History Main / DesignatedHero

7th Jan '17 12:40:11 AM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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Not to be confused with TheChosenOne, though they can occasionally overlap. [[AccidentalHero Accidental Heroes]] do accomplish heroic things, but not intentionally. If the character is publicly perceived as a Hero, but is still shown to be villainous within the narrative context of the work, then he's a VillainWithGoodPublicity. For a character who is an utter [=Jerkass=], but still ultimately heroic, see GoodIsNotNice. For a morally ambiguous character who is ''intended'' to be seen as such by the audience, see {{antihero}} and its related subtropes. Can also be related to BitchInSheepsClothing, where a character who seems like a nice person turns out to be a mean person deep down.

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Not to be confused with TheChosenOne, though they can occasionally overlap. [[AccidentalHero Accidental Heroes]] do accomplish heroic things, but not intentionally. If the character is publicly perceived as a Hero, but is still shown to be villainous within the narrative context of the work, then he's a VillainWithGoodPublicity. For a character who is an utter [=Jerkass=], {{Jerkass}}, but still ultimately heroic, see GoodIsNotNice. For a morally ambiguous character who is ''intended'' to be seen as such by the audience, see {{antihero}} and its related subtropes. Can also be related to BitchInSheepsClothing, where a character who seems like a nice person turns out to be a mean person deep down.



* ''WesternAnimation/BebesKids''. Seriously, they destroy a theme park and cause trouble for many innocent people there, yet they never get punished for it. Worse, the audience is expected not to think badly of them because they have a poor life and have "attitude." In the original stand up routine the movie was based on, they were clearly the antagonists. Robin Harris was criticizing irresponsible parents who were too selfish to raise and discipline their ill-behaved children. Also, Robin Harris' character in the movie ALSO qualifies for this trope; generally acting like a major [=Jerkass=] to everyone yet actually being praised as a good guy despite doing nothing good whatsoever.

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* ''WesternAnimation/BebesKids''. Seriously, they destroy a theme park and cause trouble for many innocent people there, yet they never get punished for it. Worse, the audience is expected not to think badly of them because they have a poor life and have "attitude." In the original stand up routine the movie was based on, they were clearly the antagonists. Robin Harris was criticizing irresponsible parents who were too selfish to raise and discipline their ill-behaved children. Also, Robin Harris' character in the movie ALSO qualifies for this trope; generally acting like a major [=Jerkass=] {{Jerkass to everyone yet actually being praised as a good guy despite doing nothing good whatsoever.



** Snake was supposed to be a likeable anti-hero [[Film/EscapeFromNewYork just like his inspiration]], but unlike his namesake he didn't have as much of a context to act the way he did (Snake Plissken at least had the excuse of living in a crime-filled post-apocalyptic future). As a result, he ended up coming off as a complete [=Jerkass=]. To add insult to injury, the guy who was supposed to be a low-life scumbag in comparison ended up being a DesignatedVictim, seeing as Snake's motivation for wanting to beat him up seemed incredibly weak.

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** Snake was supposed to be a likeable anti-hero [[Film/EscapeFromNewYork just like his inspiration]], but unlike his namesake he didn't have as much of a context to act the way he did (Snake Plissken at least had the excuse of living in a crime-filled post-apocalyptic future). As a result, he ended up coming off as a complete [=Jerkass=].{{Jerkass}}. To add insult to injury, the guy who was supposed to be a low-life scumbag in comparison ended up being a DesignatedVictim, seeing as Snake's motivation for wanting to beat him up seemed incredibly weak.
7th Jan '17 12:31:30 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''BebesKids''. Seriously, they destroy a theme park and cause trouble for many innocent people there, yet they never get punished for it. Worse, the audience is expected not to think badly of them because they have a poor life and have "attitude." In the original stand up routine the movie was based on, they were clearly the antagonists. Robin Harris was criticizing irresponsible parents who were too selfish to raise and discipline their ill-behaved children. Also, Robin Harris' character in the movie ALSO qualifies for this trope; generally acting like a major [=Jerkass=] to everyone yet actually being praised as a good guy despite doing nothing good whatsoever.

to:

* ''BebesKids''.''WesternAnimation/BebesKids''. Seriously, they destroy a theme park and cause trouble for many innocent people there, yet they never get punished for it. Worse, the audience is expected not to think badly of them because they have a poor life and have "attitude." In the original stand up routine the movie was based on, they were clearly the antagonists. Robin Harris was criticizing irresponsible parents who were too selfish to raise and discipline their ill-behaved children. Also, Robin Harris' character in the movie ALSO qualifies for this trope; generally acting like a major [=Jerkass=] to everyone yet actually being praised as a good guy despite doing nothing good whatsoever.
20th Dec '16 2:17:08 PM kataangluvr
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[[folder: Films -- Live Action]]
* Crystal from ''Dear Santa'' to the Nth degree. She's a spoiled fashionista who mooches off her parents rather than do something like get a job of her own or find a man. On the day that her mother announces that Crystal is going to be cut off from them, she finds a [[TitlteDrop "Dear Santa"]] letter from a little girl who wishes for her father to find a woman to make him smile like her mother used to. Crystal uses this opportunity to stalk this single family that she just heard of and unknowingly volunteers at the father's soup kitchen. Once she learns that he has a supportive girlfriend who's been with him since his wife's death, she does everything she can to ruin the relationship so that she can have a chance with him. It doesn't really help that the girlfriend, Jillian, is treated as the DesignatedVillain simply because she's dating the father and she's known him for years while Crystal has known him for a few weeks.
[[/folder]]
20th Dec '16 2:16:32 PM kataangluvr
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[[folder: Films -- Animated]]

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[[folder: Films -- Animated]]Live Action]]
20th Dec '16 2:16:02 PM kataangluvr
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[[folder: Films -- Animated]]
* Crystal from ''Dear Santa'' to the Nth degree. She's a spoiled fashionista who mooches off her parents rather than do something like get a job of her own or find a man. On the day that her mother announces that Crystal is going to be cut off from them, she finds a [[TitlteDrop "Dear Santa"]] letter from a little girl who wishes for her father to find a woman to make him smile like her mother used to. Crystal uses this opportunity to stalk this single family that she just heard of and unknowingly volunteers at the father's soup kitchen. Once she learns that he has a supportive girlfriend who's been with him since his wife's death, she does everything she can to ruin the relationship so that she can have a chance with him. It doesn't really help that the girlfriend, Jillian, is treated as the DesignatedVillain simply because she's dating the father and she's known him for years while Crystal has known him for a few weeks.
[[/folder]]
16th Dec '16 10:06:10 PM ADrago
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* Theatre/{{Hamlet}}. There's a fine line between being a TragicHero, an overall good person undone by a FatalFlaw, and being a DesignatedHero, a character treated by the narrative as a hero despite doing nothing heroic, and it's a [[CrossesTheLineTwice line Hamlet crosses more than twice.]] After learning from the ghost of his father that his father was murdered by Claudius, Hamlet spends the next act or so mocking and taunting Polonius, Rosencrantz, and Guildenstern, while also verbally abusing and SlutShaming Ophelia, despite that they had absolutely nothing whatsoever to do with the murder of Hamlet's father. When Hamlet finally does something, he murders Polonius because he heard a voice behind some curtains and jumps to the conclusion that it must be Claudius. He then hides the body and jokes that everybody will smell him soon enough. This murder drives Ophelia to insanity and her death (she may even have been DrivenToSuicide). Hamlet then deliberately brings about the deaths of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern [[DesignatedVillain despite little to no evidence that they actually did anything wrong.]] He finally gets around to the one person he was supposed to be killing, Claudius, only after the latter has poisoned Gertrude and gotten Laertes to poison Hamlet who then gets accidentally poisoned by Hamlet. So it could be argued that every death that occurs from the start of the play onward is all Hamlet's fault.

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* Theatre/{{Hamlet}}. There's a fine line between being a TragicHero, an overall good person undone by a FatalFlaw, and being a DesignatedHero, a character treated by the narrative as a hero despite doing nothing heroic, and it's a [[CrossesTheLineTwice line Hamlet crosses more than twice.]] twice. After learning from the ghost of his father that his father was murdered by Claudius, Hamlet spends the next act or so mocking and taunting Polonius, Rosencrantz, and Guildenstern, while also verbally abusing and SlutShaming Ophelia, despite that they had absolutely nothing whatsoever to do with the murder of Hamlet's father. When Hamlet finally does something, he murders Polonius because he heard a voice behind some curtains and jumps to the conclusion that it must be Claudius. He then hides the body and jokes that everybody will smell him soon enough. This murder drives Ophelia to insanity and her death (she may even have been DrivenToSuicide). Hamlet then deliberately brings about the deaths of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern [[DesignatedVillain despite little to no evidence that they actually did anything wrong.]] He finally gets around to the one person he was supposed to be killing, Claudius, only after the latter has poisoned Gertrude and gotten Laertes to poison Hamlet who then gets accidentally poisoned by Hamlet. So it could be argued that every death that occurs from the start of the play onward is all Hamlet's fault.
25th Nov '16 10:09:12 AM TomServo3000
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* WebVideo/TheIrateGamer himself. He blew up a harmless alien mothership because of E.T. on Atari, murdered the Kool-Aid Man for doing what he does... ON CHRISTMAS, casually pals around with Satan, blew up Ubisoft's headquarters because he couldn't get into their E3 conference, and we're supposed to treat him as the hero. If he was just an asshole that would be kind of understandable, except he has an EvilTwin [[HeroAntagonist character]] that hasn't even killed anyone or done anything remotely evil outside of stealing something.

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* WebVideo/TheIrateGamer himself. He blew up a harmless alien mothership because of E.T. on Atari, murdered the Kool-Aid Man for doing what he does... ON CHRISTMAS, casually pals around with Satan, blew up Ubisoft's headquarters because he couldn't get into their E3 conference, and we're supposed to treat him as the hero. If he was just an asshole that would be kind of understandable, except he has an EvilTwin [[HeroAntagonist [[DesignatedVillain character]] that hasn't even killed anyone or done anything remotely evil outside of stealing something.
20th Oct '16 10:10:13 AM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* Given the nature of the medium, anecdotes quite naturally circulate in tabletop RPG circles about both player and non-player characters like this. For a fairly basic example, the section "Confessions of a Hack and Slash Junkie" (which is ''actually'' about breaking out of that mold and creating memorable plots and villains) in the ''Fantasy Hero'' genre book for the 4th edition of the ''TabletopGame/{{Hero System}}'' alludes to a slaughter of kobold children by the [=PCs=] of one of the author's past playing groups "because they aren't worth experience points alive."

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* Given the nature of the medium, anecdotes quite naturally circulate in tabletop RPG circles about both player and non-player characters like this. For a fairly basic example, the section "Confessions of a Hack and Slash Junkie" (which is ''actually'' about breaking out of that mold and creating memorable plots and villains) in the ''Fantasy Hero'' genre book for the 4th edition of the ''TabletopGame/{{Hero System}}'' ''TabletopGame/HeroSystem'' alludes to a slaughter of kobold children by the [=PCs=] of one of the author's past playing groups "because they aren't worth experience points alive."
20th Oct '16 10:08:06 AM Peridonyx
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* Wrestling/TheBigShow during his feud with Floyd Mayweather Jr. Sure, Mayweather had a showboating problem, but he still pulled a BigDamnHeroes for Wrestling/ReyMysterioJr at the beginning and then even shared some of his wealth with the crowd at ''Wrestling/WrestleMania XXIV''; Show was the one who assaulted Mysterio in the first place, then spent the rest of the buildup doing the same to several others while bragging about wanting to injure Mayweather into early retirement. And during the match, Mayweather kept trying to fight fair until Show invoked DisproportionateRetribution on one of the former's bodyguards simply for giving his client some water (albeit in an overly elaborate chalice) mid-match, then kept trying to make good on the aforementioned injury threats. And yet Mayweather eventually resorting to both ZergRush interference and foreign objects to get the win was treated as dirty -- even though (A) there were no disqualifications anyway, (B) Show already had a StoryBreakerPower size advantage himself, and (C) it was all out of desperation to finally put down a stubborn {{Juggernaut}}[=.=]
17th Oct '16 3:48:28 AM Morgenthaler
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* Given the nature of the medium, anecdotes quite naturally circulate in tabletop RPG circles about both player and non-player characters like this. For a fairly basic example, the section "Confessions of a Hack and Slash Junkie" (which is ''actually'' about breaking out of that mold and creating memorable plots and villains) in the ''Fantasy Hero'' genre book for the 4th edition of the ''{{Hero System}}'' alludes to a slaughter of kobold children by the [=PCs=] of one of the author's past playing groups "because they aren't worth experience points alive."

to:

* Given the nature of the medium, anecdotes quite naturally circulate in tabletop RPG circles about both player and non-player characters like this. For a fairly basic example, the section "Confessions of a Hack and Slash Junkie" (which is ''actually'' about breaking out of that mold and creating memorable plots and villains) in the ''Fantasy Hero'' genre book for the 4th edition of the ''{{Hero ''TabletopGame/{{Hero System}}'' alludes to a slaughter of kobold children by the [=PCs=] of one of the author's past playing groups "because they aren't worth experience points alive."
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