History Main / DidNotDoTheBloodyResearch

19th Mar '17 12:25:57 PM nombretomado
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* In the ''WesternAnimation/{{Daria}}'' episode "Depth Takes a Holiday", the Holiday Spirit of Guy Fawkes Day punctuated nearly everything he said with the word 'Bollocks!'; "wanker" and "tossers" also make an appearance. As a result, the entire episode was (mercifully, one imagines) cut from the UK presentation of the series. The fact that the episode played mostly uncut on [[{{Nickelodeon}} Noggin]], when the song 'Gah God Damn It!' from "Daria! The Musical" was removed, is the source of quite a few snickers by those few US fans who were in the know.

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* In the ''WesternAnimation/{{Daria}}'' episode "Depth Takes a Holiday", the Holiday Spirit of Guy Fawkes Day punctuated nearly everything he said with the word 'Bollocks!'; "wanker" and "tossers" also make an appearance. As a result, the entire episode was (mercifully, one imagines) cut from the UK presentation of the series. The fact that the episode played mostly uncut on [[{{Nickelodeon}} [[{{Creator/Nickelodeon}} Noggin]], when the song 'Gah God Damn It!' from "Daria! The Musical" was removed, is the source of quite a few snickers by those few US fans who were in the know.
11th Mar '17 4:09:46 PM nombretomado
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* ''MightyMax'' had an episode featuring swarms of killer insects in which Max regularly refers to them by the term "bugger". It's not clear whether the creators wished to imply that he was a closet Orson Scott Card fan (unlikely given his BookDumb tendencies), were GettingCrapPastTheRadar or genuinely didn't know what it meant in the UK. [[HilarityEnsues Hilarity Ensued]] when the show was picked up for syndication over here and transmitted without anyone bothering to watch it all the way through first...

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* ''MightyMax'' ''WesternAnimation/MightyMax'' had an episode featuring swarms of killer insects in which Max regularly refers to them by the term "bugger". It's not clear whether the creators wished to imply that he was a closet Orson Scott Card fan (unlikely given his BookDumb tendencies), were GettingCrapPastTheRadar or genuinely didn't know what it meant in the UK. [[HilarityEnsues Hilarity Ensued]] when the show was picked up for syndication over here and transmitted without anyone bothering to watch it all the way through first...
10th Mar '17 5:35:33 PM Totema
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* "UsefulNotes/{{Baka}}" is considered a slightly worse insult in Osaka than in Tokyo. Someone from Osaka will use ''aho'' when they mean it affectionately.

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* "UsefulNotes/{{Baka}}" is considered a slightly worse insult in Osaka than in Tokyo. Someone from Osaka will use ''aho'' when they mean it affectionately. (This may have to do with [[TheIdiotFromOsaka the regional stereotype]].)
4th Mar '17 5:40:36 AM manofwarb
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Added DiffLines:

* In a subversion, the Vietnamese phrase for "go fuck yourself" is ''du manh yiu", which sounded like "[[DoomyDoomsOfDoom Doom On You]]" to American soldiers. They thought it was quite appropriate.
2nd Feb '17 7:02:11 PM lakingsif
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This trope covers any confusion or [[HilarityEnsues hilarity]] arising from foreign swear words, not just in the US. Since international expletives are often "G-rated" on American TV, "arse" and "shite" can be family-friendly ways of getting "ass" and "shit" [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar past the radar]]. In Britain, "ass" is the American spelling of "arse" [[note]] "Ass" (pronounced as written with a short "a") is also a term for a donkey [[/note]] - one may write "ass" to emphasise that the speaker is American rather than English. Gestures may be similarly misunderstood, such as the two-finger V-sign to signal "victory" or in the U.S. the hippy sign "peace", which is an insult in Greece and, if the hand is turned around, the equivalent to (or the same as) giving the finger in some countries such as the U.K.

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This trope covers any confusion or [[HilarityEnsues hilarity]] arising from foreign swear words, not just in the US. Since international expletives are often "G-rated" on American TV, "arse" and "shite" can be family-friendly ways of getting "ass" and "shit" [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar past the radar]]. In Britain, "ass" is the American spelling of "arse" [[note]] "Ass" (pronounced as written with a short "a") is also a term for a donkey [[/note]] - one may write "ass" to emphasise that the speaker is American rather than English. Gestures may be similarly misunderstood, such as the two-finger V-sign to signal "victory" or in the U.S. the hippy sign "peace", which is an insult in Greece and, if the hand is turned around, the equivalent to (or the same as) worse than) giving the finger in some countries such as the U.K.



* ''Series/{{Glee}}'' faced backlash from UK viewers when the term "spaz" was used casually in the episode "Hairography" (to describe the energetic dancing), because it seemed neither country knew that the word is seen differently. They seemed to have done the research, though, as in a later episode a scene where one character calls another "retarded" is edited out. Which then got backlash because the response to that (as the character was a Downs baby) was a major point for episodes, and without the scene the UK audience didn't know what was happening.



** "Puta" (depending on which Spanish speaking area you're in) is inexplicably rude. In some others, it's a catcall.



** Not that you'd use any of them if somebody could overhear. Still, "twat" is up there as one of the choice insults to shout at other drivers.



* In certain parts of the UK, the standard way to pronounce "couldn't" is the same as [[CountryMatters the first syllable of country]]. The C-word, then, may not be as effective in these places.



** In American English, it's an old-fashioned euphemism for "buttocks", and is not considered offensive at all. In British English, however, "fanny" is a crude term for female genitalia, it and words like it (minge and so forth) carry the same impact as "pussy" in American.

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** In American English, it's an old-fashioned euphemism for "buttocks", and is not considered offensive at all. In British English, however, "fanny" is a crude term for female genitalia, it and words like it (minge and so forth) carry the same impact as "pussy" in American.American (maybe more, since in the US you could say "pussy out" -- to use "fanny" like that would still be crude).



** Another pearl is the Ladino/Spanish/Italian 'De mi culo' (literally 'from my ass'). Israelis somehow decided this means corrupt/incompetent adjective. In one notable instance, a parliament member called her own party that...

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** Another pearl is the Ladino/Spanish/Italian Latino/Spanish/Italian 'De mi culo' (literally 'from my ass'). Israelis somehow decided this means corrupt/incompetent adjective. In one notable instance, a parliament member called her own party that...



* In the US, to "bum" means to beg or borrow; you'll often hear someone bum a cigarette or stick of gum from a friend. But in the UK, to "bum" means to sodomize. This means, amusingly, that you can US!bum (request) a UK!fag (cigarette), or UK!bum (sodomize) a US!fag (gay person), but neither phrase works quite right without borrowing a word usage from the other side of the pond.

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* To bum is an odd one. In the US, to "bum" UK it means to beg or borrow; you'll often hear someone bum borrow ("bum a fag" means to take a cigarette or stick of gum from a friend. But in the UK, and is a very common phrase), as well as to "bum" means annoy. In the US it can mean to sodomize. This means, amusingly, that beg or borrow, but mostly is a term for homeless people, however in some parts of the US it is used to mean sodomize (in the UK, you can US!bum (request) use it to mean something more like humping, specifically against someone's backside). So a UK!fag (cigarette), or UK!bum (sodomize) Brit asking for a US!fag (gay person), but neither phrase works quite right without borrowing cigarette could seem to some Americans like they want anal intercourse with a word usage from gay man.
* Let it be noted that
the other side offensive meaning of "faggot" is used in the pond.UK even though "fag" is not (though older people may just use it to mean wood).



* The word "snigger" is used commonly in the UK and Australia, but not in Canada and the US due to its similarity to the racial slur. Hilariously, the Canadian/American substitute - "snicker" - sees little use in the UK and Australia due to its similarity to slang for women's undergarments.

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* The word "snigger" is used commonly in the UK and Australia, but not in Canada and the US due to its similarity to the racial slur. Hilariously, the Canadian/American substitute - "snicker" - sees little use in the UK and Australia due to its similarity to slang the word for women's undergarments.


Added DiffLines:

* Pants. In America (and few parts of the UK) it means the outer clothing worn on your bottom half. In most of the UK, it refers to your undergarments. This is important because of how rude it is to talk about underwear in public in the UK.
2nd Feb '17 9:32:43 AM system
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2nd Feb '17 4:12:30 AM majike
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* "Sod" is not a particularly common word in Canadian English and is quite rare in American English (in both places it refers solely to topsoil, and is not considered even mildly offensive); on the other hand, British English uses it as an alternate for "fuck" (ex. "Sod off!") and it's only slightly less offensive. Accordingly, some North Americans lump it in with "bloody" as "one of those wacky British swear-words" and is occasionally tossed around with little understanding of just how offensive it is.

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* "Sod" is not a particularly common word in Canadian English and is quite rare in American English (in both places it refers solely to topsoil, and is not considered even mildly offensive); on the other hand, British English uses it as an alternate for "fuck" (ex. "Sod off!") and off!"), but it's only slightly less offensive. Accordingly, some North Americans lump it in with "bloody" regarded as "one of those wacky British swear-words" and is occasionally tossed around with little understanding of just how offensive it is.being rather mild.
2nd Feb '17 3:59:04 AM majike
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This is also used intentionally, to the opposite effect: unfamiliar or [[ForeignCussWord foreign swear words]] may be used where an equivalent local expression [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar would be inappropriate]]. ("Bloody" is about as strong a curse as "damn", and "bloody hell" is about the same as "goddamn", in the UK. On the other hand, it can also mean absolutely nothing more than a way of emphasising your point in Australia.)

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This is also used intentionally, to the opposite effect: unfamiliar or [[ForeignCussWord foreign swear words]] may be used where an equivalent local expression [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar would be inappropriate]]. ("Bloody" is about as strong a curse as "damn", and "bloody hell" is about the same as "goddamn", in the UK.UK [[note]] YMMV on this, as many places in southern US consider "damn" or "goddamn" to be a PrecisionFStrike, while the phrase "bloody" or "bloody hell" frequently appears in child-friendly films and in pre-watershed materials in the UK, such as Series/OnlyFoolsAndHorses and Series/HarryPotter [[/note]]. On the other hand, it can also mean absolutely nothing more than a way of emphasising your point in Australia.)
1st Feb '17 1:00:45 PM Larkmarn
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This is also used intentionally, to the opposite effect: unfamiliar or [[ForeignCussWord foreign swear words]] may be used where an equivalent local expression [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar would be inappropriate]]. ("Bloody" is about as strong a curse as "damn", and "bloody hell" is about the same as "goddamn" [[note]] Considering that some places in the southern US consider "god damn" to be a PrecisionFStrike, this British troper would argue that "bloody hell" is still incredibly mild in the UK [[/note]], in the UK. On the other hand, it can also mean absolutely nothing more than a way of emphasising your point in Australia.)

to:

This is also used intentionally, to the opposite effect: unfamiliar or [[ForeignCussWord foreign swear words]] may be used where an equivalent local expression [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar would be inappropriate]]. ("Bloody" is about as strong a curse as "damn", and "bloody hell" is about the same as "goddamn" [[note]] Considering that some places in the southern US consider "god damn" to be a PrecisionFStrike, this British troper would argue that "bloody hell" is still incredibly mild in the UK [[/note]], "goddamn", in the UK. On the other hand, it can also mean absolutely nothing more than a way of emphasising your point in Australia.)
16th Jan '17 3:55:15 PM Kombucha
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* "Bugger" has very different meanings in the US in the UK that account for its different levels of offensiveness. In the US, the word "bugger" is derived from the slang term "to bug," meaning "to annoy." Calling someone or something a "bugger" is to call them annoying. It can also be used as a slang term for vermin. In the UK, "bugger" means "to have anal sex with," and is thus considered a quite rude word. In Australia it can also have two other meanings: You can refer to someone or something as a "bugger" just 'because' ("He's a funny bugger"), or an alternative to "piss" in the phrase "Piss off!" (so, obviously, "Bugger off!")

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* "Bugger" has very different meanings in the US in the UK that account for its different levels of offensiveness. In the US, the word "bugger" is derived from the slang term "to bug," meaning "to annoy." Calling someone or something a "bugger" is to call them annoying. It can also be used as a slang term for vermin. In the UK, "bugger" means "to have anal sex with," and is thus considered a quite rude word. In both the UK and Australia it can also have two other meanings: You can refer to someone or something as a "bugger" just 'because' ("He's a funny bugger"), or an alternative to "piss" in the phrase "Piss off!" (so, obviously, "Bugger off!")
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