History Main / DeusExMachina

11th May '18 10:14:23 PM PaulA
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* Parodied in the [[Creator/BertoltBrecht Brecht]] play ''Theatre/TheThreepennyOpera'', where the playwright actually goes to the length of having his characters explain that the play really ends differently... but, for the sake of a happy ending, a royal official enters on horseback to make everything better. The play ends with a comment saying how unlike real life this is.
** There's an inversion of this trope in another Brecht play, ''The Good Person of Szechuan''. Just as things have got as bad as they can possibly get for the protagonist, Three Gods (who have been present on Earth since the opening scene, and in fact were responsible for the protagonist's predicament in the first place), pointedly do ''not'' step in to resolve matters, and instead mount a giant pink cloud and ascend into the heavens.

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* Creator/BertoltBrecht:
**
Parodied in the [[Creator/BertoltBrecht Brecht]] play ''Theatre/TheThreepennyOpera'', where the playwright actually goes to the length of having his characters explain that the play really ends differently... but, for the sake of a happy ending, a royal official enters on horseback to make everything better. The play ends with a comment saying how unlike real life this is.
** There's an inversion of this trope in another Brecht play, ''The Good Person of Szechuan''.''Theatre/TheGoodPersonOfSzechwan''. Just as things have got as bad as they can possibly get for the protagonist, Three Gods (who have been present on Earth since the opening scene, and in fact were responsible for the protagonist's predicament in the first place), pointedly do ''not'' step in to resolve matters, and instead mount a giant pink cloud and ascend into the heavens.
10th May '18 3:43:35 PM Prometheus117
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** In the Toa Inika's battle with Vezon, Jaller pulls out a unique Zamor Sphere that freezes Vezon in stasis, allowing the Inika to recover the Mask of Life. Unlike the Vahi example, there ''was'' a scene of Axonn giving Jaller the sphere, however its power was never explained,[[note]]The most Axonn says is that it's "for protection"[[/note]] which raises a lot of FridgeLogic.
** In the GrandFinale ''Journey's End'' arc, completely out of the blue, the Mask of Life creates a mystical set of Golden Armor for Tahu, which is capable of annihilating every single Rahkshi soldier ''and'' [[PowerCopying gaining all their abilities]]. This is said to be a contingency plan of the Great Beings, for if The Makuta ever rebelled. It was never mentioned prior to this, and you'd think it would've activated a lot sooner [[FailsafeFailure if it supposed to be a fail-safe]].

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** In the Toa Inika's battle with Vezon, Jaller pulls out a unique Zamor Sphere that freezes Vezon in stasis, stasis when Vezon, who's in the middle of a rage-induced VillainousBreakdown, attempts to inflict a FateWorseThanDeath on Matoro, allowing the Inika to recover the Mask of Life. Unlike the Vahi example, there ''was'' a scene of Axonn giving Jaller the sphere, however its power was never explained,[[note]]The most Axonn says is that it's "for protection"[[/note]] which raises a lot of FridgeLogic.
** In the GrandFinale ''Journey's End'' arc, completely out of the blue, the Mask of Life creates a mystical set of Golden Armor for Tahu, which is capable of annihilating every single Rahkshi soldier ''and'' [[PowerCopying gaining all their abilities]]. This Granted, the Mask Of Life has done and created some pretty crazy things with its power before, but this is said to be a contingency plan of the Great Beings, Beings for if The Makuta ever rebelled. It was never mentioned prior to this, and you'd think it would've activated a lot sooner [[FailsafeFailure if it supposed to be a fail-safe]].
8th May '18 4:17:19 PM Ninamarie124
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15th Apr '18 2:29:14 PM RaspyGulp
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* In [[WebVideo/Hbomberguy [=H.Bomberguy's=]]] video on the 2017 British Election, the horror of having to live through another Tory government is immediately resolved when [[spoiler:the money birds come back home]]

to:

* In [[WebVideo/Hbomberguy [[WebVideo/HBomberguy [=H.Bomberguy's=]]] video on the 2017 British Election, the horror of having to live through another Tory government is immediately resolved when [[spoiler:the money birds come back home]]
15th Apr '18 2:27:07 PM RaspyGulp
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* In [[WebVideo/Hbomberguy [=H.Bomberguy's]]] video on the 2017 British Election, the horror of having to live through another Tory government is immediately resolved when [[spoiler:the money birds come back home]]

to:

* In [[WebVideo/Hbomberguy [=H.Bomberguy's]]] Bomberguy's=]]] video on the 2017 British Election, the horror of having to live through another Tory government is immediately resolved when [[spoiler:the money birds come back home]]
15th Apr '18 2:26:08 PM RaspyGulp
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* In [[WebVideo/Hbomberguy [=H.Bomberguy's]]] video on the 2017 British Election, the horror of having to live through another Tory government is immediately resolved when [[spoiler:the money birds come back home]]


Added DiffLines:

* In [[WebVideo/Hbomberguy [=H.Bomberguy's]]] video on the 2017 British Election, the horror of having to live through another Tory government is immediately resolved when [[spoiler:the money birds come back home]]
15th Apr '18 2:22:15 PM RaspyGulp
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Added DiffLines:

* In [[WebVideo/Hbomberguy [=H.Bomberguy's]]] video on the 2017 British Election, the horror of having to live through another Tory government is immediately resolved when [[spoiler:the money birds come back home]]
2nd Feb '18 6:41:58 AM tyouker
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** In ''Orestes,'' Orestes and his sister have been condemned to death for murdering their mother (which Orestes was ordered to do by Apollo, since their mother killed their father, which she did because the father had killed their sister...). The two of them and Orestes' best friend Pylades have escaped, taken Orestes' fiancée hostage, and are holed up in the palace ready to burn it all down around them... when all of a sudden Apollo pops in, orders everyone to stop fighting, and ensures that all of the leads are friends and/or married. This ending is traditionally read as Euripides having written himself into a situation where none of his characters could be expected to solve things without divine intervention. However, more modern readings of the play as a very dark StealthParody (as in Anne Carson's very snarky translation), suggest that we are fully meant to notice how arbitrary Apollo's solutions to the characters' problems are.

to:

** In ''Orestes,'' Orestes and his sister have been condemned to death for murdering their mother (which Orestes was ordered to do by Apollo, since their mother killed their father, which she did because the father had killed their sister...). The two of them and Orestes' best friend Pylades have escaped, taken Orestes' fiancée hostage, and are holed up in the palace ready to burn it all down around them... when all of a sudden Apollo pops in, orders everyone to stop fighting, and ensures that all of the leads are friends and/or married. This ending is traditionally read as Euripides having written himself into a situation where none of his characters could be expected to solve things without divine intervention. However, more modern readings of the play as a very dark StealthParody (as in Anne Carson's very snarky super-snarky translation), suggest that we are fully meant to notice how arbitrary Apollo's solutions to the characters' problems are.
2nd Feb '18 6:41:24 AM tyouker
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** In ''Orestes,'' Orestes and his sister have been condemned to death for murdering their mother (which Orestes was ordered to do by Apollo, since their mother killed their father, which she did because the father had killed their sister...). The two of them and Orestes' best friend Pylades have escaped, taken Orestes' fiancée hostage, and are holed up in the palace ready to burn it all down around them... when all of a sudden Apollo pops in, orders everyone to stop fighting, and ensures that all of the leads are friends and/or married. Of course, there are two ways to read this ending. One is that Euripides wrote himself into a situation where none of his characters could be expected to solve things without divine intervention. Another, based on more recent scholarly interpretations, is that the whole play is a very dark StealthParody (''Orestes'' is thought to be the last play Euripides wrote before going into exile), and we are fully meant to notice how arbitrary Apollo's solutions to the characters' problems are.

to:

** In ''Orestes,'' Orestes and his sister have been condemned to death for murdering their mother (which Orestes was ordered to do by Apollo, since their mother killed their father, which she did because the father had killed their sister...). The two of them and Orestes' best friend Pylades have escaped, taken Orestes' fiancée hostage, and are holed up in the palace ready to burn it all down around them... when all of a sudden Apollo pops in, orders everyone to stop fighting, and ensures that all of the leads are friends and/or married. Of course, there are two ways to This ending is traditionally read this ending. One is that as Euripides wrote having written himself into a situation where none of his characters could be expected to solve things without divine intervention. Another, based on However, more recent scholarly interpretations, is that modern readings of the whole play is as a very dark StealthParody (''Orestes'' is thought to be the last play Euripides wrote before going into exile), and (as in Anne Carson's very snarky translation), suggest that we are fully meant to notice how arbitrary Apollo's solutions to the characters' problems are.
2nd Feb '18 6:38:58 AM tyouker
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** In ''Orestes,'' Orestes and his sister have been condemned to death for murdering their mother (which Orestes was ordered to do by Apollo, since their mother killed their father, which she did because the father had killed their sister...). The two of them and Orestes' best friend Pylades have escaped, taken Orestes' fiancée hostage, and are holed up in the palace ready to burn it all down around them... when all of a sudden Apollo pops in and calms everyone down, so everybody is friends and/or married. Of course, there are two ways to read this ending. One is that Euripides wrote himself into a situation where none of his characters could be expected to solve things without divine intervention. Another, based on more recent scholarly interpretations, is that the whole play is a very dark StealthParody (''Orestes'' is thought to be the last play Euripides wrote before going into exile), and we are fully meant to notice how arbitrary Apollo's solutions to the characters' problems are.

to:

** In ''Orestes,'' Orestes and his sister have been condemned to death for murdering their mother (which Orestes was ordered to do by Apollo, since their mother killed their father, which she did because the father had killed their sister...). The two of them and Orestes' best friend Pylades have escaped, taken Orestes' fiancée hostage, and are holed up in the palace ready to burn it all down around them... when all of a sudden Apollo pops in and calms in, orders everyone down, so everybody is to stop fighting, and ensures that all of the leads are friends and/or married. Of course, there are two ways to read this ending. One is that Euripides wrote himself into a situation where none of his characters could be expected to solve things without divine intervention. Another, based on more recent scholarly interpretations, is that the whole play is a very dark StealthParody (''Orestes'' is thought to be the last play Euripides wrote before going into exile), and we are fully meant to notice how arbitrary Apollo's solutions to the characters' problems are.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.DeusExMachina