History Main / DidNotDoTheBloodyResearch

17th Aug '17 3:55:39 PM tyrekecorrea
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* Creator/{{Freeform}} misspelled the word "numpty" as "numptie" when they tried to promote a broadcast of ''Film/HarryPotterAndTheDeathlyHallowsPartTwo'' on Facebook.

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* Creator/{{Freeform}} misspelled the word "numpty" as "numptie" when they tried to promote a broadcast of ''Film/HarryPotterAndTheDeathlyHallowsPartTwo'' ''Film/HarryPotterAndTheDeathlyHallowsPart2'' on Facebook.
17th Aug '17 3:55:00 PM tyrekecorrea
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[[folder: Advertising]]
* Creator/{{Freeform}} misspelled the word "numpty" as "numptie" when they tried to promote a broadcast of ''Film/HarryPotterAndTheDeathlyHallowsPartTwo'' on Facebook.
[[/folder]]
7th Aug '17 10:34:09 PM meticulousMorology
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* ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'' features the use of the word "tosser" at one point. Its meaning is roughly equivalent to "wanker."
2nd Aug '17 10:02:40 PM PetroleumJerry
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* It's a little jarring, considering the [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar superficially clean]] nature of ''[[Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000 MST3K]]'' humour, to hear them burst out with the occasional stronger-in-Britain profanity. They use the terms correctly, it's just an unexpected comedy bonus as there's virtually no US profanity in the series.

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* It's a little jarring, considering the [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar superficially clean]] nature of ''[[Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000 MST3K]]'' humour, to hear them burst out with the occasional stronger-in-Britain profanity. They use the terms correctly, it's just an unexpected comedy bonus as there's virtually no US profanity in the series.series, as any such would be edited out for US audiences (and the resulting gaps remarked upon).
2nd Aug '17 1:48:50 PM shador5529
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*** Except in the Carolinas, where it can also refer to a type of dance.
21st Jul '17 3:49:56 PM mariofan1000
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* Music/WeirdAlYankovic caused a minor controversy over the word "Spastic" being used in [[Music/MandatoryFun "Word Crimes".]] He apologized on Twitter, saying he didn't know that it was an offensive slur.

5th Jul '17 6:44:05 PM FranksGirl
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* ''Music/TheMonkees'' were told their song "Randy Scouse Git" was not acceptable in the UK because of its title, and would have to be released with an alternate title. So, they called it "[[LiteralistSnarking Alternate Title]]."

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* ''Music/TheMonkees'' were told their song "Randy Scouse Git" was not acceptable in the UK because of its title, title[[note]]For US folks, the slang translates to "horny twerp from Liverpool"[[/note]], and would have to be released with an alternate title. So, they called it "[[LiteralistSnarking Alternate Title]]."
29th Jun '17 1:59:25 PM Bassball_Batman
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-->-- '''[[http://www.randomhouse.com/wotd/index.pperl?date=19961119 Mary Cresswell]]''' on "wanker".

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-->-- '''[[http://www.randomhouse.com/wotd/index.pperl?date=19961119 Mary Cresswell]]''' on "wanker".
"wanker."



* In the first episode of Season 3's edited English dub of ''Anime/DragonBallZ'', the apparently Australian Jiece gives us such lines as, "ah bugger, this blasted thing!" and, "no bloody Saiyan that we've ever met is that strong."
* For a different culture's take, see the ClusterFBomb from ''Anime/MagicalShoppingArcadeAbenobashi''.
* The English dub of ''Anime/NegimaSecondSeason'' has two British (specifically Welsh) characters at or younger than ten years old say 'bollocks' on more than one occasion, once in front of a British adult who just giggled. The rest of the language in the show is pretty tame, however.



* For a different culture's take, see the ClusterFBomb from ''Anime/MagicalShoppingArcadeAbenobashi''.
* The English dub of ''Anime/NegimaSecondSeason'' has two British (specifically Welsh) characters at or younger than ten years old say 'bollocks' on more than one occasion, once in front of a British adult who just giggled. The rest of the language in the show is pretty tame, however.
* In the first episode of Season 3's edited English dub of ''Anime/DragonBallZ'', the apparently Australian Jiece gives us such lines as, "ah bugger, this blasted thing!" and, "no bloody Saiyan that we've ever met is that strong."



* In an issue of ''ComicBook/YTheLastMan'', a captured woman calls the leader of the Amazon gang/army a cunt. The AxCrazy leader [[LampshadeHanging lampshades]] this by going into a detailed description of the word and how it's not an insult in Britain. The captive responds by spitting on her and getting shot for her troubles. To clarify, it certainly ''is'' an insult in Britain, just (in certain circumstances) somewhat more acceptable than in America. Like most expletives, it largely depends on how you're using it.

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* Whoever decided that "wank" would be a good onomatopoeia for ''ComicBook/CaptainAmerica'''s [[http://www.superdickery.com/captain-america-i-command-you-to-wank/ shield hitting a villain in the face]] was [[YouKeepUsingThatWord clearly unaware]] of the word's [[ADateWithRosiePalms meaning]] in British/Australian/New Zealand slang. [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar Or was 100% aware of it and having a laugh]].
** It's even better. Because of the placement of the speech bubble, it looks like "I command you to--WANK!"
* In an early issue of ''ComicBook/YTheLastMan'', Creator/MarvelComics' ''ComicBook/ConanTheBarbarian'' series, British artist Barry Smith convinced American writer Roy Thomas to have a captured woman calls soldier call another soldier a "wank." After the leader of the Amazon gang/army a cunt. The AxCrazy leader [[LampshadeHanging lampshades]] this by going into a detailed description of the word and how it's not an insult in Britain. The captive responds by spitting on her and getting shot for her troubles. To clarify, it certainly ''is'' an insult in Britain, just (in certain circumstances) somewhat issue's publication, Thomas shortly ended up with more acceptable informative letters from British readers than in America. Like most expletives, it largely depends on how you're using it.he'd have liked.



* Likewise, in the eighth issue of ''ComicBook/LukeCageHeroForHire'', a Jewish woman fondly uses the word "schvartze" to refer to Luke. However, that's basically the Yiddish equivalent of the N-word. They apologized in a later issue; the writer, Steve Englehart, was tricked into using it by the artist, George Tuska, who told him that it was a neutral term.



* Whoever decided that "wank" would be a good onomatopoeia for ComicBook/CaptainAmerica's [[http://www.superdickery.com/captain-america-i-command-you-to-wank/ shield hitting a villain in the face]] was [[YouKeepUsingThatWord clearly unaware]] of the word's [[ADateWithRosiePalms meaning]] in British/Australian/New Zealand slang. [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar Or was 100% aware of it and having a laugh.]]
** It's even better. Because of the placement of the speech bubble, it looks like "I command you to--WANK!"
* In an early issue of Creator/MarvelComics' ''ComicBook/ConanTheBarbarian'' series, British artist Barry Smith convinced American writer Roy Thomas to have a soldier call another soldier a "wank". After the issue's publication, Thomas shortly ended up with more informative letters from British readers than he'd have liked.
* Likewise, in the eighth issue of ''ComicBook/LukeCageHeroForHire'', a Jewish woman fondly uses the word "schvartze" to refer to Luke. However, that's basically the Yiddish equivalent of the N-word. They apologized in a later issue; the writer, Steve Englehart, was tricked into using it by the artist, George Tuska, who told him that it was a neutral term.

to:

* Whoever decided that "wank" would be a good onomatopoeia for ComicBook/CaptainAmerica's [[http://www.superdickery.com/captain-america-i-command-you-to-wank/ shield hitting a villain in the face]] was [[YouKeepUsingThatWord clearly unaware]] of the word's [[ADateWithRosiePalms meaning]] in British/Australian/New Zealand slang. [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar Or was 100% aware of it and having a laugh.]]
** It's even better. Because of the placement of the speech bubble, it looks like "I command you to--WANK!"
* In an early issue of Creator/MarvelComics' ''ComicBook/ConanTheBarbarian'' series, British artist Barry Smith convinced American writer Roy Thomas to have ''ComicBook/YTheLastMan'', a soldier call another soldier a "wank". After the issue's publication, Thomas shortly ended up with more informative letters from British readers than he'd have liked.
* Likewise, in the eighth issue of ''ComicBook/LukeCageHeroForHire'', a Jewish
captured woman fondly uses calls the leader of the Amazon gang/army a cunt. The AxCrazy leader [[LampshadeHanging lampshades]] this by going into a detailed description of the word "schvartze" to refer to Luke. However, that's basically the Yiddish equivalent of the N-word. They apologized and how it's not an insult in a later issue; the writer, Steve Englehart, was tricked into Britain. The captive responds by spitting on her and getting shot for her troubles. To clarify, it certainly ''is'' an insult in Britain, just (in certain circumstances) somewhat more acceptable than in America. Like most expletives, it largely depends on how you're using it by the artist, George Tuska, who told him that it was a neutral term.it.



* While all the swearing recognizable to American readers of SoBadItsGood ''Manga/DeathNote'' fanfic ''FanFic/LightAndDarkTheAdventuresOfDarkYagami'' is censored out, British ones are not, leading to Watari yelling things like "''THAT TIT IS TAKING THE PISS NOW!... WE MUST GET THE WANK OUT OF THIS SODDING CONTRACEPTION!''" fully uncensored.
** Same goes for ''[[FanFic/{{ITSMYLIFE}} ITS MY LIFE!]]'', to the point that overused British curses were associated with this fic's Wheatley.

to:

* While all the swearing recognizable to American readers In ''FanFic/CalvinAndHobbesTheSeries'', a guy on his Bluetooth rants about "bloody conspiracies", which is somewhat out of SoBadItsGood ''Manga/DeathNote'' fanfic ''FanFic/LightAndDarkTheAdventuresOfDarkYagami'' is censored out, British ones are not, leading to Watari yelling things like "''THAT TIT IS TAKING THE PISS NOW!... WE MUST GET THE WANK OUT OF THIS SODDING CONTRACEPTION!''" fully uncensored.
** Same goes for ''[[FanFic/{{ITSMYLIFE}} ITS MY LIFE!]]'', to the point that overused British curses were associated with this fic's Wheatley.
place in a normally clean fic.



* In ''FanFic/CalvinAndHobbesTheSeries'', a guy on his Bluetooth rants about "bloody conspiracies", which is somewhat out of place in a normally clean fic.
* Deliberately evoked in ''FanFic/AStormOfChaosADoctorWhoovesAdventure'', The Doctor has something of a potty mouth, saying such things as "bollocks" and "bugger," due to being companions with Derpy, who's from a different region (and her slang is roughly American equivalent). Turns out, she did do the bloody research and can even tell when he curses in alien. [[RunningGag He still does it, though.]]
* ''FanFic/InThisWorldAndTheNext'': a reviewer pointed out that "it might as well be called [[ObligatorySwearing In This Shit and the Fuck]]", and yet in the very same sentence as he is called "Ronald Fucking Weasley", (literal) RonTheDeathEater is referred to as a "prat". The same reviewer asked if "this author's version of the final battle featured Harry [[GoshDangItToHeck calling Voldemort a pillock and describing his philosophy as bobbins]]". This is especially bizarre since the author ''is'' British.

to:

* ''FanFic/InThisWorldAndTheNext'': a reviewer pointed out that "it might as well be called [[ObligatorySwearing In ''FanFic/CalvinAndHobbesTheSeries'', This Shit and the Fuck]]", and yet in the very same sentence as he is called "Ronald Fucking Weasley", (literal) RonTheDeathEater is referred to as a guy on "prat." The same reviewer asked if "this author's version of the final battle featured Harry [[GoshDangItToHeck calling Voldemort a pillock and describing his Bluetooth rants about "bloody conspiracies", which philosophy as bobbins]]." This is somewhat out especially bizarre since the author ''is'' British.
* While all the swearing recognizable to American readers
of place in a normally clean fic.
''FanFic/LightAndDarkTheAdventuresOfDarkYagami'' (a SoBadItsGood ''Manga/DeathNote'' fanfic) is censored out, British ones are not, leading to Watari yelling things like "''THAT TIT IS TAKING THE PISS NOW!... WE MUST GET THE WANK OUT OF THIS SODDING CONTRACEPTION!''" fully uncensored.
** Same goes for ''[[FanFic/{{ITSMYLIFE}} ITS MY LIFE!]]'', to the point that overused British curses were associated with this fic's Wheatley.
* Deliberately evoked in ''FanFic/AStormOfChaosADoctorWhoovesAdventure'', The Doctor has something of a potty mouth, saying such things as "bollocks" and "bugger," due to being companions with Derpy, who's from a different region (and her slang is roughly American equivalent). Turns out, she did do the bloody research and can even tell when he curses in alien. [[RunningGag He still does it, though.]]
* ''FanFic/InThisWorldAndTheNext'': a reviewer pointed out that "it might as well be called [[ObligatorySwearing In This Shit and the Fuck]]", and yet in the very same sentence as he is called "Ronald Fucking Weasley", (literal) RonTheDeathEater is referred to as a "prat". The same reviewer asked if "this author's version of the final battle featured Harry [[GoshDangItToHeck calling Voldemort a pillock and describing his philosophy as bobbins]]". This is especially bizarre since the author ''is'' British.
though]].



* In ''Film/TheAvengers2012'', Loki calls Black Widow a "mewling quim" at the end of a particularly vicious rant, quim being old English slang for the [[CountryMatters female genitalia]]. The film is rated PG-13. The word is pretty archaic, and even those who know what it means would find it more a novelty than actually offensive.
* ''Film/AustinPowersTheSpyWhoShaggedMe'' had some trouble being marketed in the UK entirely because of this. The posters either partially censored the middle of the offending word or displayed the title of ''Austin Powers 2''. They also had to run different sets of ads before the 9pm {{Watershed}}, because they couldn't use the film's full title.
* ''Film/AChristmasCarol2009'' has a guest at a genteel Victorian party playing 20 Questions and guessing "Is it an arse?" She meant ass. As in donkey.



* It works the other way around, too--the same actor gets in a "Goddamn" in ''Film/{{Thunderpants}}'', in an apparently ham-fisted attempt to imitate the speech patterns of the adult {{Eagleland}}ers around him.
* The story goes that Creator/SteveMcQueenActor didn't know the meaning of the reverse V-sign while making ''Film/LeMans'' and, when told, used the gesture instead of The Finger at the end of the movie as a way of giving his character a European-flair, as a globetrotting racing driver would probably have picked up all kinds of foreign insults on his travels. (There was probably some thought of [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar getting crap past the US radar]] too).



* ''Film/VForVendetta'' has loads of American and British curse words, which makes for interesting viewing when it's on channels like FX or BBC America. In the States, they'll bleep the F-bombs, and if they're really uptight, every other curse word, but you can listen to every utterance of "Jesus ''bloody'' Christ" and sentences like "I won't have this thing getting any more ''bollocksed-up'' than it already is." unedited.
** Note, too, that several of the major characters are well-known British actors and actresses, like Creator/HugoWeaving, Creator/JohnHurt, Creator/StephenFry, etc., and the author of the original graphic novel was Creator/AlanMoore, so the cast and crew weren't saying things to try and [[FakeNationality sound]] British.
* ''Film/AustinPowersTheSpyWhoShaggedMe'' had some trouble being marketed in the UK entirely because of this. The posters either partially censored the middle of the offending word or displayed the title of ''Austin Powers 2''. They also had to run different sets of ads before the 9pm {{Watershed}}, because they couldn't use the film's full title.

to:

* ''Film/VForVendetta'' has loads In ''Film/LaraCroftTombRaider'', Lara is fond of American and British curse words, which makes for interesting viewing when the word "bugger." She uses it a couple times, once with something as innocuous as some food blowing up in the microwave. The movie is PG-13, but it's on channels like FX or BBC America. In mainly because it's an action movie, so there's very little in the States, they'll bleep way of swearing anyway.
* The story goes that Creator/SteveMcQueenActor didn't know
the F-bombs, and if they're really uptight, every other curse word, but you can listen to every utterance meaning of "Jesus ''bloody'' Christ" and sentences like "I won't the reverse V-sign while making ''Film/LeMans'' and, when told, used the gesture instead of The Finger at the end of the movie as a way of giving his character a European-flair, as a globetrotting racing driver would probably have this thing picked up all kinds of foreign insults on his travels. (There was probably some thought of [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar getting any more ''bollocksed-up'' than it already is." unedited.
** Note, too,
crap past the US radar]] too).
* ''Film/MuppetTreasureIsland'' is otherwise free of profanity, though when Billy Bones is dying, Gonzo and Rizzo lampshade the fact
that several "this was supposed to be a kids' movie!" Shortly after that, when Billy's shipmates search his room, one of them says "Billy's dead, and he hasn't got the bloody map!" Billy himself asks aloud "How does [Mrs. Bluberidge] bloody do that?" Some versions of the major characters are well-known British actors and actresses, like Creator/HugoWeaving, Creator/JohnHurt, Creator/StephenFry, etc., and the author of the original graphic novel was Creator/AlanMoore, so the cast and crew weren't saying things to try and [[FakeNationality sound]] British.
* ''Film/AustinPowersTheSpyWhoShaggedMe'' had some trouble being marketed in the UK entirely because of this. The posters either partially censored the middle of the offending word or displayed the title of ''Austin Powers 2''. They also had to run different sets of ads before the 9pm {{Watershed}}, because they couldn't use the film's full title.
film dub over "bloody" with "bloomin."



* ''Film/MuppetTreasureIsland'' is otherwise free of profanity, though when Billy Bones is dying, Gonzo and Rizzo lampshade the fact that "this was supposed to be a kids' movie!" Shortly after that, when Billy's shipmates search his room, one of them says "Billy's dead, and he hasn't got the bloody map!" Billy himself asks aloud "How does [Mrs. Bluberidge] bloody do that?" Some versions of the film dub over "bloody" with "bloomin".
* In ''Film/LaraCroftTombRaider'', Lara is fond of the word "bugger". She uses it a couple times, once with something as innocuous as some food blowing up in the microwave. The movie is PG-13, but it's mainly because it's an action movie, so there's very little in the way of swearing anyway.
* In ''Film/TheAvengers2012'', Loki calls Black Widow a "mewling quim" at the end of a particularly vicious rant, quim being old English slang for the [[CountryMatters female genitalia.]] The film is rated PG-13. The word is pretty archaic, and even those who know what it means would find it more a novelty than actually offensive.
* ''Film/AChristmasCarol2009'' has a guest at a genteel Victorian party playing 20 Questions and guessing "Is it an arse?" She meant ass. As in donkey.
* Middle-finger gestures are generally censored in America, but the ''Film/{{Trainspotting}}'' poster in which Begbie gives a V-sign is shown without any problems.



* The Japanese film ''Film/WhyDontYouPlayInHell'' has a group of amateur Japanese filmmakers give themselves the English name "Fuck Bombers." It's obviously not supposed to be as vulgar to Japanese ears as English-speakers.
* In ''Film/{{Tomorrowland}}'', [[spoiler:Governor Nixs]] very last words are [[spoiler:"Oh, bollocks."]] this was enough to get the film a 12A rating in the U.K. despite the film being rated P.G. in America.



* It works the other way around, too--the same actor gets in a "Goddamn" in ''Film/{{Thunderpants}}'', in an apparently ham-fisted attempt to imitate the speech patterns of the adult {{Eagleland}}ers around him.
* In ''Film/{{Tomorrowland}}'', [[spoiler:Governor Nixs]] very last words are [[spoiler:"Oh, bollocks."]] this was enough to get the film a 12A rating in the U.K. despite the film being rated P.G. in America.
* Middle-finger gestures are generally censored in America, but the ''Film/{{Trainspotting}}'' poster in which Begbie gives a V-sign is shown without any problems.
* ''Film/VForVendetta'' has loads of American and British curse words, which makes for interesting viewing when it's on channels like FX or BBC America. In the States, they'll bleep the F-bombs, and if they're really uptight, every other curse word, but you can listen to every utterance of "Jesus ''bloody'' Christ" and sentences like "I won't have this thing getting any more ''bollocksed-up'' than it already is." unedited.
** Note, too, that several of the major characters are well-known British actors and actresses, like Creator/HugoWeaving, Creator/JohnHurt, Creator/StephenFry, etc., and the author of the original graphic novel was Creator/AlanMoore, so the cast and crew weren't saying things to try and [[FakeNationality sound]] British.
* The Japanese film ''Film/WhyDontYouPlayInHell'' has a group of amateur Japanese filmmakers give themselves the English name "Fuck Bombers." It's obviously not supposed to be as vulgar to Japanese ears as English-speakers.



* In the Creator/LoisMcMasterBujold novel ''Literature/{{Memory}}'', Miles Vorkosigan is said to have "buggered the cartridge" from a SonicStunner to improvise a grenade. Also, he describes Impsec's security recording as having been "buggered" when he finds evidence of tampering. Nowhere else in Bujold's books do we find this sort of expression. "Buggered" is fairly innocuous US slang for fouled-up or broken (but usually not irreparably). In the UK you can ''describe'' something as "buggered" or talk about "buggering [something] ''up''", but in most dialects if you say you've "buggered [something]" you'll get some strange looks. Thus Miles' statement sounds as odd to the British ear as it does to the US ear when a Brit "[[BurnTheWitch lights up a fag]]."



* The ''[[Franchise/StarWars Han Solo Adventures]]'' series contains a character named [[http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/Bollux Bollux.]] Whether that was a deliberate attempt at GettingCrapPastTheRadar is up for debate but, unsurprisingly, he was renamed to Zollux for the UK release (as a nod to this, later material, even in the US, would refer to Zollux as an alias he would adopt later). Han specifically asks him at one point if he minds that his name is a rather insulting joke, so it's not really worried about the radar. In some rural parts of the US, "bollocks" is simply used to mean "testicles, usually of an animal", (e.g. in the context of castrating a bull)it's slightly more objectionable than "buttocks".

to:

* In ''Literature/TheKaneChronicles'', which is G-rated, except for a NarrativeProfanityFilter with Carter sometimes, Sadie uses the word "bloody" a lot.
* In ''Literature/TheLegendOfRahAndTheMuggles'', [[CardCarryingVillain Zyn]] utters the [[SoBadItsGood priceless]] line "Thats why Im the leader of this pathetic group.
The ''[[Franchise/StarWars Han Solo Adventures]]'' series contains a character named [[http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/Bollux Bollux.]] Whether that only thing you little buggers do is ask questions." Seeing as the author marketed the book for children ages six to twelve, she presumably was a deliberate attempt at GettingCrapPastTheRadar unaware of what "buggers" actually meant.
* In the Creator/LoisMcMasterBujold novel ''Literature/{{Memory}}'', Miles Vorkosigan
is up said to have "buggered the cartridge" from a SonicStunner to improvise a grenade. Also, he describes Impsec's security recording as having been "buggered" when he finds evidence of tampering. Nowhere else in Bujold's books do we find this sort of expression. "Buggered" is fairly innocuous US slang for debate but, unsurprisingly, he was renamed to Zollux for the UK release (as a nod to this, later material, even in the US, would refer to Zollux as an alias he would adopt later). Han specifically asks him at one point if he minds that his name is a rather insulting joke, so it's not really worried about the radar. In some rural parts of the US, "bollocks" is simply used to mean "testicles, fouled-up or broken (but usually not irreparably). In the UK you can ''describe'' something as "buggered" or talk about "buggering [something] ''up''", but in most dialects if you say you've "buggered [something]" you'll get some strange looks. Thus Miles' statement sounds as odd to the British ear as it does to the US ear when a Brit "[[BurnTheWitch lights up a fag]]."
* ''Literature/PlanetOfAdventure'': Creator/JackVance innocently named an alien race ''the Wankh''; the resulting second volume ''Servants
of an animal", (e.g. the Wankh'' sold quite well in a niche market. For a recent republication he consented to rename them ''Wannek'', irritating at least a few fans because a race that can express a sentence in the context overtones of castrating a bull)it's slightly more objectionable than "buttocks".single chime ought to be monosyllabic.



* In TheKaneChronicles, which is G-rated, except for a NarrativeProfanityFilter with Carter sometimes, Sadie uses the word "bloody" a lot.
* Creator/JackVance innocently named an alien race ''the Wankh''; the resulting book ''[[Literature/PlanetOfAdventure Servants of the Wankh]]'' sold quite well in a niche market. For a recent republication he consented to rename them ''Wannek'', irritating at least a few fans because a race that can express a sentence in the overtones of a single chime ought to be monosyllabic.

to:

* In TheKaneChronicles, which is G-rated, except for ''Franchise/StarWars'': The ''Han Solo Adventures'' series contains a NarrativeProfanityFilter with Carter sometimes, Sadie uses the word "bloody" a lot.
* Creator/JackVance innocently
character named an alien race ''the Wankh''; [[http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/Bollux Bollux]]. Whether that was a deliberate attempt at GettingCrapPastTheRadar is up for debate but, unsurprisingly, he was renamed to Zollux for the resulting book ''[[Literature/PlanetOfAdventure Servants UK release (as a nod to this, later material, even in the US, would refer to Zollux as an alias he would adopt later). Han specifically asks him at one point if he minds that his name is a rather insulting joke, so it's not really worried about the radar. In some rural parts of the Wankh]]'' sold quite well in a niche market. For a recent republication he consented US, "bollocks" is simply used to rename them ''Wannek'', irritating at least a few fans because a race that can express a sentence mean "testicles, usually of an animal", (e.g. in the overtones context of castrating a single chime ought to be monosyllabic.bull)it's slightly more objectionable than "buttocks."



* In ''Literature/TheLegendOfRahAndTheMuggles'', [[CardCarryingVillain Zyn]] utters the [[SoBadItsGood priceless]] line "Thats why Im the leader of this pathetic group. The only thing you little buggers do is ask questions". Seeing as the author marketed the book for children ages six to twelve, she presumably was unaware of what "buggers" actually meant.



* A [[http://news.nationalpost.com/news/canada/la-riviere-sans-retour-includes-quebec-swear-word French children's book author]] decided to introduce some local sayings to young readers in a book taking place in Canada. Unfortunately, one of those sayings happened to be "tabernacle", which due to traditional views on blasphemy is roughly as obscene in French Canada as "fuck" or "shit".

to:

* A [[http://news.nationalpost.com/news/canada/la-riviere-sans-retour-includes-quebec-swear-word French children's book author]] decided to introduce some local sayings to young readers in a book taking place in Canada. Unfortunately, one of those sayings happened to be "tabernacle", which due to traditional views on blasphemy is roughly as obscene in French Canada as "fuck" or "shit".
"shit."



* In one episode of ''Series/{{Friends}}'', Chandler calls a character a "wank", to which many British viewers react with surprise or disbelief. A one-shot character in a later episode parodies this trope, being an American who adopted ridiculously fake British mannerisms after staying there for a few months, saying things like "Oh bugger, should I not have said that? I feel like a perfect arse!"

to:

* In one episode of ''Series/{{Friends}}'', Chandler calls a character a "wank", to which many ''Series/ArrestedDevelopment'' Michael's British viewers react with surprise or disbelief. A one-shot character in girlfriend refers to him as a later episode parodies this trope, pussy and he assumes he's being an American who adopted ridiculously fake British mannerisms after staying there called a wimp. A voice over explains that in England this is actually a term of endearment. It's not clear whether the writers were mistaken or simply invented a fact for a few months, saying things like "Oh bugger, should I not have said that? I feel like a perfect arse!"the sake of the joke.



** There's a truly startling moment in ''Series/{{Angel}}'' where Spike instructs Angel to "wank off," the writer apparently believing this is analogous to "piss off." [[ADateWithRosiePalms It really isn't,]] and the British phrase would be more likely to be "wank yourself off".

to:

** There's a truly startling moment in ''Series/{{Angel}}'' where Spike instructs Angel to "wank off," the writer apparently believing this is analogous to "piss off." [[ADateWithRosiePalms It really isn't,]] isn't]], and the British phrase would be more likely to be "wank yourself off".off."



* ''Series/ArrestedDevelopment'' Michael's British girlfriend refers to him as a pussy and he assumes he's being called a wimp. A voice over explains that in England this is actually a term of endearment. It's not clear whether the writers were mistaken or simply invented a fact for the sake of the joke.
* In an episode of ''Series/ICarly'', a one-shot British character calls the main characters hob-knockers at least five times. Only one of them knows "what it really means", however, and they don't say it out loud to the viewers. In this case, Brits would be equally mystified: the insult appears to be either made up or an archaic dialect word.
* In ''Series/{{Leverage}}'', which is otherwise almost entirely devoid of profanity, Sophie Devereaux is introduced in a flashback where Nate shoots her (after she shot him when he caught her peeling priceless paintings out of their frames) and she snarls, "You wanker!"
* Ewan [=McGregor=] was a guest on ''Series/TheTonightShow'' with Jay Leno a few years back, and the conversation turned to the V-sign. [=McGregor=] was asked to explain the history of it (the ''false'' folk etymology based on the English longbowmen at Agincourt), and while doing so he demonstrated it to the entire audience. The audience cheered madly, and [=McGregor=] started laughing about how he had just flipped off both live and viewing audiences and was being applauded for doing so. He actually looked rather embarrassed by it.
* ''Series/DinnerImpossible'' chef Robert Irvine frequently throws out stuff like "bollocks," "bugger," "bloody," and "tosser" and Food Network never bleeps any of it. It's only when he uses profanity that's unsuitable for US TV that they bleep him.



* ''Series/DinnerImpossible'' chef Robert Irvine frequently throws out stuff like "bollocks," "bugger," "bloody," and "tosser" and Food Network never bleeps any of it. It's only when he uses profanity that's unsuitable for US TV that they bleep him.
* In one episode of ''Series/{{Friends}}'', Chandler calls a character a "wank", to which many British viewers react with surprise or disbelief. A one-shot character in a later episode parodies this trope, being an American who adopted ridiculously fake British mannerisms after staying there for a few months, saying things like "Oh bugger, should I not have said that? I feel like a perfect arse!"
* ''Series/{{Glee}}'' faced backlash from UK viewers when the term "spaz" was used casually in the episode "Hairography" (to describe the energetic dancing), because it seemed neither country knew that the word is seen differently. They seemed to have done the research, though, as in a later episode a scene where one character calls another "retarded" is edited out. Which then got backlash because the response to that (as the character was a Downs baby) was a major point for episodes, and without the scene the UK audience didn't know what was happening.
* For unknown reasons, the German dub of ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'' often leaves the english word "Bimbo" as untranslated GratuitousEnglish. The problem is that Bimbo is already a German word and it is a rather offensive synonym for the N-word.
* In an episode of ''Series/ICarly'', a one-shot British character calls the main characters hob-knockers at least five times. Only one of them knows "what it really means", however, and they don't say it out loud to the viewers. In this case, Brits would be equally mystified: the insult appears to be either made up or an archaic dialect word.
* On an episode of ''Series/JudgeJudy'' (which is available on her DVD "Justice Served"), a man is suing a woman he had a one-night-stand with for allegedly stealing his checkbook the morning after. The judge at one point says his bank account was "all bollocksed up," which passed uncensored. Presumably, JJ was not aware of the potential vulgarity, and neither were American S&P censors.
* In ''Series/{{Leverage}}'', which is otherwise almost entirely devoid of profanity, Sophie Devereaux is introduced in a flashback where Nate shoots her (after she shot him when he caught her peeling priceless paintings out of their frames) and she snarls, "You wanker!"
* Exploited in ''MiamiVice''. In the 80's, before the internet had opened up the world, most Americans had no idea what a wanker was, as demonstrated by the Series/MorkAndMindy script-writer above. Phil Collins, being English most certainly did know, and knew the Americans didn't; thus, as VillainOfTheWeek he was able to get away with turning to Crocket and Tubbs and saying "Do I look like some sort of wanker?" which would be a perfectly reasonable phrase for his (English) character to use.
* When ''Series/MorkAndMindy'' first arrived in the UK, it was seen as gentle inoffensive comedy about an alien arriving in the US, and it was scheduled for Sunday late afternoon viewing, just before or after the religious God-Slot. This happy state persisted even after Mindy's landlord became a semi-regular on the show. Older people catching the show as a prelude to the saintly Jess Yates presenting his blend of hymns and homilies were consternated by frequent references to '''Mr. Wanker''', a name spoken with unseemly emphasis by Robin Williams[[note]]who'd lived in Scotland and knew what a wanker was. He must have clued other cast members in about the joke, as even the lovely but squeaky-clean Mindy spoke the name with very clear enunciation.[[/note]] HilarityEnsued.



* In ''Series/WeirdScience'', Lisa once used 'wank' to mean any pointless pastime. "Then you can wank to your heart's content. Wank, wank, wank."
* Irish actor Colm Meaney got away with saying "bollocks" in the ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' episode "Time's Orphan". The BBC airing was edited accordingly.
* On an episode of ''Series/JudgeJudy'' (which is available on her DVD "Justice Served"), a man is suing a woman he had a one-night-stand with for allegedly stealing his checkbook the morning after. The judge at one point says his bank account was "all bollocksed up," which passed uncensored. Presumably, JJ was not aware of the potential vulgarity, and neither were American S&P censors.
* ''Series/OnceUponATimeInWonderland'', a spinoff of an American show made in Canada, featuring mostly British actors, seems to have Alice and/or the Knave of Hearts say the phrase "bloody hell" in nearly episode, as well as other occasional phrases like "sod off". [[WhatDoYouMeanItsNotForKids This is a family show, right?]]

to:

* In ''Series/WeirdScience'', Lisa once used 'wank' to mean any pointless pastime. "Then you can wank to your heart's content. Wank, wank, wank."
* Irish actor Colm Meaney got away with saying "bollocks" in the ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' episode "Time's Orphan". The BBC airing was edited accordingly.
* On an episode of ''Series/JudgeJudy'' (which is available on her DVD "Justice Served"), a man is suing a woman he had a one-night-stand with for allegedly stealing his checkbook the morning after. The judge at one point says his bank account was "all bollocksed up," which passed uncensored. Presumably, JJ was not aware of the potential vulgarity, and neither were American S&P censors.
* ''Series/OnceUponATimeInWonderland'', a spinoff of an American show made in Canada, featuring mostly British actors, seems to have Alice and/or the Knave of Hearts say the phrase "bloody hell" in nearly episode, as well as other occasional phrases like "sod off". off." [[WhatDoYouMeanItsNotForKids This is a family show, right?]]



* For unknown reasons, the German dub of ''Series/HowIMetYourMother'' often leaves the english word "Bimbo" as untranslated GratuitousEnglish. The problem is that Bimbo is already a German word and it is a rather offensive synonym for the N-word.
* When ''Series/MorkAndMindy'' first arrived in the UK, it was seen as gentle inoffensive comedy about an alien arriving in the US, and it was scheduled for Sunday late afternoon viewing, just before or after the religious God-Slot. This happy state persisted even after Mindy's landlord became a semi-regular on the show. Older people catching the show as a prelude to the saintly Jess Yates presenting his blend of hymns and homilies were consternated by frequent references to '''Mr. Wanker''', a name spoken with unseemly emphasis by Robin Williams[[note]]who'd lived in Scotland and knew what a wanker was. He must have clued other cast members in about the joke, as even the lovely but squeaky-clean Mindy spoke the name with very clear enunciation.[[/note]] HilarityEnsued.
* Exploited in MiamiVice. In the 80's, before the internet had opened up the world, most Americans had no idea what a wanker was, as demonstrated by the Series/MorkAndMindy script-writer above. Phil Collins, being English most certainly did know, and knew the Americans didn't; thus, as VillainOfTheWeek he was able to get away with turning to Crocket and Tubbs and saying "Do I look like some sort of wanker?" which would be a perfectly reasonable phrase for his (English) character to use.



* ''Series/{{Glee}}'' faced backlash from UK viewers when the term "spaz" was used casually in the episode "Hairography" (to describe the energetic dancing), because it seemed neither country knew that the word is seen differently. They seemed to have done the research, though, as in a later episode a scene where one character calls another "retarded" is edited out. Which then got backlash because the response to that (as the character was a Downs baby) was a major point for episodes, and without the scene the UK audience didn't know what was happening.

to:

* ''Series/{{Glee}}'' faced backlash from UK viewers when the term "spaz" was used casually Irish actor Colm Meaney got away with saying "bollocks" in the ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' episode "Hairography" (to describe the energetic dancing), because it seemed neither country knew that the word is seen differently. They seemed to have done the research, though, as in a later episode a scene where one character calls another "retarded" is "Time's Orphan." The BBC airing was edited out. Which then got backlash because the response to that (as the character accordingly.
* Ewan [=McGregor=]
was a Downs baby) guest on ''Series/TheTonightShow'' with Jay Leno a few years back, and the conversation turned to the V-sign. [=McGregor=] was a major point for episodes, asked to explain the history of it (the ''false'' folk etymology based on the English longbowmen at Agincourt), and without while doing so he demonstrated it to the scene the UK entire audience. The audience didn't know what cheered madly, and [=McGregor=] started laughing about how he had just flipped off both live and viewing audiences and was happening.being applauded for doing so. He actually looked rather embarrassed by it.
* In ''Series/WeirdScience'', Lisa once used 'wank' to mean any pointless pastime. "Then you can wank to your heart's content. Wank, wank, wank."



* A succession of radio commercials with an ''Film/AustinPowers'' tie-in had him openly talking about "shagging" every thirty seconds, apparently without any notion of what the Belgium it MEANS.

to:

* A succession of radio commercials with an ''Film/AustinPowers'' tie-in had him openly talking about "shagging" every thirty seconds, apparently without any notion of what the Belgium it MEANS.'''''means'''''.



* Having researched Victorian thieves' cant enough to create a glossary but not enough to know which words were still in use, the ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' setting ''Planescape'' also included "berk" on its list of slang. To make matters worse, most of the books were written in-universe style, slathering virtually every character's speech with cant, and that was the writers' single favorite word. Most Brits don't know what berk derives from, so it does sometimes get used casually in the UK as well, but it is still a reasonably strong term (equivalent to "moron") even if you don't know its history. [[note]]Hint:"Berk" is Cockney rhyming slang, where a shortened version of a phrase is slang for what the phrase rhymes with. It's short for "Berkshire (or "Berkeley") hunt." [[CountryMatters Yeah.]][[/note]]
** Though the few still-in-use terms included in the Cant were jarring enough (Bloody and Sodding being the most jarring) the use of the word Pike for "move on" was ill-advised, since the only derivation still in use is "Pikey", which is [[UsefulNotes/IrishTravellers rather racist]]

to:

* Having researched Victorian thieves' cant enough to create a glossary but not enough to know which words were still in use, the ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' setting ''Planescape'' also included "berk" on its list of slang. To make matters worse, most of the books were written in-universe style, slathering virtually every character's speech with cant, and that was the writers' single favorite word. Most Brits don't know what berk derives from, so it does sometimes get used casually in the UK as well, but it is still a reasonably strong term (equivalent to "moron") even if you don't know its history. [[note]]Hint:"Berk" is Cockney rhyming slang, where a shortened version of a phrase is slang for what the phrase rhymes with. It's short for "Berkshire (or "Berkeley") hunt." [[CountryMatters Yeah.]][[/note]]
Yeah]].[[/note]]
** Though the few still-in-use terms included in the Cant were jarring enough (Bloody and Sodding being the most jarring) the use of the word Pike for "move on" was ill-advised, since the only derivation still in use is "Pikey", which is [[UsefulNotes/IrishTravellers rather racist]]racist]].



* In ''VideoGame/{{Recettear}}'', Charme, The Lady Thief, repeatedly introduces herself as a "professional Berk." One wonders whether Carpe Fulgar knew exactly where [[CountryMatters that quaint colloquialism]] came from. [[note]] While drunk, she even goes so far as to say that she is Recette's personal berk.[[/note]]
** Even stranger, Tear often says "merde" (shit) when in the Japanese VO she says "mattaku" (something along the lines of an exasperated "honestly..."). Given that the rest of the translation is extremely good, this stands out as a very strange oversight.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/{{Recettear}}'', Charme, The Lady Thief, repeatedly introduces herself as a "professional Berk." One wonders whether Carpe Fulgar knew exactly where [[CountryMatters that quaint colloquialism]] came from. [[note]] While drunk, she even goes so far as to say that she is Recette's personal berk.[[/note]]
** Even stranger, Tear often says "merde" (shit) when in the Japanese VO she says "mattaku" (something along the lines of an exasperated "honestly..."). Given that the rest
Korean-developed ''VideoGame/AllianceOfValiantArms'' has one of the EU side's taunts vocalized as "Go ahead, shoot some more, you bloody tossers!" One can suppose it was the British voice actor [[ThrowItIn ad-libbing a bit]], as the other English taunts use somewhat more benign words like "rascals" and "cowards."
* The ''VideoGame/BanjoKazooie'' games contain a lot of racy Britishisms that slipped past ESRB censors and got an E rating. Note that given Rare's sense of humor [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar this was almost certainly on purpose]].
* ''VideoGame/ChronoTrigger'' features enemies called Buggers (possibly a ShoutOut by the translators to the ''Literature/EndersGame'' example, but as they are robotic and accompanied by enemies called "Debuggers", it is likely to be a coding reference and unintentionally funny). The UsefulNotes/NintendoDS release had a new
translation is extremely good, this that changed the enemies' names to Verminator and Deverminator respectively since that release was the first time the game made it across the Atlantic. The new names seem to imply that they're rogue pest control robots.
** Non-offensive example -- the band of carpenters are referred to as "blokes" by their boss. Obviously the translator has heard that "blokes" = "guys" - however, when an English-speaking player sees "Come on, you blokes!" it
stands out as if he had instead greeted a group of women with "Come on, you females!" In Australia the terms are interchangeable, but the character's supposed to be British, and British people don't use "blokes" that way. "Mate", "pal", or "chum" would make more sense in context.
** Early on in the game, one particularly disgruntled character will tell you to "take your bloody time!"
* The manual for ''Videogame/CrashTeamRacing'' offers advice for avoiding missile attacks by saying that, if the player is, 'being tailed by one of these buggers,' it's a good idea to drop something behind you. Could be GettingCrapPastTheRadar.
* ''VideoGame/DeusExHumanRevolution'''s ''Missing Link'' DLC, being made outside the UK, shows the development team isn't too experienced with the lingo; an Irish character comments on a weapon being "[[StockBritishPhrases the bollocks]]", which, most likely to the confusion of whomever wrote the subtitle script, has compromised with "bullocks." The proper expression is "the dog's bollocks", meaning "really good" (simply calling something "bollocks" means it's bad).
* Rareware inverted this trope with its next game ''VIdeoGame/DonkeyKong64'', using the line "One hell of a guy" in the [[SoBadItsGood infamous D.K. Rap]].
* Reverse example: in the DS version of ''VideoGame/DragonQuestV'', Prince Harry tells the main character, before his wedding to not "cock it up." Cue the player making innuendos about the wedding night. Although, considering Prince Harry's choice of souvenir for his own wedding [[spoiler: (he has musical instruments made so he can gleefully present the player with his
very strange oversight.own *coughcough* "marital organ")]], this one might be intentional.
* Winters (part of Foggyland, the game's equivalent of Europe) is the equivalent of the UK (especially England, but there's also a Loch Ness counterpart) in the ''VideoGame/{{EarthBound}}'' verse, but Dr. Andonuts uses the word "fag" as an insult rather than to refer to a cigarette in ''VideoGame/TheHalloweenHack''.
* British players of ''VideoGame/EscapeFromMonkeyIsland'' have been rather taken aback upon hearing the usually family-friendly Guybrush Threepwood describe a group of termites as "little buggers."
* ''VideoGame/JakAndDaxterThePrecursorLegacy'' features a fisherman with a stereotypical pseudo-Bristolian seafarers' accent. He describes unwanted fish as "buggers." The game got off with a 3+ ("general") rating.
* ''VideoGame/JazzJackrabbit 2'' fell into this trope in Britain, due to Jazz's brother being called Spaz. "Spazzy" in American English simply means "zany" or "crazy", which definitely describes him, but anywhere else it would be like naming him "Retard."



* ''[[VideoGame/Sonic3AndKnuckles Sonic 3]]'' had a a tank-like, insectoid badnik named in the manual as [[AccidentalInnuendo Buggernaut]].
** The [[http://www.games.lt/w/gbox/6956.jpg European box art]] for ''VideoGame/SonicHeroes'' has the titular hedgehog holding up three fingers to symbolise the three-character teams used in the game. The three fingers in question are his thumb, index and middle fingers, from the back. The [[http://www.blueblur.org/games/heroes/images/heroesBoxArt.jpg American box art]] doesn't show his hand.

to:

* ''[[VideoGame/Sonic3AndKnuckles Sonic 3]]'' had a a tank-like, insectoid badnik named in the manual as [[AccidentalInnuendo Buggernaut]].
** The [[http://www.games.lt/w/gbox/6956.jpg European box art]]
Kabam's ''Kingdoms of Camelot'' on Facebook has sound effects for ''VideoGame/SonicHeroes'' has the titular hedgehog holding up three fingers to symbolise the three-character teams used in various actions and screens within the game. Some are just sounds and some are spoken words supposedly by your troops or whoever. When you're attacked and you click on the report, if it's one where you lost, you can clearly hear someone saying "bugger off" in the string of words and sounds, intended to convey depressed and disappointed troops, that accompany it.
*
The three original box art for ''VideoGame/Left4Dead2'' showed the back of a hand with the middle and index fingers raised, a fairly innocuous gesture in question are his thumb, index and middle fingers, from the back. The [[http://www.blueblur.org/games/heroes/images/heroesBoxArt.States, but not so much elsewhere, requiring a change to be made for overseas boxes. [[http://i.neoseeker.com/gg/uploads/news/8-2009/news_img_23652_0.jpg American box art]] doesn't show his hand.Can be seen side-by-side here]].
** ''VideoGame/MarioKart8Deluxe'' had to patch out the [[VideoGame/{{Splatoon}} Inkling Girl]] making the same gesture.
* In ''[[VideoGame/LuigisMansion Luigi's Mansion]]'', Professor E. Gadd refers to a ghost as "the little bugger." In the UK, at least, this seems unusually strong language for a kid's game.



* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioRPG'' has Croco refer to Mario as a "persistent bugger" at one point, although it helps that [[NoExportForYou it wasn't released in Europe]] until the UsefulNotes/VirtualConsole (which changed "bugger" to "pest", anyway).
* Reverse example. In the DS version of ''VideoGame/DragonQuestV'', Prince Harry tells the main character, before his wedding to not "cock it up." Cue the player making innuendos about the wedding night. Although, considering Prince Harry's choice of souvenir for his own wedding [[spoiler: (he has musical instruments made so he can gleefully present the player with his very own *coughcough* "marital organ,")]] this one might be intentional.
* ''VideoGame/JakAndDaxterThePrecursorLegacy'' features a fisherman with a stereotypical pseudo-Bristolian seafarers' accent. He describes unwanted fish as "buggers". The game got off with a 3+ ("general") rating.
* (Perhaps) unintentional: ''[[VideoGame/MetalGearSolid3 Shagohod]]''. Makes perfect sense if you understand the Russian name. If you don't, you might only pick up on the first few letters...

to:

* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioRPG'' has Croco refer to Mario as a "persistent bugger" at one point, although it helps that [[NoExportForYou it wasn't released Rocket Racoon in Europe]] until the UsefulNotes/VirtualConsole (which changed "bugger" to "pest", anyway).
* Reverse example. In the DS version of ''VideoGame/DragonQuestV'', Prince Harry tells the main character, before his wedding to not "cock it up." Cue the player making innuendos about the wedding night. Although, considering Prince Harry's choice of souvenir for his own wedding [[spoiler: (he has musical instruments made so he can gleefully present the player
''Ultimate VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom3'' gets away with his very own *coughcough* "marital organ,")]] this one might be intentional.
calling people 'wankers' just by having a British accent.
* ''VideoGame/JakAndDaxterThePrecursorLegacy'' features ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid3'': a fisherman with a stereotypical pseudo-Bristolian seafarers' accent. He describes unwanted fish as "buggers". The game got off with a 3+ ("general") rating.
* (Perhaps) unintentional: ''[[VideoGame/MetalGearSolid3 Shagohod]]''.
(perhaps) unintentional one: ''Shagohod''. Makes perfect sense if you understand the Russian name. If you don't, you might only pick up on the first few letters...letters....



* The Australian versions of the New Play Control ''VideoGame/{{Pikmin}}'' games change the name of the Wollywog, Yellow Wollywog and Wogpole to Wollyhop, Yellow Wollyhop and Wolpole, respectively. ("Wog" is a slur for Mediterranean people, and the word "wollywog" is evocative of "Gollywog", which is an offensive caricatures of black people.)
* An interesting version that's actually not with American and British English but Japanese and American English happens in the little known PSP game ''VideoGame/PoPoLoCrois''. A monster fought ''very'' early in the game is called "Pecker." Well yeah, it ''is'' a bird after all, except guess what "Pecker" means in English? It's a slang word for a penis. It's unknown whether the game is rated "T" in North America for this reason or because there are some rather violent scenes.
* In ''VideoGame/PokemonDiamondAndPearl'', a Team Galactic grunt in Pastoria City calls the player character a "little bugger." The line was obviously rewritten for the European/Australian release.
* ''VideoGame/{{Portal 2}}'' features Wheatley, a personality core with a pronounced British accent and vocabulary to match. Later in the game, when things stop going his way, he begins swearing a lot, using the word "bloody." It's not considered a swear word in the US, so it received an E10 there.
-->'''Wheatley:''' Oh you HAD to play bloody cat and mouse, didn't you?! WELL NOW WE'RE ALL GONNA PAY THE PRICE, ''BECAUSE WE'RE ALL GOING TO BLOODY'' '''''DIE!'''''



* ''VideoGame/JazzJackrabbit 2'' fell into this trope in Britain, due to Jazz's brother being called Spaz. "Spazzy" in American English simply means "zany" or "crazy", which definitely describes him, but anywhere else it would be like naming him "Retard."
* An interesting version that's actually not with American and British English but Japanese and American English happens in the little known PSP game ''VideoGame/PoPoLoCrois''. A monster fought ''very'' early in the game is called "Pecker". Well yeah, it ''is'' a bird after all, except guess what "Pecker" means in English? It's a slang word for a penis. It's unknown whether the game is rated "T" in North America for this reason or because there are some rather violent scenes.

to:

* ''VideoGame/JazzJackrabbit In ''VideoGame/{{Recettear}}'', Charme, The Lady Thief, repeatedly introduces herself as a "professional Berk." One wonders whether Carpe Fulgar knew exactly where [[CountryMatters that quaint colloquialism]] came from. [[note]] While drunk, she even goes so far as to say that she is Recette's personal berk.[[/note]]
** Even stranger, Tear often says "merde" (shit) when in the Japanese VO she says "mattaku" (something along the lines of an exasperated "honestly..."). Given that the rest of the translation is extremely good, this stands out as a very strange oversight.
* Bosco in ''VideoGame/SamAndMaxFreelancePolice'' exclaims 'Bugger' and 'Bollocks' while impersonating a stereotypical British gent in ''Situation: Comedy''.
* ''[[VideoGame/Sonic3AndKnuckles Sonic 3]]'' had a tank-like, insectoid badnik named in the manual as [[AccidentalInnuendo Buggernaut]].
** The [[http://www.games.lt/w/gbox/6956.jpg European box art]] for ''VideoGame/SonicHeroes'' has the titular hedgehog holding up three fingers to symbolise the three-character teams used in the game. The three fingers in question are his thumb, index and middle fingers, from the back. The [[http://www.blueblur.org/games/heroes/images/heroesBoxArt.jpg American box art]] doesn't show his hand.
* ''VideoGame/StarWarsBattlefront
2'' fell into this trope in Britain, due to Jazz's brother being called Spaz. "Spazzy" in American English simply means "zany" or "crazy", is almost completely devoid of profanity, which definitely describes makes it surprising when an Imperial officer acknowledges a particular Jedi Master with what seems to be a sarcastic, 'Yoda? Bloody wonderful' (if it's not 'bloody', it's something similar enough to be a euphemism).
* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioRPG'' has Croco refer to Mario as a "persistent bugger" at one point, although it helps that [[NoExportForYou it wasn't released in Europe]] until the UsefulNotes/VirtualConsole (which changed "bugger" to "pest", anyway).
* In ''VideoGame/SuperPaperMario'', Dimentio, trying to provoke Luigi into fighting
him, but anywhere else it would be like naming him "Retard."
* An interesting version that's actually not with American and British English but Japanese and American English happens
refers to his mustache as a "shag," to which Luigi takes offense at. Shag in the little known PSP game ''VideoGame/PoPoLoCrois''. A monster fought ''very'' early in the game is called "Pecker". Well yeah, it ''is'' a bird after all, except guess what "Pecker" means in English? It's a slang word for a penis. It's unknown whether the game is rated "T" in North America means unkempt. In BritishEnglish, however, it's slang for this reason or because there are some rather violent scenes.a sexual encounter (it can also serve as the verb for the act), so they altered the line to simply calling Luigi a pushover.



* The Korean-developed ''VideoGame/AllianceOfValiantArms'' has one of the EU side's taunts vocalized as "Go ahead, shoot some more, you bloody tossers!" One can suppose it was the British voice actor [[ThrowItIn ad-libbing a bit]], as the other English taunts use somewhat more benign words like "rascals" and "cowards".
* The manual for ''Videogame/CrashTeamRacing'' offers advice for avoiding missile attacks by saying that, if the player is, 'being tailed by one of these buggers,' it's a good idea to drop something behind you. Could be GettingCrapPastTheRadar.
* ''VideoGame/ChronoTrigger'' features enemies called Buggers (possibly a ShoutOut by the translators to the ''Literature/EndersGame'' example, but as they are robotic and accompanied by enemies called "Debuggers", it is likely to be a coding reference and unintentionally funny). The UsefulNotes/NintendoDS release had a new translation that changed the enemies' names to Verminator and Deverminator respectively since that release was the first time the game made it across the Atlantic. The new names seem to imply that they're rogue pest control robots.
** Non-offensive example -- the band of carpenters are referred to as "blokes" by their boss. Obviously the translator has heard that "blokes" = "guys" - however, when an English-speaking player sees "Come on, you blokes!" it stands out as if he had instead greeted a group of women with "Come on, you females!". In Australia the terms are interchangeable, but the character's supposed to be British, and British people don't use "blokes" that way. "Mate", "pal", or "chum" would make more sense in context.
** Early on in the game, one particularly disgruntled character will tell you to "take your bloody time!".
* ''VideoGame/StarWarsBattlefront 2'' is almost completely devoid of profanity, which makes it surprising when an Imperial officer acknowledges a particular Jedi Master with what seems to be a sarcastic, 'Yoda? Bloody wonderful' (if it's not 'bloody', it's something similar enough to be a euphemism).
* The Australian versions of the New Play Control ''VideoGame/{{Pikmin}}'' games change the name of the Wollywog, Yellow Wollywog and Wogpole to Wollyhop, Yellow Wollyhop and Wolpole, respectively. ("Wog" is a slur for Mediterranean people, and the word "wollywog" is evocative of "Gollywog", which is an offensive caricatures of black people.)
* British players of ''VideoGame/EscapeFromMonkeyIsland'' have been rather taken aback upon hearing the usually family-friendly Guybrush Threepwood describe a group of termites as "little buggers."
* ''VideoGame/{{Portal 2}}'' features Wheatley, a personality core with a pronounced British accent and vocabulary to match. Later in the game, when things stop going his way, he begins swearing a lot, using the word "bloody." It's not considered a swear word in the US, so it received an E10 there.
-->'''Wheatley:''' Oh you HAD to play bloody cat and mouse, didn't you?! WELL NOW WE'RE ALL GONNA PAY THE PRICE, ''BECAUSE WE'RE ALL GOING TO BLOODY'' '''''DIE!'''''



* ''VideoGame/DeusExHumanRevolution'''s ''Missing Link'' DLC, being made outside the UK, shows the development team isn't too experienced with the lingo; an Irish character comments on a weapon being [[StockBritishPhrases "the bollocks"]], which, most likely to the confusion of whomever wrote the subtitle script, has compromised with "bullocks". The proper expression is "the dog's bollocks", meaning "really good" (simply calling something "bollocks" means it's bad).
* Rocket Racoon in ''Ultimate VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom3'' gets away with calling people 'wankers' just by having a British accent.
* The ''VideoGame/BanjoKazooie'' games contain a lot of racy Britishisms that slipped past ESRB censors and got an E rating. Note that given Rare's sense of humor [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar this was almost certainly on purpose.]]
* Rareware inverted this trope with its next game ''VIdeoGame/DonkeyKong64'', using the line "One hell of a guy" in the [[SoBadItsGood infamous D.K. Rap]].
* In ''VideoGame/SuperPaperMario'', Dimentio, trying to provoke Luigi into fighting him, refers to his mustache as a "shag," to which Luigi takes offense at. Shag in America means unkempt. In BritishEnglish, however, it's slang for a sexual encounter (it can also serve as the verb for the act), so they altered the line to simply calling Luigi a pushover.
* In ''[[VideoGame/LuigisMansion Luigi's Mansion]]'', Professor E. Gadd refers to a ghost as "the little bugger". In the UK, at least, this seems unusually strong language for a kid's game.
* Kabam's ''Kingdoms of Camelot'' on Facebook has sound effects for various actions and screens within the game. Some are just sounds and some are spoken words supposedly by your troops or whoever. When you're attacked and you click on the report, if it's one where you lost, you can clearly hear someone saying "bugger off" in the string of words and sounds, intended to convey depressed and disappointed troops, that accompany it.
* The original box art for ''VideoGame/Left4Dead2'' showed the back of a hand with the middle and index fingers raised, a fairly innocuous gesture in the States, but not so much elsewhere, requiring a change to be made for overseas boxes. [[http://i.neoseeker.com/gg/uploads/news/8-2009/news_img_23652_0.jpg Can be seen side by side here.]]
** ''VideoGame/MarioKart8Deluxe'' had to patch out the [[VideoGame/{{Splatoon}} Inkling Girl]] making the same gesture.
* Winters (part of Foggyland, the game's equivalent of Europe) is the equivalent of the UK (especially England, but there's also a Loch Ness counterpart) in the ''VideoGame/{{EarthBound}}'' verse, but Dr. Andonuts uses the word "fag" as an insult rather than to refer to a cigarette in ''VideoGame/TheHalloweenHack''.
* Bosco in ''VideoGame/SamAndMaxFreelancePolice'' exclaims 'Bugger' and 'Bollocks' while impersonating a stereotypical British gent in ''Situation: Comedy''.
* In ''VideoGame/PokemonDiamondAndPearl'', a Team Galactic grunt in Pastoria City calls the player character a "little bugger". The line was obviously rewritten for the European/Australian release.



* ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'' features the use of the word "tosser" at one point. Its meaning is roughly equivalent to "wanker."



* ''Webcomic/{{Homestuck}}'' features the use of the word "tosser" at one point. Its meaning is roughly equivalent to "wanker".



* Creator/GavinFree of ''Creator/AchievementHunter'', who is British, actually comes off as one of the cleaner Let's Players of the group in the US because he doesn't use "fuck", "shit" or "cunt" all that often, but he tosses off "bugger" and "bloody bollocks" without batting an eye.
* ''WebVideo/AtopTheFourthWall'': Linkara once, "borrowed a phrase from the British" to describe people as 'twats', but pronounced it 't-wot' - to rhyme with hot, instead of 't-wat' to rhyme with hat. This is how the word is pronounced in the United States, but ''not'' in the UK. Cue many confused British people wondering what the hell a twart is and why it's apparently British.
** In his second "Top 15 Screw-Ups", he notes that his use of "heroic spaz attack" has been discontinued after his British fans informed him of its association with cerebral palsy.
* ''WebAnimation/BravestWarriors'' never uses strong language intentionally, but there is a character named [[UnfortunateName Wankershim]].
* While swearing is ''very'' infrequent and mild in the ''WebAnimation/HomestarRunner'' universe, in sb_email 22, Strong Bad receives an e-mail from a fan from England. Since the e-mail concluded with "Thank You," Strong Bad told the sender he would sound more English if he used something in its place like "Cheers," "Cheerio," or "[[Music/SexPistols Nevermind the Bullocks]]." Of course, knowing Strong Bad [[FridgeBrilliance he probably didn't know or care he was being offensive]], or perhaps thought he was but wasn't, since the British term is 'bollocks', and 'bullocks' refers to cattle.
** Swearing is mild and rare except for the fact that the use of the word "crap" was a running joke in some of the Strong Bad e-mails.



* Creator/WilWheaton exclaims 'Bollocks' multiple times in the ''Ticket to Ride: Europe'' episode of ''WebVideo/TableTop''. This is later discussed in the episode's gag reel:
-->'''Wil:''' We can say 'Bollocks' in America like crazy, and nobody knows what we're saying, but over in Europe they have a real problem with that. Also, hello, England. Fanny.



* While swearing is ''very'' infrequent and mild in the ''WebAnimation/HomestarRunner'' universe, in sb_email 22, Strong Bad receives an e-mail from a fan from England. Since the e-mail concluded with "Thank You," Strong Bad told the sender he would sound more English if he used something in its place like "Cheers," "Cheerio," or "[[Music/SexPistols Nevermind the Bullocks]]." Of course, knowing Strong Bad [[FridgeBrilliance he probably didn't know or care he was being offensive]], or perhaps thought he was but wasn't, since the British term is 'bollocks', and 'bullocks' refers to cattle.
** Swearing is mild and rare except for the fact that the use of the word "crap" was a running joke in some of the Strong Bad e-mails.
* [[WebVideo/AtopTheFourthWall Linkara]] once, "borrowed a phrase from the British" to describe people as 'twats', but pronounced it 't-wot' - to rhyme with hot, instead of 't-wat' to rhyme with hat. This is how the word is pronounced in the United States, but ''not'' in the UK. Cue many confused British people wondering what the hell a twart is and why it's apparently British.
** In his second "Top 15 Screw-Ups", he notes that his use of "heroic spaz attack" has been discontinued after his British fans informed him of its association with cerebral palsy.
* ''WebAnimation/BravestWarriors'' never uses strong language intentionally, but there is a character named [[UnfortunateName Wankershim]].
* Creator/WilWheaton exclaims 'Bollocks' multiple times in the ''Ticket to Ride: Europe'' episode of ''WebVideo/TableTop''. This is later discussed in the episode's gag reel:
-->'''Wil:''' We can say 'Bollocks' in America like crazy, and nobody knows what we're saying, but over in Europe they have a real problem with that. Also, hello, England. Fanny.
* Creator/GavinFree of ''Creator/AchievementHunter'', who is British, actually comes off as one of the cleaner Let's Players of the group in the US because he doesn't use "fuck", "shit" or "cunt" all that often, but he tosses off "bugger" and "bloody bollocks" without batting an eye.



* Happened in ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' several times - Bart has used the word "wanker" several times, and more {{egregious}}ly, Groundskeeper Willie used the word "shite" to describe a tractor. You'd think people would notice that it's just one almost silent letter away from its American counterpart. (SkyOne apparently didn't notice this until ''after'' their first airing of this episode - unsurprisingly it's cut from future screenings, and as Creator/Channel4 runs the series at 6pm it's safe to say it's snipped there as well.)
** One episode featured a SexPistols parody including a song consisting entirely of "<Noun> is bollocks!"; for comparison, this is essentially equivalent to "bullshit." When the episode was aired on Sky in the UK it was the first ''Simpsons'' episode ever to premier after the watershed.
** The same episode also used "slag off", used in the context where an American would probably tell someone to "piss off"; viewers across the pond would have heard the term for "talking smack" instead of its intended meaning. An earlier episode (where Bart wants to be a rock star after seeing Spinal Tap) features "slag off" being used in the same context, so either this was a deliberate CallBack, or someone didn't do their research even with a little over a decade separating the episodes.
** Winked at in an episode where Homer is forced to ensure the safety of a screaming caterpillar taking up refuge in their garden. After making it clear several times he wishes to kill it but knows he can't, Homer accidentally (almost) kills it. The judge then sentences him to community service for (among other things) "...aggravated buggery."
** The episode ''Wild Barts Can't be Broken'' features a spoof of classic English horror films, which centres on a group of children being able to tell the adults of the village their secrets. One of the children accuses two men of ''rogering'' a woman. That scene is uncensored on Channel 4.
** The episode "Trash of the Titans" features the Irish band Music/{{U2}}, and repeated use of the word 'wankers.' There's a discussion in the DVDCommentary, where it's noted that the band was surprised by its repeated casual use, and the show's staff was surprised that it was an issue at all.
** It's also gone right over Principal Skinner's head on one occasion:
-->'''Bart''': Oh, come on, everyone knows the first day of school's a total wank.
-->'''Skinner''': If by wank you mean educational fun, then stand back, it's wanking time.

to:

* Happened in ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' several times - Bart ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'': Amusingly, Wakko, who speaks with a Liverpudlian accent, has used the term "fanny" a few times.
* Lizzie in ''WesternAnimation/{{Cars}}'' refers to her husband as a 'persistent little bugger'.
** Perhaps she had shag carpeting in the boot (Boot UK = trunk US).
* In the ''WesternAnimation/{{Daria}}'' episode "Depth Takes a Holiday", the Holiday Spirit of Guy Fawkes Day punctuated nearly everything he said with the
word 'Bollocks!'; "wanker" several times, and more {{egregious}}ly, Groundskeeper Willie used "tossers" also make an appearance. As a result, the word "shite" to describe a tractor. You'd think people would notice that it's just one almost silent letter away from its American counterpart. (SkyOne apparently didn't notice this until ''after'' their first airing of this entire episode - unsurprisingly it's was (mercifully, one imagines) cut from future screenings, and as Creator/Channel4 runs the series at 6pm it's safe to say it's snipped there as well.)
** One episode featured a SexPistols parody including a song consisting entirely
UK presentation of "<Noun> is bollocks!"; for comparison, this is essentially equivalent to "bullshit." When the series. The fact that the episode played mostly uncut on [[{{Creator/Nickelodeon}} Noggin]], when the song 'Gah God Damn It!' from "Daria! The Musical" was aired on Sky removed, is the source of quite a few snickers by those few US fans who were in the UK it was the first ''Simpsons'' episode ever to premier after the watershed.
** The same episode also used "slag off", used in the context where an American would probably tell someone to "piss off"; viewers across the pond would have heard the term for "talking smack" instead of its intended meaning. An earlier episode (where Bart wants to be a rock star after seeing Spinal Tap) features "slag off" being used in the same context, so either this was a deliberate CallBack, or someone didn't do their research even with a little over a decade separating the episodes.
** Winked at in an episode where Homer is forced to ensure the safety of a screaming caterpillar taking up refuge in their garden. After making it clear several times he wishes to kill it but knows he can't, Homer accidentally (almost) kills it. The judge then sentences him to community service for (among other things) "...aggravated buggery."
** The episode ''Wild Barts Can't be Broken'' features a spoof of classic English horror films, which centres on a group of children being able to tell the adults of the village their secrets. One of the children accuses two men of ''rogering'' a woman. That scene is uncensored on Channel 4.
** The episode "Trash of the Titans" features the Irish band Music/{{U2}}, and repeated use of the word 'wankers.' There's a discussion in the DVDCommentary, where it's noted that the band was surprised by its repeated casual use, and the show's staff was surprised that it was an issue at all.
** It's also gone right over Principal Skinner's head on one occasion:
-->'''Bart''': Oh, come on, everyone knows the first day of school's a total wank.
-->'''Skinner''': If by wank you mean educational fun, then stand back, it's wanking time.
know.



** Stewie (who has a fake British accent because he's a [[EvilBrit villain]]), uses both British and American words. Cue hilarity when he vainly refers to his backside as his "fanny".
* In the ''WesternAnimation/{{Daria}}'' episode "Depth Takes a Holiday", the Holiday Spirit of Guy Fawkes Day punctuated nearly everything he said with the word 'Bollocks!'; "wanker" and "tossers" also make an appearance. As a result, the entire episode was (mercifully, one imagines) cut from the UK presentation of the series. The fact that the episode played mostly uncut on [[{{Creator/Nickelodeon}} Noggin]], when the song 'Gah God Damn It!' from "Daria! The Musical" was removed, is the source of quite a few snickers by those few US fans who were in the know.
* One episode of ''WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls'' featured the Mayor catching a flying object and exuberantly yelling "I've got it, I've got the little bugger!" The first part of the line was apparently looped when it aired in Europe.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'': Amusingly, Wakko, who speaks with a Liverpudlian accent, has used the term "fanny" a few times.
* ''WesternAnimation/MightyMax'' had an episode featuring swarms of killer insects in which Max regularly refers to them by the term "bugger". It's not clear whether the creators wished to imply that he was a closet Orson Scott Card fan (unlikely given his BookDumb tendencies), were GettingCrapPastTheRadar or genuinely didn't know what it meant in the UK. [[HilarityEnsues Hilarity Ensued]] when the show was picked up for syndication over here and transmitted without anyone bothering to watch it all the way through first...

to:

** Stewie (who has a fake British accent because he's a [[EvilBrit villain]]), uses both British and American words. Cue hilarity when he vainly refers to his backside as his "fanny".
* In the ''WesternAnimation/{{Daria}}'' episode "Depth Takes a Holiday", the Holiday Spirit of Guy Fawkes Day punctuated nearly everything he said with the word 'Bollocks!'; "wanker" and "tossers" also make an appearance. As a result, the entire episode was (mercifully, one imagines) cut from the UK presentation of the series. The fact that the episode played mostly uncut on [[{{Creator/Nickelodeon}} Noggin]], when the song 'Gah God Damn It!' from "Daria! The Musical" was removed, is the source of quite a few snickers by those few US fans who were in the know.
* One episode of ''WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls'' featured the Mayor catching a flying object and exuberantly yelling "I've got it, I've got the little bugger!" The first part of the line was apparently looped when it aired in Europe.
* ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'': Amusingly, Wakko, who speaks with a Liverpudlian accent, has used the term "fanny" a few times.
* ''WesternAnimation/MightyMax'' had an episode featuring swarms of killer insects in which Max regularly refers to them by the term "bugger". It's not clear whether the creators wished to imply that he was a closet Orson Scott Card fan (unlikely given his BookDumb tendencies), were GettingCrapPastTheRadar or genuinely didn't know what it meant in the UK. [[HilarityEnsues Hilarity Ensued]] when the show was picked up for syndication over here and transmitted without anyone bothering to watch it all the way through first...
"fanny."



* ''WesternAnimation/TheTransformers'' episode "The Girl Who Loved Powerglide" opens with a man with a British accent saying "I feel like an absolute bloody fool."
** ''WesternAnimation/BeastWars'' and ''WesternAnimation/TransformersAnimated'' used "[[http://www.tfwiki.net/wiki/Slag_(slang) Slag]]" as an epithet, which while referring to metallic ore byproduct, is also a slur meaning "slut" in Britain, causing UK broadcasts of those shows to undergo edits.
* Lizzie in ''WesternAnimation/{{Cars}}'' refers to her husband as a 'persistent little bugger'.
** Perhaps she had shag carpeting in the boot ( Boot UK = trunk US)



* A mild version crops up in ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' in the episode "Super Speedy Cider Squeezy 6000". Specifically, the fact that in North America, "cider" is generally used to refer to a non-alcoholic drink whereas across the pond it's generally assumed to be alcoholic, what Americans would refer to as "Hard Cider". As a result, a lot of Europeans got a kick out of the cast going to ridiculous lengths in order to get cider. Although the cider foaming at the top combined with some of the ponies' reactions to drinking it may make this an intentional case of GettingCrapPastTheRadar.



* ''WesternAnimation/MightyMax'' had an episode featuring swarms of killer insects in which Max regularly refers to them by the term "bugger." It's not clear whether the creators wished to imply that he was a closet Orson Scott Card fan (unlikely given his BookDumb tendencies), were GettingCrapPastTheRadar or genuinely didn't know what it meant in the UK. [[HilarityEnsues Hilarity Ensued]] when the show was picked up for syndication over here and transmitted without anyone bothering to watch it all the way through first...
* A mild version crops up in ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' in the episode "Super Speedy Cider Squeezy 6000." Specifically, the fact that in North America, "cider" is generally used to refer to a non-alcoholic drink whereas across the pond it's generally assumed to be alcoholic, what Americans would refer to as "Hard Cider." As a result, a lot of Europeans got a kick out of the cast going to ridiculous lengths in order to get cider. Although the cider foaming at the top combined with some of the ponies' reactions to drinking it may make this an intentional case of GettingCrapPastTheRadar.
* One episode of ''WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls'' featured the Mayor catching a flying object and exuberantly yelling "I've got it, I've got the little bugger!" The first part of the line was apparently looped when it aired in Europe.
* Happened in ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' several times - Bart has used the word "wanker" several times, and more {{egregious}}ly, Groundskeeper Willie used the word "shite" to describe a tractor. You'd think people would notice that it's just one almost silent letter away from its American counterpart. (SkyOne apparently didn't notice this until ''after'' their first airing of this episode - unsurprisingly it's cut from future screenings, and as Creator/Channel4 runs the series at 6pm it's safe to say it's snipped there as well.)
** One episode featured a SexPistols parody including a song consisting entirely of "<Noun> is bollocks!"; for comparison, this is essentially equivalent to "bullshit." When the episode was aired on Sky in the UK it was the first ''Simpsons'' episode ever to premier after the watershed.
** The same episode also used "slag off", used in the context where an American would probably tell someone to "piss off"; viewers across the pond would have heard the term for "talking smack" instead of its intended meaning. An earlier episode (where Bart wants to be a rock star after seeing Spinal Tap) features "slag off" being used in the same context, so either this was a deliberate CallBack, or someone didn't do their research even with a little over a decade separating the episodes.
** Winked at in an episode where Homer is forced to ensure the safety of a screaming caterpillar taking up refuge in their garden. After making it clear several times he wishes to kill it but knows he can't, Homer accidentally (almost) kills it. The judge then sentences him to community service for (among other things) "...aggravated buggery."
** The episode ''Wild Barts Can't be Broken'' features a spoof of classic English horror films, which centres on a group of children being able to tell the adults of the village their secrets. One of the children accuses two men of ''rogering'' a woman. That scene is uncensored on Channel 4.
** The episode "Trash of the Titans" features the Irish band Music/{{U2}}, and repeated use of the word 'wankers.' There's a discussion in the DVDCommentary, where it's noted that the band was surprised by its repeated casual use, and the show's staff was surprised that it was an issue at all.
** It's also gone right over Principal Skinner's head on one occasion:
-->'''Bart''': Oh, come on, everyone knows the first day of school's a total wank.
-->'''Skinner''': If by wank you mean educational fun, then stand back, it's wanking time.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheTransformers'' episode "The Girl Who Loved Powerglide" opens with a man with a British accent saying "I feel like an absolute bloody fool."
** ''WesternAnimation/BeastWars'' and ''WesternAnimation/TransformersAnimated'' used "[[http://www.tfwiki.net/wiki/Slag_(slang) Slag]]" as an epithet, which while referring to metallic ore byproduct, is also a slur meaning "slut" in Britain, causing UK broadcasts of those shows to undergo edits.



* Like the above examples of Americans using British swear words, most younger Asians know the meaning of these words (more or less), but find them cute or funny because, as [[ForeignCussWord foreign words,]] they don't have the same emotional impact. Similarly, many Japanese people, particularly young ones, are aware from movies that the middle finger gesture is rude in the United States - they just don't realize HOW rude, and will happily throw it around as if it was just a gesture of wacky mild defiance. Manga and anime characters are sometimes drawn making the gesture as well, with the same not-meant-to-be-offensive context, which can be very jarring for American manga readers who aren't used to that kind of thing.

to:

* Like the above examples of Americans using British swear words, most younger Asians know the meaning of these words (more or less), but find them cute or funny because, as [[ForeignCussWord foreign words,]] words]], they don't have the same emotional impact. Similarly, many Japanese people, particularly young ones, are aware from movies that the middle finger gesture is rude in the United States - they just don't realize HOW rude, and will happily throw it around as if it was just a gesture of wacky mild defiance. Manga and anime characters are sometimes drawn making the gesture as well, with the same not-meant-to-be-offensive context, which can be very jarring for American manga readers who aren't used to that kind of thing.



* Often satirized on British magazine TV shows such as ''That's Life'', which sometimes featured foreign products which accidentally fell into this trope -- such as (Danish) Bollux washing powder. Such a pity that was never marketed in the UK, imagine the campaign; "To all your tough laundry stains, say Bollux".
* French from France and Quebec French have various dialectal differences. When the Premier of Quebec visited France in 2009, a French member of parliament thought that it would be a friendly gesture to welcome him with a nice, informal Quebec phrase. His staff found a phrase online meaning "I hope you're not too tired" (from your trip.) Unfortunately, it was ''J'espère que vous n'avez pas la plotte à terre,'' literally meaning "I hope you don't have your cunt on the ground." [[http://www.cyberpresse.ca/le-soleil/actualites/politique/200902/09/01-825716-plotte-a-terre-les-dessous-dune-gaffe.php The story (in French)]].

to:

* Often satirized on British magazine TV shows such as ''That's Life'', which sometimes featured foreign products which accidentally fell into this trope -- such as (Danish) Bollux washing powder. Such a pity that was never marketed in the UK, imagine the campaign; "To all your tough laundry stains, say Bollux".
Bollux."
* French from France and Quebec French have various dialectal differences. When the Premier of Quebec visited France in 2009, a French member of parliament thought that it would be a friendly gesture to welcome him with a nice, informal Quebec phrase. His staff found a phrase online meaning "I hope you're not too tired" (from your trip.) Unfortunately, it was ''J'espère que vous n'avez pas la plotte à terre,'' terre'', literally meaning "I hope you don't have your cunt on the ground." [[http://www.cyberpresse.ca/le-soleil/actualites/politique/200902/09/01-825716-plotte-a-terre-les-dessous-dune-gaffe.php The story (in French)]].



** It's also the derivation of the band name "The Pogues", originally "Pogue Mahone". They shortened it when BBC airplay became a likelihood, as it was pointed out that there are Irish-speakers who listen.

to:

** It's also the derivation of the band name "The Pogues", originally "Pogue Mahone". Mahone." They shortened it when BBC airplay became a likelihood, as it was pointed out that there are Irish-speakers who listen.



* in the 1980s in the UK, "twat" was said to mean "pregnant goldfish". No idea why.

to:

* in the 1980s in the UK, "twat" was said to mean "pregnant goldfish". goldfish." No idea why.



** Fanny was also at one time quite a popular name for girls and dogs in many parts of the world. This has led to generations of juvenile sniggering when 'classic' literature comes up with lines like "Will no one come and play with my little Fanny?".

to:

** Fanny was also at one time quite a popular name for girls and dogs in many parts of the world. This has led to generations of juvenile sniggering when 'classic' literature comes up with lines like "Will no one come and play with my little Fanny?".Fanny?"



** The word "skitt" is a slightly informal word for "dirt" (the verb form, "skitten" is the common term for "dirty"), but can also be used as an extremely mild expression of anger (we're talking about as offensive as saying "oh no" here), as well as a very mild insult typically directed at physical objects (around the level of calling something a "stupid thing"). The word is pronounced exactly the same way as the English "shit". Cue not-very-English-savvy Norwegians picking up the word "shit" from English television and movies and assuming it's as inoffensive as the Norwegian word, then trying to use it in English-speaking countries.
*** A similar dichotomy occurs between High and Low German. The Low German word "Schiet" (pronounced "sheet") is etymologically the equivalent of High German "Scheiße", but also means "dirt" or "mud" (such as children will use in their games), and "Schieter" and "Schietbüdel" ("Büdel" means "bag") can be used as terms of affection. North Germans speaking High German will sometimes use "Schiet" as an euphemism for "Scheiße". (On a related note, cf. Low German "Mo(o)rs", literarily "arse", but used almost only affectionally. Even in the Low German equivalent to the Götz of Berlichingen words, "Klei mi am Mors!", it's not much of a profanity. [[SchmuckBait OK, now go try it with "Arsch" and compare reactions...]])
** Also, in Norwegian "homo" is a common shortform for the far more stiff "homofil" (homosexual), and also an informal, though not rude, word for "gay man". Assuming the same is the case in English-speaking countries is not good for your health.

to:

** The word "skitt" is a slightly informal word for "dirt" (the verb form, "skitten" is the common term for "dirty"), but can also be used as an extremely mild expression of anger (we're talking about as offensive as saying "oh no" here), as well as a very mild insult typically directed at physical objects (around the level of calling something a "stupid thing"). The word is pronounced exactly the same way as the English "shit". "shit." Cue not-very-English-savvy Norwegians picking up the word "shit" from English television and movies and assuming it's as inoffensive as the Norwegian word, then trying to use it in English-speaking countries.
*** A similar dichotomy occurs between High and Low German. The Low German word "Schiet" (pronounced "sheet") is etymologically the equivalent of High German "Scheiße", but also means "dirt" or "mud" (such as children will use in their games), and "Schieter" and "Schietbüdel" ("Büdel" means "bag") can be used as terms of affection. North Germans speaking High German will sometimes use "Schiet" as an euphemism for "Scheiße". "Scheiße." (On a related note, cf. Low German "Mo(o)rs", literarily "arse", but used almost only affectionally. Even in the Low German equivalent to the Götz of Berlichingen words, "Klei mi am Mors!", it's not much of a profanity. [[SchmuckBait OK, now go try it with "Arsch" and compare reactions...]])
]]).
** Also, in Norwegian "homo" is a common shortform for the far more stiff "homofil" (homosexual), and also an informal, though not rude, word for "gay man". man." Assuming the same is the case in English-speaking countries is not good for your health.



* While the [[WardingGestures horns]] are used as a warding/cursing gesture in most Latin countries, in 'some' of them (mainly Brazil and Italy) they can also mean "your wife is cheating on you". Incidentally in some latin countries (mainly Brazil and Italy, notice a trend here?) "your wife is cheating" is considered one of the worst possible insults, and in the wrong company can easily get you stabbed for the trouble. (Which, in turn, makes the trope played quite literally).

to:

* While the [[WardingGestures horns]] are used as a warding/cursing gesture in most Latin countries, in 'some' of them (mainly Brazil and Italy) they can also mean "your wife is cheating on you". you." Incidentally in some latin countries (mainly Brazil and Italy, notice a trend here?) "your wife is cheating" is considered one of the worst possible insults, and in the wrong company can easily get you stabbed for the trouble. (Which, in turn, makes the trope played quite literally).



** In Russia, ironically, calling someone "black" can be much more offensive than stating that someone was or is "Negr". Russians never had a problem linked to objectifying black people, you see, but "black" is also used to generalize and label people from Caucasia, which has a whole different level of emotional load.

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** In Russia, ironically, calling someone "black" can be much more offensive than stating that someone was or is "Negr". "Negr." Russians never had a problem linked to objectifying black people, you see, but "black" is also used to generalize and label people from Caucasia, which has a whole different level of emotional load.



* This popped up in a summit between Spain and Argentina, where some Spanish politician used the word "coger". While in Spain it means just "take" or "pick", in Argentina it's [[ClusterFBomb something entirely different]].

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* This popped up in a summit between Spain and Argentina, where some Spanish politician used the word "coger". "coger." While in Spain it means just "take" or "pick", in Argentina it's [[ClusterFBomb something entirely different]].



* In Britain, Creator/{{BBC}}4 found it necessary to issue a warning that in one particular episode of Danish political drama ''{{Borgen}}'' that there would be "strong language". ''Borgen'' is subtitled rather than dubbed into English. While it is true that this particular episode contained a few "shit"s and the occasional "fuck" in the subtitling, what completely passed under the radar is that these words are not considered the strongest expletives in most Scandinavian languages, on a par with "bloody", "bugger" and "sod". Other episodes lacked no such prefatory warning at all, despite use of Danish terms roughly meaning "Go to Hell!" and related high-emotional damning, despite the fact that in Denmark, Sweden and Norway this is the worst possible "Fuck Off!" that you can say to somebody. Expat Danes in Britain might justifiably have wondered where their advisory warning was...

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* In Britain, Creator/{{BBC}}4 found it necessary to issue a warning that in one particular episode of Danish political drama ''{{Borgen}}'' that there would be "strong language". language." ''Borgen'' is subtitled rather than dubbed into English. While it is true that this particular episode contained a few "shit"s and the occasional "fuck" in the subtitling, what completely passed under the radar is that these words are not considered the strongest expletives in most Scandinavian languages, on a par with "bloody", "bugger" and "sod". "sod." Other episodes lacked no such prefatory warning at all, despite use of Danish terms roughly meaning "Go to Hell!" and related high-emotional damning, despite the fact that in Denmark, Sweden and Norway this is the worst possible "Fuck Off!" that you can say to somebody. Expat Danes in Britain might justifiably have wondered where their advisory warning was...



* Trope may even strike in a single country: In the Bavarian dialect, you can say "Fotzn" to mean the mouth (it's the Bavarian equivalent of "gob" or "pie hole" -- a bit rude, but no profanity). In the rest of Germany, the word "Fotz''e''" means... [[CountryMatters another orifice]] entirely. (Etymologically, both derive from a word meaning "bag".)
** In the Rhineland, the related word "Futt" can mean "behind" and "Futtloch" ("Loch" = "hole") means "anus".
** A old german way to say the N-word was to call a black person "Mohr". While especially younger people are no longer aware of this, older people are and find it regulary disturbing that especially chocolate products often have the word in their name ("Mohrenkopf" for a creme and buisquit product covered in chocolate meaning "A black persons head"). The biggest offender had been the chocolate brand "Sarotti" which regulary used the CatchPhrase "Die Schokolade mit dem Sarotti-Mohr" aka "The chocolate with the Sarotti-N***er".

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* Trope may even strike in a single country: In the Bavarian dialect, you can say "Fotzn" to mean the mouth (it's the Bavarian equivalent of "gob" or "pie hole" -- a bit rude, but no profanity). In the rest of Germany, the word "Fotz''e''" means... [[CountryMatters another orifice]] entirely. (Etymologically, both derive from a word meaning "bag".)
"bag.")
** In the Rhineland, the related word "Futt" can mean "behind" and "Futtloch" ("Loch" = "hole") means "anus".
"anus."
** A old german way to say the N-word was to call a black person "Mohr". "Mohr." While especially younger people are no longer aware of this, older people are and find it regulary disturbing that especially chocolate products often have the word in their name ("Mohrenkopf" for a creme and buisquit product covered in chocolate meaning "A black persons head"). The biggest offender had been the chocolate brand "Sarotti" which regulary used the CatchPhrase "Die Schokolade mit dem Sarotti-Mohr" aka "The chocolate with the Sarotti-N***er".Sarotti-N***er."



* In standard Malay, "betina" is used to refer female non-humans and using it on a woman is ''worse'' than "bitch". In Kelantanese dialect, it's a neutral term referring to ''all'' females, human and non-human.
* Any work of media that portrays the word "goddamn" as being used in the American Bible Belt without incident qualifies. Although not universal, many who live in the Bible Belt are, as the name implies, Christian: to non-Christians or those of more liberal mindsets, it's only slightly worse than "damn". To conservative Christians, it's on par with "''motherfucking''", if not ''worse'' (it tends to be seen as not just profane, but ''blasphemous''). This tends to ruffle some feathers when the word appears in PG-rated movies.

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* In standard Malay, "betina" is used to refer female non-humans and using it on a woman is ''worse'' than "bitch". "bitch." In Kelantanese dialect, it's a neutral term referring to ''all'' females, human and non-human.
* Any work of media that portrays the word "goddamn" as being used in the American Bible Belt without incident qualifies. Although not universal, many who live in the Bible Belt are, as the name implies, Christian: to non-Christians or those of more liberal mindsets, it's only slightly worse than "damn". "damn." To conservative Christians, it's on par with "''motherfucking''", if not ''worse'' (it tends to be seen as not just profane, but ''blasphemous''). This tends to ruffle some feathers when the word appears in PG-rated movies.



* This has somewhat become the case with the word "fag" in recent years. Having long been a slur towards homosexuals (though it's had nearly a dozen entirely unrelated meanings over the last century as people just seem to like using the word), in the current internet generation it's become by many just a generic insult, with calling someone a fag or faggot basically being the equivalent of "moron" or "douchebag". This doesn't really carry over to anywhere else in the world (aside from [[NWordPrivileges self-deprecation among actual gay people]]).

to:

* This has somewhat become the case with the word "fag" in recent years. Having long been a slur towards homosexuals (though it's had nearly a dozen entirely unrelated meanings over the last century as people just seem to like using the word), in the current internet generation it's become by many just a generic insult, with calling someone a fag or faggot basically being the equivalent of "moron" or "douchebag". "douchebag." This doesn't really carry over to anywhere else in the world (aside from [[NWordPrivileges self-deprecation among actual gay people]]).



* Slavic languages can have a lot of fun with this as they are to various degrees similar and often one word in one Slavic language means something else in other Slavic language. One example for all - quite an embarrassingly high number of Czechs got ruffled in a pub while talking to their nearest cousins Slovaks and telling someone they are "sprosty" which in Czech means "You curse a lot", but in Slovak it is the equivalent of saying "You are an idiot".

to:

* Slavic languages can have a lot of fun with this as they are to various degrees similar and often one word in one Slavic language means something else in other Slavic language. One example for all - quite an embarrassingly high number of Czechs got ruffled in a pub while talking to their nearest cousins Slovaks and telling someone they are "sprosty" which in Czech means "You curse a lot", but in Slovak it is the equivalent of saying "You are an idiot".idiot."



* "Kaffir" was originally just the Arabic word for "nonbeliever." In the Islamic world, it certainly isn't a ''positive'' thing to call someone, but it's more akin to the English "heathen" or "infidel" than anything else. But after Arab slave traders used it to refer to African pagans, the term eventually caught on among white people as an anti-black slur. As such, in places like UsefulNotes/SouthAfrica, it's [[http://www.cracked.com/personal-experiences-2134-5-things-i-learned-growing-up-in-neo-nazi-militia.html equivalent to the N word.]]

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* "Kaffir" was originally just the Arabic word for "nonbeliever." In the Islamic world, it certainly isn't a ''positive'' thing to call someone, but it's more akin to the English "heathen" or "infidel" than anything else. But after Arab slave traders used it to refer to African pagans, the term eventually caught on among white people as an anti-black slur. As such, in places like UsefulNotes/SouthAfrica, it's [[http://www.cracked.com/personal-experiences-2134-5-things-i-learned-growing-up-in-neo-nazi-militia.html equivalent to the N word.]] word]].
17th Jun '17 10:28:17 AM Gosicrystal
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* The ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII'' fic ''Phantom Dreams'' had Seifer refer to Squall as a little bugger, which given the [[SlashFic nature]] of the fic was AccidentallyAccurate.

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* The ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII'' fic ''Phantom Dreams'' had has Seifer refer to Squall as a little bugger, which given the [[SlashFic nature]] SlashFic nature of the fic was AccidentallyAccurate.story is {{foreshadowing}}.
27th May '17 3:48:20 PM nombretomado
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* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioRPG'' has Croco refer to Mario as a "persistent bugger" at one point, although it helps that [[NoExportForYou it wasn't released in Europe]] until the VirtualConsole (which changed "bugger" to "pest", anyway).

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* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioRPG'' has Croco refer to Mario as a "persistent bugger" at one point, although it helps that [[NoExportForYou it wasn't released in Europe]] until the VirtualConsole UsefulNotes/VirtualConsole (which changed "bugger" to "pest", anyway).
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