History Main / DirtyCop

23rd Nov '16 11:06:31 PM AFreakyDude
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* Later, Wrestling/TheMountie (aka Wrestling/JacquesRougeau) played the heel cop, using cheap, dirty methods to beat his opponents. Then he would handcuff them and [[ShockAndAwe zap them with his shock stick]].

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* Later, Wrestling/TheMountie (aka Wrestling/JacquesRougeau) played the heel cop, using cheap, dirty methods to beat his opponents. Then he would handcuff them and [[ShockAndAwe zap them with his [[StunGuns shock stick]].
23rd Nov '16 10:59:42 PM AFreakyDude
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[[folder:Professional Wrestling]]
* The Wrestling/BigBossMan played it straight as a heel, handcuffing his opponents and beating them with his nightstick.
* Later, Wrestling/TheMountie (aka Wrestling/JacquesRougeau) played the heel cop, using cheap, dirty methods to beat his opponents. Then he would handcuff them and [[ShockAndAwe zap them with his shock stick]].
[[/folder]]
15th Nov '16 7:54:33 PM dmcreif
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* ''Series/{{Copper}}'' is set in 1864 New York and is full of DirtyCops, including the hero and his friends. The police force of the time were notoriously corrupt and for the most part acted as just another street gang. When the detectives foil a bank robbery, there is a definite pecking order as to who gets to steal what from the crime scene. The informant gets to grab a few coins, the detectives get to stuff their pockets with some bank notes, the sergeant gets a pocket watch belonging to one of the dead robbers and the captain gets to deliver the remaining money back to the bank and decide how much he will keep as payment for the 'protection' his cops provided.

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* ''Series/{{Copper}}'' is set in 1864 New York and is full of DirtyCops, including the hero and his friends. The police force of the time were notoriously corrupt and for the most part acted as just another a glorified street gang. When the detectives foil a bank robbery, there is a definite pecking order as to who gets to steal what from the crime scene. The informant gets to grab a few coins, the detectives get to stuff their pockets with some bank notes, the sergeant gets a pocket watch belonging to one of the dead robbers and the captain gets to deliver the remaining money back to the bank and decide how much he will keep as payment for the 'protection' his cops provided.
10th Nov '16 4:44:03 PM ashlay
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* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 5}}'': The cops who apprehend the protagonist drug and beat him to try and get information on his accomplices. The head of the department is also a member of TheConspiracy, and plans to kill the protagonist and their friends to protect his illicit activities.
3rd Nov '16 5:14:17 PM Morgenthaler
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* Basically, in ''Fast Five'', every Rio civil police, military police (PMERJ), or Brazilian Federal Highway Patrol (PRF) cruiser or officer we see, except for Elena, is dirty since they are all on Reyes' payroll to protect his money. Too bad for them, it cost them either their cruisers or their lives once they met Toretto and his team.

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* Basically, in ''Fast Five'', ''Film/FastFive'', every Rio civil police, military police (PMERJ), or Brazilian Federal Highway Patrol (PRF) cruiser or officer we see, except for Elena, is dirty since they are all on Reyes' payroll to protect his money. Too bad for them, it cost them either their cruisers or their lives once they met Toretto and his team.team.
* ''Film/TheHitman'': Ron Delany (Michael Parks), the main character's old partner, is revealed to have actually been working with gangs in the area to supervise illegal shipments when he shoots his partner for interfering. He later joins up with an Iranian gang to wipe out all the opposition.
28th Oct '16 9:22:25 PM Fireblood
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* ''Series/MurderInTheFirst'': Season two reveals an entire group of them called "the Union" that runs drugs, loan sharking, money laundering and prostitution rackets.
26th Oct '16 1:05:29 PM Morgenthaler
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* In ''ASongOfIceAndFire'' Janos Slynt is this, although the fact that he's taking bribes is less noticeable than that he's starting selling promotions.

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* In ''ASongOfIceAndFire'' ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' Janos Slynt is this, although the fact that he's taking bribes is less noticeable than that he's starting selling promotions.
26th Oct '16 12:50:17 PM dmcreif
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** Dwight Tilghman is a prison guard who routinely brutalizes Wee-Bey Brice because Wee-Bey killed a cousin of his. He also trafficks drugs into the prison. Avon Barksdale and Stringer Bell conspire to frame him for trafficking tainted drugs into the jail.
2nd Oct '16 1:34:13 PM nombretomado
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* [[EquestriaChronicles The royal guard]] is corrupt and abusive, although its officers try to keep things safe and reasonable.

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* [[EquestriaChronicles [[Roleplay/EquestriaChronicles The royal guard]] is corrupt and abusive, although its officers try to keep things safe and reasonable.
2nd Oct '16 11:27:37 AM randomtroper89
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* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_Eppolito_and_Stephen_Caracappa Louis Eppolito and Stephen Caracappa]] were detectives with the Organized Crime Homicide Unit of the NYPD's Major Case Squad. They were ''also'' informants and assassins for the mob, murdering eight people on orders from the Lucchese crime family.
** Ironically, before he was caught, Eppolito had bit parts in a few movies -- including ''Film/GoodFellas''.

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* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_Eppolito_and_Stephen_Caracappa Louis Eppolito and Stephen Caracappa]] were detectives with the Organized Crime Homicide Unit of the NYPD's Major Case Squad. They were ''also'' informants also'informants and assassins for the mob, murdering eight people on orders from the Lucchese crime family.
**
family. Ironically, before he was caught, Eppolito had bit parts in a few movies -- including ''Film/GoodFellas''.



* [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Rogerson Roger "The Dodger" Rogerson]], formerly one of the most decorated officers in the New South Wales Police Force, has become synonymous with this trope in Australia. Over the course of his career (and afterwards) Rogerson was accused of police brutality, drug trafficking, fabricating confessions, at least two murders, and attempting to kill a fellow police officer who refused a bribe to bury evidence in a case against him. Despite his infamy, he enjoyed a measure of celebrity thanks to his exploits. He was convicted of the murder of a Sydney college student that was allegedly the result of a drug deal gone wrong in 2016.
** [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ray_%22Gunner%22_Kelly Ray "Gunner" Kelly]] and [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fred_Krahe Fred Krahe]] were known associates of Rogerson and belonged to a clique of dirty cops within the NSW Police, which allegedly included the then-commissioner. Like Rogerson, both were known for their extensive dealings with organized crime figures, protecting local rackets, and coercing confessions.

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* New South Wales Police Force had a clique of dirty cops within the NSW Police, which included the then-commissioner:
**
[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roger_Rogerson Roger "The Dodger" Rogerson]], formerly one of the most decorated officers in the New South Wales Police Force, officers, has become synonymous with this trope in Australia. Over the course of his career (and afterwards) Rogerson was accused of police brutality, drug trafficking, fabricating confessions, at least two murders, and attempting to kill a fellow police officer who refused a bribe to bury evidence in a case against him. Despite his infamy, he enjoyed a measure of celebrity thanks to his exploits. He was convicted of the murder of a Sydney college student that was allegedly the result of a drug deal gone wrong in 2016. \n** [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ray_%22Gunner%22_Kelly Ray "Gunner" Kelly]] and [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fred_Krahe Fred Krahe]] were known associates of Rogerson and belonged to a clique of dirty cops within the NSW Police, which allegedly included the then-commissioner. Like Rogerson, both were known for their extensive dealings with organized crime figures, protecting local rackets, and coercing confessions.



** [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ray_%22Gunner%22_Kelly Ray "Gunner" Kelly]] and [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fred_Krahe Fred Krahe]] were known associates of Rogerson and both were known for their extensive dealings with organized crime figures, protecting local rackets, and coercing confessions.



* One of the many shocking things that came out of investigation of organised crime in London in the 1960's was that so many constables and inspectors were on the take from the Kray Brothers and the Richardsons. The Met was reorganised and reformed after this. However, the old mentality lives on: during more recent investigation into the scandal of illegal phone-tapping by [[BritishNewspapers sleazy newspapers]], it emerged that many, many, British coppers were happy to accept "inducements" from ''News of The World'' and ''Sun'' reporters. The unhealthy relationship between policemen and [[BritishNewspapers sleazy hacks]] explains how quickly and unerringly embarrassing arrests involving celebrities get onto the front pages of the papers. Money goes one way and information goes the other.
* There were a lot of these in New York in the late 19th Century. They were eventually cleaned up by the determined efforts of a police commissioner named UsefulNotes/TheodoreRoosevelt. The future President was known for ''personally'' walking the beats of his officers at odd hours to check to see if his people were doing their jobs, and if he caught them abusing their positions, he would sack them on the spot.c
* In a case of incompetency sitting right on the border of corruption, when Miami Gardens split from Miami-Dade County to form their own town and corresponding police department, a number of residents protested their seemingly overly-aggressive arrest policy. When one shop owner, two years later, finally called the media, the scandal that erupted revealed that number of "stops"[[labelnote:*]]police actions resulting in a citation or arrest[[/labelnote]] were wildly out of proportion for Miami Gardens. Compared to the City of Miami Police, with a population of 400,000 under its jurisdiction and approximately 3,700 stops in that two year period, Miami Gardens had a population of 110,000 and approximately ''97,000'' stops. The investigation could not, however, turn up a ''reason'' for the ridiculous number: there were no kickbacks, no corruption, no fees or taxes generated; it's been suggested that the cops simply wanted to get their arrest numbers up (to look better for funding, perhaps), but even that has been questioned. The police may have simply been overzealous, but their personal actions in that time were suspicious at best, including arresting one man ''250 times'' for trespassing. ''At the place where he worked!''



* Without touching upon the accuracy of this belief, it's commonly believed in the US that police in many other countries (Mexico, which shares a ''long'' border with the US, is a frequent target) are corrupt, at least to the extent of arresting people on fabricated or overblown charges and demanding bribes/"fines" for them to be released. While there are undoubtedly a ''few'' corrupt cops pretty much everywhere, the extent of the problem tends to be greatly exaggerated (the fact that standard legal procedure dealing with the timing of payment of fines and access to legal advocates differs from country to country may lend strength to the rumors).
** In a similar example, it's a common belief in most states that the Highway Patrol in one or more neighboring states specifically targets cars with out-of-state plates to issue speeding tickets to, knowing that in most cases people who were simply passing through will just pay the fine rather than making a special trip back to contest the ticket. Regardless of how much truth there may be in the accusation, the trope is well established enough to make it into ''many'' jokes and works of fiction.
*** This is true for several reasons. Tickets are generally higher when given to out-of-state drivers, which means more revenue. Also, there's an obviously better chance of catching someone violating a tri-state law if they have out-of-state plates: essentially, your license and your vehicle are meant to be registered in your home state. If you are driving in State A, with plates from State B, and a license from State C, you'll have more problems than a mere speeding ticket will give. ''However,'' this isn't necessarily an example of corruption, and most cops who do this will still prioritize more dangerous drivers about the "easy ticket" if made to choose.
* Corruption in the NYPD was brought to the forefront in the late 1960s and early 1970s by [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Serpico Frank Serpico]], an NYPD officer who [[DefectorFromDecadence sought to expose the corruption amongst his colleagues]].
* The Chicago police during the time that AlCapone was active. The Mafia and the local police were public rivals, but secretly were partners. So long as Capone and the other organizations kept the violence low and kept to the shadows, they allowed them to bootleg and operate freely, with the cops naturally being paid a cut of the profits to turn a blind eye.
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