History Main / DressedInLayers

6th Sep '17 6:04:26 AM Robbyn
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* It's implied Team Rocket from ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'' does this, since their reveals involve pulling off their disguise to reveal the uniform underneath. Even when James' [[CreepyCrossdresser female]] {{disguise|dInDrag}} is quite skimpy. And almost anytime they get to hide gloves under bare hands.
* In the ''VideoGame/FatalFury'' anime movie, Kim Kapwan somehow disintegrates all of his clothing, revealing his fighting outfit below (all in the middle of a party where no fighting was expected to actually take place -- talk about CrazyPrepared.)



* In ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'', during the first invasion of Konoha, the Third Hokage [[FlungClothing flings off his clothes]] to reveal a full suit of armour. Apparently he was wearing it under his Hokage robes [[ProperlyParanoid just in case he was attacked]]. Quite a few character seemingly wear some kind of chainmail vests under their shirts, Naruto included, though for some of them at least a little is visible through their shirts.

to:

* In ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'', during the first invasion ''VideoGame/FatalFury'' anime movie, Kim Kapwan somehow disintegrates all of Konoha, his clothing, revealing his fighting outfit below (all in the Third Hokage [[FlungClothing flings off his clothes]] to reveal a full suit middle of armour. Apparently he a party where no fighting was wearing it under his Hokage robes [[ProperlyParanoid just in case he was attacked]]. Quite a few character seemingly wear some kind of chainmail vests under their shirts, Naruto included, though for some of them at least a little is visible through their shirts.expected to actually take place -- talk about CrazyPrepared.)



* A particularly egregious example in ''Anime/SailorMoon'' when Zoisite is disguised as the mini-skirted titular character, then drops the skirt to reveal his usual uniform underneath.
* Asura of ''Manga/SoulEater'' is said to have been so paranoid and [[LonersAreFreaks averse to contact]] that he wore several sets of heavy clothes on top of one another.



* In ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'', during the first invasion of Konoha, the Third Hokage [[FlungClothing flings off his clothes]] to reveal a full suit of armour. Apparently he was wearing it under his Hokage robes [[ProperlyParanoid just in case he was attacked]]. Quite a few character seemingly wear some kind of chainmail vests under their shirts, Naruto included, though for some of them at least a little is visible through their shirts.
* It's implied Team Rocket from ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'' does this, since their reveals involve pulling off their disguise to reveal the uniform underneath. Even when James' [[CreepyCrossdresser female]] {{disguise|dInDrag}} is quite skimpy. And almost anytime they get to hide gloves under bare hands.
* A particularly egregious example in ''Anime/SailorMoon'' when Zoisite is disguised as the mini-skirted titular character, then drops the skirt to reveal his usual uniform underneath.
* Asura of ''Manga/SoulEater'' is said to have been so paranoid and [[LonersAreFreaks averse to contact]] that he wore several sets of heavy clothes on top of one another.



* Franchise/{{Superman}} in all his adaptations:
** In [[UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks the Silver Age]], writers would occasionally go to great lengths to {{justif|iedTrope}}y and explain how he could hide his cape under Clark Kent's dress shirt, or fit shoes and socks over his Superman boots (the usual answer was something like "super compression.") For the record, while operating as Superman, he kept his Clark Kent clothes in a hidden pouch of his indestructible cape.
** Subverted in ''Comicbook/{{Millennium}}'' when Comicbook/LanaLang, controlled by the Manhunters, tried to expose Clark as Superman by ripping open his shirt in the Daily Planet offices. As it turns out, Clark is thanking his lucky stars that he happened to not be wearing his supersuit that day and so Lana was stunned to find only his bare chest.
** In ''Comicbook/SupermanBrainiac'' Clark is talking to Comicbook/LoisLane when his super-hearing senses an emergency. Quickly he rips his shirt, revealing his costume beneath.
* Franchise/{{Batman}} usually. Sometimes shown having his costume in his briefcase.
* Franchise/SpiderMan. Though he's sometimes shown having his costume in his backpack. He's also one of the few superheroes who can rival Superman with the iconic shirt open reveal. And his daughter, Comicbook/SpiderGirl does it too once or twice.
** In very early Spidey stories he notes that he specifically designed the costume for this - putting the join between the gloves and the arms high up so that they wouldn't be exposed if his sleeves ride up, for instance.
* ComicBook/IronMan, for much of his career, had to wear the entire chest piece under his clothes to keep his heart going. In one early adventure, he took this a step further, [[PaperThinDisguise successfully hiding his identity]] on a long commercial airline flight by wearing a trenchcoat and fedora over his armor. The ''grey, bulky'' Iron Man armor, even!
* ComicBook/CaptainAmerica used to wear his suit ''and his shield, strapped to his back'', under his civilian clothes. This got {{lampshade|Hanging}}d in the ''Peter Porker: The Spectacular Spider Ham'' series, where Captain Americat did the same thing. Peter questions this and Cap says "My tailor is ''very'' good."
* Franchise/GreenLantern Hal Jordan used to wear his uniform under his clothes in UsefulNotes/{{the Silver Age|OfComicBooks}}, but he eventually realized he does not have to bother when he can simply use his power ring to change his clothes into that outfit.
* When Comicbook/{{Supergirl}} appeared in ''ComicBook/{{Batgirl 2009}}'' #14, both girls enjoyed a pleasant (and normal) night at Comicbook/{{Batgirl}}'s college campus. Later, [[ItMakesSenseInContext after the sudden appearance of 24 Draculas]], the two realized that they would need to cut their night-off short and save the day. Supergirl [[ClothingDamage ripped off her top]] to reveal her costume beneath it, then turned to Batgirl:

to:

* ''Franchise/TheDCU'':
**
Franchise/{{Superman}} in all his adaptations:
** *** In [[UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks the Silver Age]], writers would occasionally go to great lengths to {{justif|iedTrope}}y and explain how he could hide his cape under Clark Kent's dress shirt, or fit shoes and socks over his Superman boots (the usual answer was something like "super compression.") For the record, while operating as Superman, he kept his Clark Kent clothes in a hidden pouch of his indestructible cape.
** *** Subverted in ''Comicbook/{{Millennium}}'' when Comicbook/LanaLang, controlled by the Manhunters, tried to expose Clark as Superman by ripping open his shirt in the Daily Planet offices. As it turns out, Clark is thanking his lucky stars that he happened to not be wearing his supersuit that day and so Lana was stunned to find only his bare chest.
** *** In ''Comicbook/SupermanBrainiac'' Clark is talking to Comicbook/LoisLane when his super-hearing senses an emergency. Quickly he rips his shirt, revealing his costume beneath.
* ** Franchise/{{Batman}} usually. Sometimes shown having his costume in his briefcase.
* Franchise/SpiderMan. Though he's sometimes shown having his costume in his backpack. He's also one of the few superheroes who can rival Superman with the iconic shirt open reveal. And his daughter, Comicbook/SpiderGirl does it too once or twice.
** In very early Spidey stories he notes that he specifically designed the costume for this - putting the join between the gloves and the arms high up so that they wouldn't be exposed if his sleeves ride up, for instance.
* ComicBook/IronMan, for much of his career, had to wear the entire chest piece under his clothes to keep his heart going. In one early adventure, he took this a step further, [[PaperThinDisguise successfully hiding his identity]] on a long commercial airline flight by wearing a trenchcoat and fedora over his armor. The ''grey, bulky'' Iron Man armor, even!
* ComicBook/CaptainAmerica used to wear his suit ''and his shield, strapped to his back'', under his civilian clothes. This got {{lampshade|Hanging}}d in the ''Peter Porker: The Spectacular Spider Ham'' series, where Captain Americat did the same thing. Peter questions this and Cap says "My tailor is ''very'' good."
* Franchise/GreenLantern
''Franchise/GreenLantern'': Hal Jordan used to wear his uniform under his clothes in UsefulNotes/{{the Silver Age|OfComicBooks}}, but he eventually realized he does not have to bother when he can simply use his power ring to change his clothes into that outfit.
* ** When Comicbook/{{Supergirl}} appeared in ''ComicBook/{{Batgirl 2009}}'' #14, both girls enjoyed a pleasant (and normal) night at Comicbook/{{Batgirl}}'s college campus. Later, [[ItMakesSenseInContext after the sudden appearance of 24 Draculas]], the two realized that they would need to cut their night-off short and save the day. Supergirl [[ClothingDamage ripped off her top]] to reveal her costume beneath it, then turned to Batgirl:



* Notably averted by Barry Allen, Franchise/TheFlash, who kept his costume compressed in his ring. When released, the costume expanded to full size. Perhaps implausible scientifically, but it allowed Barry to wear ordinary clothes and avoid this trope... except that every once in a while, they indicated that the Flash followed this trope ''in reverse''. Supposedly, the Flash wore his costume ''over'' his regular clothes, which themselves were somehow super-compressed to give him his usual "skintight costume" appearance! Most fans [[FanonDiscontinuity sensibly ignore]] these occasional revelations, particularly since the hero is more than fast enough to change clothes and hide his regular outfit... or, heck, even ''run home'' and neatly fold his clothes before putting them away in his closet, without missing a beat.
* ComicBook/{{Batgirl}} had an unusual variation on this trope in her earliest adventures. Barbara Gordon wore clothes that would be ''converted'' into parts of her Batgirl outfit. For example, her beret unrolled to become Batgirl's cowl, and her reversible skirt, when removed, became a cape. After a couple stories, the writers evidently noticed certain flaws in this arrangement (most notably, the requirement that Barbara always wear pretty much [[LimitedWardrobe the same exact outfit]]), and in later stories either showed her changing at home, or didn't go into detail about how she managed to change elsewhere.
* Comicbook/PowerGirl follows this trope, especially as drawn by Amanda Conner. Conner is one of the few artists to clearly put a lot of thought into making this trope ''plausible'' as something a real person might actually do. Karen Starr's outfits are carefully chosen to work with her costume. She usually wears bulky sweaters, and scarves to cover up the Power Girl costume's high collar. And she frequently wears Power Girl's big, serious ''boots'' with these outfits, though somewhat disguised by colorful leggings. "Non-concealable" pieces, like her cape and gloves, go into a gym bag. It's not only believable, but it gives Karen Starr her own unique style that's quirky, a little kooky, and even sexy, considering how much is covered up.
* Comicbook/TheAtom originally had an inverted version of this trope. Namely, his costume is worn ''outside'' his civilian clothes, but it's a special tough material stretched so thin, it's invisible. Only when he shrinks significantly does it become visible.
* Spoofed multiple times in Italian WesternAnimation/DonaldDuck comics featuring Paperinik, Donald's superhero alter ego:

to:

* ** Notably averted by Barry Allen, Franchise/TheFlash, who kept his costume compressed in his ring. When released, the costume expanded to full size. Perhaps implausible scientifically, but it allowed Barry to wear ordinary clothes and avoid this trope... except that every once in a while, they indicated that the Flash followed this trope ''in reverse''. Supposedly, the Flash wore his costume ''over'' his regular clothes, which themselves were somehow super-compressed to give him his usual "skintight costume" appearance! Most fans [[FanonDiscontinuity sensibly ignore]] these occasional revelations, particularly since the hero is more than fast enough to change clothes and hide his regular outfit... or, heck, even ''run home'' and neatly fold his clothes before putting them away in his closet, without missing a beat.
* ** ComicBook/{{Batgirl}} had an unusual variation on this trope in her earliest adventures. Barbara Gordon wore clothes that would be ''converted'' into parts of her Batgirl outfit. For example, her beret unrolled to become Batgirl's cowl, and her reversible skirt, when removed, became a cape. After a couple stories, the writers evidently noticed certain flaws in this arrangement (most notably, the requirement that Barbara always wear pretty much [[LimitedWardrobe the same exact outfit]]), and in later stories either showed her changing at home, or didn't go into detail about how she managed to change elsewhere.
* ** Comicbook/PowerGirl follows this trope, especially as drawn by Amanda Conner. Conner is one of the few artists to clearly put a lot of thought into making this trope ''plausible'' as something a real person might actually do. Karen Starr's outfits are carefully chosen to work with her costume. She usually wears bulky sweaters, and scarves to cover up the Power Girl costume's high collar. And she frequently wears Power Girl's big, serious ''boots'' with these outfits, though somewhat disguised by colorful leggings. "Non-concealable" pieces, like her cape and gloves, go into a gym bag. It's not only believable, but it gives Karen Starr her own unique style that's quirky, a little kooky, and even sexy, considering how much is covered up.
* ** Comicbook/TheAtom originally had an inverted version of this trope. Namely, his costume is worn ''outside'' his civilian clothes, but it's a special tough material stretched so thin, it's invisible. Only when he shrinks significantly does it become visible.
* ''Franchise/MarvelUniverse'':
** Franchise/SpiderMan. Though he's sometimes shown having his costume in his backpack. He's also one of the few superheroes who can rival Superman with the iconic shirt open reveal. And his daughter, Comicbook/SpiderGirl does it too once or twice.
*** In very early Spidey stories he notes that he specifically designed the costume for this - putting the join between the gloves and the arms high up so that they wouldn't be exposed if his sleeves ride up, for instance.
** ComicBook/IronMan, for much of his career, had to wear the entire chest piece under his clothes to keep his heart going. In one early adventure, he took this a step further, [[PaperThinDisguise successfully hiding his identity]] on a long commercial airline flight by wearing a trenchcoat and fedora over his armor. The ''grey, bulky'' Iron Man armor, even!
** ComicBook/CaptainAmerica used to wear his suit ''and his shield, strapped to his back'', under his civilian clothes. This got {{lampshade|Hanging}}d in the ''Peter Porker: The Spectacular Spider Ham'' series, where Captain Americat did the same thing. Peter questions this and Cap says "My tailor is ''very'' good."
* Spoofed multiple times in Italian WesternAnimation/DonaldDuck ''ComicBook/DisneyDucksComicUniverse'' comics featuring Paperinik, Donald's Donald Duck's superhero alter ego:



* Parodied in ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' in the episode "[[SuperheroEpisode Less Than Hero]]": [[ActionGirl Leela]] tears off her clothes to reveal her Clobberella costume to her parents. At the end of the conversation, however, Leela tears off her costume to reveal another set of normal clothes, claiming "It was brisk, I [[TropeNamers dressed in layers]]". The bonus joke is that [[http://www.tmnttoys.com/reviews/misc/futurama4/2537.jpg neither outfit could realistically cover the other]]--her normal clothes couldn't hide Cloberella's opera gloves or orange boots, but Cloberella's LeotardOfPower couldn't hide Leela's pants, either.
* In ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'', when Robin is forced to go to a prom with a girl. At one point he rips off his prom suit to reveal his costume - including the gloves, even though his hands had been bare while he was in the suit. An unusual example of this trope because Robin was still wearing his mask and not concealing his heroic identity (indeed, on this show, the viewer doesn't know what Robin's secret identity is, or even whether he has one.) Presumably, he was just wearing the suit because it was a formal occasion.
* In an episode of ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'': Peter, Cleveland and Quagmire are dressed as waiters at a fancy dinner party at the Pewterschmits' mansion and are planning to rob their vault. They rip off their tuxes to reveal black 'thieving' clothes underneath, complete with black stocking caps.
* ''WesternAnimation/SuperTed'' takes this to an similar extreme. [=SuperTed=] would unzip his fur to reveal his costume, then unzip his costume to reveal his fur afterwards, infinitely.



* ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants''
** Parodied in the episode "F.U.N." When Plankton steals a Krabby Patty from the Krusty Krab, [=SpongeBob=] decides to come to the rescue and rips off his normal clothes to reveal...an identical set of his normal clothes.
** Also parodied in "Fry Cook Games". When [=SpongeBob=] and Patrick get on the wrestling ring, [=SpongeBob=] tears off his clothes to reveal a Speedo. Patrick then tears off his clothes to reveal... a business suit, which he then tears off to reveal his Speedo.
* Spoofed in an episode of ''WesternAnimation/KingOfTheHill'' where Dale sneaks onto the local army base. He gets in in his exterminator's jumpsuit, then hides in a bush and removes it to reveal an army uniform. He passes by an officer...then hides in another bush and takes off the uniform, revealing ''another'' exterminator's jumpsuit underneath it. Considering [[ConspiracyTheorist what kind of person Dale is]], he'd probably consider this totally necessary.
* Parodied in ''WesternAnimation/TheProudFamily'' when Penny is going out with friends and keeps ripping off her normal clothes to reveal an identical set of clothing. After [[OverlyLongGag about the tenth time]], she finally gets to the clothes she actually wanted to wear - it was an outfit her parents wouldn't approve of, so she waited until she was out with her friends to show.


Added DiffLines:

* In an episode of ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'': Peter, Cleveland and Quagmire are dressed as waiters at a fancy dinner party at the Pewterschmits' mansion and are planning to rob their vault. They rip off their tuxes to reveal black 'thieving' clothes underneath, complete with black stocking caps.
* Parodied in ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' in the episode "[[SuperheroEpisode Less Than Hero]]": [[ActionGirl Leela]] tears off her clothes to reveal her Clobberella costume to her parents. At the end of the conversation, however, Leela tears off her costume to reveal another set of normal clothes, claiming "It was brisk, I [[TropeNamers dressed in layers]]". The bonus joke is that [[http://www.tmnttoys.com/reviews/misc/futurama4/2537.jpg neither outfit could realistically cover the other]]--her normal clothes couldn't hide Cloberella's opera gloves or orange boots, but Cloberella's LeotardOfPower couldn't hide Leela's pants, either.
* Spoofed in an episode of ''WesternAnimation/KingOfTheHill'' where Dale sneaks onto the local army base. He gets in in his exterminator's jumpsuit, then hides in a bush and removes it to reveal an army uniform. He passes by an officer...then hides in another bush and takes off the uniform, revealing ''another'' exterminator's jumpsuit underneath it. Considering [[ConspiracyTheorist what kind of person Dale is]], he'd probably consider this totally necessary.
* Parodied in ''WesternAnimation/TheProudFamily'' when Penny is going out with friends and keeps ripping off her normal clothes to reveal an identical set of clothing. After [[OverlyLongGag about the tenth time]], she finally gets to the clothes she actually wanted to wear - it was an outfit her parents wouldn't approve of, so she waited until she was out with her friends to show.
* ''WesternAnimation/SpongeBobSquarePants''
** Parodied in the episode "F.U.N." When Plankton steals a Krabby Patty from the Krusty Krab, [=SpongeBob=] decides to come to the rescue and rips off his normal clothes to reveal...an identical set of his normal clothes.
** Also parodied in "Fry Cook Games". When [=SpongeBob=] and Patrick get on the wrestling ring, [=SpongeBob=] tears off his clothes to reveal a Speedo. Patrick then tears off his clothes to reveal... a business suit, which he then tears off to reveal his Speedo.
* ''WesternAnimation/SuperTed'' takes this to an similar extreme. [=SuperTed=] would unzip his fur to reveal his costume, then unzip his costume to reveal his fur afterwards, infinitely.
* In ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'', when Robin is forced to go to a prom with a girl. At one point he rips off his prom suit to reveal his costume - including the gloves, even though his hands had been bare while he was in the suit. An unusual example of this trope because Robin was still wearing his mask and not concealing his heroic identity (indeed, on this show, the viewer doesn't know what Robin's secret identity is, or even whether he has one.) Presumably, he was just wearing the suit because it was a formal occasion.
2nd Aug '17 10:05:45 AM Dahsupahbloopah
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Played for Laughs in the Anime/DragonballZ movie Anime/DragonBallZBrolyTheLegendarySuperSaiyan and Anime/DragonballSuper when Goku, having to wear a fancy suit, gets the chance to ditch it and is revealed to be wearing his Trademark Clothing.
13th May '17 11:29:17 AM jccw227
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** In a later episode, Clark's powers get transferred to Lois, so she adopts the superhero identity, Ultra Woman. She ends up wearing a costume Martha Kent makes for her underneath and complains to Clark about how uncomfortable it is. He explains that you get used to it, like thermal underwear.
23rd Apr '17 5:37:14 PM JoeMerl
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Parodied in ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' in the episode "Less Than Hero" Leela tears off her clothes to reveal her Clobberella costume. Her mother complains that it's rather revealing. Then Leela tears off her costume to reveal another set of identical clothes, claiming "It was brisk, I [[TropeNamers dressed in layers]]". Naturally, neither of her costumes would actually have concealed the other one.

to:

* Parodied in ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' in the episode "Less "[[SuperheroEpisode Less Than Hero" Leela Hero]]": [[ActionGirl Leela]] tears off her clothes to reveal her Clobberella costume. Her mother complains that it's rather revealing. Then costume to her parents. At the end of the conversation, however, Leela tears off her costume to reveal another set of identical normal clothes, claiming "It was brisk, I [[TropeNamers dressed in layers]]". Naturally, The bonus joke is that [[http://www.tmnttoys.com/reviews/misc/futurama4/2537.jpg neither of her costumes would actually have concealed outfit could realistically cover the other one.other]]--her normal clothes couldn't hide Cloberella's opera gloves or orange boots, but Cloberella's LeotardOfPower couldn't hide Leela's pants, either.
2nd Jan '17 3:39:49 AM Tron80
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[folder:Comics]]

to:

[[folder:Comics]][[folder:Comic Books]]



** In 'Comicbook/SupermanBrainiac'' Clark is talking to Comicbook/LoisLane when his super-hearing senses an emergency. Quickly he rips his shirt, revealing his costume beneath.

to:

** In 'Comicbook/SupermanBrainiac'' ''Comicbook/SupermanBrainiac'' Clark is talking to Comicbook/LoisLane when his super-hearing senses an emergency. Quickly he rips his shirt, revealing his costume beneath.
2nd Jan '17 3:39:12 AM Tron80
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** In 'Comicbook/SupermanBrainiac'' Clark is talking to Comicbook/LoisLane when his super-hearing senses an emergency. Quickly he rips his shirt, revealing his costume beneath.
25th Dec '16 2:20:57 PM Tron80
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* When Comicbook/{{Supergirl}} appeared in ComicBook/{{Batgirl|2009}}'s self-titled series[[note]]''Batgirl'' #14 (2010)[[/note]], the two of them enjoyed a pleasant (and normal) night at Batgirl's college campus. Later, [[ItMakesSenseInContext after the sudden appearance of 24 Draculas]], the two realized that they would need to cut their night-off short and save the day. Supergirl [[ClothingDamage ripped off her top]] to reveal her costume beneath it, then turned to Batgirl:
--> '''Supergirl:''' "Aren't you gonna...you know..."\\

to:

* When Comicbook/{{Supergirl}} appeared in ComicBook/{{Batgirl|2009}}'s self-titled series[[note]]''Batgirl'' #14 (2010)[[/note]], the two of them ''ComicBook/{{Batgirl 2009}}'' #14, both girls enjoyed a pleasant (and normal) night at Batgirl's Comicbook/{{Batgirl}}'s college campus. Later, [[ItMakesSenseInContext after the sudden appearance of 24 Draculas]], the two realized that they would need to cut their night-off short and save the day. Supergirl [[ClothingDamage ripped off her top]] to reveal her costume beneath it, then turned to Batgirl:
--> '''Supergirl:''' "Aren't you gonna... you know..."\\



'''Supergirl:''' "[[LesYay Does it have a bat on it]]?"\\

to:

'''Supergirl:''' "[[LesYay Does "Does it have a bat on it]]?"\\it?"\\
10th Dec '16 6:44:24 AM DaibhidC
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Done in early episodes of ''Series/LoisAndClarkTheNewAdventuresOfSuperman'', before they decided on spinning into costume instead. On one occasion, Clark is wearing a shirt with the top two buttons undone, and clearly isn't wearing his costume underneath it. Then there's a shift of camera angle, and suddenly the shirt is buttoned to the neck, just in time for him to rip it open...

to:

* Done in early episodes of ''Series/LoisAndClarkTheNewAdventuresOfSuperman'', ''Series/LoisAndClark'', before they decided on spinning into costume instead. On one occasion, Clark is wearing a shirt with the top two buttons undone, and clearly isn't wearing his costume underneath it. Then there's a shift of camera angle, and suddenly the shirt is buttoned to the neck, just in time for him to rip it open...
10th Dec '16 6:43:56 AM DaibhidC
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Apart from one shirt-ripping scene with Clark in ''Series/{{Smallville}}'', the series has averted this. Save possibly for one scene in an early Season 10 Episode. Oliver Queen (in his street clothes) is investigating an apartment. Someone else enters, and moments later he confronts them in full Green Arrow gear. Played straight in the very last scene of the finale, which ends on Clark doing the iconic Superman reveal.

to:

* Apart from one shirt-ripping scene with Clark in ''Series/{{Smallville}}'', the series has averted this. Save possibly for one scene in an early Season 10 Episode. Oliver Queen (in his street clothes) is investigating an apartment. Someone else enters, and moments later he confronts them in full Green Arrow gear. Played straight in the very last scene of the finale, which ends on Clark doing the iconic Superman reveal. And the episode "Booster" has a classic phone-booth change, in which Clark is somehow wearing a leather jacket under his suit.


Added DiffLines:

* Done in early episodes of ''Series/LoisAndClarkTheNewAdventuresOfSuperman'', before they decided on spinning into costume instead. On one occasion, Clark is wearing a shirt with the top two buttons undone, and clearly isn't wearing his costume underneath it. Then there's a shift of camera angle, and suddenly the shirt is buttoned to the neck, just in time for him to rip it open...
10th Dec '16 6:25:14 AM DaibhidC
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ComicBook/CaptainAmerica used to wear his suit ''and his shield, strapped to his back'', under his civilian clothes. This got {{lampshade|Hanging}}d in the ''Peter Porker: The Spectacular Spider Ham'' series, where Captain America did the same thing. Peter questions this and Cap says "My tailor is ''very'' good."

to:

* ComicBook/CaptainAmerica used to wear his suit ''and his shield, strapped to his back'', under his civilian clothes. This got {{lampshade|Hanging}}d in the ''Peter Porker: The Spectacular Spider Ham'' series, where Captain America Americat did the same thing. Peter questions this and Cap says "My tailor is ''very'' good."
This list shows the last 10 events of 150. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.DressedInLayers