History Main / DesignatedHero

1st Dec '17 3:27:25 PM PStriderFan
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* One of the many complaints that ''WesternAnimation/TheEmojiMovie'' has is that the main character, Gene, who is meant to be seen as the hero, causes the ''majority'' of the film's problems ranging from panicking for no good reason while being scanned by Alex, causing several apps to be deleted, and even [[spoiler: leaving the ''Just Dance'' girl, [[EnsembleDarkhorse Akiko Glitter]], to die in the trash along with the Trolls while ''only'' showing concern for [[TheLoad Hi-5.]] It ''really'' doesn't help that it's technically ''Gene's'' fault Akiko is in the trash to begin with]]

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* One of the many complaints that ''WesternAnimation/TheEmojiMovie'' has is that the main character, Gene, who is meant to be seen as the hero, causes the ''majority'' of the film's problems ranging from panicking for no good reason while being scanned by Alex, causing several apps to be deleted, and even [[spoiler: leaving the ''Just Dance'' girl, [[EnsembleDarkhorse Akiko Glitter]], to die in the trash along with the Trolls while ''only'' showing concern for [[TheLoad Hi-5.]] It ''really'' doesn't help that it's technically ''Gene's'' fault ''Gene's fault'' Akiko is in the trash to begin with]] with.]]
1st Dec '17 3:25:56 PM PStriderFan
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* One of the many complaints that ''WesternAnimation/TheEmojiMovie'' has is that the main character Gene, who is meant to be seen as the hero, causes the ''majority'' of the film's problems ranging from panicking for no good reason while being scanned by Alex, causing several apps to be deleted, and even [[spoiler: leaving the ''Just Dance'' girl, [[EnsembleDarkhorse Akiko Glitter]], to die in the trash along with the Trolls while ''only'' showing concern for [[TheLoad Hi-5.]]]]

to:

* One of the many complaints that ''WesternAnimation/TheEmojiMovie'' has is that the main character character, Gene, who is meant to be seen as the hero, causes the ''majority'' of the film's problems ranging from panicking for no good reason while being scanned by Alex, causing several apps to be deleted, and even [[spoiler: leaving the ''Just Dance'' girl, [[EnsembleDarkhorse Akiko Glitter]], to die in the trash along with the Trolls while ''only'' showing concern for [[TheLoad Hi-5.]]]] ]] It ''really'' doesn't help that it's technically ''Gene's'' fault Akiko is in the trash to begin with]]
27th Nov '17 1:19:21 PM BurgerLord
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'''Note:''' InUniverse examples or {{Intentional|Audience Reaction}} ones go to NominalHero.

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'''Note:''' InUniverse examples or {{Intentional|Audience Reaction}} ones go to NominalHero.
NominalHero or EvilHero.
14th Nov '17 8:00:44 PM Jacob175
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* One of the most common criticisms of the Sisterhood in ''Webcomic/SinFest''. The author wants them to be seen as heroic and noble feminists who are fighting against "the Patriarchy," which is a tangible organization/conspiracy within the world of the strip. Instead, they come across as {{Jerkass}} [[StrawFeminist Straw Feminists]]. They brook no disagreement with their viewpoints and refuse to debate their opinions, perform morally questionable actions (like hacking into a Fembot factory and turning the androids against the staff), and even have a member who, when questioned about why she "hates men," ''doesn't disagree with the idea and labels men as her oppressor''. They are never called out on their more extreme behavior, and the author seems to want them to be seen as 100% in the right.

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* One of the most common criticisms of the Sisterhood in ''Webcomic/SinFest''.''Webcomic/{{Sinfest}}''. The author wants them to be seen as heroic and noble feminists who are fighting against "the Patriarchy," which is a tangible organization/conspiracy within the world of the strip. Instead, they come across as {{Jerkass}} [[StrawFeminist Straw Feminists]]. They brook no disagreement with their viewpoints and refuse to debate their opinions, perform morally questionable actions (like hacking into a Fembot factory and turning the androids against the staff), and even have a member who, when questioned about why she "hates men," ''doesn't disagree with the idea and labels men as her oppressor''. They are never called out on their more extreme behavior, and the author seems to want them to be seen as 100% in the right.



* ''Webcomic/SonicTheComicOnline'' is a deconstruction of this trope, showing the consequences of Sonic's behavior from the original ''ComicBook/SonicTheComic''. Even from the start, it's clear Sonic's ego, putdowns and self-righteousness has begun to wear thin on everyone and [[spoiler:when the Kane Network uses their resources to reveal all of his more morally ambiguous decisions to Mobius, the populace finally hits their breaking point and turns on Sonic.]]



* [[VideoGame/HalfLife Gordon Freeman]] is depicted as being like this in ''Machinima/FreemansMind''. Everyone hails him as a great hero, but really he just sort of bumbles around and saves the world by an accident, while at the same time trying to negotiate with enemy soldiers (it doesn't work), looting things around Black Mesa, and trying to find anything he can to get high (such as animal tranquilizers). A good example is episode 19: throughout the last few episodes, he had been randomly wandering around, pressing buttons because they looked shiny and shooting zombies who attacked him. Turns out he accidentally turns on a rocket engine that burns a giant monster to death (that he had avoided being crushed by due to sneaking and sheer dumb luck). The creator justify that if a scientist shoot his way out of an alien invasion, chances are he had a dark side before hell broke loose.

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* [[VideoGame/HalfLife Gordon Freeman]] is depicted as being like this in ''Machinima/FreemansMind''. Everyone hails him as a great hero, but really he just sort of bumbles around and saves the world by an accident, while at the same time trying to negotiate with enemy soldiers (it doesn't work), looting things around Black Mesa, and trying to find anything he can to get high (such as animal tranquilizers). A good example is episode 19: throughout the last few episodes, he had been randomly wandering around, pressing buttons because they looked shiny and shooting zombies who attacked him. Turns out he accidentally turns on a rocket engine that burns a giant monster to death (that he had avoided being crushed by due to sneaking and sheer dumb luck). The creator justify justifies that if a scientist shoot his way out of an alien invasion, chances are he had a dark side before hell broke loose.
21st Oct '17 5:59:35 AM PStriderFan
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* One of the many complaints that ''WesternAnimation/TheEmojiMovie'' has is that the main character Gene, while a NiceGuy, causes the ''majority'' of the film's problems ranging from panicking for no good reason while being scanned by Alex, causing several apps to be deleted, and even [[spoiler: leaving the ''Just Dance'' girl, [[EnsembleDarkhorse Akiko Glitter]], to die in the trash along with the Trolls while ''only'' showing concern for [[TheLoad Hi-5.]]]]

to:

* One of the many complaints that ''WesternAnimation/TheEmojiMovie'' has is that the main character Gene, while a NiceGuy, who is meant to be seen as the hero, causes the ''majority'' of the film's problems ranging from panicking for no good reason while being scanned by Alex, causing several apps to be deleted, and even [[spoiler: leaving the ''Just Dance'' girl, [[EnsembleDarkhorse Akiko Glitter]], to die in the trash along with the Trolls while ''only'' showing concern for [[TheLoad Hi-5.]]]]
20th Oct '17 6:53:16 PM PStriderFan
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* One of the many complaints that WesternAnimation/TheEmojiMovie has is that the main character Gene, while a NiceGuy, causes the ''majority'' of the film's problems ranging from freaking out during the first day at his new job for no good reason, causing several apps to deleted, and even [[spoiler: neglecting to save the ''Just Dance'' girl, Akiko Glitter, from ''dying'' in the trash while ''only'' showing concern for [[TheLoad Hi-5]]]]. It also doesn't help matters that Smiler is [[DesignatedVillain seen as the bad guy]] for trying to prevent him from nearly ''killing'' the entire city.

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* One of the many complaints that WesternAnimation/TheEmojiMovie ''WesternAnimation/TheEmojiMovie'' has is that the main character Gene, while a NiceGuy, causes the ''majority'' of the film's problems ranging from freaking out during the first day at his new job panicking for no good reason, reason while being scanned by Alex, causing several apps to be deleted, and even [[spoiler: neglecting to save leaving the ''Just Dance'' girl, [[EnsembleDarkhorse Akiko Glitter, from ''dying'' Glitter]], to die in the trash along with the Trolls while ''only'' showing concern for [[TheLoad Hi-5]]]]. It also doesn't help matters that Smiler is [[DesignatedVillain seen as the bad guy]] for trying to prevent him from nearly ''killing'' the entire city. Hi-5.]]]]
20th Oct '17 6:43:21 PM PStriderFan
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Added DiffLines:

* One of the many complaints that WesternAnimation/TheEmojiMovie has is that the main character Gene, while a NiceGuy, causes the ''majority'' of the film's problems ranging from freaking out during the first day at his new job for no good reason, causing several apps to deleted, and even [[spoiler: neglecting to save the ''Just Dance'' girl, Akiko Glitter, from ''dying'' in the trash while ''only'' showing concern for [[TheLoad Hi-5]]]]. It also doesn't help matters that Smiler is [[DesignatedVillain seen as the bad guy]] for trying to prevent him from nearly ''killing'' the entire city.
30th Sep '17 6:19:09 AM Shadowgazer
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On the flip side, there's the DesignatedVillain, who we're supposed to dislike despite the fact that he's [[StrawmanHasAPoint right about everything]]. This is often because [[SmugSnake everything he says gets accompanied by an annoying smirk]]. Another inversion would be the VillainProtagonist, who, while presented as the ''protagonist'', is in no way presented as a ''hero''; rather the opposite. (Ironically, a failed attempt at writing a VillainProtagonist can lead to misunderstanding the author's intentions and come off as a Designated Hero, though a work with a sympathetic VillainProtagonist can use this trope to their advantage by making the [[SmugSuper hero who opposes them this]]). UnsympatheticComedyProtagonist are also an inversion since they are meant to be booed and often laughed at by the audience but this can be a result if one of their jokes comes across as [[DudeNotFunny offensive]] to the audience members. A third inversion is the author letting the audience decide on their own about whether a character is good or evil and keeping a truly neutral stance.

Not to be confused with TheChosenOne, though they can occasionally overlap. [[AccidentalHero Accidental Heroes]] do accomplish heroic things, but not intentionally. If the character is publicly perceived as a Hero, but is still shown to be villainous within the narrative context of the work, then he's a VillainWithGoodPublicity. For a character who is an utter {{Jerkass}}, but still ultimately heroic, see GoodIsNotNice. For a morally ambiguous character who is ''intended'' to be seen as such by the audience, see {{antihero}} and its related subtropes. Can also be related to BitchInSheepsClothing, where a character who seems like a nice person turns out to be a mean person deep down.

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On the flip side, there's the DesignatedVillain, who we're supposed to dislike despite the fact that he's [[StrawmanHasAPoint right about everything]]. This is often because [[SmugSnake everything he says gets accompanied by an annoying smirk]]. Another inversion would be the VillainProtagonist, who, while presented as the ''protagonist'', is in no way presented as a ''hero''; rather the opposite. (Ironically, a failed attempt at writing a VillainProtagonist can lead to misunderstanding the author's intentions and come off as a Designated Hero, though a work with a sympathetic VillainProtagonist can use this trope to their advantage by making the [[SmugSuper hero who opposes them this]]). UnsympatheticComedyProtagonist are also an inversion since they are meant to be booed and often laughed at by the audience but this can be a result if one of their jokes comes across as [[DudeNotFunny offensive]] to the audience members. A third inversion is the author letting the audience decide on their own about whether a character is good or evil and keeping a truly neutral stance.\n\n

Not to be confused with TheChosenOne, though they can occasionally overlap. [[AccidentalHero Accidental Heroes]] do accomplish heroic things, but not intentionally. If the character is publicly perceived as a Hero, but is still shown to be villainous within the narrative context of the work, then he's a VillainWithGoodPublicity. For a character who is an utter {{Jerkass}}, can be rude and antisocial, but still ultimately heroic, see GoodIsNotNice. For a morally ambiguous character who is ''intended'' to be seen as such by the audience, see {{antihero}} and its related subtropes. Can also be related to BitchInSheepsClothing, where a character who seems like a nice person turns out to be a mean person deep down.



See ShowDontTell. Almost always a result of being UnintentionallyUnsympathetic. Such a character might inspire RootingForTheEmpire when the villains are seen as more likable than the main character.
The level of designation falls on a spectrum, in more minor cases it's where an AntiHero is treated as an Ideal Hero while a theoretically extreme case would be a character that a sensible work would treat as a Complete Monster being TheHero.

It should be noted however, that this accusation can be the result of [[MisaimedFandom audiences drawing the wrong conclusion]]. After all, not all heroes are [[AllLovingHero boy scouts]]. Some are [[AntiHero meant to be jerks]] or [[GrayingMorality develop morally questionable traits over time.]] Some are meant to walk in the [[ShadesOfConflict grey line.]] Or alternately, their morality may be meant to be [[BlueAndOrangeMorality completely foreign to humans.]]

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See ShowDontTell. Almost always a result of being UnintentionallyUnsympathetic. Such a character might inspire RootingForTheEmpire when the villains even if they are really bad, are seen as more likable than the main character.
The level of designation falls on a spectrum, in more minor cases it's where an AntiHero is treated as an Ideal Hero while a theoretically extreme case would be a character that a sensible work would treat as a Complete Monster being TheHero.

TheHero or in the darkest case a Complete Monster being a mild {{antihero}} when the audience feels that the term {{antihero}} is ''too good for them''

It should be noted however, that this accusation can be the result of [[MisaimedFandom audiences drawing the wrong conclusion]]. After all, not all heroes are [[AllLovingHero boy scouts]]. Some are [[AntiHero meant to be jerks]] jerks or ambiguous to begin with]] or [[GrayingMorality develop morally questionable traits over time.]] Some are meant to walk in the [[ShadesOfConflict grey line.]] line]] with the author letting the audience decide on their own about whether a character is good or evil and keeping a truly neutral stance. Or alternately, their morality may be meant to be [[BlueAndOrangeMorality completely foreign to humans.]]
]] Also viewers should keep in mind that there are comedies where the bad character being treated as good is deliberate as a form of critisism against their society or if the writers are feeling particularly sarcastic by having them being treated as heroic by the narration as well and actually wanting the audience to disagree with it.
30th Sep '17 5:50:51 AM Shadowgazer
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An extremely common plot associated with this character is their riding the coattails of a [[AccidentalHero misunderstanding]] or undeserved reward until they finally feel guilty about it -- and are allowed to keep it at the end anyway. In so-called 'guy movies', this is sometimes associated with an implausibly attractive woman inexplicably respecting that he came forward with this information and allowing it to wipe away all fault for what he originally did, despite the fact that most reasonable human beings would never want to see him again. But hey, he learned to be a NiceGuy, right?

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An extremely common plot associated with this character is their riding the coattails of a [[AccidentalHero misunderstanding]] or undeserved reward until they finally feel guilty about it -- and are allowed to keep it at the end anyway. This kind of plot does happen with deliberate [[AntiHero antiheroes]] as well but in those cases it is obvious that it is considered wrong and more often than not, leads the characters to become more genuinely heroic by the end. In so-called 'guy movies', this is sometimes associated with an implausibly attractive woman inexplicably respecting that he came forward with this information and allowing it to wipe away all fault for what he originally did, despite the fact that most reasonable human beings would never want to see him again. But hey, he learned to be a NiceGuy, right?



On the flip side, there's the DesignatedVillain, who we're supposed to dislike despite the fact that he's [[StrawmanHasAPoint right about everything]]. This is often because [[SmugSnake everything he says gets accompanied by an annoying smirk]]. Another inversion would be the VillainProtagonist, who, while presented as the ''protagonist'', is in no way presented as a ''hero''; rather the opposite. (Ironically, a failed attempt at writing a VillainProtagonist can come off as a Designated Hero, though a work with a sympathetic VillainProtagonist can use this trope to their advantage by making the [[SmugSuper hero who opposes them this]]). UnsympatheticComedyProtagonist are usually given a free pass but this can be a result if one of their jokes comes across as [[DudeNotFunny offensive]] to the audience members.

to:

On the flip side, there's the DesignatedVillain, who we're supposed to dislike despite the fact that he's [[StrawmanHasAPoint right about everything]]. This is often because [[SmugSnake everything he says gets accompanied by an annoying smirk]]. Another inversion would be the VillainProtagonist, who, while presented as the ''protagonist'', is in no way presented as a ''hero''; rather the opposite. (Ironically, a failed attempt at writing a VillainProtagonist can lead to misunderstanding the author's intentions and come off as a Designated Hero, though a work with a sympathetic VillainProtagonist can use this trope to their advantage by making the [[SmugSuper hero who opposes them this]]). UnsympatheticComedyProtagonist are usually given a free pass also an inversion since they are meant to be booed and often laughed at by the audience but this can be a result if one of their jokes comes across as [[DudeNotFunny offensive]] to the audience members.
members. A third inversion is the author letting the audience decide on their own about whether a character is good or evil and keeping a truly neutral stance.
26th Sep '17 8:39:40 PM FGHIK
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A Designated Hero is a character in a story who, despite being presented as heroic, is actually a {{Jerkass}} at best and an arguable villain at worst. This is not the same as the deliberately morally ambiguous AntiHero. From the praise they receive from other characters and even the narrative, it is plain that the audience is expected to like and root for the Designated Hero; instead, they have problems that can even inspire pity or, on rare occasions, disgust.

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A Designated Hero is a character in a story who, despite being presented as heroic, is actually a {{Jerkass}} at best and an arguable villain at worst. This is not the same as the deliberately morally ambiguous AntiHero. From the praise they receive from other characters and even characters, the narrative, and perhaps WordOfGod, it is plain that the audience is expected to like and root for the Designated Hero; instead, they have problems that can even inspire pity or, on rare occasions, disgust.
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