History Main / DirecttoVideo

16th May '16 8:18:35 PM LinTaylor
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** ''Series/KamenRiderDouble'' had two direct-to-DVD movies focusing on two of the other Riders in that universe (Accel, the [[SixthRanger Second Rider]], and Eternal, the BigBad of ''[[TheMovie Double Forever]]''.)
** ''Series/KamenRiderGaim'', much like ''Double'' before it, has gotten a series called ''Gaim Gaiden'' which is DTV movies focusing on characters other than the titular hero. The first pair of movies focused on Zangetsu and Baron, while the second (determined by a fan poll) will spotlight Knuckle and Duke.

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** ''Series/KamenRiderDouble'' Starting with ''Series/KamenRiderDouble'', several series have had two direct-to-DVD movies focusing on two of the other Riders in that universe (Accel, focus on a different character while the [[SixthRanger Second Rider]], and Eternal, the BigBad of ''[[TheMovie Double Forever]]''.)
** ''Series/KamenRiderGaim'', much like ''Double'' before it, has gotten a series called ''Gaim Gaiden'' which is DTV movies focusing on characters other than the titular hero. The first pair of
hero simply appears in reduced capacity. Double's movies focused on Zangetsu Accel and Eternal. ''Series/KamenRiderGaim'' got four movies, focusing on Zangetsu, Baron, while the second (determined by a fan poll) will spotlight Knuckle and Duke.Duke. ''Series/KamenRiderDrive'' started with one for Chaser, then two more for Mach and Heart, the first time a non-Rider got his own movie[[note]]Though said movie gives Heart a Kamen Rider form[[/note]].
25th Apr '16 11:34:23 AM TVRulezAgain
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In the United States, while there have been plenty of direct-to-video films and such since the advent of home video, they were usually things that were considered financially unsound to release in theaters, like instructional videos, specialized documentaries, foreign films, films with controversial or niche subject matter, and pornography. The practice of creating and releasing regular fiction specifically for video didn't really take off until 1994 with Creator/{{Disney}}'s ''Disney/AladdinTheReturnOfJafar'' and Creator/{{Universal}}'s ''TheLandBeforeTime II'', neither of which was intended to hit theaters at any point in its production.[[note]]The financial failure of ''Disney/TheRescuersDownUnder'' was what caused Disney to decide to do this with their sequels. Repeated itself when in the mid 2000s they tried again with sequels for ''Disney/PeterPan'' and ''Disney/TheJungleBook''. Once again, the failure of those films resumed their straight to DVD methods.[[/note]] Other studios started following suit, hardly limited to child-oriented animation. In particular, independent studios and filmmakers quickly picked up on this distribution model, due to its lower distribution costs and reduced censorship (video stores will often stock [[UnratedEdition unrated]] films that theaters won't touch).

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In the United States, while there have been plenty of direct-to-video films and such since the advent of home video, they were usually things that were considered financially unsound to release in theaters, like instructional videos, specialized documentaries, foreign films, films with controversial or niche subject matter, and pornography. The practice of creating and releasing regular fiction specifically for video didn't really take off until 1994 with Creator/{{Disney}}'s ''Disney/AladdinTheReturnOfJafar'' and Creator/{{Universal}}'s ''TheLandBeforeTime ''WesternAnimation/TheLandBeforeTime II'', neither of which was intended to hit theaters at any point in its production.[[note]]The financial failure of ''Disney/TheRescuersDownUnder'' was what caused Disney to decide to do this with their sequels. Repeated itself when in the mid 2000s they tried again with sequels for ''Disney/PeterPan'' and ''Disney/TheJungleBook''. Once again, the failure of those films resumed their straight to DVD methods.[[/note]] Other studios started following suit, hardly limited to child-oriented animation. In particular, independent studios and filmmakers quickly picked up on this distribution model, due to its lower distribution costs and reduced censorship (video stores will often stock [[UnratedEdition unrated]] films that theaters won't touch).
23rd Apr '16 8:41:33 PM MsChibi
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There is a distinct business model that drives the direct-to-video industry, particularly when it involves lower-quality films. One might think that churning out mediocre-to-bad movies on purpose would be a dumb idea, until one looks at the sales and rental figures. A cheap 70- to 90-minute film can be produced for as little as a few thousand dollars if you hire obscure actors, crew and writers (often non-UsefulNotes/{{union|s in Hollywood}}, and barely getting minimum wage), [[CaliforniaDoubling everything gets shot around the studio]], and nothing is required that can't be obtained from the studio's stock wardrobe and props. Or, as has been trending since the mid-2000s, animation will now be done as [[SpecialEffectsFailure pretty cheap]] CGI movies. The studio then usually makes about $3-5 million off this, most of it from sales to rental chains. It floods the market with tripe into which nobody put any true effort, but it still makes money in the long run. It's the [[SpiritualSuccessor modern equivalent]] of the BMovie; in fact, many of these would be B movies if double features were still a regular thing. Some direct-to-video flicks will [[PolishTheTurd try to make lemonade of their lemons]] by claiming that their movie is "too intense", "too scary", "too well-written", "too sexy", or "too lavishly budgeted" for theaters; usually [[GenreSavvy the viewers don't fall for it]].

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There is a distinct business model that drives the direct-to-video industry, particularly when it involves lower-quality films. One might think that churning out mediocre-to-bad movies on purpose would be a dumb idea, until one looks at the sales and rental figures. A cheap 70- to 90-minute film can be produced for as little as a few thousand dollars if you hire obscure actors, crew and writers (often non-UsefulNotes/{{union|s in Hollywood}}, and barely getting minimum wage), [[CaliforniaDoubling everything gets shot around the studio]], and nothing is required that can't be obtained from the studio's stock wardrobe and props. Or, as has been trending since the mid-2000s, animation will now be done as [[SpecialEffectsFailure pretty cheap]] CGI movies. The studio then usually makes about $3-5 million off this, most of it from sales to rental chains. It floods the market with tripe into which nobody put any true effort, but it still makes money in the long run. It's the [[SpiritualSuccessor modern equivalent]] of the BMovie; in fact, many of these would be B movies if double features were still a regular thing. Some direct-to-video flicks will [[PolishTheTurd try to make lemonade of their lemons]] by claiming that their movie is "too intense", "too scary", "too well-written", "too sexy", or "too lavishly budgeted" for theaters; usually [[GenreSavvy the viewers don't fall for it]].
it]]. It may be a sign that a series or franchise the movie is associated with has long since [[JumpTheShark jumped the shark]], or is about to ''very'' soon.



See also ItsNotSupposedToWinOscars, the GhettoIndex, and AudienceAlienatingPremise.

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See also ItsNotSupposedToWinOscars, the GhettoIndex, {{Sequelitis}} and AudienceAlienatingPremise.
23rd Apr '16 8:37:04 PM MsChibi
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Internationally, many films that had a theatrical release may be released Direct-to-Video in other countries [[note]]''WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls'' movie for example, after its flop in the U.S., was converted to direct to video for the European market (although it did get a British cinema release).[[/note]]. This may be due to several factors: it might be a sign that the film was a complete failure in its home country, or it might be because the subject matter or style limit its appeal in a particular foreign market.

There is a distinct business model that drives the direct-to-video industry, particularly when it involves lower-quality films. One might think that churning out mediocre-to-bad movies on purpose would be a dumb idea, until one looks at the sales and rental figures. A cheap 70- to 90-minute film can be produced for as little as a few thousand dollars if you hire obscure actors, crew and writers (often non-UsefulNotes/{{union|s in Hollywood}}, and barely getting minimum wage), [[CaliforniaDoubling everything gets shot around the studio]], and nothing is required that can't be obtained from the studio's stock wardrobe and props. Or, as has been trending since the mid-2000s, animation will now be done as [[SpecialEffectsFailure pretty cheap]] CGI movies. The studio then usually makes about $3-5 million off this, most of it from sales to rental chains. It floods the market with tripe into which nobody put any true effort, but it still makes money in the long run. It's the [[SpiritualSuccessor modern equivalent]] of the BMovie; in fact, many of these would be B movies if double features were still a regular thing. Some direct-to-video flicks will [[PolishTheTurd try to make lemonade of their lemons]] by claiming that their movie is "too intense", "too scary", "too well-written" or "too lavishly budgeted" for theaters; usually the viewers don't fall for it.

to:

Internationally, many films that had a theatrical release may be released Direct-to-Video in other countries [[note]]''WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls'' movie for example, after its flop in the U.S., was converted to direct to video for the European market (although it did get a British cinema release).[[/note]]. This may be due to several factors: it might be a sign that the film was a complete failure in its home country, or it might be because [[AudienceAlienatingPremise the subject matter matter]] [[WidgetSeries or style style]] limit its appeal in a particular foreign market.

There is a distinct business model that drives the direct-to-video industry, particularly when it involves lower-quality films. One might think that churning out mediocre-to-bad movies on purpose would be a dumb idea, until one looks at the sales and rental figures. A cheap 70- to 90-minute film can be produced for as little as a few thousand dollars if you hire obscure actors, crew and writers (often non-UsefulNotes/{{union|s in Hollywood}}, and barely getting minimum wage), [[CaliforniaDoubling everything gets shot around the studio]], and nothing is required that can't be obtained from the studio's stock wardrobe and props. Or, as has been trending since the mid-2000s, animation will now be done as [[SpecialEffectsFailure pretty cheap]] CGI movies. The studio then usually makes about $3-5 million off this, most of it from sales to rental chains. It floods the market with tripe into which nobody put any true effort, but it still makes money in the long run. It's the [[SpiritualSuccessor modern equivalent]] of the BMovie; in fact, many of these would be B movies if double features were still a regular thing. Some direct-to-video flicks will [[PolishTheTurd try to make lemonade of their lemons]] by claiming that their movie is "too intense", "too scary", "too well-written" well-written", "too sexy", or "too lavishly budgeted" for theaters; usually [[GenreSavvy the viewers don't fall for it.
it]].


Added DiffLines:

See also ItsNotSupposedToWinOscars, the GhettoIndex, and AudienceAlienatingPremise.
23rd Apr '16 8:32:39 PM MsChibi
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Simply put, this is the practice of skipping theaters/television and just going straight to home video as the first release. This is generally not a good sign in terms of quality (especially if it ''was'' originally going to be released theatrically, but was consigned to video)--the term "direct-to-video" or "straight-to-video" often gets used as slang for [[TheyJustDidntCare "cheaply made, rushed, low quality"]], and in extreme cases, "complete bucket of crap."

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Simply put, this is the practice of skipping theaters/television theaters/[[MadeForTVMovie television]] and just going straight to home video as the first release. This is generally not a good sign in terms of quality (especially if it ''was'' originally going to be released theatrically, but was consigned to video)--the term "direct-to-video" or "straight-to-video" often gets used as slang for [[TheyJustDidntCare "cheaply made, rushed, low quality"]], and in extreme cases, "complete bucket of crap."
5th Apr '16 1:26:25 AM C2
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** And the Tinker Bell movies (with the exception of The Pirate Fairy, thanks to ''Film/MuppetsMostWanted'' coming out at the same time) are shown at the El Capitan so they can be nominated for an Oscar, but it never seems to happen.

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** And the Tinker Bell movies (with the exception of The Pirate Fairy, thanks to ''Film/MuppetsMostWanted'' coming out at the same time) are shown at the El Capitan so they can be hypothetically nominated for an Oscar, but it never seems thus padding the list of eligible animated films. [[note]] Academy rules state that in order for the Best Animated Feature category to happen.have 5 nominated titles in a given year, 16 films must be made eligible.[[/note]]
21st Mar '16 1:02:27 PM erforce
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* The same year, Warner Bros. Family Entertainment also put out ''[[Series/TheAddamsFamily Addams Family Reunion]]'' in the same manner. It fared about as well as the prior mentioned movies, though unlike those, ''Reunion'' was not intended as a direct sequel to [[Film/TheAddamsFamily the first two films in its series]].

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* The same year, Warner Bros. Family Entertainment also put out ''[[Series/TheAddamsFamily Addams Family Reunion]]'' ''Film/AddamsFamilyReunion'' in the same manner. It fared about as well as the prior mentioned movies, though unlike those, ''Reunion'' was not intended as a direct sequel to [[Film/TheAddamsFamily the first two films in its series]].
5th Mar '16 9:24:06 AM Mario500
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Sometimes, things that were originally intended to be Direct to Video end up getting retrofitted to show on television or in theaters. Usually, only some minimal editing is done to make it fit for theaters, but there have been cases where the project was intervened midway and beefed up to make it quite a bit better. An example of the former is ''WesternAnimation/Dougs1stMovie'', which was put into theaters after the success of ''WesternAnimation/TheRugratsMovie''. A famous example of the latter is ''WesternAnimation/ToyStory2'', on which Creator/{{Pixar}} expanded tremendously for its theatrical release, along with another Disney film, ''WesternAnimation/RecessSchoolsOut''. More recently, ''Honey 2'' - intended as a DirectToVideo movie (which is still the case in North America) got a European theatrical release first... and no, Creator/JessicaAlba [[CaptainObvious did not return]].

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Sometimes, things that were originally intended to be Direct to Video end up getting retrofitted to show on television or in theaters. Usually, only some minimal editing is done to make it fit for theaters, but there have been cases where the project was intervened midway and beefed up to make it quite a bit better. An example of the former is ''WesternAnimation/Dougs1stMovie'', which was put into theaters after the success of ''WesternAnimation/TheRugratsMovie''. A famous example of the latter is ''WesternAnimation/ToyStory2'', on which Creator/{{Pixar}} expanded tremendously for its theatrical release, along with another Disney film, ''WesternAnimation/RecessSchoolsOut''. More recently, ''Honey 2'' - intended as a DirectToVideo movie (which is still the case in North America) got a European theatrical release first... and no, Creator/JessicaAlba [[CaptainObvious did not return]].
first
1st Mar '16 9:25:29 AM spectertv
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[[/folder]]
25th Feb '16 10:29:31 AM spectertv
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** "[=SpongeBob=] Meets the Strangler" and "Pranks a Lot" were released the VHS/DVD release ''The Seascape Capers'' before airing on TV.

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** "[=SpongeBob=] Meets the Strangler" and "Pranks a Lot" were released on the VHS/DVD release ''The Seascape Capers'' before airing on TV.
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