History Main / DreamingOfAWhiteChristmas

11th Aug '16 7:15:08 PM DesertDragon
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In the [[UsefulNotes/ChristmasInAmerica United States]], white Christmases are most likely to be seen in the Northeast, the upper Midwest, and the Rockies. Even in those regions they're far from a sure thing, however, since the really heavy snowfall usually doesn't come until January or later.

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In the [[UsefulNotes/ChristmasInAmerica United States]], white Christmases are most likely to be seen in the Northeast, the upper Midwest, and the Rockies. Even in those regions they're far from a sure thing, however, since Some years the really heavy snowfall usually doesn't come until January snow can fly as early as November or later.
even late October, but on TV you never see snow during the Halloween or Thanksgiving episodes.
11th Aug '16 7:12:22 PM DesertDragon
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The snow will be there to look "pretty". It does not melt or turn slushy, and is never coated with dirt or litter. It is ''never'' accompanied by freezing winds or icy rains. It can always be easily molded into snowmen or [[SnowballFight snowballs]] (real snow has to be warmish and melty first). The darn stuff usually ''isn't even cold or wet''. No one ever has trouble traveling in it unless it's [[SnowedIn a plot point]], and it even [[ItsAlwaysSpring conveniently vanishes by the next episode]]. Why, it's almost as if Mother Nature herself [[DoTheyKnowItsChristmasTime knows it's Christmas time]] and has decided to [[EmpathicEnvironment act accordingly]].

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The snow will be there to look "pretty". It does not melt or turn slushy, and is never coated with dirt or litter. It is ''never'' accompanied by freezing winds or icy rains. It can always be easily molded into snowmen or [[SnowballFight snowballs]] (real snow has to be warmish and melty first). The darn stuff usually ''isn't even cold or wet''.wet first). No one ever has trouble traveling in it unless it's [[SnowedIn a plot point]], and it even [[ItsAlwaysSpring conveniently vanishes by the next episode]]. Why, it's almost as if Mother Nature herself [[DoTheyKnowItsChristmasTime knows it's Christmas time]] and has decided to [[EmpathicEnvironment act accordingly]].
19th Jun '16 2:01:41 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
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* "Jingle Bells". "Jingle Bell Rock". "Sleigh Ride". "Winter Wonderland". "Marshmallow World". "Let It Snow". "Baby, It's Cold Outside". "I've Got My Love to Keep Me Warm". All are secular, seasonal tunes about winter which make no mention of any holiday, and would be appropriate well into January (and February, and possibly even March) in many parts of the U.S. Yet they are rarely heard on the radio or in department stores after December 25th, and never, ''ever'' after January 1st.

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* "Jingle Bells".Bells"[[labelnote:]](The French and German translations do include references about New Year and Christmas respectively, however)[[/labelnote]]. "Jingle Bell Rock". "Sleigh Ride". "Winter Wonderland". "Marshmallow World". "Let It Snow". "Baby, It's Cold Outside". "I've Got My Love to Keep Me Warm". All are secular, seasonal tunes about winter which make no mention of any holiday, and would be appropriate well into January (and February, and possibly even March) in many parts of the U.S. Yet they are rarely heard on the radio or in department stores after December 25th, and never, ''ever'' after January 1st.
13th May '16 7:20:33 AM Morgenthaler
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[[quoteright:350:[[WesternAnimation/ACharlieBrownChristmas http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/charliebrownchristmas.png]]]]
8th Apr '16 10:30:36 AM Morgenthaler
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* An episode of ''ThirdWatch'''s fourth season had a ''very'' heavy snowstorm hit New York (although not at Christmas), and Faith Yokas' daughter Emily was trapped in a car. The squads find her, get her to hospital, and the episode ends. The next episode begins on the next morning -- and there's no sign whatsoever that the storm ever happened.

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* An episode of ''ThirdWatch'''s ''Series/ThirdWatch'''s fourth season had a ''very'' heavy snowstorm hit New York (although not at Christmas), and Faith Yokas' daughter Emily was trapped in a car. The squads find her, get her to hospital, and the episode ends. The next episode begins on the next morning -- and there's no sign whatsoever that the storm ever happened.
29th Mar '16 8:31:11 AM Mdumas43073
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In the [[AVeryBritishChristmas United Kingdom]] -- particularly in Southern England and Wales -- there is seldom any snow at Christmas. Much of the popular mythology of an "old-fashioned" white Christmas goes back to Creator/CharlesDickens, who was really just being nostalgic for ''his'' childhood Christmases of the early 19th century... which happened to fall during the tail end of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Ice_Age Little Ice Age]], resulting in the first eight years of Dickens' life having eight white Christmases in a row. Lucky bugger.

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In the [[AVeryBritishChristmas United Kingdom]] -- particularly in Southern England and Wales -- there is seldom any snow at Christmas. Much of the popular mythology of an "old-fashioned" white Christmas goes back to Creator/CharlesDickens, who was really just being nostalgic for ''his'' childhood Christmases of the early 19th century... which happened to fall during the tail end of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Ice_Age Little Ice Age]], resulting in the Age]]. The first eight years of Dickens' life having saw eight white Christmases in a row. Lucky bugger.
27th Mar '16 1:05:39 AM Mdumas43073
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This is most often seen in HollywoodNewEngland, but will likely be the case in any setting if [[SoCalization your writers are from southern California]], which is a much warmer ecosystem and Christmas means pouring rain and flash floods. What little snow they do see is likely the dry, powdery kind from ski trips to Lake Tahoe, not realizing that snow elsewhere tends to be far more wet and heavy. Strangely enough, it seldom snows in fiction during ''other'' winter holidays, except maybe New Year's. Valentine's Day in particular is almost always absent of snow despite being in the middle of February. In RealLife, the white stuff can fly as early as Halloween and as late as Easter in many locales. That said, in real life having snow ''right at Christmas'' can be a decidedly hit-or-miss proposition.

to:

This is most often seen in HollywoodNewEngland, but will likely be the case in any setting if [[SoCalization your writers are from southern California]], which is a much warmer ecosystem and Christmas means pouring rain and flash floods. What little snow they do see is likely the dry, powdery kind from ski trips to Lake Tahoe, not realizing that snow elsewhere tends to be far more wet and heavy. Strangely enough, it seldom snows in fiction during ''other'' winter holidays, except maybe New Year's. Valentine's Day in particular is almost always absent of snow despite being in the middle of February. In RealLife, the white stuff can fly as early as Halloween and as late as Easter in many locales. That said, in real life having snow ''right at Christmas'' can be a decidedly hit-or-miss proposition.\n
27th Mar '16 1:04:46 AM Mdumas43073
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This is most often seen in HollywoodNewEngland, but will likely be the case in any setting if [[SoCalization your writers are from southern California]], which is a much warmer ecosystem and Christmas means pouring rain and flash floods. What little snow they do see is likely the dry, powdery kind from ski trips to Lake Tahoe, not realizing that snow elsewhere tends to be far more wet and heavy. Strangely enough, it seldom snows in fiction during ''other'' winter holidays, except maybe New Year's. Valentine's Day in particular is almost always absent of snow despite being in the middle of February. In RealLife, the white stuff can fly as early as Halloween and as late as Easter in many locales. On the other hand, in real life having snow ''right at Christmas'' can be a decidedly hit-or-miss proposition.

In the [[UsefulNotes/ChristmasInAmerica United States]], white Christmases are almost never seen outside of the Northeast, the upper Midwest, and the Rockies. Even in those regions they're far from a sure thing, since the really heavy snowfall usually doesn't come until January or later.

to:

This is most often seen in HollywoodNewEngland, but will likely be the case in any setting if [[SoCalization your writers are from southern California]], which is a much warmer ecosystem and Christmas means pouring rain and flash floods. What little snow they do see is likely the dry, powdery kind from ski trips to Lake Tahoe, not realizing that snow elsewhere tends to be far more wet and heavy. Strangely enough, it seldom snows in fiction during ''other'' winter holidays, except maybe New Year's. Valentine's Day in particular is almost always absent of snow despite being in the middle of February. In RealLife, the white stuff can fly as early as Halloween and as late as Easter in many locales. On the other hand, That said, in real life having snow ''right at Christmas'' can be a decidedly hit-or-miss proposition.

In the [[UsefulNotes/ChristmasInAmerica United States]], white Christmases are almost never most likely to be seen outside of in the Northeast, the upper Midwest, and the Rockies. Even in those regions they're far from a sure thing, however, since the really heavy snowfall usually doesn't come until January or later.
25th Mar '16 1:16:30 AM Mdumas43073
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This is most often seen in HollywoodNewEngland, but will likely be the case in any setting if [[SoCalization your writers are from southern California]], which is a much warmer ecosystem and Christmas means pouring rain and flash floods. What little snow they do see is likely the dry, powdery kind from ski trips to Lake Tahoe, not realizing that snow elsewhere tends to be far more wet and heavy. Strangely enough, it seldom snows in fiction during ''other'' winter holidays, except maybe New Year's. Valentine's Day in particular is almost always absent of snow despite being in the middle of February. In RealLife, the white stuff can fly as early as Halloween and as late as Easter in many locales. However, in real life having snow ''right at Christmas'' can be a decidedly hit-or-miss proposition.

to:

This is most often seen in HollywoodNewEngland, but will likely be the case in any setting if [[SoCalization your writers are from southern California]], which is a much warmer ecosystem and Christmas means pouring rain and flash floods. What little snow they do see is likely the dry, powdery kind from ski trips to Lake Tahoe, not realizing that snow elsewhere tends to be far more wet and heavy. Strangely enough, it seldom snows in fiction during ''other'' winter holidays, except maybe New Year's. Valentine's Day in particular is almost always absent of snow despite being in the middle of February. In RealLife, the white stuff can fly as early as Halloween and as late as Easter in many locales. However, On the other hand, in real life having snow ''right at Christmas'' can be a decidedly hit-or-miss proposition.
25th Mar '16 1:15:58 AM Mdumas43073
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This is most often seen in HollywoodNewEngland, but will likely be the case in any setting if [[SoCalization your writers are from southern California]], which is a much warmer ecosystem and Christmas means pouring rain and flash floods. What little snow they do see is likely the dry, powdery kind from ski trips to Lake Tahoe, not realizing that snow elsewhere tends to be far more wet and heavy. Strangely enough, it seldom snows in fiction during ''other'' winter holidays, except maybe New Year's. Valentine's Day in particular is almost always absent of snow despite being in the middle of February. In RealLife, the white stuff can fly as early as Halloween and as late as Easter in many locales. However, in real life having snow ''at Christmas'' can be a decidedly hit-or-miss proposition.

to:

This is most often seen in HollywoodNewEngland, but will likely be the case in any setting if [[SoCalization your writers are from southern California]], which is a much warmer ecosystem and Christmas means pouring rain and flash floods. What little snow they do see is likely the dry, powdery kind from ski trips to Lake Tahoe, not realizing that snow elsewhere tends to be far more wet and heavy. Strangely enough, it seldom snows in fiction during ''other'' winter holidays, except maybe New Year's. Valentine's Day in particular is almost always absent of snow despite being in the middle of February. In RealLife, the white stuff can fly as early as Halloween and as late as Easter in many locales. However, in real life having snow ''at ''right at Christmas'' can be a decidedly hit-or-miss proposition.
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