History Main / DreamTeam

22nd Jun '16 5:54:24 AM gewunomox
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* For the RollingStones concert film ''Film/ShineALight'' director Creator/MartinScorsese assembled seven of among the best cinematographers in the industry just to operate the cameras at the Beacon Theater in NYC where the show was held.

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* For the RollingStones Music/TheRollingStones concert film ''Film/ShineALight'' director Creator/MartinScorsese assembled seven of among the best cinematographers in the industry just to operate the cameras at the Beacon Theater in NYC where the show was held.
18th Jun '16 12:20:10 AM Morgenthaler
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* The entire premise of ''TurtlesForever'' is based upon this - The [[WesternAnimation/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles1987 80s Turtles]] team up with the [[WesternAnimation/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles2003 00s Turtles]] [[spoiler:and later, the [[ComicBook/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtlesMirage Turtles from the Mirage comic book]] ''and'' Krang & the 80's Shredder]] to stop [[spoiler:the 00's Shredder from destroying the TMNT multiverse]].

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* The entire premise of ''TurtlesForever'' ''WesternAnimation/TurtlesForever'' is based upon this - The [[WesternAnimation/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles1987 80s Turtles]] team up with the [[WesternAnimation/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles2003 00s Turtles]] [[spoiler:and later, the [[ComicBook/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtlesMirage Turtles from the Mirage comic book]] ''and'' Krang & the 80's Shredder]] to stop [[spoiler:the 00's Shredder from destroying the TMNT multiverse]].



* ''TotalDrama All Stars'' had the the heroic and the devious characters from the past four seasons join forces.

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* ''TotalDrama ''WesternAnimation/TotalDrama All Stars'' had the the heroic and the devious characters from the past four seasons join forces.



* ProStars was another also-ran kid's TV show with a similar premise. In this show, Bo Jackson, Michael Jordan, and Wayne Gretzky teamed up to form a sports-themed super-hero group helping kids and saving the environment from cheesy villains. Each of the athletes was a superhero, each of them using gimmicks based on their respective sports, with Bo covering football and baseball. Live-action sequences with all three athletes talking to kids about morality were also included. Picture Michael Jordan and company as the protagonists of a show like ''WesternAnimation/{{Captain Planet|and the Planeteers}}'' and you'll have a good idea how cheesy it is.

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* ProStars WesternAnimation/ProStars was another also-ran kid's TV show with a similar premise. In this show, Bo Jackson, Michael Jordan, and Wayne Gretzky teamed up to form a sports-themed super-hero group helping kids and saving the environment from cheesy villains. Each of the athletes was a superhero, each of them using gimmicks based on their respective sports, with Bo covering football and baseball. Live-action sequences with all three athletes talking to kids about morality were also included. Picture Michael Jordan and company as the protagonists of a show like ''WesternAnimation/{{Captain Planet|and the Planeteers}}'' and you'll have a good idea how cheesy it is.
22nd May '16 10:09:45 AM BiffJr
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* The ComicBook/JusticeSocietyOfAmerica was the ''original'' dream team of superheroes.
** Actually, by design, they more or less ''weren't'', at least at first. DC established an in-house rule that any character who had (or later got) his own monthly title could no longer appear as an active member of the JSA (they could be "Honorary Members", though). Which made sense even in an in-universe way; a character with a monthly title was presumably busy with whatever adventures were appearing in that title. Superman and Batman thus ''started off'' as "Honorary Members," and Flash and Green Lantern (the Golden Age ones, Jay Garrick and Alan Scott) left shortly after the series began when they got their own titles as well. This rule was dropped after a few years, but originally it was thought of as a way to spotlight lesser-known characters and see if they were popular enough with readers to support a title of their own, instead of a "dream team" of the best of the best.

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* The ComicBook/JusticeSocietyOfAmerica was became the ''original'' dream team of superheroes.
** Actually, by design, they more or less ''weren't'', at least at first. DC established an in-house rule that any character who had (or later got) his own monthly title could no longer appear as an active member of the JSA (they could be "Honorary Members", though). Which made sense even in an in-universe way; a character with a monthly title was presumably busy with whatever adventures were appearing in that title. Superman and Batman thus ''started off'' as "Honorary Members," and Flash and Green Lantern (the Golden Age ones, Jay Garrick and Alan Scott) left shortly after the series began when they got their own titles as well. This rule was dropped after a few years, but
superheroes. The team originally it was thought of as a way to spotlight lesser-known characters and see if they were popular enough didn't allow any members with readers to support a title of their own, instead of a "dream team" of the best of the best.but this was changed.
19th May '16 3:57:01 PM nombretomado
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* [[TheMightyBoosh Noel Fielding and Julian Barratt]] in [[Series/NathanBarley a production]] written by CharlieBrooker? Sign me up!

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* [[TheMightyBoosh [[Series/TheMightyBoosh Noel Fielding and Julian Barratt]] in [[Series/NathanBarley a production]] written by CharlieBrooker? Sign me up!
29th Apr '16 4:26:36 PM nombretomado
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* ProStars was another also-ran kid's TV show with a similar premise. In this show, Bo Jackson, Michael Jordan, and Wayne Gretzky teamed up to form a sports-themed super-hero group helping kids and saving the environment from cheesy villains. Each of the athletes was a superhero, each of them using gimmicks based on their respective sports, with Bo covering football and baseball. Live-action sequences with all three athletes talking to kids about morality were also included. Picture Michael Jordan and company as the protagonists of a show like CaptainPlanet and you'll have a good idea how cheesy it is.

to:

* ProStars was another also-ran kid's TV show with a similar premise. In this show, Bo Jackson, Michael Jordan, and Wayne Gretzky teamed up to form a sports-themed super-hero group helping kids and saving the environment from cheesy villains. Each of the athletes was a superhero, each of them using gimmicks based on their respective sports, with Bo covering football and baseball. Live-action sequences with all three athletes talking to kids about morality were also included. Picture Michael Jordan and company as the protagonists of a show like CaptainPlanet ''WesternAnimation/{{Captain Planet|and the Planeteers}}'' and you'll have a good idea how cheesy it is.
22nd Apr '16 11:57:43 PM aye_amber
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* This was the premise of two 90's video game based animated shows. There was the SoBadItsGood CaptainNTheGameMaster and the unforgettably awful The Power Team, an animated show served up alongside VideoPower. The former licensed some of the biggest characters from the NES glory days, including Simon Belmont of ''VideoGame/{{Castlevania|I}}'', Pitt of ''VideoGame/KidIcarus'', Franchise/MegaMan, Mother Brain of ''VideoGame/{{Metroid|1}}'' fame, and so on. The result was a strange product by today's standards and the quality is certainly debatable. Acclaim wanted to do a similar show, but using only it's own rather shallow roster of characters. The resulting cartoon featured the monster truck Big Foot, a walking tomato called Kwirk, a generic barbarian claiming to be Kuros of WizardsAndWarriors, Tyrone of Arch Rivals (who plays basketball - that's it), and a Max Force of {{NARC}} who was not able to use his guns on a show aimed at children. The resulting show is almost universally panned by the few who remember it.

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* This was the premise of two 90's '90s video game based animated shows. There was the SoBadItsGood CaptainNTheGameMaster WesternAnimation/CaptainNTheGameMaster and the unforgettably awful The ''The Power Team, Team,'' an animated show served up alongside VideoPower. Series/VideoPower. The former licensed some of the biggest characters from the NES [[UsefulNotes/NintendoEntertainmentSystem NES]] glory days, including Simon Belmont of ''VideoGame/{{Castlevania|I}}'', Pitt ''VideoGame/{{Castlevania|I}},'' Pit of ''VideoGame/KidIcarus'', ''VideoGame/KidIcarus,'' Franchise/MegaMan, Mother Brain of ''VideoGame/{{Metroid|1}}'' fame, and so on. The result was a strange product by today's standards and the quality is certainly debatable. Acclaim wanted to do a similar show, but using only it's its own rather shallow roster of characters. The resulting cartoon featured the monster truck Big Foot, a walking tomato called Kwirk, a generic barbarian claiming to be Kuros of WizardsAndWarriors, VideoGame/WizardsAndWarriors, Tyrone of Arch Rivals VideoGame/ArchRivals (who plays basketball - -- that's it), and a Max Force of {{NARC}} VideoGame/{{NARC}} who was not able to use his guns on a show aimed at children. The resulting show is almost universally panned by the few who remember it.
20th Apr '16 6:52:25 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''ComicBook/{{Necronauts}}'': Creator/ArthurConanDoyle, Creator/HPLovecraft, Charles Fort and Harry Houdini team up.

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* ''ComicBook/{{Necronauts}}'': Creator/ArthurConanDoyle, Creator/HPLovecraft, Charles Fort and Harry Houdini Creator/HarryHoudini team up.
20th Feb '16 2:49:42 PM DarkPhoenix94
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** The Brazil teams of the 60's, featuring Pele, another candidate for the greatest player of all time (and usually named as such), and the phenomenally talented and tragically flawed Jairzinho, and of the early 80's, featuring the likes of cultured captain and midfielder Socrates (who later became a dentist) and Zico, an attacking midfielder of great flair widely considered to be one of the best of all time. The difference was, however, the former team won three World Cups (1958, 1962, 1970), their streak only interrupted by England's '66 win, while the latter were knocked out in the Quarter-Finals of the 1982 World Cup by eventual champions Italy.

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** The Brazil teams of the 60's, featuring Pele, another candidate for the greatest player of all time (and usually named as such), and the phenomenally talented and tragically flawed Jairzinho, Garrincha, and of the early 80's, featuring the likes of cultured captain and midfielder Socrates (who later became a dentist) and Zico, an attacking midfielder of great flair widely considered to be one of the best of all time. The difference was, however, the former team won three World Cups (1958, 1962, 1970), their streak only interrupted by England's '66 win, while the latter were knocked out in the Quarter-Finals of the 1982 World Cup by eventual champions Italy.
20th Feb '16 11:55:59 AM DarkPhoenix94
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* The 1954 Hungarian Soccer team at the World Cup that year was the closest we'll get to a dream team in international soccer. While other nations have had amazing teams, like Brazil and West Germany, the so-called "Golden Team" literally changed the way the game was played, especially in England, where a historic 6-3 thrashing at football's home launched a national rethinking that lead to their World Cup victory in 1966. The Mighty Magyars are also notable as being the best team to never win a World Cup, coming up short in the final hurdle against emerging power West Germany. The team soon split up after the 1956 Hungarian Revolution, but the impact they brought to the sport with their overwhelming dominance set ripples through the football world.

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* The 1954 Hungarian Soccer UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball team at the World Cup that year was the closest we'll get to a dream team in international soccer. While other nations have had amazing teams, like Brazil and West Germany, the so-called "Golden Team" literally changed the way the game was played, especially in England, where a historic 6-3 thrashing at football's home launched a national rethinking that lead to their World Cup victory in 1966. The Mighty Magyars Magyars, led by the legendary Ferenc Puskas, a candidate for the greatest player of all time, are also notable as being the best team to never win a World Cup, coming up short in the final hurdle against emerging power West Germany. The team soon split up after the 1956 Hungarian Revolution, but the impact they brought to the sport with their overwhelming dominance set ripples through the football world.world.
* Other football (soccer) teams, however, have come close since.
** England's 1966 side, famed for playing a 4-2-4 formation that is extremely unconventional even by today's standards of ever shifting formations - back then, in the days of perpetual 4-4-2, it was bloody unique - and, on their victory, earned them the sobriquet 'the Wingless Wonders'. The tireless stamina this required as well as the fact that the World Cup was being played on home soil helped spur them on, beating West Germany in the final, with striker Geoff Hurst scoring the first and only hat trick in a World Cup final. One of those goals, to put England 3-2 up and effectively win the game (Hurst scored the 4th at the very last minute, when fans were already streaming onto the pitch to celebrate, leading to the famous, "They think it's all over, they think it's all over, it is now!" from commentator Kenneth Wolstenhome) was famously controversial, as it bounced off the bar. English fans say it bounced in and that Liverpool striker Roger Hunt's wheeling away to celebrate when he was set to follow up proves it. German fans say that it bounced out and all that proves is that Hunt needed glasses. [[note]] When England faced Germany at the 2010 World Cup and were, at 2-1 down, denied a similar goal, a lot of German fans said, "That was for '66." English fans were not amused and Germany went on to win [[CurbstompBattle 4-1]]. [[/note]]
** The Brazil teams of the 60's, featuring Pele, another candidate for the greatest player of all time (and usually named as such), and the phenomenally talented and tragically flawed Jairzinho, and of the early 80's, featuring the likes of cultured captain and midfielder Socrates (who later became a dentist) and Zico, an attacking midfielder of great flair widely considered to be one of the best of all time. The difference was, however, the former team won three World Cups (1958, 1962, 1970), their streak only interrupted by England's '66 win, while the latter were knocked out in the Quarter-Finals of the 1982 World Cup by eventual champions Italy.
** On a club level, the Liverpool team of the 1970's and 1980's was considered next to unstoppable, winning between 1975 and 1990, ''ten'' League titles, ''four'' European Cups (nowadays, known as the UsefulNotes/UEFAChampionsLeague), one UEFA Cup (like the European Cup's little brother), two FA Cups, four League Cups, one European Super Cup [[note]] Contested by the winners of the European Cup and UEFA Cup respectively [[/note]] and nine Community Shields [[note]] Similar to the previous, but between the title winners and the FA Cup winners, or the title winners and second place if a team did the league and cup double. [[/note]]. This incredible winning streak was made possible by the talents of first star striker Kevin Keegan, then his replacement (and some might argue, improvement) 'King' Kenny Dalglish, lightning fast Welsh striker Ian Rush who became the club's record scorer, cultured centre back Alan Hansen and swift and skilful winger John Barnes who once scored a goal for England against Brazil so good that the Brazilians, not easily impressed people, kept showing it on tv for months afterwards because it was ''just that good.'' His forays into rap are equally memorable, but for all the wrong reasons.
** More recently, the Barcelona team of the late Oughts to, arguably, the present day, starting out with the trademark 'tiki-taka' style of passing triangles, around opposition team members in a fashion that was, essentially, the legendary style of Total Football pioneered by the above mentioned Hungary team, in which every player can play every position and thereby shift interchangeably, confusing the hell out of the opposition. This worked like a charm and usually made whoever they were playing against look like complete idiots as this team, which revolved around playmakers Xavi and Andres Iniesta and was spearheaded by Lionel Messi (a serious candidate for the greatest player of all time - he's won 5 Ballon d'Or's, awarded annually to the best player in the world, and as of February 2016, he's only 28). It is no coincidence that at roughly the same time, the Spanish national team won the 2008 European Championship, the 2010 World Cup and the 2012 European Championship. It is also probably no coincidence that the 2014 World Cup, played when the powers of that squad were failing, [[EpicFail led to Spain going out at the Group Stage.]] Despite this hiccup, a change of style and the addition of Brazilian wunderkind Neymar and electric and controversial Uruguayan Luis Suarez, the two of whom formed a triad with Lionel Messi guaranteed to make any defender in the world wish that they'd brought the brown pants and Barcelona returned to nigh invincible type.
30th Jan '16 12:53:34 PM youngbond007
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* The TropeNamer is the 1992 American men's UsefulNotes/{{Olympic|Games}} basketball team. [[note]]Specifically a 1991 ''Sports Illustrated'' article about the team by Jack [=McCallum=]. However, while [=McCallum=] used the word "dream" a couple of times in his article, he says he did not come up with the cover blurb and doesn't know which editor at ''SI'' was responsible.[[/note]] The Americans had always been dominant in basketball at the Olympics, sending college basketball players to comply with amateur requirements. (Not all countries were so scrupulous on this point.) But a bronze medal in 1988 was embarrassing enough that for the first time [[UsefulNotes/NationalBasketballAssociation NBA]] players ([[MyFriendsAndZoidberg and Christian Laettner]]) were selected for the 1992 team after the International Basketball Federation officially opened the games to pros. It was almost certainly the greatest collection of talent ever assembled on one basketball team--and quite possibly any sport--with at least three players (Magic Johnson, Larry Bird, and UsefulNotes/MichaelJordan) often considered the best in their positions to ever play. Eleven of the twelve team members are in the Basketball Hall of Fame (as is the team itself), and the twelfth--Laettner--is considered one of the greatest college players of all time and went on to have a successful NBA career himself. Coach Chuck Daly remarked that it was like "[[ElvisPresley Elvis]] and Music/TheBeatles put together"; Bird joked that if they lost they "probably wouldn't be allowed back in the country." They won by an average of almost 44 points; the closest game saw them win by 32 against Croatia (who expressed gratitude to win the Silver medal [[ForegoneConclusion before the game was even played]]).

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* The TropeNamer is the 1992 American men's UsefulNotes/{{Olympic|Games}} basketball team. [[note]]Specifically a 1991 ''Sports Illustrated'' article about the team by Jack [=McCallum=]. However, while [=McCallum=] used the word "dream" a couple of times in his article, he says he did not come up with the cover blurb and doesn't know which editor at ''SI'' was responsible.[[/note]] The Americans had always been dominant in basketball at the Olympics, sending college basketball players to comply with amateur requirements. (Not all countries were so scrupulous on this point.) But a bronze medal in 1988 was embarrassing enough that for the first time [[UsefulNotes/NationalBasketballAssociation NBA]] players ([[MyFriendsAndZoidberg and Christian Laettner]]) Laettner from Duke University]]) were selected for the 1992 team after the International Basketball Federation officially opened the games to pros. It was almost certainly the greatest collection of talent ever assembled on one basketball team--and quite possibly any sport--with at least three players (Magic Johnson, Larry Bird, and UsefulNotes/MichaelJordan) often considered the best in their positions to ever play. Eleven of the twelve team members are in the Basketball Hall of Fame (as is the team itself), and the twelfth--Laettner--is considered one of the greatest college players of all time and went on to have a successful NBA career himself. Coach Chuck Daly remarked that it was like "[[ElvisPresley Elvis]] and Music/TheBeatles put together"; Bird joked that if they lost they "probably wouldn't be allowed back in the country." They won by an average of almost 44 points; the closest game saw them win by 32 against Croatia (who expressed gratitude to win the Silver medal [[ForegoneConclusion before the game was even played]]).
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.DreamTeam