History Main / DisneyOwnsThisTrope

16th Feb '17 10:01:05 PM Ominae
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* If you were waiting on a LoadingScreen of a game made between 1995 and 2015 and wondered why there wasn't a MiniGame to play while you wait, it was due to {{Namco}}; they had a patent on that which lasted during that period, until the patent finally ended in 2015, despite the concept coming from old tape loader games on the C64.

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* If you were waiting on a LoadingScreen of a game made between 1995 and 2015 and wondered why there wasn't a MiniGame to play while you wait, it was due to {{Namco}}; [[Creator/BandaiNamcoEntertainment Namco]]; they had a patent on that which lasted during that period, until the patent finally ended in 2015, despite the concept coming from old tape loader games on the C64.
31st Jan '17 6:27:31 AM SutairuMasuta
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** Ever since the mid-to-late '00s it seems that WWE has taken their policy a step further by making all newcomers use a WWE-given name, even those who previously wrestled under their real names or own their own names. Wrestling/CMPunk, Wrestling/{{Sting}}, Wrestling/SamoaJoe and Wrestling/AJStyles have all managed to evade this rule.

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** Ever since the mid-to-late '00s it seems that WWE has taken their policy a step further by making all newcomers use a WWE-given name, even those who previously wrestled under their real names or own their own names. Wrestling/CMPunk, Wrestling/{{Sting}}, Wrestling/SamoaJoe Wrestling/SamoaJoe, Wrestling/AJStyles, Wrestling/AustinAries, Wrestling/ShinsukeNakamura and Wrestling/AJStyles Wrestling/BobbyRoode have all managed to evade this rule.
18th Jan '17 12:30:26 PM RacattackForce
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* Infamous in the video game industry is the 1982 ''Creator/{{Universal}} City Studios, Inc. v. Creator/{{Nintendo}} Co., Ltd.'' lawsuit, where Universal claimed that Nintendo's ''VideoGame/DonkeyKong'' was a violation of their ownership of ''Film/KingKong''. After several months of Universal refusing to officially seek legal proceedings, instead simply trying to get Nintendo to agree to a settlement without litigation, a lawyer working for Nintendo discovered that not only did Universal not own the trademark rights to ''Film/KingKong'', but that they themselves had argued in the past that the character was in the public domain. The court case officially declared in 1984 that the character VideoGame/DonkeyKong could not be confused with Film/KingKong, and that while Universal Studios owned the majority of rights (with the remainder being divided between creator Richard Cooper, RKO Studios, and the Dino De Laurentiis company), they did not hold exclusive rights to the name and character as they had claimed. This court case win against one of the biggest movie studios in the world placed the then-"young"[[note]]Though the company is OlderThanRadio, at this point in time they had only been in the the video game industry for about decade, and in the United States marketplace for less than five years[[/note]] Nintendo in the "Don't Mess with Us" category. Nintendo went on to thank the lawyer that helped them win the case by hiring him as their main consul in America and naming [[VideoGame/{{Kirby}} a certain character]] after him. That said, part of Universal's desire in all this was to have a top-notch video game company to make licensed games for their films. After failing to get Nintendo, Universal bought Creator/LJNToys: a company most well-known through the numerous WebVideo/TheAngryVideoGameNerd videos covering their horrid video game library. On a side note, Nintendo and Universal [[HilariousInHindsight would work together]] almost thirty years later to create a series of theme parks.

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* Infamous in the video game industry is the 1982 ''Creator/{{Universal}} City Studios, Inc. v. Creator/{{Nintendo}} Co., Ltd.'' lawsuit, where Universal claimed that Nintendo's ''VideoGame/DonkeyKong'' was a violation of their ownership of ''Film/KingKong''. After several months of Universal refusing to officially seek legal proceedings, instead simply trying to get Nintendo to agree to a settlement without litigation, a lawyer working for Nintendo discovered that not only did Universal not own the trademark rights to ''Film/KingKong'', but that they themselves had argued in the past that the character was in the public domain. The court case officially declared in 1984 that the character VideoGame/DonkeyKong could not be confused with Film/KingKong, and that while Universal Studios owned the majority of rights (with the remainder being divided between creator Richard Cooper, RKO Studios, Creator/RKOPictures, and the Dino De Laurentiis company), they did not hold exclusive rights to the name and character as they had claimed. This court case win against one of the biggest movie studios in the world placed the then-"young"[[note]]Though the company is OlderThanRadio, at this point in time they had only been in the the video game industry for about decade, and in the United States marketplace for less than five years[[/note]] Nintendo in the "Don't Mess with Us" category. Nintendo went on to thank the lawyer that helped them win the case by hiring him as their main consul in America and naming [[VideoGame/{{Kirby}} a certain character]] after him. That said, part of Universal's desire in all this was to have a top-notch video game company to make licensed games for their films. After failing to get Nintendo, Universal bought Creator/LJNToys: a company most well-known through the numerous WebVideo/TheAngryVideoGameNerd videos covering their horrid video game library. On a side note, Nintendo and Universal [[HilariousInHindsight would work together]] almost thirty years later to create a series of theme parks.
18th Jan '17 12:28:39 PM RacattackForce
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* Infamous in the video game industry was the 1982 ''Creator/{{Universal}} City Studios, Inc. v. Creator/{{Nintendo}} Co., Ltd.'' lawsuit, where Universal claimed the Nintendo's ''VideoGame/DonkeyKong'' was a violation of their ownership of ''Film/KingKong''. After several months of Universal refusing to officially seek legal proceedings, instead simply trying to get Nintendo to agree to a settlement without litigation, a certain lawyer working for Nintendo discovered that not only did Universal not own the trademark rights to ''Film/KingKong'', but that they themselves had argued in the past that the character was in the public domain. The court case officially declared in 1984 that the character VideoGame/DonkeyKong could not be confused with Film/KingKong, and that while Universal Studios owned the majority of rights (with the remainder being divided between creator Richard Cooper, RKO Studios, and the Dino De Laurentiis company), they did not hold exclusive rights to the name and character as they had claimed. Allowing a then-"young" Nintendo[[note]]Though the company is OlderThanRadio, they had only been in the the video game industry and the United States marketplace for about a decade and five years, respectively, at this point[[/note]] to successfully sue Universal and firmly plant themselves in the "Don't Mess with Us" category. Nintendo went on to thank the lawyer that helped them win the case by hiring him as their main consul in America and naming [[VideoGame/{{Kirby}} a certain character]] after him. That said, part of Universal's desire in all this was to have a top-notch video game company to make licensed games for their films. After failing to get Nintendo, Universal bought Creator/LJNToys: a company most well-known through the numerous WebVideo/TheAngryVideoGameNerd videos covering their horrid video game library. On a side note, Nintendo and Universal [[HilariousInHindsight would work together]] almost thirty years later to create a series of theme parks.

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* Infamous in the video game industry was is the 1982 ''Creator/{{Universal}} City Studios, Inc. v. Creator/{{Nintendo}} Co., Ltd.'' lawsuit, where Universal claimed the that Nintendo's ''VideoGame/DonkeyKong'' was a violation of their ownership of ''Film/KingKong''. After several months of Universal refusing to officially seek legal proceedings, instead simply trying to get Nintendo to agree to a settlement without litigation, a certain lawyer working for Nintendo discovered that not only did Universal not own the trademark rights to ''Film/KingKong'', but that they themselves had argued in the past that the character was in the public domain. The court case officially declared in 1984 that the character VideoGame/DonkeyKong could not be confused with Film/KingKong, and that while Universal Studios owned the majority of rights (with the remainder being divided between creator Richard Cooper, RKO Studios, and the Dino De Laurentiis company), they did not hold exclusive rights to the name and character as they had claimed. Allowing a then-"young" Nintendo[[note]]Though This court case win against one of the biggest movie studios in the world placed the then-"young"[[note]]Though the company is OlderThanRadio, at this point in time they had only been in the the video game industry for about decade, and in the United States marketplace for about a decade and less than five years, respectively, at this point[[/note]] to successfully sue Universal and firmly plant themselves years[[/note]] Nintendo in the "Don't Mess with Us" category. Nintendo went on to thank the lawyer that helped them win the case by hiring him as their main consul in America and naming [[VideoGame/{{Kirby}} a certain character]] after him. That said, part of Universal's desire in all this was to have a top-notch video game company to make licensed games for their films. After failing to get Nintendo, Universal bought Creator/LJNToys: a company most well-known through the numerous WebVideo/TheAngryVideoGameNerd videos covering their horrid video game library. On a side note, Nintendo and Universal [[HilariousInHindsight would work together]] almost thirty years later to create a series of theme parks.
18th Jan '17 12:20:36 PM RacattackForce
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* Then there is the infamous ''Creator/{{Universal}} v. Creator/{{Nintendo}}'' lawsuit, where Universal claimed the Nintendo's ''VideoGame/DonkeyKong'' was a violation of their ownership of ''Film/KingKong''. After several months of Universal refusing to officially seek legal proceedings, instead simply trying to get Nintendo to agree to a settlement without litigation, a certain lawyer working for Nintendo discovered that Universal did not own the trademark rights to ''Film/KingKong'', but that they had simultaneously argued that he was in the public domain so they could make some cheesy B movies of him in the '70s and that they owned all rights pertaining to him. The court case officially declared that the character VideoGame/DonkeyKong could not be confused with Film/KingKong, and that while Universal Studios owned the majority of rights, with the remainder being divided between creator Richard Cooper, RKO Studios, and the Dino De Laurentiis company, they did not hold exclusive rights to the name and character as they had claimed. Nintendo then proceeded to successfully sue Universal into the ground. Oh and Nintendo went on to thank the lawyer that found it out by first hiring him as their main consul in America, then later naming a [[VideoGame/{{Kirby}} certain character]] after him. While firmly planting Nintendo in the "Don't Mess with Us" category in the U.S., this case did have one unfortunate downside for gamers: Universal still wanted a game company to make licensed games for their films. And after failing to get Nintendo, Universal bought LJN.

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* Then there is Infamous in the infamous video game industry was the 1982 ''Creator/{{Universal}} City Studios, Inc. v. Creator/{{Nintendo}}'' Creator/{{Nintendo}} Co., Ltd.'' lawsuit, where Universal claimed the Nintendo's ''VideoGame/DonkeyKong'' was a violation of their ownership of ''Film/KingKong''. After several months of Universal refusing to officially seek legal proceedings, instead simply trying to get Nintendo to agree to a settlement without litigation, a certain lawyer working for Nintendo discovered that not only did Universal did not own the trademark rights to ''Film/KingKong'', but that they themselves had simultaneously argued in the past that he the character was in the public domain so they could make some cheesy B movies of him in the '70s and that they owned all rights pertaining to him. domain. The court case officially declared in 1984 that the character VideoGame/DonkeyKong could not be confused with Film/KingKong, and that while Universal Studios owned the majority of rights, with rights (with the remainder being divided between creator Richard Cooper, RKO Studios, and the Dino De Laurentiis company, company), they did not hold exclusive rights to the name and character as they had claimed. Nintendo then proceeded Allowing a then-"young" Nintendo[[note]]Though the company is OlderThanRadio, they had only been in the the video game industry and the United States marketplace for about a decade and five years, respectively, at this point[[/note]] to successfully sue Universal into the ground. Oh and Nintendo went on to thank the lawyer that found it out by first hiring him as their main consul in America, then later naming a [[VideoGame/{{Kirby}} certain character]] after him. While firmly planting Nintendo plant themselves in the "Don't Mess with Us" category in category. Nintendo went on to thank the U.S., lawyer that helped them win the case by hiring him as their main consul in America and naming [[VideoGame/{{Kirby}} a certain character]] after him. That said, part of Universal's desire in all this case did was to have one unfortunate downside for gamers: Universal still wanted a top-notch video game company to make licensed games for their films. And after After failing to get Nintendo, Universal bought LJN.Creator/LJNToys: a company most well-known through the numerous WebVideo/TheAngryVideoGameNerd videos covering their horrid video game library. On a side note, Nintendo and Universal [[HilariousInHindsight would work together]] almost thirty years later to create a series of theme parks.
18th Jan '17 11:57:00 AM RacattackForce
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** Nintendo trademarked the phrase "[[ThisMeansWar It's On Like Donkey Kong]]", as well as several sounds from ''Franchise/SuperMarioBros'' (including coins, mushrooms, and pipes) in the mid-2010s.



* In March of 2016 Nintendo announced they would be trademarking several sounds from ''Franchise/SuperMarioBros'' including coins, mushrooms, and pipes due to the amount of people using them for different purposes.
18th Jan '17 11:53:47 AM RacattackForce
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* In late January of 2016, WebVideo/TheFineBrothers controversially announced plans for [[WebVideo/{{React}} React World]], a reaction video network that tried to commercially affiliate the genre itself with their own channel by trademarking the term "React" and copyrighting reaction videos, which would give them a cut of the profits on all videos in the "reaction" genre. This led to a massive backlash against them from viewers and other [=YouTubers=] for supposedly trying to take control of reaction videos on [=YouTube=], and their subscribers started dropping like flies (they're losing around 100 a minute because of their decision). On February 2, they repealed their decision, removing the licenses and subsequent Content ID strikes, but by then it was too late; their subscribers are still falling at a rapid rate and [[CreatorKiller it's unlikely that they'll reclaim them]].

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* In late January of 2016, WebVideo/TheFineBrothers controversially announced plans for [[WebVideo/{{React}} React World]], a reaction video network that tried to commercially affiliate the genre itself with their own channel by trademarking the term "React" and copyrighting reaction videos, which would give them a cut of the profits on all videos in the "reaction" genre. This led to a massive backlash against them from viewers and other [=YouTubers=] for supposedly trying to take control of reaction videos on [=YouTube=], and their subscribers subscriber numbers started dropping like flies (they're losing (losing around 100 a minute because of their decision). On February 2, they repealed their decision, removing the licenses and subsequent Content ID strikes, but by then it was too late; their subscribers are still falling at a rapid rate and [[CreatorKiller it's unlikely that they'll reclaim them]].strikes.
18th Jan '17 11:51:00 AM RacattackForce
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* As of January 21, 2014, the developers of ''VideoGame/CandyCrushSaga'' held exclusive rights to the word "candy" in app titles, and tried to file for rights of the word "saga". They later gave up on the latter (due to them attempting to sue several companies using "saga" in their products, which created quite a backdraft), and gave up the rights for the former, in February, as a result.

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* As of January 21, In 2014, the developers of ''VideoGame/CandyCrushSaga'' held exclusive rights to the word "candy" in app titles, and tried to file for rights of the word "saga". They later gave up on the latter (due to them attempting to sue several companies using "saga" in their products, which created quite a backdraft), and gave up the rights for the former, in February, former a month later as a result.
30th Dec '16 5:36:26 PM jormis29
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* In 2013, Disney announced that they were planning to trademark the phrase "Dia de los muertos" (Day of the Dead, a well-known holiday in Mexico) for marketing purposes related to ''WesternAnimation/{{Coco}}'', the upcoming Creator/{{Pixar}} film based on said holiday. The Latino community had [[InternetBackdraft a bit of an uproar]] about this, among them Mexican-American cartoonist Lalo Alcaraz, who drew a poster of a giant skeletal Mickey with the caption "It's coming to trademark your cultura". A week later, Disney decided not to go through with the trademarking, which they said was [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coco_(2017_film) "intended to protect any potential title for our film and related activities"]]. (Alcaraz was then asked to consult on the film.)

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* In 2013, Disney announced that they were planning to trademark the phrase "Dia de los muertos" (Day of the Dead, a well-known holiday in Mexico) for marketing purposes related to ''WesternAnimation/{{Coco}}'', the upcoming Creator/{{Pixar}} film based on said holiday. The Latino community had [[InternetBackdraft a bit of an uproar]] about this, among them Mexican-American cartoonist Lalo Alcaraz, who drew a poster of a giant skeletal Mickey with the caption "It's coming to trademark your cultura". A week later, Disney decided not to go through with the trademarking, which they said was [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coco_(2017_film) "intended to protect any potential title for our film and related activities"]]. (Alcaraz was then asked to consult on the film.)
29th Dec '16 9:14:41 AM ZombieAladdin
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Added DiffLines:

* [[Creator/MidwayGames Bally's]] advertisements for ''Pinball/TheAddamsFamily'' boasted that 49 patents were made specifically for the machine. Like with Williams, they have also since expired as they have not been renewed, allowing other companies to use those mechanisms. That being said, some of them were not very well-liked, like the pulsating magnets throwing the ball in random directions, so no one else wanted to use them anyway.
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