History Main / DemocracyIsBad

9th Nov '17 10:03:03 AM Allronix
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* ''Series/TheOrville'': "Majority Rule" has a world where ''everything'' is decided via social media and even facts (like whether an area is filled with dangerous radiation) are subject to public opinion. Too many "down" votes, and you get lobotomized. Something as overtly stupid as defacing a public monument or as innocently insensitive as wearing the wrong kind of ''hat'' can get you enough down votes to be hauled off and executed. Even though the planetary Union in the series is a democracy, the point is that direct democracy in a world where citizens are too lazy to be informed and without the rule of law is a nightmare.
21st Oct '17 12:08:49 AM Omeganian
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* The only democracy in Creator/JRRTolkien's Middle-Earth works is Esgaroth, the Master of which is shown as an extremely unsavory character. [[Film/TheHobbit The movies]] seem to have changed it, with him laughing at the idea of elections.
13th Sep '17 10:54:33 AM TheNerevarine
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* ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'': No highborn noble in the series, whether they of heroic or villainous bent, express any support for democracy in a highly feudalistic setting like Westeros, where [[DeliberateValuesDissonance birthright determines who leads than their merits]]. Even sympathetic characters like Tyrion Lannister sneer at the Mountain Clans and the Free Cities for settling their issues on popular vote, as well as finds the [[PoliticallyIncorrectHero notion of women voting ridiculous]]. The closest thing to democratic practices in Westeros is the [[ElectiveMonarchy kingsmoot]] by the Ironborn, who tend to be reviled as a nation of reavers and pirates by the rest of Westeros, and the Night's Watch elections, where their Lord Commanders are chosen by its members, and any of them can campaign for the position (although, the Night's Watch is monastic knightly order rather than a kingdom).

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* ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'': No highborn noble in the series, whether they of heroic or villainous bent, express any support for democracy in a highly feudalistic setting like Westeros, where [[DeliberateValuesDissonance birthright determines who leads than their merits]]. Even sympathetic characters like Tyrion Lannister sneer at the Mountain Clans and the Free Cities for settling their issues on popular vote, as well as finds the [[PoliticallyIncorrectHero notion of women voting ridiculous]]. The closest thing to democratic practices in Westeros is the [[ElectiveMonarchy kingsmoot]] by the Ironborn, who tend to be reviled as a nation of reavers and pirates by the rest of Westeros, and the Night's Watch elections, where their Lord Commanders are chosen by its members, and any of them can campaign for the position (although, position, although the Night's Watch is a monastic knightly order rather than a kingdom).kingdom.
13th Sep '17 2:08:59 AM TheNerevarine
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* ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'': No highborn noble in the series, whether they of heroic or villainous bent, express any support for democracy in a highly feudalistic setting like Westeros, where [[DeliberateValuesDissonance birthright determines who leads than their merits]]. Even sympathetic characters like Tyrion Lannister sneer at the Mountain Clans and the Free Cities for settling their issues on popular vote, as well as finds the [[PoliticallyIncorrectHero notion of women voting ridiculous]]. The closest thing to democratic practices in Westeros is the [[ElectiveMonarchy kingsmoot]] by the Ironborn, who tend to be reviled as a nation of reavers and pirates by the rest of Westeros, and the Night's Watch elections, where their Lord Commanders are chosen by its members, and any of them can campaign for the position (although, the Night's Watch is monastic knightly order rather than a kingdom).
10th Sep '17 7:28:07 AM Morgenthaler
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* Marvel often dips its toe into this in issues of ''What If...?'' where Doctor Doom does in fact conquer the world. Without all that meddlesome democracy getting in his way, Doom usually ushers in a [[MarySuetopia glorious Utopia that just so happens to line up with the writer's own beliefs]]. Remember, kids, benevolent fascism is the way to go!
** Given that Doom's entire life mission is to prove that ReedRichardsIsUseless, this actually makes sense though.
* Also in the MarvelUniverse this is especially demonstrated as being very much the case with humanity's reactions towards [[ComicBook/XMen mutants]]. Several dystopian alternate futures have been depicted where the United States government has become tyrannical and made a mess of society in their zeal to hunt down and exterminate mutants. Yet it is usually shown that this happened with the full support of the general public, and the evil government is nonetheless duly elected.

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* Marvel often dips its toe into this in issues of ''What If...?'' ''ComicBook/WhatIf'' where Doctor Doom does in fact conquer the world. Without all that meddlesome democracy getting in his way, Doom usually ushers in a [[MarySuetopia glorious Utopia that just so happens to line up with the writer's own beliefs]]. Remember, kids, benevolent fascism is the way to go!
**
go! Given that Doom's entire life mission is to prove that ReedRichardsIsUseless, this actually makes sense though.
* Also in the MarvelUniverse Franchise/MarvelUniverse this is especially demonstrated as being very much the case with humanity's reactions towards [[ComicBook/XMen mutants]]. Several dystopian alternate futures have been depicted where the United States government has become tyrannical and made a mess of society in their zeal to hunt down and exterminate mutants. Yet it is usually shown that this happened with the full support of the general public, and the evil government is nonetheless duly elected.
8th Aug '17 9:01:36 AM Divra
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*** More specifically, the book attempts to make the case for a kind of selective democracy where anyone can vote, but may only do so by first proving they are socially responsible - i.e. by becoming a veteran. Crucially the book makes it clear that the armed forces have no choice but to take anyone who signs up. As long as they can pass the entrance exam, a place must be found for them somewhere in the various armed forces to allow them to prove they are socially responsible and thus can vote. When later questioned if other ways to earn the vote were available or if it was strictly veterans who should be able to vote, Heinlein made it clear that while the book didn't show it, he did believe there should be other non-combat careers or efforts able to demonstrate the social responsibility required to vote.

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*** More specifically, the book attempts to make the case for a kind of selective democracy where anyone can vote, but may only do so by first proving they are socially responsible - i.e. by becoming a veteran. Crucially the book makes it clear that the armed forces have no choice but to take anyone who signs up. As long as they can pass are capable of understanding the entrance exam, oath of service, a place must be found for them somewhere in the various armed forces to allow them to prove they are socially responsible and thus can vote. When later questioned if other ways to earn the vote were available or if it was strictly veterans who should be able to vote, Heinlein made it clear that while the book didn't show it, he did believe there should be other non-combat careers or efforts able to demonstrate the social responsibility required to vote.
22nd Jul '17 5:07:44 AM Grudgeal
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** Trunicht himself holds this viewpoint InUniverse, pointing out that any system [[AtLeastIAdmitIt that would put him in charge]] can't be as good as all that.
12th Jul '17 9:33:31 AM Derkhan
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* The official narrative of the Imperium in ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer40000}}''. While some planetary governments practice democracy to some degree, the threat of Chaos is believed to be so great that the people should not be allowed to decide for themselves, and they should be under the constant watch of the Imperial Inquisition.
** They had democracy and it didn't end well. Crapsack world indeed.
** Large scale democracy is physically impossible for the Imperium. Travel and communication are so slow and unreliable that they have only a vague idea how many member worlds they even have, much less trying to organize a vote.

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* The official narrative of the Imperium in ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer40000}}''. While some planetary governments practice democracy to some degree, the threat of Chaos is believed to be so great that the people should not be allowed to decide for themselves, and they should be under the constant watch of the Imperial Inquisition.
** They had democracy and it didn't end well. Crapsack world indeed.
** Large scale
Inquisition. Additionally, large-scale democracy is physically impossible for the Imperium. Travel and communication are so slow and unreliable that they have only a vague idea how many member worlds they even have, much less trying to organize a vote.
13th May '17 6:15:16 PM nombretomado
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* In ''Franchise/StarCraft'' the Terran Confederacy was corrupt and oppressive, in the backstory they nuked a planet that attempted to secede and in the first game they attempted to weaponize the Zerg to take out rebellions with plausible deniability. Granted, Arcturus Mengsk is at least as bad when he takes out the Confederacy and sets himself up as Emperor of the Terran Dominion, but [[spoiler: his son Valerian at least claims to end the tyrannical oppression when he ascends to the throne by replacing all the corrupt officials to make sure the people have a voice.]]

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* In ''Franchise/StarCraft'' ''VideoGame/StarCraft'' the Terran Confederacy was corrupt and oppressive, in the backstory they nuked a planet that attempted to secede and in the first game they attempted to weaponize the Zerg to take out rebellions with plausible deniability. Granted, Arcturus Mengsk is at least as bad when he takes out the Confederacy and sets himself up as Emperor of the Terran Dominion, but [[spoiler: his son Valerian at least claims to end the tyrannical oppression when he ascends to the throne by replacing all the corrupt officials to make sure the people have a voice.]]
9th May '17 7:55:37 PM TheRoguePenguin
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** Vault 11 doesn't help democracy's case either. [[spoiler:The computer running the Vault demanded the sacrifice of the Overseer every year or else it exterminate the entire Vault population]]. The citizens of the Vault decided to make elections to decide who was going to [[spoiler:be sacrificed]], leading to hilarious 1950's campaign posters with stuff like "Haley is a known adulterer and Communist sympathiser! Vote for Haley!" To make this even worse, [[spoiler:a group of people formed a corrupt "tyranny of the majority" and found a way to rig the vote system, so they could effectively choose who to be sacrificed and would never be sacrificed themselves. This changed when an enemy of theirs started murdering party members, getting them to vote her as the Overseer, and then using her powers as Overseer to get rid of the voting system and replace it with the sacrifice being picked at random by the computer. With their power gone, the corrupt party got majorly pissed off and a civil war broke out which led to the deaths of nearly everyone in the Vault. Oh, and it turns out the computer was [[ILied absolutely lying]]: it would've actually ''rewarded'' them if they didn't sacrifice anyone.]]

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** Vault 11 doesn't help democracy's case either. [[spoiler:The computer running the Vault demanded the sacrifice of a member of the Overseer Vault every year or else it exterminate the entire Vault population]]. The citizens of the Vault decided to make the Overseer, who knew about it, double as the [[spoiler:sacrifice]]. This lead to elections to decide who was going to [[spoiler:be sacrificed]], leading to hilarious 1950's campaign posters with stuff like "Haley is a known adulterer and Communist sympathiser! Vote for Haley!" To make this even worse, [[spoiler:a group of people formed a corrupt "tyranny of the majority" and found a way to rig the vote system, so they could effectively choose who to be sacrificed and would never be sacrificed themselves. This changed when an enemy of theirs started murdering party members, getting them to vote her as the Overseer, and then using her powers as Overseer to get rid of the voting system and replace it with the sacrifice being picked at random by the computer. With their power gone, the corrupt party got majorly pissed off and a civil war broke out which led to the deaths of nearly everyone in the Vault. Oh, and it turns out the computer was [[ILied absolutely lying]]: it would've actually ''rewarded'' them if they didn't sacrifice anyone.]]
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