History Main / Disneyfication

28th Apr '16 8:44:03 PM Pichu-kun
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* ''Literature/TheAdventuresOfPinocchio'' already underwent this process when it was a book: There, Pinocchio is killed (still a puppet) by hanging, which author Carlo Collodi had planned to be the ending of the book. But on the publisher's demand Collodi added extra chapters in which Pinocchio not only is restored to life, but also becomes a real boy ([[EarnYourHappyEnding after a lot of hard and cruel life lessons, that is]]). When Disney made their ''Disney/{{Pinocchio}}'' movie, they in turn cut out the hanging completely, as well as other dark elements like Pinocchio [[spoiler:killing the cricket]]. The original also had Pinocchio, after he had been turned into a donkey, [[spoiler:being tossed into the sea to drown by his owner, and surviving only because his wooden body was lighter than water.]]
** Of course, much like ''The Hunchback of Notre Dame'', the film is still noted for being much grimmer than the average Disney affair, most notably retaining the villain's {{Karma Houdini}}s (and even adding another in the case of Foulfellow). There are few LighterAndSofter adaptations that depict hundreds of children being captured, transformed, and [[TheBadGuyWins successfully]] sent to a FateWorseThanDeath.

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* ''Literature/TheAdventuresOfPinocchio'' already underwent this process when it was a book: There, Pinocchio is killed (still a puppet) by hanging, which author Carlo Collodi had planned to be the ending of the book. But on the publisher's demand Collodi added extra chapters in which Pinocchio not only is restored to life, but also becomes a real boy ([[EarnYourHappyEnding after a lot of hard and cruel life lessons, that is]]). When Disney made their ''Disney/{{Pinocchio}}'' movie, they in turn cut out the hanging completely, as well as other dark elements like Pinocchio [[spoiler:killing the cricket]]. The original also had Pinocchio, after he had been turned into a donkey, [[spoiler:being tossed into the sea to drown by his owner, and surviving only because his wooden body was lighter than water.]]
**
]] Of course, much like ''The Hunchback of Notre Dame'', the film is still noted for being much grimmer than the average Disney affair, most notably retaining the villain's {{Karma Houdini}}s (and even adding another in the case of Foulfellow). There are few LighterAndSofter adaptations that depict hundreds of children being captured, transformed, and [[TheBadGuyWins successfully]] sent to a FateWorseThanDeath.



--> Inside the packed twelve-hundred-seat theatre, the members of the audience responded to the movie with enthusiasm: they gave it a five-minute standing ovation. In the midst of the celebrating crowd, it would have been easy to overlook [[http://www.newyorker.com/archive/2005/12/19/051219fa_fact1?currentPage=all the sixty-five-year-old woman sitting there, weeping.]]
** The film ''Film/SavingMrBanks'' tells the story of Travers' doomed attempts to make the production of the film stick to her conception of the characters. Ironically, this film Disneyfies the true story.
* ''Disney/{{Pocahontas}}'' shredded everything we know about the historical woman. For one thing, she was between 10 and 12 years old when she first met John Smith, making a romantic relationship unlikely at best. Her father had fifty wives and many children. She was taken to Jamestown as a hostage and married before her trip to London, and no Armada was threatening to annihilate her people. John Smith was not a Prince Charming type, but in fact an unattractive, short man with a giant woolly beard. The only bit they got right was her saving Smith from execution, and even that is considered by some historians to be the enactment of a ritual (and thus Smith wasn't in any real danger). [[UnreliableNarrator Still other historians suspect Smith of making up the entire story, since it doesn't appear until he wrote his memoirs, four years after her ''death'']].
** And she didn't actually marry John Smith. She married John ''Rolfe''. The sequel addresses this, albeit in an inaccurate way, playing with drama between the two Johns. Still, in real life John Smith wasn't even competition: he was more of a father-type figure to her than a love interest.

to:

--> Inside the packed twelve-hundred-seat theatre, the members of the audience responded to the movie with enthusiasm: they gave it a five-minute standing ovation. In the midst of the celebrating crowd, it would have been easy to overlook [[http://www.newyorker.com/archive/2005/12/19/051219fa_fact1?currentPage=all the sixty-five-year-old woman sitting there, weeping.]]
**
]] The film ''Film/SavingMrBanks'' tells the story of Travers' doomed attempts to make the production of the film stick to her conception of the characters. Ironically, this film Disneyfies the true story.
* ''Disney/{{Pocahontas}}'' shredded everything we know about the historical woman. For one thing, she was between 10 and 12 years old when she first met John Smith, making a romantic relationship unlikely at best. Her father had fifty wives and many children. She was taken to Jamestown as a hostage and married before her trip to London, and no Armada was threatening to annihilate her people. John Smith was not a Prince Charming type, but in fact an unattractive, short man with a giant woolly beard. The only bit they got right was her saving Smith from execution, and even that is considered by some historians to be the enactment of a ritual (and thus Smith wasn't in any real danger). [[UnreliableNarrator Still other historians suspect Smith of making up the entire story, since it doesn't appear until he wrote his memoirs, four years after her ''death'']].
**
''death'']]. And she didn't actually marry John Smith. She married John ''Rolfe''. The sequel addresses this, albeit in an inaccurate way, playing with drama between the two Johns. Still, in real life John Smith wasn't even competition: he was more of a father-type figure to her than a love interest.



* Creator/RudyardKipling's ''Literature/JungleBooks'' (yes, two of them) depict the orphaned Mowgli growing into a strong and intelligent young man whose jungle upbringing will make him something of a NobleSavage. Baloo was a sleepy [[GrumpyBear grump]] with a HiddenHeartOfGold, rather than a kindly GentleGiant. Kaa the python, while large, intimidating, and alien, is one of Mowgli's ''allies'', not enemies. Hathi the elephant is wise and powerful and when he tells Shere Khan to clear off ("How Fear Came"), the tiger does so -- he is not a pompous ass who fancies himself a Victoria Cross-winning British Army colonel. There is quite a lot of violence, too. At one point Kaa hypnotizes a troupe of monkeys into becoming his helpless (ahem) dinner guests; later on Mowgli and the wolves kill Shere Khan by a stampede of water-buffalo over him. (In the Disney version he doesn't even die!) The story "Red Dog" has Mowgli cause the marauding dogs of the title to be attacked by millions of angry bees; those who jump in the river to survive are attacked by Mowgli with a knife; and those left then face Mowgli ''and'' his enraged wolf pack. And incidentally, Mowgli does most of this while he's naked. It should come as no surprise that none of the violence or nudity makes it into the Disney version, but Disney not only censors the story but effectively throws out every last original plot thread. A documentary on the DVD explains how Disney's writers "improved" on the original, but in fact it becomes clear that what they really did was to whittle away at the original storyline until there was almost nothing left except for a few almost coincidental similarities. They can't even pronounce Mowgli's name right. ("''Mow'' rhymes with ''cow''", says Kipling.)
** All this can be easily explained by the fact that Walt Disney specifically told the production crew ''not'' to read the book. He gave an outline on the characters and plot ideas he wanted and didn't want the book itself to be used as a reference - specially as the original script and songs, inspired by the book, had a bit more darkness than is usual in a Disney film (to the point that the writer was ditched despite a long story with Disney, and the only song kept before changing composers was a cheery tune that became the SignatureSong of the film, "The Bear Necessities").

to:

* Creator/RudyardKipling's ''Literature/JungleBooks'' (yes, two of them) depict the orphaned Mowgli growing into a strong and intelligent young man whose jungle upbringing will make him something of a NobleSavage. Baloo was a sleepy [[GrumpyBear grump]] with a HiddenHeartOfGold, rather than a kindly GentleGiant. Kaa the python, while large, intimidating, and alien, is one of Mowgli's ''allies'', not enemies. Hathi the elephant is wise and powerful and when he tells Shere Khan to clear off ("How Fear Came"), the tiger does so -- he is not a pompous ass who fancies himself a Victoria Cross-winning British Army colonel. There is quite a lot of violence, too. At one point Kaa hypnotizes a troupe of monkeys into becoming his helpless (ahem) dinner guests; later on Mowgli and the wolves kill Shere Khan by a stampede of water-buffalo over him. (In the Disney version he doesn't even die!) The story "Red Dog" has Mowgli cause the marauding dogs of the title to be attacked by millions of angry bees; those who jump in the river to survive are attacked by Mowgli with a knife; and those left then face Mowgli ''and'' his enraged wolf pack. And incidentally, Mowgli does most of this while he's naked. It should come as no surprise that none of the violence or nudity makes it into the Disney version, but Disney not only censors the story but effectively throws out every last original plot thread. A documentary on the DVD explains how Disney's writers "improved" on the original, but in fact it becomes clear that what they really did was to whittle away at the original storyline until there was almost nothing left except for a few almost coincidental similarities. They can't even pronounce Mowgli's name right. ("''Mow'' rhymes with ''cow''", says Kipling.)
**
) All this can be easily explained by the fact that Walt Disney specifically told the production crew ''not'' to read the book. He gave an outline on the characters and plot ideas he wanted and didn't want the book itself to be used as a reference - specially as the original script and songs, inspired by the book, had a bit more darkness than is usual in a Disney film (to the point that the writer was ditched despite a long story with Disney, and the only song kept before changing composers was a cheery tune that became the SignatureSong of the film, "The Bear Necessities").



* Oddly enough, ''Film/{{Newsies}}'' is not a particularly {{egregious}} example of Disneyfication. It's safe to say that the New York newsboys of 1899 didn't burst into spontaneous well-choreographed musical numbers as they walked the streets, and the violence occurring as a result of the strike is a bit sanitized (no blood); but we do see newsboys sleeping on the streets, smoking cigars, betting on races, beating up strikebreakers, et cetera.
** Of course, one must point out that the newspapers ''never actually lowered their prices'' in the end; they came to an agreement with the newsies where they agreed to buy back their unsold papers. While this agreement was pretty mutually beneficial, clearly the idea of the rag-tag kids' union getting everything they wanted in the end was too good for Disney to pass up.

to:

* Oddly enough, ''Film/{{Newsies}}'' is not a particularly {{egregious}} example of Disneyfication. It's safe to say that the New York newsboys of 1899 didn't burst into spontaneous well-choreographed musical numbers as they walked the streets, and the violence occurring as a result of the strike is a bit sanitized (no blood); but we do see newsboys sleeping on the streets, smoking cigars, betting on races, beating up strikebreakers, et cetera.
**
cetera. Of course, one must point out that the newspapers ''never actually lowered their prices'' in the end; they came to an agreement with the newsies where they agreed to buy back their unsold papers. While this agreement was pretty mutually beneficial, clearly the idea of the rag-tag kids' union getting everything they wanted in the end was too good for Disney to pass up.



* The story of RobinHood had been thoroughly bowdlerised before Walt Disney was born, and [[Disney/RobinHood their take on it]] is actually far from the worst abuse of the mythos.
** To be fair, the narrator outright admits that everybody has their own version of the story (true enough) and that this was just the version that the animals tell.

to:

* The story of RobinHood had been thoroughly bowdlerised before Walt Disney was born, and [[Disney/RobinHood their take on it]] is actually far from the worst abuse of the mythos.
**
mythos. To be fair, the narrator outright admits that everybody has their own version of the story (true enough) and that this was just the version that the animals tell.



* ''Disney/{{Tangled}}'' skips the TeenPregnancy and [[spoiler: has Flynn get a [[BloodlessCarnage rather clean]] stab wound at the end, instead of having his eyes gouged out. Although one could argue that the two balanced out, since Flynn actually ''dies'', only to be brought back.]]

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* ''Disney/{{Tangled}}'' skips the TeenPregnancy and [[spoiler: has Flynn get a [[BloodlessCarnage rather clean]] stab wound at the end, instead of having his eyes gouged out. Although one could argue that the two balanced out, since Flynn actually ''dies'', only to be brought back.]]]] The film was originally much darker until directors changed partway, thiugh it still lacked either of those aspects.



* Fairies in general. Case in point: Tinker Bell (who [[KilledOffForReal dies for real]] in the original novel). Though you do see some of it peeking through in the first Peter Pan movie, all traces of traditional Fair Folk sociopathy are gone in later appearances.

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* Fairies in general. Case in point: Tinker Bell (who [[KilledOffForReal dies for real]] in the original novel). Though you do see some of it peeking through in the first Peter Pan ''Disney/PeterPan'' movie, all traces of traditional Fair Folk sociopathy are gone in later appearances.appearances. By ''Franchise/DisneyFairies'' it is completely gone and Tinkerbell is a more mellow PluckyGirl.





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* In the ''HBO Storybook Musicals'' adaptation of ''Literature/TheLittleMatchGirl'' the story is set in more modern times, the girl doesn't die, and she receives a HappilyEverAfter. Oddly, their adaptation of ''The Marzipan Pig'' kept its depressing nature.
24th Apr '16 8:46:35 AM Silverblade2
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* Any comic book adaptation that isn't specifically praised for being dark and edgy. There's a reason why so many people confuse comics books with cartoons, or assume superheroes [[AnimationAgeGhetto are for kids]] (and admitting to reading them to those who haven't may lead to awkwardness). Apparantly, that characters such as the {{Punisher}} and {{Wolverine}} regularly kill others, and characters like Franchise/{{Batman}} and SpiderMan's premise is based around death means nothing to some people, because the cartoons are too childish to be taken seriously sometimes.
13th Apr '16 2:03:41 AM jameygamer
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* A particularly egregious case occurs in ''WesternAnimation/TheKingAndI''. The king's advisor Kralahome is turned into the BigBad. Animal sidekicks are omnipresent, and they serve little actual purpose in the story. The slave girl Tuptim is given as a love interest to King Mongkut's eldest son instead of Mongkut himself to avoid the implications of a fifty-something man interested in a teenage girl. The King's multiple wives are omitted too. Comedy is put in the movie in exchange for the stuff taken out. And yet the film includes a rather stereotypical caricature in the form of the villain's sidekick. The King also lives at the end of the movie. The estate of Rogers and Hammerstein was not pleased with the film, and as a result it no longer allows animated adaptations of its musicals.

to:

* A particularly egregious case occurs in ''WesternAnimation/TheKingAndI''. The king's advisor Kralahome is turned into the BigBad. Animal sidekicks are omnipresent, and they serve little actual purpose in the story. The slave girl Tuptim is given as a love interest to King Mongkut's eldest son instead of Mongkut himself to avoid the implications of a fifty-something man interested in a teenage girl. The King's multiple wives are omitted too. Comedy is put in the movie in exchange for the stuff taken out. And yet the film includes a rather stereotypical caricature in the form of the villain's sidekick. The King also lives at the end of the movie. The estate of Rogers and Hammerstein was not pleased with the film, and as a result it no longer allows animated adaptations of its musicals.musicals; this move plus the film becoming a BoxOfficeBomb crushed the career of director Richard Rich.
11th Apr '16 1:21:07 PM KamenRiderKrypton
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** ''WesernAnimation/{{Camelot}}'' removed the sexual undertones of [[Myth/KingArthur the original myths]] to make the story kid-friendly. It still shows the [[YourCheatingHeart adulterous affair]] between Guinivere and ncelot, but anything explicit is not shown, not even a kiss.

to:

** ''WesernAnimation/{{Camelot}}'' removed the sexual undertones of [[Myth/KingArthur the original myths]] to make the story kid-friendly. It still shows the [[YourCheatingHeart adulterous affair]] between Guinivere and ncelot, Lancelot, but anything explicit is not shown, not even a kiss.
1st Apr '16 4:47:56 AM Morgenthaler
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* Disney actually went back and did this to an attraction in [[Ride/DisneyThemeParks Tokyo Disney Sea]]. The SinbadTheSailor attraction went from a telling of all of Sinbad's daring adventures and the dangers he faced along the way though in a rather stylized Mary Blair fashion to a sanitized TastesLikeDiabetes version with a happy Alan Menken song, Sinbad given a clean shave and a tiger cub sidekick, and all the monsters becoming Sinbad's friends or helping him along the way that brings to mind "it's a small world".

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* Disney actually went back and did this to an attraction in [[Ride/DisneyThemeParks Tokyo Disney Sea]]. The SinbadTheSailor Literature/SinbadTheSailor attraction went from a telling of all of Sinbad's daring adventures and the dangers he faced along the way though in a rather stylized Mary Blair fashion to a sanitized TastesLikeDiabetes version with a happy Alan Menken song, Sinbad given a clean shave and a tiger cub sidekick, and all the monsters becoming Sinbad's friends or helping him along the way that brings to mind "it's a small world".
28th Mar '16 6:16:33 PM BURGINABC
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* Many films based on ''Literature/AliceInWonderland'' apply elements from ''Through the Looking-Glass'', and [[Disney/AliceInWonderland the 1951 classic]] is no exception. Here the Queen of Hearts gets the [[AdaptationalVillainy villain upgrade]].




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* {{Disney/Frozen}} actually ''[[InvertedTrope inverts]]'' this trope, oddly enough. It does take a great deal of creative liberties with [[Literature/TheSnowQueen the source material]], to the point that the story is barely recognizable. However, the result is actually in many respects quite a bit darker than the original.
22nd Mar '16 2:01:14 PM Willbyr
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** Most of GoNagai's classics were originally aimed for teens and adults. TV adaptions for kids during 1970s-1980s softened the materials significantly. A notable example is ''DevilMan''. Even though the show is still a horror genre, it's nowhere as brutal as the original.

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** Most of GoNagai's Creator/GoNagai's classics were originally aimed for teens and adults. TV adaptions for kids during 1970s-1980s softened the materials significantly. A notable example is ''DevilMan''.''Manga/{{Devilman}}''. Even though the show is still a horror genre, it's nowhere as brutal as the original.
7th Mar '16 2:40:10 PM Morgenthaler
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* ''Series/{{Merlin}}''. Goodbye incestuous lovechild of Arthur and Morgan le Fay, hello adorable orphan druid boy.

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* ''Series/{{Merlin}}''.''Series/{{Merlin 2008}}''. Goodbye incestuous lovechild of Arthur and Morgan le Fay, hello adorable orphan druid boy.



* ''{{Wishbone}}'' does this as a matter of course, being a kids' show about reading literature. For example, in the ''Literature/{{Frankenstein}}'' episode, the Monster's request for a bride is replaced with a request to "make me a frieeeend!", the Monster is [[LostInImitation portrayed much more like the dumb brute from the movies than the highly intelligent creature from the book]], and Victor (Wishbone) doesn't die.

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* ''{{Wishbone}}'' ''Series/{{Wishbone}}'' does this as a matter of course, being a kids' show about reading literature. For example, in the ''Literature/{{Frankenstein}}'' episode, the Monster's request for a bride is replaced with a request to "make me a frieeeend!", the Monster is [[LostInImitation portrayed much more like the dumb brute from the movies than the highly intelligent creature from the book]], and Victor (Wishbone) doesn't die.



* WalkerTexasRanger was Disneyfied rather abruptly in the fifth season. Three weeks after "Forgotten People", the plot of which dealt with a veritable Dr. Mengele working in a nursing home, there was "Brainchild", featuring an orphaned ChildProdigy, whose best friend is a talking supercomputer, and a plot more fitting of a late-60s live-action Disney flick.

to:

* WalkerTexasRanger ''Series/WalkerTexasRanger'' was Disneyfied rather abruptly in the fifth season. Three weeks after "Forgotten People", the plot of which dealt with a veritable Dr. Mengele working in a nursing home, there was "Brainchild", featuring an orphaned ChildProdigy, whose best friend is a talking supercomputer, and a plot more fitting of a late-60s live-action Disney flick.



* Occurs in story in ''SidMeiersAlphaCentauri'', when the tale of a war hero is repackaged as a story for kids:

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* Occurs in story in ''SidMeiersAlphaCentauri'', ''VideoGame/SidMeiersAlphaCentauri'', when the tale of a war hero is repackaged as a story for kids:
26th Feb '16 8:35:43 PM Rubber_Lotus
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* In ''Disney/TheAdventuresOfIchabodAndMrToad'', ''Literature/TheLegendOfSleepyHollow'' (the "Ichabod" segment) is quite faithful to the original, and the end of it is left ambiguous for the viewer to decide whether Ichabod really left town or was spirited away by the Headless Horseman.

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* In Once again, largely averted in ''Disney/TheAdventuresOfIchabodAndMrToad'', ''Literature/TheLegendOfSleepyHollow'' (the "Ichabod" segment) is quite faithful to at least in the original, [[Literature/TheLegendOfSleepyHollow the "Ichabod"]] segment). Disney added a catchy musical number and some cartoon slapstick, and perhaps made Brom Bones a little meaner, but the GreyAndGrayMorality of the original story is largely preserved, and the end of it is still left ambiguous for the viewer to decide whether Ichabod really left town or was spirited away by the Headless Horseman.
19th Feb '16 10:57:46 AM rjd1922
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** ''WesernAnimation/{{Camelot}} removed the sexual undertones of [[Myth/KingArthur the original myths]] to make the story kid-friendly. It still shows the [[YourCheatingHeart adulterous affair]] between Guinivere and ncelot, but anything explicit is not shown, not even a kiss.

to:

** ''WesernAnimation/{{Camelot}} ''WesernAnimation/{{Camelot}}'' removed the sexual undertones of [[Myth/KingArthur the original myths]] to make the story kid-friendly. It still shows the [[YourCheatingHeart adulterous affair]] between Guinivere and ncelot, but anything explicit is not shown, not even a kiss.
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