History Main / DidNotDoTheBloodyResearch

19th Aug '16 9:56:44 AM Midna
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* In ''VideoGame/PokemonDiamondAndPearl'', a Team Galactic grunt in Pastoria City calls the player character a "little bugger". The line was obviously rewritten for the European/Australian release.
16th Aug '16 1:02:48 AM PaulA
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* In the Creators/LoisMcMasterBujold Literature/VorkosiganSaga novel ''Memory'', Miles Vorkosigan is said to have "buggered the cartridge" from a SonicStunner to improvise a grenade. Also, he describes Impsec's security recording as having been "buggered" when he finds evidence of tampering. Nowhere else in Bujold's books do we find this sort of expression. "Buggered" is fairly innocuous US slang for fouled-up or broken (but usually not irreparably). In the UK you can ''describe'' something as "buggered" or talk about "buggering [something] ''up''", but in most dialects if you say you've "buggered [something]" you'll get some strange looks. Thus Miles' statement sounds as odd to the British ear as it does to the US ear when a Brit "[[BurnTheWitch lights up a fag]]."

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* In the Creators/LoisMcMasterBujold Literature/VorkosiganSaga Creator/LoisMcMasterBujold novel ''Memory'', ''Literature/{{Memory}}'', Miles Vorkosigan is said to have "buggered the cartridge" from a SonicStunner to improvise a grenade. Also, he describes Impsec's security recording as having been "buggered" when he finds evidence of tampering. Nowhere else in Bujold's books do we find this sort of expression. "Buggered" is fairly innocuous US slang for fouled-up or broken (but usually not irreparably). In the UK you can ''describe'' something as "buggered" or talk about "buggering [something] ''up''", but in most dialects if you say you've "buggered [something]" you'll get some strange looks. Thus Miles' statement sounds as odd to the British ear as it does to the US ear when a Brit "[[BurnTheWitch lights up a fag]]."
11th Aug '16 4:59:23 PM SuperSauce
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* "Bugger" has very different meanings in the US in the UK that account for its different levels of offensiveness. In the US, the word "bugger" is derived from the slang term "to bug," meaning "to annoy." Calling someone or something a "bugger" is to call them annoying. It can also be used as a slang term for vermin. In the UK, "bugger" means "to have anal sex with," and is thus considered a quite rude word. In Australia it can also have two other meanings: You can refer to someone or something a "bugger" just 'because' ("He's a funny bugger"), or an alternative to "piss" in the phrase "Piss off!" (so, obviously, "Bugger off!")

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* "Bugger" has very different meanings in the US in the UK that account for its different levels of offensiveness. In the US, the word "bugger" is derived from the slang term "to bug," meaning "to annoy." Calling someone or something a "bugger" is to call them annoying. It can also be used as a slang term for vermin. In the UK, "bugger" means "to have anal sex with," and is thus considered a quite rude word. In Australia it can also have two other meanings: You can refer to someone or something as a "bugger" just 'because' ("He's a funny bugger"), or an alternative to "piss" in the phrase "Piss off!" (so, obviously, "Bugger off!")
7th Aug '16 8:41:05 PM SuperSauce
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* "Bugger" has very different meanings in the US in the UK that account for its different levels of offensiveness. In the US, the word "bugger" is derived from the slang term "to bug," meaning "to annoy." Calling someone or something a "bugger" is to call them annoying. It can also be used as a slang term for vermin. In the UK, "bugger" means "to have anal sex with," and is thus considered a quite rude word.

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* "Bugger" has very different meanings in the US in the UK that account for its different levels of offensiveness. In the US, the word "bugger" is derived from the slang term "to bug," meaning "to annoy." Calling someone or something a "bugger" is to call them annoying. It can also be used as a slang term for vermin. In the UK, "bugger" means "to have anal sex with," and is thus considered a quite rude word. In Australia it can also have two other meanings: You can refer to someone or something a "bugger" just 'because' ("He's a funny bugger"), or an alternative to "piss" in the phrase "Piss off!" (so, obviously, "Bugger off!")
4th Aug '16 4:45:54 AM 06tele
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* In a rare example of an English writer not understanding English slang, the Victorian poet Creator/RobertBrowning got the impression that the word "twat" meant part of a nun's cowl, and included it in his 1841 poem ''Pippa Passes'': "Then, owls and bats, cowls and twats, / Monks and nuns, in a cloister’s moods, Adjourn to the oak-stump pantry!" His mistake was not pointed out until 1888.[[note]]Browning got the word "twat" from a 1660 poem called "Vanity of Vanities", which includes the couplet "They talk'd of his having a Cardinall's Hat / They'd send him as soon an Old Nun's Twat." Browning was a sophisticated man, but in common with most Victorians he wasn't much of a one for sexual slang.[[/note]]
18th Jul '16 1:25:54 PM PeppermintTwist
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* "Bugger" has very different meanings in the US in the UK that account for its different levels of offensiveness. In the US, the word "bugger" is derived from the slang term "to bug," meaning "to annoy." Calling someone or something a "bugger" is to call them annoying. It can also be used as a slang term for vermin. In the UK, "bugger" means "to have anal sex with," and is thus considered a quite rude word.
16th Jul '16 7:49:43 AM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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** It's made its way to Bosnia through rap videos on MTV, where black people throw the term around casually as a term for friends. Cue Bosnian youths greeting each other with "Vatz-ap mah nigga" and some very pissed off tourists. Also South Slavic profanities are infamously crude, creative and ubiquitous, so most English swear-words are barely acknowledged as such.

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** It's made its way to Bosnia through rap videos on MTV, where [[NWordPrivileges black people throw the term around casually as a term for friends. friends]]. Cue white Bosnian youths greeting each other with "Vatz-ap mah nigga" and some very pissed off tourists. Also South Slavic profanities are infamously crude, creative and ubiquitous, so most English swear-words are barely acknowledged as such.



* This has somewhat become the case with the word "fag" in recent years. Having long been a slur towards homosexuals (though it's had nearly a dozen entirely unrelated meanings over the last century as people just seem to like using the word), in the current internet generation it's become by many just a generic insult, with calling someone a fag or faggot basically being the equivalent of "moron" or "douchebag". This doesn't really carry over to anywhere else in the world (aside from self-deprecation among actual gays).

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* This has somewhat become the case with the word "fag" in recent years. Having long been a slur towards homosexuals (though it's had nearly a dozen entirely unrelated meanings over the last century as people just seem to like using the word), in the current internet generation it's become by many just a generic insult, with calling someone a fag or faggot basically being the equivalent of "moron" or "douchebag". This doesn't really carry over to anywhere else in the world (aside from [[NWordPrivileges self-deprecation among actual gays).gay people]]).
* Speaking of the word "fag," in the UK, it simply means a cigarette, whereas in the US it's an anti-gay slur. Also in the UK, "fag" was a school slang term for a younger boy who essentially acted as a servant to an older boy. While this no doubt included sexual favors in some cases, that wasn't the default assumption. Thus, it's not uncommon for a man in an older British work to say casually "Oh yes, I know him well—I was his fag at school."
* In the US, to "bum" means to beg or borrow; you'll often hear someone bum a cigarette or stick of gum from a friend. But in the UK, to "bum" means to sodomize. This means, amusingly, that you can US!bum (request) a UK!fag (cigarette), or UK!bum (sodomize) a US!fag (gay person), but neither phrase works quite right without borrowing a word usage from the other side of the pond.
14th Jul '16 1:01:01 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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** It means the exact same thing in American English that it does in British—most Americans would be surprised anyone thought it was an exclusively British expression ([[DiscoDan it just sounds slightly outdated to American ears]]). Apparently, TheyJustDidntCare.

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** It means the exact same thing in American English that it does in British—most Americans would be surprised anyone thought it was an exclusively British expression ([[DiscoDan it just sounds slightly outdated to American ears]]). Apparently, TheyJustDidntCare.
11th Jul '16 5:25:27 PM Nentuaby
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* In America, "spaz" is a gentle insult to say that someone is prone to going crazy or acting silly. "Spazzing out" is a casual term for temporarily going crazy, but not considered vulgar or rude in and of itself. In the UK, however, its original form "spastic" is used to describe someone with literal developmental or physical disabilities, and its use as an insult is taken seriously. Its original usage was a clinical term to simply describe muscle spasms.

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* In America, "spaz" is a gentle insult to say that someone is prone to going crazy or acting silly. silly, erratically, or over-energetically. "Spazzing out" is a casual term for temporarily going crazy, wild, but not considered vulgar or rude in and of itself. In the UK, however, its original form "spastic" is used to describe someone with literal developmental or physical disabilities, and its use as an it's considered not just a pretty serious insult is taken seriously. Its original usage was but a clinical term to simply describe muscle spasms.hateful slur.
10th Jul '16 9:51:59 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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* Trope may even strike in a single country: In Bavarian dialect, you can say "Fotzn" to mean the mouth (it's the Bavarian equivalent of "gob" - a bit rude, but no profanity). In the rest of Germany, the word "Fotz''e''" means... [[CountryMatters another orifice]] entirely. (Etymologically, both derive from a word meaning "bag".)

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* Trope may even strike in a single country: In the Bavarian dialect, you can say "Fotzn" to mean the mouth (it's the Bavarian equivalent of "gob" - or "pie hole" -- a bit rude, but no profanity). In the rest of Germany, the word "Fotz''e''" means... [[CountryMatters another orifice]] entirely. (Etymologically, both derive from a word meaning "bag".)
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