History Main / DirectToVideo

25th Dec '16 12:15:39 PM BuddyBoy600alt
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** In 1988, Random House Home Video released 'Series/SesameStreetSongsHomeVideo''. It features songs from the show itself. The release came with a song lyrics poster.

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** In 1988, Random House Home Video released 'Series/SesameStreetSongsHomeVideo''.''Series/SesameStreetSongsHomeVideo''. It features songs from the show itself. The release came with a song lyrics poster.
25th Dec '16 12:14:57 PM BuddyBoy600alt
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** In 1986, Random House Home Video released ''My Sesame Street Home Video''. It features best clips from the show itself. The release came with an activity book.
** In 1988, Random House Home Video released ''Sesame Street Songs Home Video''. It features songs from the show itself. The release came with a song lyrics poster.

to:

** In 1986, Random House Home Video released ''My Sesame Street Home Video''.''Series/MySesameStreetHomeVideo''. It features best clips from the show itself. The release came with an activity book.
** In 1988, Random House Home Video released ''Sesame Street Songs Home Video''.'Series/SesameStreetSongsHomeVideo''. It features songs from the show itself. The release came with a song lyrics poster.
22nd Dec '16 9:46:39 PM DavidDelony
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In short, while "direct-to-video" means "too bad for theaters" in the West, OVA means "too good for a TV series" in the East. This might be changing with the rise of {{Creator/Netflix}}'s original programming. Netflix originals are technically "direct-to-video" but have high production values and A-list talent on par with cable series, so the stigma against direct-to-video might fade. Indeed, some, like {{Series/StrangerThings}} have become quite popular and well-respected in their own right.

to:

In short, while "direct-to-video" means "too bad for theaters" in the West, OVA means "too good for a TV series" in the East. This might be changing with the rise of {{Creator/Netflix}}'s original programming. Netflix originals are technically "direct-to-video" but have high production values and A-list talent on par with cable series, so the stigma against direct-to-video might fade. Indeed, some, like {{Series/StrangerThings}} like
''Series/StrangerThings''
have become quite popular and well-respected in their own right.
16th Dec '16 1:51:07 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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There is a distinct business model that drives the direct-to-video industry, particularly when it involves lower-quality films. One might think that churning out mediocre-to-bad movies on purpose would be a dumb idea, until one looks at the sales and rental figures. A cheap 70- to 90-minute film can be produced for as little as a few thousand dollars if you hire obscure actors, crew and writers (often non-UsefulNotes/{{union|s in Hollywood}}, and barely getting minimum wage), [[CaliforniaDoubling everything gets shot around the studio]], and nothing is required that can't be obtained from the studio's stock wardrobe and props. Or, as has been trending since the mid-2000s, animation will now be done as [[SpecialEffectsFailure pretty cheap]] CGI movies. The studio then usually makes about $3-5 million off this, most of it from sales to rental chains. It floods the market with tripe into which nobody put any true effort, but it still makes money in the long run. It's the [[SpiritualSuccessor modern equivalent]] of the BMovie; in fact, many of these would be B movies if double features were still a regular thing. Some direct-to-video flicks will [[PolishTheTurd try to make lemonade of their lemons]] by claiming that their movie is "too intense", "too scary", "too well-written", "too sexy", or "too lavishly budgeted" for theaters; usually [[GenreSavvy the viewers don't fall for it]]. It may be a sign that a series or franchise the movie is associated with has long since [[JumpTheShark jumped the shark]], or is about to ''very'' soon.

to:

There is a distinct business model that drives the direct-to-video industry, particularly when it involves lower-quality films. One might think that churning out mediocre-to-bad movies on purpose would be a dumb idea, until one looks at the sales and rental figures. A cheap 70- to 90-minute film can be produced for as little as a few thousand dollars if you hire obscure actors, crew and writers (often non-UsefulNotes/{{union|s in Hollywood}}, and barely getting minimum wage), [[CaliforniaDoubling everything gets shot around the studio]], and nothing is required that can't be obtained from the studio's stock wardrobe and props. Or, as has been trending since the mid-2000s, animation will now be done as [[SpecialEffectsFailure pretty cheap]] CGI movies. The studio then usually makes about $3-5 million off this, most of it from sales to rental chains. It floods the market with tripe into which nobody put any true effort, but it still makes money in the long run. It's the [[SpiritualSuccessor modern equivalent]] of the BMovie; in fact, many of these would be B movies if double features were still a regular thing. Some direct-to-video flicks will [[PolishTheTurd try to make lemonade of their lemons]] by claiming that their movie is "too intense", "too scary", "too well-written", "too sexy", or "too lavishly budgeted" for theaters; usually [[GenreSavvy the viewers don't fall for it]].it. It may be a sign that a series or franchise the movie is associated with has long since [[JumpTheShark jumped the shark]], or is about to ''very'' soon.
15th Dec '16 6:23:27 PM BuddyBoy600alt
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* ''[[Creator/{{Disney}} Walt Disney Home Video]]'' releases ''WesternAnimation/DisneysSingAlongSongs'' as a direct-to-video series. The series has songs from various Disney films and television shows, and kids at home can sing-along by ''[[FollowTheBouncingBall following Mickey the Bouncing Ball]]'' as it bounces on the lyrics.

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* ''[[Creator/{{Disney}} Walt Disney Home Video]]'' releases ''WesternAnimation/DisneysSingAlongSongs'' ''WesternAnimation/DisneySingAlongSongs'' as a direct-to-video series. The series has songs from various Disney films and television shows, and kids at home can sing-along by ''[[FollowTheBouncingBall following Mickey the Bouncing Ball]]'' as it bounces on the lyrics.
15th Dec '16 6:13:04 PM BuddyBoy600alt
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* ''[[Creator/{{Disney}} Walt Disney Home Video]]'' releases ''Disney's Sing-Along Songs'' as a direct-to-video series. The series has songs from various Disney films and television shows, and kids at home can sing-along by ''[[FollowTheBouncingBall following Mickey the Bouncing Ball]]'' as it bounces on the lyrics.

to:

* ''[[Creator/{{Disney}} Walt Disney Home Video]]'' releases ''Disney's Sing-Along Songs'' ''WesternAnimation/DisneysSingAlongSongs'' as a direct-to-video series. The series has songs from various Disney films and television shows, and kids at home can sing-along by ''[[FollowTheBouncingBall following Mickey the Bouncing Ball]]'' as it bounces on the lyrics.
12th Dec '16 10:44:28 AM jamespolk
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* Most concert videos. While films in the past like Music/LedZeppelin's ''The Song Remains the Same'', Music/TheBand's ''The Last Waltz'' and Music/TalkingHeads' ''Film/StopMakingSense'' have had theatrical releases, they haven't really been box-office blockbusters, but the artists have loyal audiences for live footage. Hence, direct-to-DVD makes a lot of financial sense for these live videos.

to:

* Most concert videos. While films in the past like Music/LedZeppelin's ''The Song Remains the Same'', Music/TheBand's ''The Last Waltz'' ''Film/TheLastWaltz'' and Music/TalkingHeads' ''Film/StopMakingSense'' have had theatrical releases, they haven't really been box-office blockbusters, but the artists have loyal audiences for live footage. Hence, direct-to-DVD makes a lot of financial sense for these live videos.
3rd Dec '16 9:01:15 PM ElSquibbonator
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In short, while "direct-to-video" means "too bad for theaters" in the West, OVA means "too good for a TV series" in the East. This might be changing with the rise of {{Creator/Netflix}}'s original programming. Netflix originals are technically "direct-to-video" but have high production values and A-list talent on par with cable series, so the stigma against direct-to-video might fade. Indeed, some, like {{Series/StrangerThings}} have become

to:

In short, while "direct-to-video" means "too bad for theaters" in the West, OVA means "too good for a TV series" in the East. This might be changing with the rise of {{Creator/Netflix}}'s original programming. Netflix originals are technically "direct-to-video" but have high production values and A-list talent on par with cable series, so the stigma against direct-to-video might fade. Indeed, some, like {{Series/StrangerThings}} have become
become quite popular and well-respected in their own right.
3rd Dec '16 9:00:33 PM ElSquibbonator
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In short, while "direct-to-video" means "too bad for theaters" in the West, OVA means "too good for a TV series" in the East. This might be changing with the rise of {{Creator/Netflix}}'s original programming. Netflix originals are technically "direct-to-video" but have high production values and A-list talent on par with cable series, so the stigma against direct-to-video might fade.

to:

In short, while "direct-to-video" means "too bad for theaters" in the West, OVA means "too good for a TV series" in the East. This might be changing with the rise of {{Creator/Netflix}}'s original programming. Netflix originals are technically "direct-to-video" but have high production values and A-list talent on par with cable series, so the stigma against direct-to-video might fade.
fade. Indeed, some, like {{Series/StrangerThings}} have become
26th Nov '16 9:05:01 AM StFan
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* In 2006, WarnerBros made a brand specifically devoted to DirectToVideo films entitled Warner Premiere. These consisted of sequels to their live action output, animated films for ''Main/ScoobyDoo'', ''Main/TomAndJerry'', and the DCUniverseAnimatedOriginalMovies (mentioned below), and a few original titles here and there (like the [[TheShelfOfMovieLanguishment delayed]] ''Film/TrickRTreat''). Due to the growing decline of the DVD market and other economic setbacks, Warner Bros. pulled the plug on the label in 2013. The studio still makes direct to video films, but those are under the regular Warner Home Video banner.

to:

* In 2006, WarnerBros made a brand specifically devoted to DirectToVideo films entitled Warner Premiere. These consisted of sequels to their live action output, animated films for ''Main/ScoobyDoo'', ''Main/TomAndJerry'', and the DCUniverseAnimatedOriginalMovies WesternAnimation/DCUniverseAnimatedOriginalMovies (mentioned below), and a few original titles here and there (like the [[TheShelfOfMovieLanguishment delayed]] ''Film/TrickRTreat''). Due to the growing decline of the DVD market and other economic setbacks, Warner Bros. pulled the plug on the label in 2013. The studio still makes direct to video films, but those are under the regular Warner Home Video banner.
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