for the first Famicom game. The game's sequel, ''[[VideoGame/CastlevaniaIIBelmontsRevenge Belmont's Revenge]]'', would be more consistent with the Japanese setting.
4th Feb '18 8:11:41 AM BigJimbo
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** The Hungarian dub doesn't translate the names, but neither does it bother to translate titles (such as "Mare in the Moon"), leading to a very bizarre dub, where the characters seem to be arbitrarily switching between languages. Promo material explains that "The ponies have beautiful English names", but... what sense does ''that'' make?

to:

** The Hungarian dub doesn't translate the names, but neither does it bother to translate titles (such as "Mare in the Moon"), leading to a very bizarre dub, where the characters seem to be arbitrarily switching between languages. Promo material explains that "The ponies have beautiful English names", but... what sense does ''that'' make?doesn't make any sense.



** Naturally, this is the case when ''[[WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyEquestriaGirls Equestria Girls]]'' received a Japanese dub that was released on Netflix. Japanese viewers may be confused as to where Twilight suddenly got wings from, and why she suddenly has a crown and is a princess. Of course, since Season 3 of Friendship Is Magic has yet to air in Japan, which [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS3E13MagicalMysteryCure explains everything]], this left a major plot hole in Equestria Girls' Japanese Dub. It got worse when Rainbow Rocks and Friendship Games were quickly and subsequently released in the region. ''Rainbow Rocks'' features [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS4E26TwilightsKingdomPart2 Twilight's new castle]], and ''Friendship Games'' has a scene in its {{Stinger}} mentioning [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS5E26TheCutieRemarkPart2 Twilight's time travelling adventures]]. Naturally, since Seasons 3 and beyond have yet to come to Japan, this turned a mere plot hole, into a plot ''canyon'' for Japanese viewers. Needless to say, many Japanese fans are NOT happy that the ''Equestria Girls'' films have been dubbed before the rest of ''Friendship Is Magic'' and have even boycotted this move by watching Japanese fansubbed versions of the original show in English online instead. This hasn't deterred anything it seems, as ''Legend Of Everfree'' and the ''Magical Movie Night'' special were still released in Japan, speaking of the latter, it features ''[[SixthRanger Starlight Glimmer]]'', expanding the plotholes even wider.

to:

** Naturally, this is the case when ''[[WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyEquestriaGirls Equestria Girls]]'' received a Japanese dub that was released on Netflix. Japanese viewers may be confused as to where Twilight suddenly got wings from, and why she suddenly has a crown and is a princess. Of course, since Season 3 of Friendship Is Magic has yet to air in Japan, which [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS3E13MagicalMysteryCure explains everything]], this left a major plot hole in Equestria Girls' Japanese Dub. It got worse when Rainbow Rocks and Friendship Games were quickly and subsequently released in the region. ''Rainbow Rocks'' features [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS4E26TwilightsKingdomPart2 Twilight's new castle]], and ''Friendship Games'' has a scene in its {{Stinger}} mentioning [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS5E26TheCutieRemarkPart2 Twilight's time travelling adventures]]. Naturally, since Seasons 3 and beyond have yet to come to Japan, this turned a mere plot hole, into a plot ''canyon'' for Japanese viewers. Needless to say, many Japanese fans are NOT not happy that the ''Equestria Girls'' films have been dubbed before the rest of ''Friendship Is Magic'' and have even boycotted this move by watching Japanese fansubbed versions of the original show in English online instead. This hasn't deterred anything it seems, as ''Legend Of Everfree'' and the ''Magical Movie Night'' special were still released in Japan, speaking of the latter, it features ''[[SixthRanger Starlight Glimmer]]'', expanding the plotholes even wider.


Added DiffLines:

* ''[[WesternAnimation/LittleLulu The Little Lulu Show]]'' has the Greek dubs of the episode "Beautiful Lulu". In the original version, Tubby says "homeliest" in a muffled voice, because he's eating chocolate, and Iggy says his toe is prettier than Lulu while they're making fun of her. The first Greek dub makes the mistake of having Tubby ''blatantly'' say "The most popular girl in the neighborhood" (counts as {{Woolseyism}} because "popular" and "ugly" sound alike in Greek) and Lulu says "he said I was 1 metre with my hands up" as if Tubby said that instead of Iggy. The second dub makes no mistake on the muffled voice, but still gets the toe thing wrong because Iggy's line is omitted.
28th Jan '18 9:59:31 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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Added DiffLines:

** The dub claimed that when Piccolo and Kami went to the next dimension, the dragon balls went with them. Since they had functional dragon balls in the next dimension, why couldn't they just wish themselves and the other dead Z-fighters back, instead of needing the surviving Z-fighters to use Namek's dragon balls?
24th Jan '18 6:19:34 PM themisterfree
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Added DiffLines:

* Some ''Franchise/PowerRangers'' installments will cut elements of the source sentai they either don't need, don't fit the story/setting at hand, or the American censors don't like. But as a result of using sentai footage, [[TheArtifact artifacts often show up]] out of nowhere, and either aren't acknowledged at all, or try to explain it away. The most infamous examples originate in ''Series/PowerRangersLostGalaxy''; due to a ''very'' TroubledProduction, the show was basically in a state of behind the scenes chaos, so thus the Rangers suddenly have the [[BoomStick Quasar Launchers]] in the middle of a battle, and they know how to make the Galactabeasts transform into their [[HumongousMecha Galactazords]] with their [[SwissArmyWeapon Transdaggers]] without any warning.
23rd Jan '18 1:57:38 PM Spanks
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** Naturally, this is the case when ''[[WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyEquestriaGirls Equestria Girls]]'' received a Japanese dub that was released on Netflix. Japanese viewers may be confused as to where Twilight suddenly got wings from, and why she suddenly has a crown and is a princess. Of course, since Season 3 of Friendship Is Magic has yet to air in Japan, which [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS3E13MagicalMysteryCure explains everything]], this left a major plot hole in Equestria Girls' Japanese Dub. It got worse when Rainbow Rocks and Friendship Games were quickly and subsequently released in the region. ''Rainbow Rocks'' features [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS4E26TwilightsKingdomPart2 Twilight's new castle]], and ''Friendship Games'' has a scene in its {{Stinger}} mentioning [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS5E26TheCutieRemarkPart2 Twilight's time travelling adventures]]. Naturally, since Seasons 3 and beyond have yet to come to Japan, this turned a mere plot hole, into a plot ''canyon'' for Japanese viewers. Needless to say, many Japanese fans are NOT happy that the ''Equestria Girls'' films have been dubbed before the rest of ''Friendship Is Magic'' and have even boycotted this move by watching Japanese fansubbed versions of the original show in English online instead.

to:

** Naturally, this is the case when ''[[WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyEquestriaGirls Equestria Girls]]'' received a Japanese dub that was released on Netflix. Japanese viewers may be confused as to where Twilight suddenly got wings from, and why she suddenly has a crown and is a princess. Of course, since Season 3 of Friendship Is Magic has yet to air in Japan, which [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS3E13MagicalMysteryCure explains everything]], this left a major plot hole in Equestria Girls' Japanese Dub. It got worse when Rainbow Rocks and Friendship Games were quickly and subsequently released in the region. ''Rainbow Rocks'' features [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS4E26TwilightsKingdomPart2 Twilight's new castle]], and ''Friendship Games'' has a scene in its {{Stinger}} mentioning [[Recap/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagicS5E26TheCutieRemarkPart2 Twilight's time travelling adventures]]. Naturally, since Seasons 3 and beyond have yet to come to Japan, this turned a mere plot hole, into a plot ''canyon'' for Japanese viewers. Needless to say, many Japanese fans are NOT happy that the ''Equestria Girls'' films have been dubbed before the rest of ''Friendship Is Magic'' and have even boycotted this move by watching Japanese fansubbed versions of the original show in English online instead. This hasn't deterred anything it seems, as ''Legend Of Everfree'' and the ''Magical Movie Night'' special were still released in Japan, speaking of the latter, it features ''[[SixthRanger Starlight Glimmer]]'', expanding the plotholes even wider.
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