History Main / DeconReconSwitch

21st Feb '17 10:28:09 PM LinTaylor
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* ''Manga/MedakaBox'' readily flip-flops between being a standard ''Magazine/ShonenJump'' fighting series and a deconstruction of the same. Initially Medaka is portrayed as a practically perfect AllLovingHero, but then it's shown [[SacrificedBasicSkillForAwesomeTraining despite having seemingly limitless abilities, she has a very hard time relating to or even understanding other people]], and that having no purpose in life beyond "help everyone I meet" is dangerously unhealthy. By the end of the series, her kindness towards others has earned her the love of everyone in the school, and those limitless abilities let her [[spoiler:save the Earth after her evil uncle tried to drop the Moon on it.]]
12th Feb '17 9:28:23 AM RobTan
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* ''Series/GameOfThrones'', much like [[Lierature/ASongOfIceAndFire the books it is based on]] started out as a deconstruction of HeroicFantasy, beginning with showing how unsuited for rule the RebelLeader would be, and how big of a mess a continent-spanning empire covering multiple cultures would be in if the unifying royal dynasy was extinguished, and just going from there. However, by the end of season 6, where the story starts to deviate from the books [[spoiler:all the good and light gray factions and fan-favorite characters have started to coalesce together to fight the greater enemy of the White Walkers, and the main villains are now a classic PirateKing and an [[EvilOverlord Evil]] [[GodSaveUSFromTheQueen Queen]], rather than the political chessmasters of previous seasons]]. The best symbol for this is the Brotherhood Without Banners, in the books they have devolved to bandits under the ladership of an undead horror, but in the series [[spoiler:they are holy warriors in service to a God of Light]].

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* ''Series/GameOfThrones'', much like [[Lierature/ASongOfIceAndFire the books it is based on]] started out as a deconstruction of HeroicFantasy, beginning with showing how unsuited for rule the RebelLeader would be, and how big of a mess a continent-spanning empire covering multiple cultures would be in if the unifying royal dynasy was extinguished, and just going from there. However, by the end of season 6, where the story starts to deviate from the books [[spoiler:all the good and light gray factions and fan-favorite characters have started to coalesce together to fight the greater enemy of the White Walkers, and the main villains are now a classic PirateKing and an [[EvilOverlord Evil]] [[GodSaveUSFromTheQueen Queen]], rather than the political chessmasters of previous seasons]]. The best symbol for this is the Brotherhood Without Banners, in the books they have devolved to bandits under the ladership leadership of an undead horror, but in the series [[spoiler:they are holy warriors in service to a God of Light]].
12th Feb '17 9:27:35 AM RobTan
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* ''Series/GameOfThrones'', much like [[Lierature/ASongOfIceAndFire the books it is based on]] started out as a deconstruction of HeroicFantasy, beginning with showing how unsuited for rule the RebelLeader would be, and how big of a mess a continent-spanning empire covering multiple cultures would be in if the unifying royal dynasy was extinguished, and just going from there. However, by the end of season 6, where the story starts to eviate from the books [[spoiler:all the good and light gray factions and fan-favorite characters have started to coalesce together to fight the greater enemy of the White Walkers, and the main villains are now a classic PirateKing and an [[EvilOverlord Evil]] [[GodSaveUSFromTheQueen Queen]], rather than the political chessmasters of previous seasons]]. The best symbol for this is the Brotherhood Without Banners, in the books they have devolved to bandits under the ladership of an undead horror, but in the series [[spoiler:they are holy warriors in service to a God of Light]].

to:

* ''Series/GameOfThrones'', much like [[Lierature/ASongOfIceAndFire the books it is based on]] started out as a deconstruction of HeroicFantasy, beginning with showing how unsuited for rule the RebelLeader would be, and how big of a mess a continent-spanning empire covering multiple cultures would be in if the unifying royal dynasy was extinguished, and just going from there. However, by the end of season 6, where the story starts to eviate deviate from the books [[spoiler:all the good and light gray factions and fan-favorite characters have started to coalesce together to fight the greater enemy of the White Walkers, and the main villains are now a classic PirateKing and an [[EvilOverlord Evil]] [[GodSaveUSFromTheQueen Queen]], rather than the political chessmasters of previous seasons]]. The best symbol for this is the Brotherhood Without Banners, in the books they have devolved to bandits under the ladership of an undead horror, but in the series [[spoiler:they are holy warriors in service to a God of Light]].
26th Jan '17 8:13:59 AM HarfynnTeuport
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* ''Film/GalaxyQuest'' spends the first half of the film showing the actors from the initial ''[[ShowWithinAShow Galaxy Quest]]'' TV show to be a bunch of jaded washouts with little to their name other than adoring fans. They're then given control of an actual spaceship by some [[AliensStealCable misguided aliens who've mistaken them for heroes]] [[BigDamnHeroes who will save them]] from evil RubberForeheadAliens... and nearly get themselves and everyone else killed. Only once they finally realise their situation in the final act and start applying all of the old tropes from their TV show do they start kicking ass whilst simultaneously showing why people fell in love with shows like ''Series/StarTrek'' in the first place.
22nd Jan '17 7:38:13 PM Ebrbfureh
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Lightly based on Hegelian dialectic - the thesis (the trope), the antithesis (the {{deconstruction}}), and the synthesis ({{reconstruction}} and a changed trope.)

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Lightly based on Hegelian dialectic - the dialectic--the thesis (the trope), the antithesis (the {{deconstruction}}), and the synthesis ({{reconstruction}} and a changed trope.)
16th Jan '17 1:01:30 PM luord
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** In its SpiritualSequel, ''KingsmanTheSecretService'', director MatthewVaughn does the same thing to spies.
5th Jan '17 10:43:46 AM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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** ''VideoGame/TalesOfGraces'' shows that just because a character TookALevelInBadass doesn't make them a better person. After a TimeSkip, the party members all become much stronger physically, but most of them haven't developed emotionally, resulting in a lot of animosity and bitterness over what happened during the time skip, or their {{Dark and Troubled Past}}s. It puts it back together by having the party talk a few things out, with main character Asbel coming to see that it's his actions, not his strength, that make him a {{Badass}}.
* ''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite'' did this to the Pokemon series as a whole and was created with this in mind to keep it fresh and interesting.

to:

** ''VideoGame/TalesOfGraces'' shows that just because a character TookALevelInBadass doesn't make them a better person. After a TimeSkip, the party members all become much stronger physically, but most of them haven't developed emotionally, resulting in a lot of animosity and bitterness over what happened during the time skip, or their {{Dark and Troubled Past}}s. It puts it back together by having the party talk a few things out, with main character Asbel coming to see that it's his actions, not his strength, that make him a {{Badass}}.
*
badass.
%%*
''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite'' did this to the Pokemon series as a whole and was created with this in mind to keep it fresh and interesting.
3rd Jan '17 4:25:42 PM oforiousmic
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* ''Series/GameOfThrones'', much like [[Lierature/ASongOfIceAndFire the books it is based on]] started out as a deconstruction of HeroicFantasy, beginning with showing how unsuited for rule the bRebelLeader would be, and how big of a mess a continent-spanning empire covering multiple cultures would be in if the unifying royal dynasy was extinguished, and just going from there. However, by the end of season 6, where the story starts to eviate from the books [[spoiler:all the good and light gray factions and fan-favorite characters have started to coalesce together to fight the greater enemy of the White Walkers, and the main villains are now a classic PirateKing and an [[EvilOverlord Evil]] [[GodSaveUSFromTheQueen Queen]], rather than the political chessmasters of previous seasons]]. The best symbol for this is the Brotherhood Without Banners, in the books they have devolved to bandits under the ladership of an undead horror, but in the series [[spoiler:they are holy warriors in service to a God of Light]].

to:

* ''Series/GameOfThrones'', much like [[Lierature/ASongOfIceAndFire the books it is based on]] started out as a deconstruction of HeroicFantasy, beginning with showing how unsuited for rule the bRebelLeader RebelLeader would be, and how big of a mess a continent-spanning empire covering multiple cultures would be in if the unifying royal dynasy was extinguished, and just going from there. However, by the end of season 6, where the story starts to eviate from the books [[spoiler:all the good and light gray factions and fan-favorite characters have started to coalesce together to fight the greater enemy of the White Walkers, and the main villains are now a classic PirateKing and an [[EvilOverlord Evil]] [[GodSaveUSFromTheQueen Queen]], rather than the political chessmasters of previous seasons]]. The best symbol for this is the Brotherhood Without Banners, in the books they have devolved to bandits under the ladership of an undead horror, but in the series [[spoiler:they are holy warriors in service to a God of Light]].
1st Jan '17 7:06:29 PM RaisenRhaasen
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** [[OlderThanTheyThink Arguably done as early as]] ''VideoGame/{{Persona2}}, albeit in a way that isn't quite as central to the plot.

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** [[OlderThanTheyThink Arguably done as early as]] ''VideoGame/{{Persona2}}, ''VideoGame/Persona2'', albeit in a way that isn't quite as central to the plot.
31st Dec '16 3:32:37 AM Morgenthaler
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* The first couple of hours of ClintEastwood's ''{{Film/Unforgiven}}'' are an absolutely brutal deconstruction of one of the most popular and versatile tropes of all time: The {{Badass}}. The movie makes it very clear that if a "badass" [[TheGunslinger gunman]] shoots somebody, the victim was probably already helpless (sitting on the crapper with his pistol out of reach), that even if someone like English Bob is genuinely a good shot with a pistol, when confronted with superior numbers he'll quickly be reduced to a sniveling and beaten man, that so-called "gunslingers" are just drunken and probably cowardly criminals, and that killing in general is just an ugly and stupid business. Stories about mythically badass killers are surely just tall-tales, undoubtedly distorted beyond all semblance of reality by credulous people repeating and embellishing stories they've heard, just as we see happening right before our eyes in the increasingly grotesquely exaggerated accounts of what happened to the prostitute Delilah. Then Will Munny learns that the townsfolk have killed his friend Ned and have his body on display outside the saloon with a sign on his coffin. He proceeds to drink half a bottle of whiskey, marches into a room full of armed men who are planning to go out and hunt him down and kill him in the morning, and (belting out [[PreMortemOneLiner badass one-liners left and right]]) faces down everybody, gunning down more than half a dozen men (''most'' of whom were armed) while remaining unscathed by a hail of bullets, and rides off with a BadassBoast so strong that men with rifles who plainly have the drop on him don't dare even take a shot. Even then, it's [[AntiHero very far from clear if he's any kind of "good guy"]], but Lord knows he's a genuine {{Badass}}.

to:

* The first couple of hours of ClintEastwood's Creator/ClintEastwood's ''{{Film/Unforgiven}}'' are an absolutely brutal deconstruction of one of the most popular and versatile tropes of all time: The {{Badass}}.ActionHero. The movie makes it very clear that if a "badass" [[TheGunslinger gunman]] shoots somebody, the victim was probably already helpless (sitting on the crapper with his pistol out of reach), that even if someone like English Bob is genuinely a good shot with a pistol, when confronted with superior numbers he'll quickly be reduced to a sniveling and beaten man, that so-called "gunslingers" are just drunken and probably cowardly criminals, and that killing in general is just an ugly and stupid business. Stories about mythically badass killers are surely just tall-tales, undoubtedly distorted beyond all semblance of reality by credulous people repeating and embellishing stories they've heard, just as we see happening right before our eyes in the increasingly grotesquely exaggerated accounts of what happened to the prostitute Delilah. Then Will Munny learns that the townsfolk have killed his friend Ned and have his body on display outside the saloon with a sign on his coffin. He proceeds to drink half a bottle of whiskey, marches into a room full of armed men who are planning to go out and hunt him down and kill him in the morning, and (belting out [[PreMortemOneLiner badass one-liners left and right]]) faces down everybody, gunning down more than half a dozen men (''most'' of whom were armed) while remaining unscathed by a hail of bullets, and rides off with a BadassBoast so strong that men with rifles who plainly have the drop on him don't dare even take a shot. Even then, it's [[AntiHero very far from clear if he's any kind of "good guy"]], but Lord knows he's a genuine {{Badass}}.badass.
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