History Main / Disneyfication

1st Dec '16 7:54:42 AM Prinzenick
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Examples from works by Disney [[DisneyFication/{{Disney}} have their own page.]]

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Examples from works by Disney Creator/{{Disney}} [[DisneyFication/{{Disney}} have their own page.]]
1st Dec '16 7:50:23 AM Prinzenick
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Examples from works by Disney [[{{Disneyfication}}/{{Disney}} have their own page.]]

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1st Dec '16 7:49:54 AM Prinzenick
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1st Dec '16 7:49:41 AM Prinzenick
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Examples from works by Disney [[{{Disneyfication}}/Disney have their own page.]]



[[folder: Disney]]
Disney, being the TropeNamer, frequently does this for their movies, especially ones that are based on a pre-existing story.

!!Animated Films
* Disney's animated features are by far the most frequent users of this trope:
** ''Disney/SnowWhiteAndTheSevenDwarfs''. The original script was actually closer to the original fairy tale than the final film, but due to pacing, money issues, and worries over OffModel animation, a lot of scenes had to be cut, including the two other times the Queen tries to kill Snow White (by giving her a poisoned comb and suffocating her by pulling her corset strings too tight). An interesting case is with the witch's death. In the original story, the queen is exposed for her crimes at Snow White's wedding to the prince, and is burned to death. In the Disney film, she is chased to the top of a cliff by the dwarves; as she tries to send a boulder down to crush them, the cliff is struck by lightning, [[DisneyVillainDeath she and the boulder fall off]], and she is at least killed from the high fall, and is also presumably crushed by the boulder and eaten by vultures. While the latter is seemingly darker than the former, keep in mind, this way it is nature getting revenge on the witch, not any of the heroes.
** ''Literature/TheAdventuresOfPinocchio'' already underwent this process when it was a book: There, Pinocchio is killed (still a puppet) by hanging, which author Carlo Collodi had planned to be the ending of the book. But on the publisher's demand Collodi added extra chapters in which Pinocchio not only is restored to life, but also becomes a real boy ([[EarnYourHappyEnding after a lot of hard and cruel life lessons, that is]]). When Disney made their ''Disney/{{Pinocchio}}'' movie, they in turn cut out the hanging completely, as well as other dark elements like Pinocchio [[spoiler:killing the cricket]]. The original also had Pinocchio, after he had been turned into a donkey, [[spoiler:being tossed into the sea to drown by his owner, and surviving only because his wooden body was lighter than water.]] Of course, much like ''The Hunchback of Notre Dame'', the film is still noted for being much grimmer than the average Disney affair, most notably retaining the villain's {{Karma Houdini}}s (and even adding another in the case of Foulfellow). There are few LighterAndSofter adaptations that depict hundreds of children being captured, transformed, and [[TheBadGuyWins successfully]] sent to a FateWorseThanDeath.
** ''Disney/{{Bambi}}'' compared to the novel its based on, ''Bambi: A Life In The Woods''. True, Bambi's mother dies in the film, but its tone still is significantly lighter than the novel's, which was much darker and more brutal, including graphic death scenes. They also never included Bambi's cousin Gobo's death. [[KissingCousins And they failed to mention Faline was his cousin!]]
** ''Disney/MakeMineMusic'': The story of ''Peter and the Wolf'' is changed around a bit, giving names to the various characters among other things.
** ''Disney/FunAndFancyFree'': A mild case for the Bongo half of the film. The original story also features a happy ending, but is still more cynical and violent. Notably, Bongo never becomes accepted by the other bears, his beloved rejects him for Lumpjaw, and the happy ending comes from another circus troupe finding him and re-introducing him to civilization.
** The UsefulNotes/JohnnyAppleseed story as presented in ''Disney/MelodyTime''. His life was originally much harder than it was presented in the film. It also plays up his positive qualities more and glosses over the fact that in real life, Johnny was a shrewd businessman and promoted his own religion.
** Once again, largely averted in ''Disney/TheAdventuresOfIchabodAndMrToad'', at least in the [[Literature/TheLegendOfSleepyHollow the "Ichabod"]] segment). Disney added a catchy musical number and some cartoon slapstick, and perhaps made Brom Bones a little meaner, but the GreyAndGrayMorality of the original story is largely preserved, and the end is still left ambiguous for the viewer to decide whether Ichabod really left town or was spirited away by the Headless Horseman. The [[Literature/TheWindInTheWillows Mr. Toad segment]], on the other hand, changes the story so that Toad is innocent, whereas in the book he really did steal the car.
** ''Disney/SleepingBeauty''. Besides the minor HijackedByJesus elements, we also have the fact that the only precaution to protect the princess in the original was the outlawing of spinning wheels; the princess slept for one hundred years, as opposed to just until PrinceCharming returned home; speaking of the Prince, he wasn't introduced until ''after'' those one hundred years had passed.
** In T. H. White's ''Literature/TheSwordInTheStone'', young Wart's education by the wizard Merlin contains powerful moral lessons that will help the young man face his future role as [[spoiler:Myth/KingArthur]]. [[Disney/TheSwordInTheStone The Disney version]] throws away all of the moral messages and replaces them with (admittedly sometimes very good) visual gags. Pretty much all of Sir Ector and Kay's character development was dropped in favor of making them a Disney-typical abusive family--for example, Kay in the book was only a couple years apart from Wart in age and was a companion and playmate, whereas the film turns him into a [[JerkAss cynical, surly bully]] to Wart.
** Creator/RudyardKipling's ''Literature/JungleBooks'' (yes, two of them) depict the orphaned Mowgli growing into a strong and intelligent young man whose jungle upbringing will make him something of a NobleSavage. Baloo was a sleepy [[GrumpyBear grump]] with a HiddenHeartOfGold, rather than a kindly GentleGiant. Kaa the python, while large, intimidating, and alien, is one of Mowgli's ''allies'', not enemies. Hathi the elephant is wise and powerful and when he tells Shere Khan to clear off ("How Fear Came"), the tiger does so -- he is not a pompous ass who fancies himself a Victoria Cross-winning British Army colonel. There is quite a lot of violence, too. At one point Kaa hypnotizes a troupe of monkeys into becoming his helpless (ahem) dinner guests; later on Mowgli and the wolves kill Shere Khan by a stampede of water-buffalo over him. (In the Disney version he doesn't even die!) The story "Red Dog" has Mowgli cause the marauding dogs of the title to be attacked by millions of angry bees; those who jump in the river to survive are attacked by Mowgli with a knife; and those left then face Mowgli ''and'' his enraged wolf pack. And incidentally, Mowgli does most of this while he's naked. It should come as no surprise that none of the violence or nudity makes it into the Disney version, but Disney not only censors the story but effectively throws out every last original plot thread. A documentary on the DVD explains how Disney's writers "improved" on the original, but in fact it becomes clear that what they really did was to whittle away at the original storyline until there was almost nothing left except for a few almost coincidental similarities. They can't even pronounce Mowgli's name right. ("''Mow'' rhymes with ''cow''", says Kipling.) All this can be easily explained by the fact that Walt Disney specifically told the production crew ''not'' to read the book. He gave an outline on the characters and plot ideas he wanted and didn't want the book itself to be used as a reference - specially as the original script and songs, inspired by the book, had a bit more darkness than is usual in a Disney film (to the point that the writer was ditched despite a long story with Disney, and the only song kept before changing composers was a cheery tune that became the SignatureSong of the film, "The Bear Necessities").
** The story of RobinHood had been thoroughly bowdlerised before Walt Disney was born, and [[Disney/RobinHood their take on it]] is actually far from the worst abuse of the mythos. To be fair, the narrator outright admits that everybody has their own version of the story (true enough) and that this was just the version that the animals tell.
** ''Disney/TheFoxAndTheHound''. In the [[Literature/TheFoxAndTheHound original book]], [[spoiler: Tod and Copper were never friends to begin with, Tod loses his first mate to a trap and his second to the hunter, Chief doesn't survive his encounter with that train, and at the end Tod dies of exhaustion while being relentlessly chased by Copper and his master. And then Copper is [[ShootTheDog literally shot in the head]] by his owner to avoid having to abandon him.]]
** ''Disney/TheBlackCauldron'' mishmashed plot elements from the first two books of Creator/LloydAlexander's ''Literature/ChroniclesOfPrydain'' (''The Book of Three'' and ''The Black Cauldron''), gave the amalgamated villain an annoying sidekick, turned the truculent dwarves into cute little pixies, and made beast-man Gurgi a cutesy animal character. No songs, though, and about 15 minutes of the film were removed for concerns about being too "dark" (said scenes were presumably more true to the book).
** ''Disney/TheLittleMermaid'' gets a happy ending, unlike the bittersweet fate of the mermaid in [[Literature/TheLittleMermaid the original tale]] by Creator/HansChristianAndersen. Also, in the original story, the sea witch was a TrueNeutral character. In the movie, she's named Ursula and upgraded to the BigBad.
** ''Disney/BeautyAndTheBeast'' is a notable aversion of this, as the Disney adaptation is [[http://dettoldisney.wordpress.com/2011/11/11/beauty-and-the-beast-vs-la-belle-et-la-bete/ darker than the original fairy tale.]]
** ''Disney/{{Aladdin}}'': The story is drastically different from the original, and is a complete 180 in tone from the stories of the ''Literature/ArabianNights''. For starters, they were definetely '''not''' family or kid aimed tales; they covered adult subjects like forced marriage, infidelity, serial uxoricide, and explicit descriptions of human anatomy ... and that's just in the ''frame story''! And that's not even getting into the parts where Scheherazade starts rambling on about corpse-tearing ghouls, bestiality, or [[GagPenis penis humor,]] and the inherent ValuesDissonance and sometimes racist content in the stories. The Disney Aladdin removes all of this to make the film appropriate for kids and families. In the original story, Aladdin had ''two'' genies - a weaker one in a ring, and the stronger one in the lamp - and had ''no limit'' on the number of tasks he could set them to. Yes, he won the hand of a princess, but that was barely the midpoint of the story; the evil wizard who had first used Aladdin to try to retrieve the lamp (and who had no connection to the princess in any way) was not quickly disposed of but instead discovered Aladdin's success, and successfully stole the lamp (and the princess, and Aladdin's palace, and almost everything else) with the clever ruse of "New lamps for old!" Aladdin had to win everything back from the wizard using his wits and the lesser genie he still had in his ring. There weren't any cute animal companions, magic carpets hadn't been thought up when the story was written, and the princess didn't have much of a part - she ranged from ruining everything by giving away the lamp, all the way down to being eye candy only present for Aladdin to marry.
** If you take ''Disney/TheLionKing'' as a version of Hamlet, then it Disneyfies it in spades! Everyone has different names, and are portrayed as animals who can talk and sing. Additionally, none of the main characters die except for the protagonist's father and uncle. When the protagonist sees his father's ghost imploring him to avenge him, the movie makes it clear that the ghost really did appear to him, as opposed to acknowledging the possibility that the protagonist only hallucinated the spirit. The movie also ends with the protagonist and his love interest becoming king and queen and having a daughter, since the script doesn't kill them off.
*** The DirectToVideo [[Disney/TheLionKingIISimbasPride sequel]] is, similarly, a Disneyfied ''Theatre/RomeoAndJuliet''. Among other changes, the main couple directly help their feuding families make peace instead of killing themselves.
** ''Disney/{{Pocahontas}}'' shredded everything we know about the historical woman. For one thing, she was between 10 and 12 years old when she first met John Smith, making a romantic relationship unlikely at best. Her father had fifty wives and many children. She was taken to Jamestown as a hostage and married before her trip to London, and no Armada was threatening to annihilate her people. John Smith was not a Prince Charming type, but in fact an unattractive, short man with a giant woolly beard. The only bit they got right was her saving Smith from execution, and even that is considered by some historians to be the enactment of a ritual (and thus Smith wasn't in any real danger). [[UnreliableNarrator Still other historians suspect Smith of making up the entire story, since it doesn't appear until he wrote his memoirs, four years after her ''death'']]. And she didn't actually marry John Smith. She married John ''Rolfe''. In real life, John Smith was more of a father-type figure to her than a love interest.
** ''Disney/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame''. You wouldn't think Creator/VictorHugo's [[Literature/TheHunchbackOfNotreDame original novel]] would be suitable fare for a children's movie. Despite being one of Disney's darkest movies, they still made it much nicer than the book -- Esmeralda was nicer, Phoebus was nicer, Quasimodo was nicer, there was a clearer line between good and evil, and the good guys didn't all die or kill themselves at the end. Even more strangely, the Disney movie is actually ''darker'' than the novel in a few respects; gypsy genocide isn't on the agenda at all in the book, nor is Paris burned. Also, Disney changed Quasimodo's public humiliation from simple corporal punishment to the whim of a sadistic crowd.
*** Strangely, the film owes a fair bit more to the 1939 movie based on the novel. And speaking of the clearer line between good and evil, Frollo alone makes the movie ''incredibly'' dark for a Disney flick by being the most twisted villain they ever came up with. And strangely, unlike the other examples, ''he was nicer in the book''
** ''Disney/{{Hercules}}'' not only has a HijackedByJesus style, but also implies that the Greek gods had wholesome family values, when in the original mythologies, having extramarital relations, whether with mortals or other gods, was a boredom-relieving exercise. The [[EverybodyHatesHades Disneyfication of Hades]] from DarkIsNotEvil to BigBad is pretty amazing. They took the Greek concept of the Underworld and Hades (which was more or less a neutral judging point) and spun it to better resemble Hell and the Devil. Complete with imp minions. Luckily, [[ChewingTheScenery James Woods]] is a great actor. They also made him quite [[DeadpanSnarker cynical]] (and possibly the OnlySaneMan), which only helped. In the original myth, not only was Heracles the product of an extramarital affair (with a mortal woman, Alcmene), but Hera loathed him and tried multiple times to torture and kill him. At one stage, she inflicted a madness on him that drove him to murder his children and his first wife, Megara - and it was Heracles who had to carry out penance for this in the form of the Twelve Labours. That's right, not only were the Gods petty and promiscuous; since they couldn't hurt their fellow Gods, they would attack the mortals who worshipped and championed them instead.
** ''{{Disney/Tarzan}}'' is a case where Disneyfication ''improved'' the original work. For instance, Burrough's virulent racist and xenophobic material was removed and a century's worth of scientific research about the true peaceful nature of gorillas was incorporated into the story.
** ''Literature/TheSteadfastTinSoldier'' was given a happy ending by Disney in ''Disney/{{Fantasia 2000}}'', partly from the SoundtrackDissonance that would occur if they did keep the original ending. The animators had storyboarded the sequence ending with the tin soldier and the ballerina melting into a heart-shape, but it was unused.
*** Amazingly enough, the Disney short film adaptation of ''{{Literature/The Little Match Girl}}'' (intended for the abandoned ''Fantasia Continues'', but finished as a standalone short), another [[SarcasmMode cheery]] Hans Christian Andersen tale, averts this almost completely. The little girl is still a poor beggar, and she still freezes to death in an alley, like she did in the story. The only changes that were made were made for time or aesthetic: The abusive parents angle was absent, and the story was set in Russia instead of Denmark to avoid {{Soundtrack Dissonance}}.
** ''Disney/TreasurePlanet'': Silver isn't anywhere as nice in the original ''Literature/TreasureIsland'' book. And Billy Bones was a most unwelcome guest at the Benbow, staying several months before he died. And Mr. Arrow was a drunk.
** Notably subverted with ''[[Film/AChristmasCarol2009 Disney's A Christmas Carol]]''. In spite of [[NeverTrustATrailer the marketing making it look like a lighthearted comedy]], it is in reality one of the most accurate (not to mention darkest and scariest) adaptations of the novel out there.
** ''Disney/{{Tangled}}'' skips the TeenPregnancy[[note]]The orignal fairy tale ''itself'' had actually already been Disneyficated - in the first version she reveals her visiting lover to her "mother" by asking "Why is my dress getting so tight around my belly?", indicating what kind of action they were getting on during his visits; in Grimm's second version this line was changed to "Mother, you are so much lighter to lift up than my lover!"[[/note]] and [[spoiler: has Flynn get a [[BloodlessCarnage rather clean]] stab wound at the end, instead of having his eyes gouged out. Although one could argue that the two balanced out, since Flynn actually ''dies'', only to be brought back.]] The film was originally much darker until directors changed partway, though it still lacked either of those aspects.
** {{Disney/Frozen}} actually ''[[InvertedTrope inverts]]'' this trope, oddly enough. It does take a great deal of creative liberties with [[Literature/TheSnowQueen the source material]], to the point that the story is barely recognizable. However, the result is actually in many respects quite a bit darker than the original.

!!Short Cartoons
* The story of the ''Literature/ThreeLittlePigs'' originally had the first two pigs eaten by the wolf after their houses were blown down. The [[Disney/ThreeLittlePigs Disney cartoon]] of the story allowed them to run to the next house before the wolf could get his meal. The original has the big bad wolf being boiled alive after he attempts to gain access to the brick house via the chimney, whereas the Disney version simply has the wolf burning his hand and running away scared. Some other sanitized versions will have the wolf pass out from the exhaustion of trying to blow the third house down.
* Disney's 1953 short cartoon adaptation of Robert Lawson's 1939 book ''Ben and Me'' is a borderline InNameOnly adaptation. The book focused more heavily on actual historical events and personages, and included incidents from Franklin's French career at Versailles, which is thrown out in favor of a LighterAndSofter comedic story. According to the book ''Chuck Jones Conversations'', the reason for this was because the films director, Ham Luske, hadn't even read the book.
* The short "The Brave Engineer". In real life, John Luther "Casey" Jones actually died in the train crash. The Disney cartoon [[SparedByTheAdaptation lets him live.]]

!!Live Action Films
* ''Literature/MaryPoppins'' began as a series of seven books about a quite snarky and unpleasant magical nanny. Particularly towards the final books, the series become increasingly bizarre and increasingly interested in mythology, mysticism, and herbalism (as was [[AuthorAppeal its author, P. L. Travers]], a devotee of Theosophy). It's all a far cry from the [[Film/MaryPoppins Disney film version]], which Travers loathed.
--> Inside the packed twelve-hundred-seat theatre, the members of the audience responded to the movie with enthusiasm: they gave it a five-minute standing ovation. In the midst of the celebrating crowd, it would have been easy to overlook [[http://www.newyorker.com/archive/2005/12/19/051219fa_fact1?currentPage=all the sixty-five-year-old woman sitting there, weeping.]] The film ''Film/SavingMrBanks'' tells the story of Travers' doomed attempts to make the production of the film stick to her conception of the characters. Ironically, this film Disneyfies the true story.
* ''Film/BedknobsAndBroomsticks'', Disney's so-called adaptation of Mary Norton's ''Literature/BedknobAndBroomstick'', dropped the original book's ''entire plot'', and instead created a new one from whole cloth involving Eglantine Price's attempt to learn magic solely in order to help the British effort in UsefulNotes/WorldWarTwo. Along the way, a medieval sorcerer became a modern con-man, an island of {{Talking Animal}}s was added apparently just to give Disney's animation division something to do that year, and a climactic battle scene of magically powered suits of plate armor versus a Nazi invasion force replaced the book's much more low-key conclusion. Oh, and they made it a musical. A major plot element complete with its own musical number, critical to the climax of the film, was conjured up out of a random two-word phrase ("substitutiary locomotion") that appears only once in a minor conversation on which the children eavesdrop in the book. And on top of all that, they pluralized both nouns in the title, as a nod to when Norton published the second part of the book as ''Bonfires and Broomsticks''.
* ''Film/AKidInKingArthursCourt'': The Disney adaptation does this to Mark Twain's novel ''Literature/AConnecticutYankeeInKingArthursCourt''. The book was a satire and GenreDeconstruction of Arthurian lore that ended on a pretty depressing note, with the protagonist having all his achievements undone, then losing his friends, family and mind before finally dying. In this film, almost the entire plot is thrown out in favor of a more conventional children's film with a hip, young protagonist, a Camelot that wouldn't be out of place in a theme park, and an unambiguously happy ending.
* Oddly enough, ''Film/{{Newsies}}'' is not a particularly {{egregious}} example of Disneyfication. It's safe to say that the New York newsboys of 1899 didn't burst into spontaneous well-choreographed musical numbers as they walked the streets, and the violence occurring as a result of the strike is a bit sanitized (no blood); but we do see newsboys sleeping on the streets, smoking cigars, betting on races, beating up strikebreakers, et cetera. Of course, one must point out that the newspapers ''never actually lowered their prices'' in the end; they came to an agreement with the newsies where they agreed to buy back their unsold papers. While this agreement was pretty mutually beneficial, clearly the idea of the rag-tag kids' union getting everything they wanted in the end was too good for Disney to pass up.
* ''Film/TheNorthAvenueIrregulars'' gives [[Literature/TheNorthAvenueIrregulars the original story]] a happier, and much more chaotic, ending. Rather than just having to settle for making a dent in TheMafia, these Irregulars take down the entire local operation in an impromptu demolition derby.
* ''Film/LemonadeMouth'' offers a modern example - Charlie's [[AngstySurvivingTwin stillborn twin brother]] is replaced with an older brother who's away at college.
* ''Film/IntoTheWoods'' is a mixed bag. It's less risque than the [[Theatre/IntoTheWoods original production]], but nonetheless contains many dark themes and plays around with them. For instance, [[spoiler:the affair with the Prince and the Baker's Wife]] is kept intact, albeit with ambiguity of how far it went. In addition, the sexual subtext between The Big Bad Wolf and Little Red Riding Hood are kept in and made creepier with the fact that an actual little girl played her, rather than an adult in a costume. However, [[spoiler:Jack's mother's death]] is not as grisly as the original production, and [[spoiler:Rapunzel does not die]] in this version.

!!Live Action TV
* The Series/WaltDisneyPresents TV Show Series/TheSwampFox softened a few things too. The blacks, like Marion's servant Oscar and the maid Dehlia, are just called 'servants' or for the men 'boys', they're never indicated to be slaves. And of course, there's no mention of how Marion, like many slave owners,sometimes raped female slaves. The Tories are made more out and out bad guys, when things were a lot more complex during the real American Revolution. Canada, the birthplace of series lead Leslie Nielsen, actually banned the series because of that part. And Marion's wife, Mary Videaux, was also his cousin, and that got cut.
* Present-day original Creator/DisneyChannel shows aren't exempt either - the third season of ''KickinIt'' had the 15/16yo main characters throw a huge Halloween bash at a place they were house-sitting while the B-plot involved people being chased by scary rednecks. Alcohol and guns, respectively, were glaringly absent.
* ''Series/DoctorSynTheScarecrow'' completely excises the title character's dark history as a pirate and his BackStory of pursuing an unfaithful wife to America--instead he's just an intelligent vicar who at some point decided to help his parishioners by leading smugglers as "The Scarecrow". That said, it can still get pretty dark, what with the second episode's fake hanging and all.

!!Video Games
* Disney managed to do this to ''themselves'' by censoring some things in ''KingdomHearts II'''s [[Franchise/PiratesOfTheCaribbean Port Royal]] level. Such as removing the part where Will aims a gun at his own head, giving the Rifle wielding [[GhostPirate Undead]] {{Pirate}}s Crossbows instead, and toning down the special effects on Undead Pirates hit with magic spells. All of this was done in order to keep the game at a E10+ rating. An attempt which ultimately failed, because they left the scene where Undead!Barbossa drinks a bottle of wine to scare Elizabeth in the game.

!!Real Life / Ride/DisneyThemeParks
* Disney's dulling-down of subject matter actually extends into the physical world -- real estate, in particular. The differences between New York City's Times Square before Disney took over most of 42nd Street and Times Square afterward are profound and at times somewhat depressing. Yes, it's cleaner and more family-friendly and a fair bit safer to walk around after dark, but sometimes it seems about as real as Main Street USA.
* Disney actually went back and did this to an attraction in [[Ride/DisneyThemeParks Tokyo Disney Sea]]. The Literature/SinbadTheSailor attraction went from a telling of all of Sinbad's daring adventures and the dangers he faced along the way though in a rather stylized Mary Blair fashion to a sanitized TastesLikeDiabetes version with a happy Alan Menken song, Sinbad given a clean shave and a tiger cub sidekick, and all the monsters becoming Sinbad's friends or helping him along the way that brings to mind "it's a small world".
** Another Disney example is Walt Disney World's ''The [=ExtraTERRORestrial=] Alien Encounter'' becoming ''Stitch's Great Escape!'' The original attraction, the theme parks' darkest, had the trapped audience menaced in the dark by a deadly Xenomorph-like alien. Because it fell firmly into WhatDoYouMeanItsNotForKids territory, it was revamped into a prequel to ''Disney/LiloAndStitch'' in which the audience need not fear for its life and the worst thing Stitch does is belch in one's face. Since it didn't completely mitigate the frightening conceit of being trapped in the dark, however, the attraction not only alienated (so to speak) the original's fanbase but let down families hoping for harmless fun.
** The three versions of Epcot's Journey into Imagination ride depict a process of de-Disneyfying a concept and then Disneyfying the result! Originally the musical salute to imagination was drenched in colorful whimsy -- ZeppelinsFromAnotherWorld, a purple dragon named Figment, etc. In 1999, it was completely overhauled into a mundane-by-comparison non-musical tour through the "Imagination Institute" built primarily around optical illusions; EccentricMentor Dreamfinder was completely excised and Figment got only a cameo or two. This version went over so poorly that designers were assigned to take it and put some of the whimsy back in. In the third version, the tour is ''supposed'' to be ordered and mundane, but Figment playfully disrupts it again and again to prove that imagination needs room to run wild. And there's ''a lot'' of singing. While it will never replace the original in the hearts of Disney park die-hards, general consensus is that the third version's significantly better than the second.

!!Other studios now or once owned by Disney have adopted the practice as well
* The anti-religious theme of Miramax Films' 2000 [[TheFilmOfTheBook film of the book]] ''{{Film/Chocolat}}'' was softened by replacing the bitter churchman of the book with a town representative. Also, the town itself was made to look drab and ugly in the opening acts, when the very first scene in the book describes the heroine and her daughter watching a bright parade through the streets of the same town. The most {{egregious}} change is the ending -- the novel contained a brief, drunken hookup between the heroine and a male supporting character, leaving her pregnant as she left the village to continue drifting. In the movie, the relationship between her and the man is developed into a full romantic subplot, he returns at the end, and the heroine decides she doesn't need to leave the village, breaking the cycle.
* The 1995 Hollywood Pictures film version of ''Film/TheScarletLetter'' starring Creator/DemiMoore not only has [[spoiler: Hester, Dimmesdale, and Pearl riding off into the sunset, but also Dimmesdale is saved from hanging by a convenient tribe of Native Americans]]. Though to be entirely fair, director Roland Joffe explicitly stated that the film was only very "loosely" based on the book.
* Fairies in general. Case in point: Tinker Bell (who [[KilledOffForReal dies for real]] in [[Literature/PeterPan the original novel]]). Though you do see some of it peeking through in the first ''Disney/PeterPan'' movie, all traces of traditional TheFairFolk sociopathy are gone in later appearances. By ''Franchise/DisneyFairies'' it is completely gone and Tinkerbell is a more mellow PluckyGirl.
[[/folder]]
30th Nov '16 9:39:14 AM Prinzenick
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** ''Disney/SnowWhiteAndTheSevenDwarfs''. The original script was actually closer to the original fairy tale than the final film, but due to pacing, money issues, and worries over OffModel animation, a lot of scenes had to be cut, including the two other times the Queen tries to kill Snow White (by giving her a poisoned comb and suffocating her by pulling her corset strings too tight). An interesting case is with the witch's death. In the original story, the queen is exposed for her crimes at Snow White's wedding to the prince, and is burned to death. In the Disney film, she is chased to the top of a cliff by the dwarves; as she tries to send a boulder down to crush them, the cliff is struck by lightning, [[DisneyVillainDeath she and the boulder fall off]], and she is presumably crushed and eaten by vultures[[note]]Note that we never actually ''see'' her die / dead. There is a WMG theory that she survived the fall off the cliff and is Mother Gothel from Disney/{{Tangled}}. Once she found the flower which gave her youth / eternal life, Snow White's beauty wasn't an issue to her anymore, and she lived a few centuries until Rapunzels parents took away the flower[[/note]]. While the latter is seemingly darker than the former, keep in mind, this way it is nature getting revenge on the witch, not any of the heroes.

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** ''Disney/SnowWhiteAndTheSevenDwarfs''. The original script was actually closer to the original fairy tale than the final film, but due to pacing, money issues, and worries over OffModel animation, a lot of scenes had to be cut, including the two other times the Queen tries to kill Snow White (by giving her a poisoned comb and suffocating her by pulling her corset strings too tight). An interesting case is with the witch's death. In the original story, the queen is exposed for her crimes at Snow White's wedding to the prince, and is burned to death. In the Disney film, she is chased to the top of a cliff by the dwarves; as she tries to send a boulder down to crush them, the cliff is struck by lightning, [[DisneyVillainDeath she and the boulder fall off]], and she is at least killed from the high fall, and is also presumably crushed by the boulder and eaten by vultures[[note]]Note that we never actually ''see'' her die / dead. There is a WMG theory that she survived the fall off the cliff and is Mother Gothel from Disney/{{Tangled}}. Once she found the flower which gave her youth / eternal life, Snow White's beauty wasn't an issue to her anymore, and she lived a few centuries until Rapunzels parents took away the flower[[/note]].vultures. While the latter is seemingly darker than the former, keep in mind, this way it is nature getting revenge on the witch, not any of the heroes.
26th Nov '16 11:27:21 AM Morgenthaler
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A SubTrope of {{Bowdlerise}}. Compare SadlyMythtaken (often caused by this). Contrast {{Grimmification}}. Not to be confused with {{Disneyesque}}, which is emulating the stereotypical visual style of Disney animated movies, but not necessarily emulating the tone.

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A SubTrope of {{Bowdlerise}}. Compare AbridgedForChildren, when this happens to the original work. See also SadlyMythtaken (often caused by this). Contrast {{Grimmification}}. Not to be confused with {{Disneyesque}}, which is emulating the stereotypical visual style of Disney animated movies, but not necessarily emulating the tone.
25th Nov '16 9:48:53 AM Prinzenick
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Film/TheWizardOfOz'': The original L. Frank Baum books contain a surprising amount of casual and sometimes decidedly un-PC violence: in the first one alone besides the wholesale witchicide the Scarecrow twists the necks of crows sent to attack them, the Tin Woodsman chops the heads off vicious wolves, and the Cowardly Lion swats the head off a giant spider with his paw. And, of course, the Tin Woodsman became tin by gradually having all his bits cut off and replaced up to and including his head. Additionally in the book Dorothy intentionally throws the bucket of water on the Wicked Witch after she's mean to the Cowardly Lion (she doesn't know it'll make her melt of course). The film changes this to Dorothy trying to put out a fire on the Scarecrow's arms and the water accidentally splashing on the Witch.
21st Nov '16 7:06:13 PM eowynjedi
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to:

* ''Series/DoctorSynTheScarecrow'' completely excises the title character's dark history as a pirate and his BackStory of pursuing an unfaithful wife to America--instead he's just an intelligent vicar who at some point decided to help his parishioners by leading smugglers as "The Scarecrow". That said, it can still get pretty dark, what with the second episode's fake hanging and all.
19th Nov '16 8:25:47 PM LB7979
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** ''Disney/{{Tangled}}'' skips the TeenPregnancy and [[spoiler: has Flynn get a [[BloodlessCarnage rather clean]] stab wound at the end, instead of having his eyes gouged out. Although one could argue that the two balanced out, since Flynn actually ''dies'', only to be brought back.]] The film was originally much darker until directors changed partway, though it still lacked either of those aspects.

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** ''Disney/{{Tangled}}'' skips the TeenPregnancy TeenPregnancy[[note]]The orignal fairy tale ''itself'' had actually already been Disneyficated - in the first version she reveals her visiting lover to her "mother" by asking "Why is my dress getting so tight around my belly?", indicating what kind of action they were getting on during his visits; in Grimm's second version this line was changed to "Mother, you are so much lighter to lift up than my lover!"[[/note]] and [[spoiler: has Flynn get a [[BloodlessCarnage rather clean]] stab wound at the end, instead of having his eyes gouged out. Although one could argue that the two balanced out, since Flynn actually ''dies'', only to be brought back.]] The film was originally much darker until directors changed partway, though it still lacked either of those aspects.
19th Nov '16 8:10:19 PM LB7979
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** ''Disney/SnowWhiteAndTheSevenDwarfs''. The original script was actually closer to the original fairy tale than the final film, but due to pacing, money issues, and worries over OffModel animation, a lot of scenes had to be cut, including the two other times the Queen tries to kill Snow White (by giving her a poisoned comb and suffocating her by pulling her corset strings too tight). An interesting case is with the witch's death. In the original story, the queen is exposed for her crimes at Snow White's wedding to the prince, and is burned to death. In the Disney film, she is chased to the top of a cliff by the dwarves; as she tries to send a boulder down to crush them, the cliff is struck by lightning, [[DisneyVillainDeath she and the boulder fall off]], and she is presumably crushed and eaten by vultures. While the latter is seemingly darker than the former, keep in mind, this way it is nature getting revenge on the witch, not any of the heroes.

to:

** ''Disney/SnowWhiteAndTheSevenDwarfs''. The original script was actually closer to the original fairy tale than the final film, but due to pacing, money issues, and worries over OffModel animation, a lot of scenes had to be cut, including the two other times the Queen tries to kill Snow White (by giving her a poisoned comb and suffocating her by pulling her corset strings too tight). An interesting case is with the witch's death. In the original story, the queen is exposed for her crimes at Snow White's wedding to the prince, and is burned to death. In the Disney film, she is chased to the top of a cliff by the dwarves; as she tries to send a boulder down to crush them, the cliff is struck by lightning, [[DisneyVillainDeath she and the boulder fall off]], and she is presumably crushed and eaten by vultures.vultures[[note]]Note that we never actually ''see'' her die / dead. There is a WMG theory that she survived the fall off the cliff and is Mother Gothel from Disney/{{Tangled}}. Once she found the flower which gave her youth / eternal life, Snow White's beauty wasn't an issue to her anymore, and she lived a few centuries until Rapunzels parents took away the flower[[/note]]. While the latter is seemingly darker than the former, keep in mind, this way it is nature getting revenge on the witch, not any of the heroes.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.Disneyfication