History Main / DependingOnTheWriter

19th Mar '17 2:58:20 PM nombretomado
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* The NuzlockeComics involve turning [[AfterActionReport a playthrough of one of the Pokemon games into a comic strip or written story]], and there are a lot of variations on the rules of the challenge itself, as well as the setting and the characters involved. Does the term "Nuzlocke" have any meaning within the world itself? Is it a Self-Imposed Challenge, a curse, or simply an unnamed rule of the world? Can trainers understand what their Pokemon are saying? If so, how? Can only some of their Pokemon communicate with them, via human speech or telepathy, or can all of them speak freely?

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* The NuzlockeComics Webcomic/NuzlockeComics involve turning [[AfterActionReport a playthrough of one of the Pokemon games into a comic strip or written story]], and there are a lot of variations on the rules of the challenge itself, as well as the setting and the characters involved. Does the term "Nuzlocke" have any meaning within the world itself? Is it a Self-Imposed Challenge, a curse, or simply an unnamed rule of the world? Can trainers understand what their Pokemon are saying? If so, how? Can only some of their Pokemon communicate with them, via human speech or telepathy, or can all of them speak freely?
2nd Mar '17 4:33:03 AM CumbersomeTercel
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** Leela was a particularly bad example. When first introduced by Creator/ChrisBoucher and Creator/RobertHolmes she was relatively uncivilised but in fact highly intelligent (she is shown as abandoning all superstition when the Doctor explains science to her). In "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS14E5TheRobotsOfDeath The Robots of Death]]" (also by Boucher), she immediately understands what's [[{{Phobia}} going]] [[UncannyValley on]] with Poul, but lacks the cultural context to articulate it to any characters other than the Doctor. In "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS14E6TheTalonsOfWengChiang The Talons of Weng-Chiang]]" by Holmes, she caught on the nature of the villain almost as quickly as the doctor. Bob Baker and Dave Martin, on the other hand, saw her as just uneducated and stupid and struggled to use her - in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS15E2TheInvisibleEnemy The Invisible Enemy]]" she's described as 'all instinct and emotion', and in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS15E5Underworld Underworld]]" by the same writers she gets hit by StunGuns and spends most of the story [[IntoxicationEnsues acting stoned as comic relief]]. Compare to "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS15E4TheSunMakers The Sun Makers]]", in which she is also comic relief for most of the story, but able to understand fairly sophisticated economic situations.

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** Leela was a particularly bad example. When first introduced by Creator/ChrisBoucher and Creator/RobertHolmes she was relatively uncivilised but in fact highly intelligent (she is shown as abandoning all superstition when the Doctor explains science to her). In "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS14E5TheRobotsOfDeath The Robots of Death]]" (also by Boucher), she immediately understands what's [[{{Phobia}} going]] [[UncannyValley on]] with Poul, but lacks the cultural context to articulate it to any characters other than the Doctor. In "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS14E6TheTalonsOfWengChiang The Talons of Weng-Chiang]]" by Holmes, she caught on the nature of the villain almost as quickly as the doctor.Doctor. Bob Baker and Dave Martin, on the other hand, saw her as just uneducated and stupid and struggled to use her - in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS15E2TheInvisibleEnemy The Invisible Enemy]]" she's described as 'all instinct and emotion', and in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS15E5Underworld Underworld]]" by the same writers she gets hit by StunGuns and spends most of the story [[IntoxicationEnsues acting stoned as comic relief]]. Compare to "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS15E4TheSunMakers The Sun Makers]]", in which she is also comic relief for most of the story, but able to understand fairly sophisticated economic situations.
2nd Mar '17 4:30:38 AM CumbersomeTercel
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** Sarah Jane Smith. This character is a feminist, and she was featured at a pretty chaotic time for feminism, so the character completely changes depending on the current author's attitude to women and/or feminism. She varies from a StrawFeminist to a PluckyGirl to TheLoad to {{Adorkable}} (like the author is saying feminists are sooo cute with their silly little ideas!) to YouGoGirl. That she continually came across as intelligent, able to take care of herself, and able to stand up to the Doctor, points a lot to Creator/EisabethSladen's skill. Sometimes there would even be a more feminist-friendly script editor contrasting with a more antifeminist writer - see "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS12E1Robot Robot]]", where fun is poked at Sarah's hypocrisy in making an ActuallyThatsMyAssistant blunder between a man and a woman, but a later scene shows her getting justifiably angry with a nerdy male political crank who thinks that in an ideal world Sarah would dress to his tastes.

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** Sarah Jane Smith. This character is a feminist, and she was featured at a pretty chaotic time for feminism, so the character completely changes depending on the current author's attitude to women and/or feminism. She varies from a StrawFeminist to a PluckyGirl to TheLoad to {{Adorkable}} (like the author is saying feminists are sooo cute with their silly little ideas!) to YouGoGirl. That she continually came across as intelligent, able to take care of herself, and able to stand up to the Doctor, points a lot to Creator/EisabethSladen's Creator/ElisabethSladen's skill. Sometimes there would even be a more feminist-friendly script editor contrasting with a more antifeminist writer - see "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS12E1Robot Robot]]", where fun is poked at Sarah's hypocrisy in making an ActuallyThatsMyAssistant blunder between a man and a woman, but a later scene shows her getting justifiably angry with a nerdy male political crank who thinks that in an ideal world Sarah would dress to his tastes.
2nd Mar '17 4:26:32 AM CumbersomeTercel
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** There are several episodes which imply Drusilla isn't quite as insane as she's perceived, that at least some of her craziness is faked, and that she's actually much more lucid and cunning (in her own way intelligent) than she may appear. Most simply portray her as a unintelligible loon who can't see what's in front of her. It also varies whether she genuinely loves and cares about Spike, or if she simply sees him as a favored toy to manipulate and use. While the second half of Season 2, "Lie to Me" and "Lover's Walk" seem to support the latter theory, other episodes like "Crush," "School Hard," "Fool For Love" and pretty much all the comics write Drusilla as a heartbroken ex-lover who really does love Spike, albeit in her own, strange way.

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** There are several episodes which imply Drusilla isn't quite as insane as she's perceived, that at least some of her craziness is faked, and that she's actually much more lucid and cunning (in her own way intelligent) than she may appear. Most simply portray her as a unintelligible loon who can't see what's in front of her. It also varies whether she genuinely loves and cares about Spike, or if she simply sees him as a favored toy to manipulate and use. While the second half of Season 2, "Lie to Me" "[[{{Recap/BuffyTheVampireSlayerS2E7LieToMe}} Lie To Me]]" and "Lover's Walk" "[[{{Recap/BuffyTheVampireSlayerS3E8LoversWalk}} Lovers Walk]]" seem to support the latter theory, other episodes like "Crush," "School Hard," "Fool "[[{{Recap/BuffyTheVampireSlayerS5E14Crush}} Crush]]", "[[{{Recap/BuffyTheVampireSlayerS2E3SchoolHard}} School Hard]]" "[[{{Recap/BuffyTheVampireSlayerS5E7FoolForLove}} Fool For Love" Love]] " and pretty much all the comics write Drusilla as a heartbroken ex-lover who really does love Spike, albeit in her own, strange way.



** Q, as WebSite/SFDebris points out, was strongly subjected to this. He could either be detached and sinister ("Encounter at Farpoint", "Q Who", "True Q", "All Good Things..."), wild and silly ("Hide and Q", "Q-Pid", and his subsequent appearances on ''Deep Space Nine'' and ''Voyager''), or a third personality in that of the educator ("Tapestry" where Q teaches Picard something about himself or "All Good Things..." where Q is [[spoiler:actually trying to help Picard, without the other Q actually knowing about it]]). Then again, this ''is'' Q we're talking about.

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** Q, as WebSite/SFDebris points out, was strongly subjected to this. He could either be detached and sinister ("Encounter ("[[{{Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS1E1EncounterAtFarpoint}} Encounter at Farpoint", "Q Who", "True Q", "All Farpoint]]", "[[{{Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS2E16QWho}} Q Who]]", "[[{{Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS6E6TrueQ}} True Q]]", "[[{{Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS7E24AllGoodThings}} All Good Things..."), ]]"), wild and silly ("Hide (" [[{{Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS1E9HideAndQ}} Hide and Q", "Q-Pid", Q]]", "[[{{Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS4E20Qpid}} Qpid]]", and his subsequent appearances on ''Deep Space Nine'' and ''Voyager''), or a third personality in that of the educator ("Tapestry" ("[[{{Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS6E14Tapestry}} Tapestry]]" where Q teaches Picard something about himself or "All Good Things..." where Q is [[spoiler:actually trying to help Picard, without the other Q actually knowing about it]]). Then again, this ''is'' Q we're talking about.



*** The first two are somewhat reconcilable, the Time Lords are immensely powerful but have so dedicated themselves to non-interference that if something manages to get inside their defenses, they are almost helpless since they have no idea how to deal with it (and in every case in the classic series, that something is a Time Lord, not some random invading race Even in "Invasion of Time", it is the Doctor that allows the aliens to invade, because he knows that if he doesn't, some other, more sinister Time Lord, eventually will).

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*** The first two are somewhat reconcilable, the Time Lords are immensely powerful but have so dedicated themselves to non-interference that if something manages to get inside their defenses, they are almost helpless since they have no idea how to deal with it (and in every case in the classic series, that something is a Time Lord, not some random invading race Even in "Invasion "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS15E6TheInvasionOfTime The Invasion of Time", Time]]", it is the Doctor that allows the aliens to invade, because he knows that if he doesn't, some other, more sinister Time Lord, eventually will).



** Sarah Jane Smith. This character is a feminist, and she was featured at a pretty chaotic time for feminism, so the character completely changes depending on the current author's attitude to women and/or feminism. She varies from a StrawFeminist to a PluckyGirl to TheLoad to {{Adorkable}} (like the author is saying feminists are sooo cute with their silly little ideas!) to YouGoGirl. That she continually came across as intelligent, able to take care of herself, and able to stand up to the Doctor, points a lot to Lis Sladen's skill. Sometimes there would even be a more feminist-friendly script editor contrasting with a more antifeminist writer - see "Robot", where fun is poked at Sarah's hypocrisy in making an ActuallyThatsMyAssistant blunder between a man and a woman, but a later scene shows her getting justifiably angry with a nerdy male political crank who thinks that in an ideal world Sarah would dress to his tastes.
** Leela was a particularly bad example. When first introduced by Chris Boucher and Robert Holmes she was relatively uncivilised but in fact highly intelligent (she is shown as abandoning all superstition when the Doctor explains science to her). In "The Robots of Death" (also by Boucher), she immediately understands what's [[{{Phobia}} going]] [[UncannyValley on]] with Poul, but lacks the cultural context to articulate it to any characters other than the Doctor. In "The Talons of Weng-Chiang" by Holmes, she caught on the nature of the villain almost as quickly as the doctor. Bob Baker and Dave Martin, on the other hand, saw her as just uneducated and stupid and struggled to use her - in "The Invisible Enemy" she's described as 'all instinct and emotion', and in "Underworld" by the same writers she gets hit by StunGuns and spends most of the story [[IntoxicationEnsues acting stoned as comic relief]]. Compare to "The Sun Makers", in which she is also comic relief for most of the story, but able to understand fairly sophisticated economic situations.
** Matthew Waterhouse complained about Adric being written like this, particularly "Four to Doomsday". From that story's notes (quoting Doctor Who Magazine):

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** Sarah Jane Smith. This character is a feminist, and she was featured at a pretty chaotic time for feminism, so the character completely changes depending on the current author's attitude to women and/or feminism. She varies from a StrawFeminist to a PluckyGirl to TheLoad to {{Adorkable}} (like the author is saying feminists are sooo cute with their silly little ideas!) to YouGoGirl. That she continually came across as intelligent, able to take care of herself, and able to stand up to the Doctor, points a lot to Lis Sladen's Creator/EisabethSladen's skill. Sometimes there would even be a more feminist-friendly script editor contrasting with a more antifeminist writer - see "Robot", "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS12E1Robot Robot]]", where fun is poked at Sarah's hypocrisy in making an ActuallyThatsMyAssistant blunder between a man and a woman, but a later scene shows her getting justifiably angry with a nerdy male political crank who thinks that in an ideal world Sarah would dress to his tastes.
** Leela was a particularly bad example. When first introduced by Chris Boucher Creator/ChrisBoucher and Robert Holmes Creator/RobertHolmes she was relatively uncivilised but in fact highly intelligent (she is shown as abandoning all superstition when the Doctor explains science to her). In "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS14E5TheRobotsOfDeath The Robots of Death" Death]]" (also by Boucher), she immediately understands what's [[{{Phobia}} going]] [[UncannyValley on]] with Poul, but lacks the cultural context to articulate it to any characters other than the Doctor. In "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS14E6TheTalonsOfWengChiang The Talons of Weng-Chiang" Weng-Chiang]]" by Holmes, she caught on the nature of the villain almost as quickly as the doctor. Bob Baker and Dave Martin, on the other hand, saw her as just uneducated and stupid and struggled to use her - in "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS15E2TheInvisibleEnemy The Invisible Enemy" Enemy]]" she's described as 'all instinct and emotion', and in "Underworld" "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS15E5Underworld Underworld]]" by the same writers she gets hit by StunGuns and spends most of the story [[IntoxicationEnsues acting stoned as comic relief]]. Compare to "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS15E4TheSunMakers The Sun Makers", Makers]]", in which she is also comic relief for most of the story, but able to understand fairly sophisticated economic situations.
** Matthew Waterhouse Creator/MatthewWaterhouse complained about Adric being written like this, particularly "Four "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS19E2FourToDoomsday Four to Doomsday". Doomsday]]". From that story's notes (quoting Doctor ''Doctor Who Magazine):Magazine''):



** Susan had originally been intended as a CreepyGood ActionGirl with PsychicPowers but was {{ReTool}}ed into a "normal girl" after the unaired pilot. The result of this is that her character fluctuates wildly between scripts: in "An Unearthly Child" she is a nice girl who [[IJustWantToBeNormal wishes she was normal]] but shows a little NightmareFetishist behaviour ("I like walking through the dark. It's mysterious.") and physically attacks a massive, armed caveman to save her friends; in "The Daleks" she is a KiddieKid who displays exaggerated fear about walking through the dark and the few times she's allowed to speak it's to make stupid suggestions ("First we all lie down and pretend to be dead..."); in "The Edge of Destruction" she [[TheOphelia drifts around in a long dress, babbles about creatures inside her and threatens to shred Ian with a pair of surgical scissors]]; in "Marco Polo" she is a TotallyRadical sixties teen who thinks everything is "gear"; in "The Keys of Marinus" she is a DistressedDamsel; in "The Aztecs" she has nothing to do; in "The Sensorites" she [[CallingTheOldManOut has a fight with her grandfather and saves the day with her telepathic powers]]; and then in "The Reign of Terror" she [[TheMillstone refuses to attempt to escape from a prison when she and Barbara are due to be guillotined because she's scared of the rats and then develops a fever for plot convenience]]. It's such a horrible mess you can tell the writers were relieved to start again with a blank slate when she got replaced with SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute [[PluckyGirl Vicki]].
** Creator/StevenMoffat once criticised Creator/TomBaker for this, saying his performance was 'thunderously effective' but he 'completely reinterpreted his character to fit that week's script', saying it's impossible to tell that the Doctor in "Seeds of Doom" and "City of Death" are supposed to be the same person. Moffat since disowned this criticism, but there is a grain of truth in it, especially early on: In "Robot", he's a genuinely funny and goofy CloudCuckooLander who doesn't care that much about anything, even Sarah; in "The Ark in Space", he's a fearsome and aloof ByronicHero and very openly fond of ImpliedLoveInterest Sarah; in "The Sontaran Experiment" he's all ObfuscatingStupidity and foul temper; in "Genesis of the Daleks" he's all wisdom and righteousness and the potential for DirtyBusiness. "The Seeds of Doom" makes him a cold and violent TuxedoAndMartini {{Expy}}, "The Talons of Weng-Chiang" makes him into a bohemian and methodical Franchise/SherlockHolmes Expy, in "City of Death" he's somewhere between [[Franchise/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy Zaphod Beeblebrox]] and [[Literature/DirkGentlysHolisticDetectiveAgency Dirk Gently]] and in "Warrior's Gate" he's a WizardClassic. There are times in his tenure where he's an InvincibleHero who [[AllLovingHero loves everyone]] and never ''ever'' shows any vulnerability, and times when he's a brooding and fallible AntiHero who [[BreakTheBadass genuinely struggles with his fear of the monsters]], and sometimes swings into the opposite between stories. Tom Baker's performance holds the whole thing together, though arguably less from skill (his skill is in being able to pull off all those different personalities in the first place) and more from sheer force of personality.

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** Susan had originally been intended as a CreepyGood ActionGirl with PsychicPowers but was {{ReTool}}ed into a "normal girl" after the unaired pilot. The result of this is that her character fluctuates wildly between scripts: in "An "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E1AnUnearthlyChild An Unearthly Child" Child]]" she is a nice girl who [[IJustWantToBeNormal wishes she was normal]] but shows a little NightmareFetishist behaviour ("I like walking through the dark. It's mysterious.") and physically attacks a massive, armed caveman to save her friends; in "The Daleks" "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E2TheDaleks The Daleks]]" she is a KiddieKid who displays exaggerated fear about walking through the dark and the few times she's allowed to speak it's to make stupid suggestions ("First we all lie down and pretend to be dead..."); in "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E3TheEdgeOfDestruction The Edge of Destruction" Destruction]]" she [[TheOphelia drifts around in a long dress, babbles about creatures inside her and threatens to shred Ian with a pair of surgical scissors]]; in "Marco Polo" "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E4MarcoPolo Marco Polo]]" she is a TotallyRadical sixties teen who thinks everything is "gear"; in "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E5TheKeysOfMarinus The Keys of Marinus" Marinus]]" she is a DistressedDamsel; in "The Aztecs" "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E6TheAztecs The Aztecs]]" she has nothing to do; in "The Sensorites" "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E7TheSensorites The Sensorites]]" she [[CallingTheOldManOut has a fight with her grandfather and saves the day with her telepathic powers]]; and then in "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E8TheReignOfTerror The Reign of Terror" Terror]]" she [[TheMillstone refuses to attempt to escape from a prison when she and Barbara are due to be guillotined because she's scared of the rats and then develops a fever for plot convenience]]. It's such a horrible mess you can tell the writers were relieved to start again with a blank slate when she got replaced with SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute [[PluckyGirl Vicki]].
** Creator/StevenMoffat once criticised Creator/TomBaker for this, saying his performance was 'thunderously effective' but he 'completely reinterpreted his character to fit that week's script', saying it's impossible to tell that the Doctor in "Seeds "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS13E6TheSeedsOfDoom The Seeds of Doom" Doom]]" and "City "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS17E2CityOfDeath City of Death" Death]]" are supposed to be the same person. Moffat since disowned this criticism, but there is a grain of truth in it, especially early on: In "Robot", he's a genuinely funny and goofy CloudCuckooLander who doesn't care that much about anything, even Sarah; in "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS12E2TheArkInSpace The Ark in Space", Space]]", he's a fearsome and aloof ByronicHero and very openly fond of ImpliedLoveInterest Sarah; in "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS12E3TheSontaranExperiment The Sontaran Experiment" Experiment]]" he's all ObfuscatingStupidity and foul temper; in "Genesis "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS12E4GenesisOfTheDaleks Genesis of the Daleks" Daleks]]" he's all wisdom and righteousness and the potential for DirtyBusiness. "The Seeds of Doom" makes him a cold and violent TuxedoAndMartini {{Expy}}, "The Talons of Weng-Chiang" makes him into a bohemian and methodical Franchise/SherlockHolmes Expy, in "City of Death" he's somewhere between [[Franchise/TheHitchhikersGuideToTheGalaxy Zaphod Beeblebrox]] and [[Literature/DirkGentlysHolisticDetectiveAgency Dirk Gently]] and in "Warrior's Gate" "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS18E5WarriorsGate Warriors' Gate]]" he's a WizardClassic. There are times in his tenure where he's an InvincibleHero who [[AllLovingHero loves everyone]] and never ''ever'' shows any vulnerability, and times when he's a brooding and fallible AntiHero who [[BreakTheBadass genuinely struggles with his fear of the monsters]], and sometimes swings into the opposite between stories. Tom Baker's performance holds the whole thing together, though arguably less from skill (his skill is in being able to pull off all those different personalities in the first place) and more from sheer force of personality.



** Creator/RobertHolmes' Doctor always tends to be a bit more prickly and abrasive than others', and he has gone on record as saying he writes them all the same on the page and lets the actor deal with it. Compare the way the Doctor is written in (say) "The Krotons", "Carnival of Monsters", "The Sunmakers", "Caves of Androzani" and "Mysterious Planet" - bar the odd CatchPhrase or gimmick and the maturing of Holmes' writing style, they're all unmistakably the same character, even if played by five different actors.

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** Creator/RobertHolmes' Doctor always tends to be a bit more prickly and abrasive than others', and he has gone on record as saying he writes them all the same on the page and lets the actor deal with it. Compare the way the Doctor is written in (say) "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS6E4TheKrotons The Krotons]]", "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS10E2CarnivalOfMonsters Carnival of Monsters]]", "The Krotons", "Carnival Sun-Makers", "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS21E6TheCavesOfAndrozani The Caves of Monsters", "The Sunmakers", "Caves of Androzani" Androzani]]" and "Mysterious Planet" "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS23E1TheMysteriousPlanet The Mysterious Planet]]" - bar the odd CatchPhrase or gimmick and the maturing of Holmes' writing style, they're all unmistakably the same character, even if played by five different actors.



** This can even fluctuate in episodes written by the ''same person''--in "A Very Glee Christmas," the school's hatred of the New Directions is rather clear when they go around caroling ("YOU'RE MAKING ME HATE CHRISTMAS!"), but by "Prom Queen" they're the ones ''performing all the music'', and the crowd is going wild. Both episodes written by Ian Brennan.

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** This can even fluctuate in episodes written by the ''same person''--in "A "[[Recap/GleeS2E10AVeryGleeChristmas A Very Glee Christmas," Christmas]]", the school's hatred of the New Directions is rather clear when they go around caroling ("YOU'RE MAKING ME HATE CHRISTMAS!"), but by "Prom Queen" "[[Recap/GleeS2E20PromQueen Prom Queen]]" they're the ones ''performing all the music'', and the crowd is going wild. Both episodes written by Ian Brennan.
27th Feb '17 2:49:22 PM mariofan1000
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*** Homer's relationship with him can range from SitcomArchNemesis to VitriolicBestBuds to outright wishing him dead.
26th Feb '17 7:15:37 PM danlansdowne
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** Q, as WebSite/SFDebris points out, was strongly subjected to this. He could either be detached and sinister ("Encounter at Farpoint", "Q Who", "True Q", "All Good Things..."), wild and silly ("Hide and Q", "Q-Pid", and his subsequent appearances on ''Deep Space Nine'' and ''Voyager''), or a third personality in that of the educator ("Tapestry" where Q teaches Picard something about himself or "All Good Things..." where Q is [[spoiler:actually trying to help Picard, without the other Q actually knowing about it]]).

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** Q, as WebSite/SFDebris points out, was strongly subjected to this. He could either be detached and sinister ("Encounter at Farpoint", "Q Who", "True Q", "All Good Things..."), wild and silly ("Hide and Q", "Q-Pid", and his subsequent appearances on ''Deep Space Nine'' and ''Voyager''), or a third personality in that of the educator ("Tapestry" where Q teaches Picard something about himself or "All Good Things..." where Q is [[spoiler:actually trying to help Picard, without the other Q actually knowing about it]]). Then again, this ''is'' Q we're talking about.
26th Feb '17 4:27:10 AM ShorinBJ
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** Leonard can range between being a sympathetic, cheerful nice guy who almost always does the right thing, stands by others and simply has trouble asserting himself. And being a winy, short tempered, holier-than-thou horn dog who has no problems mocking and dismissing his own friends, putting up with anything if it means there's a chance he will get sex out of it, being totally willing to sell out his own beliefs and likes the moment it will benefit him and going around acting as if the world owes him something.

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** Leonard can range between being a sympathetic, cheerful nice guy who almost always does the right thing, stands by others and simply has trouble asserting himself. And being a winy, whiny, short tempered, holier-than-thou horn dog horndog who has no problems mocking and dismissing his own friends, putting up with anything if it means there's a chance he will get sex out of it, being totally willing to sell out his own beliefs and likes the moment it will benefit him and going around acting as if the world owes him something.



** Raj is either realistically lonely and slightly desperate for affection, as well as being in touch with his feminine side. Or a completely winy and potentially delusion jerk who blows all his good luck by turning arrogant to a level beyond Sheldon's the second things start going well for him.

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** Raj is either realistically lonely and slightly desperate for affection, as well as being in touch with his feminine side. Or a completely winy whiny and potentially delusion delusional jerk who blows all his good luck by turning arrogant to a level beyond Sheldon's the second things start going well for him.
26th Feb '17 4:19:29 AM ShorinBJ
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** The best example is probably the character, Tahiri. She has managed to cycle through being the girl RaisedByNatives, the VictoriousChildhoodFriend, the [[ShellShockedVeteran shell shocked torture victim]], the [[HerHeartWillGoOn widowed lover]], AxCrazy, the [[SplitPersonalityTakeover girl with split personalities]] (which later merge into a 3rd personality), the [[Literature/DarkNestTrilogy cultish bug girl]], a [[TheDarkSide Sith apprentice]], the [[MummiesAtTheDinnerTable lover who just won't let go]], a [[{{Squick}} pedophile seductress]], the FemmeFatale and is now on the [[JourneyToFindOneself journey to find herself]]. These all occurred with little to no character development and all function subsequently from each other? Oh boy....

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** The best example is probably the character, character Tahiri. She has managed to cycle through being the girl RaisedByNatives, the VictoriousChildhoodFriend, the [[ShellShockedVeteran shell shocked torture victim]], the [[HerHeartWillGoOn widowed lover]], AxCrazy, the [[SplitPersonalityTakeover girl with split personalities]] (which later merge into a 3rd personality), the [[Literature/DarkNestTrilogy cultish bug girl]], a [[TheDarkSide Sith apprentice]], the [[MummiesAtTheDinnerTable lover who just won't let go]], a [[{{Squick}} pedophile seductress]], the FemmeFatale and is now on the [[JourneyToFindOneself journey to find herself]]. These all occurred with little to no character development and all function subsequently from each other? Oh boy....
26th Feb '17 4:14:37 AM ShorinBJ
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* The Comicbook/IncredibleHulk has numerous factors of his character that vary between writers; Whether he's a dumb brute that can only speak in HulkSpeak, a completely mindless monster who can't talk at all, or someone with a fairly average intellect with a somewhat odd speech pattern. This is somewhat justified by Banner having multiple personality syndrome and there being thousands of Hulks in his mind. Also depending on the writer is the Hulk's powerlevel; while it is in a state of flux depending on his emotional state, some writers have him being knocked out by an average python choking him for less than a minute, and dying from being impaled by a triton when he's previously survived wounds that make that seem like a papercut by comparison.
** One telling comparison is to look at a few recent depictions of the Hulk by two very different writers. Greg Pak has been the main writer on the Hulk for about five years now and has gone into great lengths to give the Hulk, rather than Bruce Banner, some in depth character development through such storylines as ''ComicBook/PlanetHulk'', ''ComicBook/WorldWarHulk'', and ''ComicBook/FallOfTheHulks'', which paint a complex and sympathetic picture of the Jade Giant. Then there's Mark Millar's run on ''ComicBook/TheUltimates'' and the ''ComicBook/OldManLogan'' mini series. The former shows Banner as weak willed and insecure (not completely unjustified given it's meant to be early on in the character's history) and the Hulk as, among other things, an active cannibal. The latter shows Banner/Hulk as an insane red neck who leads a gang of his inbred mutant children(sired with his cousin, ComicBook/SheHulk, suggested to have been by rape) and rules over the ruins of the west coast. Granted, Millar's versions are an [[UltimateUniverse alternate universe]] and BadFuture, respectively, but one gets the idea that he doesn't think highly of the character.

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* The Comicbook/IncredibleHulk has numerous factors of his character that vary between writers; Whether he's a dumb brute that can only speak in HulkSpeak, a completely mindless monster who can't talk at all, or someone with a fairly average intellect with a somewhat odd speech pattern. This is somewhat justified by Banner having multiple personality syndrome and there being thousands of Hulks in his mind. Also depending on the writer is the Hulk's powerlevel; power level; while it is in a state of flux depending on his emotional state, some writers have him being knocked out by an average python choking him for less than a minute, and dying from being impaled by a triton when he's previously survived wounds that make that seem like a papercut by comparison.
** One telling comparison is to look at a few recent depictions of the Hulk by two very different writers. Greg Pak has been the main writer on the Hulk for about five years now and has gone into great lengths to give the Hulk, rather than Bruce Banner, some in depth in-depth character development through such storylines as ''ComicBook/PlanetHulk'', ''ComicBook/WorldWarHulk'', and ''ComicBook/FallOfTheHulks'', which paint a complex and sympathetic picture of the Jade Giant. Then there's Mark Millar's run on ''ComicBook/TheUltimates'' and the ''ComicBook/OldManLogan'' mini series. The former shows Banner as weak willed and insecure (not completely unjustified given it's meant to be early on in the character's history) and the Hulk as, among other things, an active cannibal. The latter shows Banner/Hulk as an insane red neck redneck who leads a gang of his inbred mutant children(sired children (sired with his cousin, ComicBook/SheHulk, suggested to have been by rape) and rules over the ruins of the west coast. Granted, Millar's versions are an [[UltimateUniverse alternate universe]] and BadFuture, respectively, but one gets the idea that he doesn't think highly of the character.



** Another is the use of the word "human" by sympathetic characters -- certain villains draw a bright line, but whether aliens feel the need to specify "humans and mutants" or whether the X-Men themselves refer to "humans" or "non-mutant humans" depends far more on the writer than the characters.

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** Another is the use of the word "human" by sympathetic characters -- certain villains draw a bright line, but whether aliens feel the need to specify "humans and mutants" or whether the X-Men themselves refer to "humans" or "non-mutant humans" depends far more on the writer than the characters. Justified since the terms aren't being used scientifically; mutants are a ''subspecies'' of human rather than a separate species. All mutants are humans, but not all humans are mutants.[[note]]Some writers have referred to them as separate species, but if two populations can and do interbreed regularly, as is the case here, they are the same species.[[/note]]
26th Feb '17 4:00:30 AM ShorinBJ
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*** From the earliest comics to Film/TheDarkKnightSaga to the various animated series, he's been portrayed as a HarmlessVillain, MagnificentBastard, TheMadHatter, AffablyEvil, FauxAffablyEvil, BoredWithInsanity, etc... listing everything he's been would warrant [[ComicBook/TheJoker its own section!]] It's probable that ''all'' of these are true. A text story by Creator/GrantMorrison in ''Batman and son'', leading to the Joker's role in ''Batman RIP'', has him ''deciding'' it's time for a new persona and considering various options.

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*** From the earliest comics to Film/TheDarkKnightSaga to the various animated series, he's been portrayed as a HarmlessVillain, MagnificentBastard, TheMadHatter, AffablyEvil, FauxAffablyEvil, BoredWithInsanity, etc... listing everything he's been would warrant [[ComicBook/TheJoker its own section!]] It's probable that ''all'' of these are true. A text story by Creator/GrantMorrison in ''Batman and son'', Son'', leading to the Joker's role in ''Batman RIP'', has him ''deciding'' it's time for a new persona and considering various options.



** ComicBook/HarleyQuinn is not quite as bad as ComicBook/TheJoker however just like him she's been quite up for interpretation:
*** Is Harley a psychologist or a psychiatrist? In ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' she was a psychologist however the comics have zigzagged between the two. It's possible the writers don't recognize they're two very different careers and mix them up.

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** ComicBook/HarleyQuinn is not quite as bad as ComicBook/TheJoker however ComicBook/TheJoker, but just like him him, she's been quite up for interpretation:
*** Is Harley a psychologist or a psychiatrist? In ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' she was a psychologist however psychologist, but the comics have zigzagged between the two. It's possible the writers don't recognize they're two very different careers and mix them up.



* Minor Catwoman opponent Cyber-Cat has only appeared a few times, but nobody can seem to agree on her motivation or whether she's actually evil or just arrogant. Is she simply trying to ensure her own technical skills are good enough? Is she a MadDoctor, or does she want to sell things to terrorists? Who knows?

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* Minor Catwoman opponent Cyber-Cat has only appeared only a few times, but nobody can seem to agree on her motivation or whether she's actually evil or just arrogant. Is she simply trying to ensure her own technical skills are good enough? Is she a MadDoctor, or does she want to sell things to terrorists? Who knows?



* The second female Hawk of ''Hawk and Dove'' named Holly Granger was a case of this in her tenure in the comics. Was she a bad-tempered [[BrattyTeenageDaughter bratty younger sister]] with a punk edge? Or was she more of a promiscuous seductress? Did she speak in a phony British accent with slang or not? And was she Dawn's younger or older sister (the latter which would technically make her a case of ChristmasCake when she slept with Power Boy in that {{Squick}}-inducing scene, [[SarcasmMode thank you very much, Judd Winick.]]). [[spoiler: Is it any wonder she became Blackest Night cannon fodder?]]

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* The second female Hawk of ''Hawk and Dove'' named Holly Granger was a case of this in her tenure in the comics. Was she a bad-tempered [[BrattyTeenageDaughter bratty younger sister]] with a punk edge? Or was she more of a promiscuous seductress? Did she speak in a phony British accent with slang or not? And was she Dawn's younger or older sister (the latter which would technically make her a case of ChristmasCake when she slept with Power Boy in that {{Squick}}-inducing scene, [[SarcasmMode thank you very much, Judd Winick.]]). [[spoiler: Is [[spoiler:Is it any wonder she became Blackest Night cannon fodder?]]



* Franchise/WonderWoman might as well be the patron saint of this trope. Every writer since her re-creation in the 1980s has wanted to put their own stamp on the character to the point where they flat out ignore what the previous writer has done with the character. Her revolving Supporting Cast and extraordinarily minor RoguesGallery are testaments to this.
** Post-''[[ComicBook/CrisisOnInfiniteEarths Crisis]]'', the biggest element to swing back and forth with her is whether she's going to be the man hating StrawFeminist that makes a little more sense when she first leaves Themyscira, or the more mature rounded character who actually has a sense of humor and good relationships with several male characters.

to:

* Franchise/WonderWoman might as well be the patron saint of this trope. Every writer since her re-creation in the 1980s has wanted to put their own stamp on the character to the point where they flat out ignore what the previous writer has done with the character. Her revolving Supporting Cast supporting cast and extraordinarily minor RoguesGallery are testaments to this.
** Post-''[[ComicBook/CrisisOnInfiniteEarths Crisis]]'', the biggest element to swing back and forth with her is whether she's going to be the man hating man-hating StrawFeminist that makes a little more sense when she first leaves Themyscira, or the more mature mature, rounded character who actually has a sense of humor and good relationships with several male characters.
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