History Main / DiabolusexMachina

14th May '17 1:59:00 AM needsanewhobby
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* ''Creator/RoladDahl'' does this a few times but ''Literature/JameAndTheGiantPeach'' has the most egregious example. James lives a happy, contented life until one day his parents are randomly killed by a rhino. Taken UpToEleven in the film version, where the death is done offstage, in the following voiceover: "And then, one day, a terrible thing happened. A [[GiantSpaceFleaFromNowhere giant rhinoceros came out of nowhere]] and gobbled up his poor mother and father."
2nd May '17 3:36:35 PM kaxamdays
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* In ''Theatre/{{Finale}}, the reveal that [[spoiler:the world is ending in a week]] comes at the end of Act 2, and ''severely'' screws up everyone's plans.

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* In ''Theatre/{{Finale}}, ''Theatre/{{Finale}}'', the reveal that [[spoiler:the world is ending in a week]] comes at the end of Act 2, and ''severely'' screws up everyone's plans.
2nd May '17 3:31:39 PM kaxamdays
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* In ''Theatre/{{Finale}}, the reveal that [[spoiler:the world is ending in a week]] comes at the end of Act 2, and ''severely'' screws up everyone's plans.
23rd Apr '17 5:41:04 PM LongLiveHumour
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* ''Anime/FullmetalAlchemist'' (2003) has a recurring villain seemingly die only to show up in time for the finale with half his body replaced by automail and guns, including [[TisOnlyABulletInTheBrain ''half of his head'']] - jarring rather badly with the previously established rules of prosthetics for this world. The only purpose for his reappearance is so he can drive madly across the city to the Fuhrer's residence, [[spoiler:shoot Roy Mustang in the face as the poor man staggers out]], and then be shot dead.

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* ''Anime/FullmetalAlchemist'' (2003) has a recurring villain seemingly die only to show up in time for the finale with half his body replaced by automail and guns, including [[TisOnlyABulletInTheBrain ''half ''[[TisOnlyABulletInTheBrain half of his head'']] head]]'' - jarring rather badly with the previously established rules of prosthetics for this world. The only purpose for his reappearance is so he can drive madly across the city to the Fuhrer's residence, [[spoiler:shoot Roy Mustang in the face as the poor man staggers out]], and then be shot dead.
23rd Apr '17 5:36:00 PM LongLiveHumour
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* ''Anime/FullmetalAlchemist'' (2003) has a recurring villain seemingly die only to show up in time for the finale with half his body replaced by automail and guns, including [[TisOnlyABulletInTheBrain ''half of his head'']] - jarring rather badly with the previously established rules of prosthetics for this world. The only purpose for his reappearance is so he can drive madly across the city to the Fuhrer's residence, [[spoiler:shoot Roy Mustang in the face as the poor man staggers out]], and then be shot dead.
21st Apr '17 12:27:28 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* ''WesternAnimation/TheBoondocks'' episode "Ballin" has Riley coming close to [[BrokenStreak finally]] winning a game when [[spoiler:the mentally challenged replacement center for his main competition turns out to be a child-prodigy at basketball]]. Of course, [[spoiler:[[LaserGuidedKarma he ''really'' deserved that]], since he got that far by sending the previous center off crying when told her her mom did cocaine, was cheating on her dad at the country club, and her parents were waiting until after her birthday to tell her they were getting divorced]].

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* ''WesternAnimation/TheBoondocks'' episode "Ballin" has Riley coming close to [[BrokenStreak finally]] [[BrokenWinLossStreak finally winning a game game]] when [[spoiler:the mentally challenged replacement center for his main competition turns out to be a child-prodigy at basketball]]. Of course, [[spoiler:[[LaserGuidedKarma he ''really'' deserved that]], since he got that far by sending the previous center off crying when told her her mom did cocaine, was cheating on her dad at the country club, and her parents were waiting until after her birthday to tell her they were getting divorced]].
20th Apr '17 7:46:44 AM Peridonyx
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* ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts3DDreamDropDistance'' is especially infamous for this. [[spoiler:Everything since the original ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsI'' endures a big HappyEndingOverride as part of the GreaterScopeVillain's [[{{Asspull}} out-of-nowhere]] StableTimeLoop just to set up GrandFinale ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsIII'']] -- which, combined with the overall ArcFatigue, just caused quite a few fans to call FranchiseKiller.
18th Apr '17 8:21:31 AM Noraneko
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* A common criticism of the BittersweetEnding to ''Film/LaLaLand'', which is almost universally loved apart from its ending, is that it is this. [[spoiler:The film is mostly about a very believable romance between its leads, Mia and Sebastian. Their relationship is depicted, warts and all, with all the arguments and failures that occur in most real-life romances, but also the elation and passion that occur in their best parts. The film builds up to a point where both of them are likely to experience career success, but are required to part for a time because Mia's career will take her to Paris for several months. The feeling at this point of the film is of a MaybeEverAfter - maybe they'll get back together after she returns to Los Angeles and maybe things will work out, maybe they won't. Then there's a TimeSkip of five years and she's married to someone we've never seen before, with a nice house and a child. What happened to her and Sebastian? We don't know. It's never explained. Her husband's name is David; this is essentially all we know about him, because he gets almost no lines in the film, and what he does get is throwaway exposition. They're in Los Angeles, decide to turn off of a traffic jam on a freeway to get dinner, and then decide to wander into a jazz club, which turns out to be the club Sebastian had wanted to set up for the whole film, with the name she had suggested to him for it and the logo she had designed for it. She and Sebastian notice each other and share a knowing look; then he begins playing a song he wrote for her, and there's an ImagineSpot where they think of the life they could have had together. And it's exactly the life she shares with David, down to the smallest details. (Some of the details of their meeting are an idealised vision of the way things could have gone in a perfect world; the things that happen after they marry, however, are exactly identical to her real life.) The ImagineSpot ends, she and her David get up to leave, and she turns around and shares one last wistful smile at him before leaving. The fact that Mia and Sebastian don't end up together isn't the point of criticism; it's that the reason they don't end up together is, after such a believable depiction of their romance for the first two hours of the film, not even explained. The ending is impossible to see coming, and delivers no closure whatsoever to the audience. The fact that it's a subversion of the audience's expectations of the HappilyEverAfter ending isn't the complaint. It's the fact that there ''is'' essentially no resolution for the part of the film the audience cares the most about; we're just told they don't end up together, and we're not even told why, much less [[ShowDontTell shown]].]]

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* A common criticism of the BittersweetEnding to ''Film/LaLaLand'', which is almost universally loved apart from its ending, is that it is this. [[spoiler:The film is mostly about a very believable romance between its leads, Mia and Sebastian. Their relationship is depicted, warts and all, with all the arguments and failures that occur in most real-life romances, but also the elation and passion that occur in their best parts. The film builds up to a point where both of them are likely to experience career success, but are required to part for a time because Mia's career will take her to Paris for several months. The feeling at this point of the film is of a MaybeEverAfter - maybe they'll [[spoiler:Mia and Sebastian break up and don't get back together after she returns to Los Angeles again, despite affirming that they'll always love each other, and maybe things will work out, maybe they won't. Then there's Mia ends up having a TimeSkip of five years child with someone else.]] Though the director was clearly trying to go for a more realistic and less "fairy tale" ending, many felt that it didn't gel with the rest of the film, which wasn't averse to standard Hollywood magic tropes [[spoiler:(such as an extremely famous casting director happening to be one of the few people at Mia's one-woman show and immediately gaining such an interest in her that she's married willing to someone we've never seen before, with give her a nice house good part in an upcoming big picture)]]. Many were similarly unconvinced at [[spoiler:the final breakup]], finding it contrived, unnecessary drama, and a child. What happened to her rather hackneyed attempt at being subversive when so much of the rest of the movie had no trouble garnering acclaim when it was typical fanciful Hollywood magic, and Sebastian? We don't know. It's never explained. Her husband's name is David; this is essentially all we know about him, because he gets almost no lines in were unconvinced that the fantasy sequence couldn't have just been the true end of the film, and what he does get is throwaway exposition. They're in Los Angeles, decide to turn off of a traffic jam on a freeway to get dinner, and then decide to wander into a jazz club, which turns out to be the club Sebastian had wanted to set up for the whole film, with the name she had suggested to him for it and the logo she had designed for it. She or [[spoiler:Mia and Sebastian notice each other and share a knowing look; then he begins playing a song he wrote for her, and there's an ImagineSpot where they think of the life they could have had together. And it's exactly the life she shares with David, down to the smallest details. (Some of the details of their meeting are an idealised vision of the way things could have gone in a perfect world; the things that happen after they marry, however, are exactly identical to her real life.) The ImagineSpot ends, she and her David get up to leave, and she turns around and shares one last wistful smile at him before leaving. The fact that Mia and Sebastian don't end up getting back together isn't the point of criticism; it's that the reason they don't end up together is, after such a believable depiction of when their romance for careers have settled more instead of Mia apparently moving on immediately to another man and having a baby when one of the main reasons they broke up in the first two hours of the film, not even explained. The ending is impossible to see coming, and delivers no closure whatsoever to the audience. The fact place was that it's a subversion of the audience's expectations of the HappilyEverAfter ending isn't the complaint. It's the fact that there ''is'' essentially no resolution for the part of the film the audience cares the most about; we're just told they don't end up together, and we're not even told why, much less [[ShowDontTell shown]].]]she could focus on her career.]]
16th Apr '17 8:35:39 PM Blazer
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* The 1978 disaster film ''Avalanche'' leads this into {{Narm}} territory. After spending 3/4ths of the movie introducing us to the various characters in the film, the titular avalanche kills a vast majority of them because they don't see it coming. Then, by ''[[EpicFail sheer incompetence]]'' do many others die. The worst case is the male lead's mother. She survives the avalanche, survives the kitchen of the winter resort blowing up, survives suffering a concussion and going into shock and we're shown her being taken to a hospital. However, she doesn't survive ''that'' as the stupid driver decides to wipe out by driving down the hilly road like a madman, sending everyone except the leading lady to a fiery death. That's not counting the DisasterDominoes caused by the first responders racing to the rescue.
13th Apr '17 1:28:08 PM LaTriezieme
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* ''WebAnimation/{{RWBY}}'': In the last few episodes of season 3 [[spoiler: a massive Grimm Dragon arrives and effectively screws over Vale & allies.]]

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* ''WebAnimation/{{RWBY}}'': In the last few episodes of season 3 [[spoiler: a massive Grimm Dragon arrives and effectively screws over Vale & allies.]]]] Somewhat Downplayed, in that they were effectively screwed by things that were foreshadowed, but things still went almost catastrophically wrong in a short period of time, after establishing a tend of the characters pulling through at the last minute.
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