History Main / DeconReconSwitch

11th Dec '17 8:45:38 AM CaptainCrawdad
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Series/GameOfThrones'', much like [[Lierature/ASongOfIceAndFire the books it is based on]] started out as a deconstruction of HeroicFantasy, beginning with showing how unsuited for rule the RebelLeader would be, and how big of a mess a continent-spanning empire covering multiple cultures would be in if the unifying royal dynasy was extinguished, and just going from there. However, by the end of season 6, where the story starts to deviate from the books [[spoiler:all the good and light gray factions and fan-favorite characters have started to coalesce together to fight the greater enemy of the White Walkers, and the main villains are now a classic PirateKing and an [[EvilOverlord Evil]] [[GodSaveUSFromTheQueen Queen]], rather than the political chessmasters of previous seasons]]. The best symbol for this is the Brotherhood Without Banners, in the books they have devolved to bandits under the leadership of an undead horror, but in the series [[spoiler:they are holy warriors in service to a God of Light]]. Another example is House Stark's fate, which, for most of the series, has been a by-word regarding how a family of honorable fantasy heroes, good politics and Westeros don't mix. At the beginning of the War of Five Kings, House Stark (similar to the Greyjoy-led Ironborn) had the smallest army and fewest allies. After the Red Wedding, their ranks and leadership were virtually annihilated—the house itself functionally extinct. Their only remaining clanspeople (Sansa, Arya, Bran, Rickon and Jon) were either tossed around like bargaining chips or hunted like fugitives. And yet, by Season 6, they have a) retaken their ancestral seat and destroyed their centuries-long rivals, b) regained the support of the North and re-established their independent Kingdom, and c) pieced together a standing army through assimilating the Free Folk and allying with the knights of the Vale. By contrast, the three-way alliance that brought them on their knees —Boltons, Freys and Lannisters — are respectively extinct, in a DecapitatedArmy and SuccessionCrisis situation, and currently on the verge of collapse.

to:

* ''Series/GameOfThrones'', much like [[Lierature/ASongOfIceAndFire the books it is based on]] started out as ''Series/GameOfThrones'' has a deconstruction theme of deconstructing of HeroicFantasy, beginning with showing how unsuited for rule things not turning out "like they do in the RebelLeader would be, and how big of stories" being a mess a continent-spanning empire covering multiple cultures would be in if the unifying royal dynasy was extinguished, and just going from there. However, by the end of season 6, where the story starts to deviate from the books [[spoiler:all the good and light gray factions and fan-favorite running theme. Good characters have started to coalesce together to fight the greater enemy get killed as a result of the White Walkers, their principled actions, and the main villains are now a classic PirateKing and an [[EvilOverlord Evil]] [[GodSaveUSFromTheQueen Queen]], rather than triumph because of their ruthlessness. However, as the series goes on, the plot becomes more traditional, with the political chessmasters of previous seasons]]. The best symbol for this is the Brotherhood Without Banners, in the books they have devolved intrigue between morally grey factions transitioning into epic heroes rising to bandits under the leadership of meet an undead horror, but in the series [[spoiler:they are holy warriors in service to a God of Light]]. Another example is House Stark's fate, which, for most of the series, has been a by-word regarding how a family of honorable fantasy heroes, good politics and Westeros don't mix. At the beginning of the War of Five Kings, House Stark (similar to the Greyjoy-led Ironborn) had the smallest army and fewest allies. After the Red Wedding, their ranks and leadership were virtually annihilated—the house itself functionally extinct. Their only remaining clanspeople (Sansa, Arya, Bran, Rickon and Jon) were either tossed around like bargaining chips or hunted like fugitives. And yet, by Season 6, they have a) retaken their ancestral seat and destroyed their centuries-long rivals, b) regained the support of the North and re-established their independent Kingdom, and c) pieced together a standing army through assimilating the Free Folk and allying with the knights of the Vale. By contrast, the three-way alliance that brought them on their knees —Boltons, Freys and Lannisters — are respectively extinct, in a DecapitatedArmy and SuccessionCrisis situation, and currently on the verge of collapse.ObviouslyEvil threat.
11th Dec '17 8:40:36 AM CaptainCrawdad
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Film/TheManFromUNCLE'', while a straightforward Bond-esque espionage adventure stylistically sticking strictly to the Martini Flavored end of the sliding scale of SpyFiction, portrays a Stale Beer take on the Cold War with nations more than willing to stab each other in the back to get the job done. The suave, [[SharpDressedMan sharp-dressed]], [[TheCasanova womanizing]] [[TheAce ace]] Napoleon Solo is also a kleptomaniacal, sex-addicted World War II veteran who turned to [[GentlemanThief high-class crime]], who only works for the CIA because he's a BoxedCrook riding out what would have been his prison sentence in the field after the government decided his talents could be put to use. His partner, the brooding, unstoppable GeniusBruiser Illya Kuryakin is in fact severely emotionally damaged after the events of his childhood, has difficulties with social interaction, and is prone to episodes of psychotic rage that threaten to compromise even the simplest of undercover missions, who works in the KGB mainly to try and erase the shame of his parents' indiscretions. They spend a good chunk of the movie trying to either kill or spy on one other. The villainess, in turn, while perfectly happy to luxuriate in her power and sadism, is also cunning. However, the same demons that cause Solo and Kuryakin's problems are also what drive them to become the best agents of their respective agencies, which as far as fieldwork goes more than make up for their failings in the end, and their enemy is roped into behaving in more stereotypically villainous fashion - to her downfall - as Solo is skilled enough at finding people's BerserkButton to get her to [[VillainousBreakdown lose her sense of caution.]] In the end, the two, in spite of their initial disdain for one another, learn to respect each other enough to TakeAThirdOption rather than kill each other at the behest of their agencies to retrieve a device that might provide an edge in the arms race, and instead join with Alexander Waverly in U.N.C.L.E., precipitating the events of [[Series/TheManFromUNCLE the original series.]]
* The first couple of hours of Creator/ClintEastwood's ''{{Film/Unforgiven}}'' are a deconstruction of one of the most popular and versatile tropes of all time: The ActionHero. The movie makes it very clear that if a "badass" [[TheGunslinger gunman]] shoots somebody, the victim was probably already helpless (sitting on the crapper with his pistol out of reach), that even if someone like English Bob is genuinely a good shot with a pistol, when confronted with superior numbers he'll quickly be reduced to a sniveling and beaten man, that so-called "gunslingers" are just drunken and probably cowardly criminals, and that killing in general is just an ugly and stupid business. Stories about mythically badass killers are surely just tall-tales, undoubtedly distorted beyond all semblance of reality by credulous people repeating and embellishing stories they've heard, just as we see happening right before our eyes in the increasingly grotesquely exaggerated accounts of what happened to the prostitute Delilah. Then Will Munny learns that the townsfolk have killed his friend Ned and have his body on display outside the saloon with a sign on his coffin. He proceeds to drink half a bottle of whiskey, marches into a room full of armed men who are planning to go out and hunt him down and kill him in the morning, and (belting out [[PreMortemOneLiner badass one-liners left and right]]) faces down everybody, gunning down more than half a dozen men (''most'' of whom were armed) while remaining unscathed by a hail of bullets, and rides off with a BadassBoast so strong that men with rifles who plainly have the drop on him don't dare even take a shot. Even then, it's [[AntiHero very far from clear if he's any kind of "good guy"]], but Lord knows he's a genuine badass.

to:

* ''Film/TheManFromUNCLE'', while a straightforward ''Film/TheManFromUNCLE'' deconstructs the Bond-esque espionage adventure stylistically sticking strictly to spy thriller by turning the Martini Flavored end of the sliding scale of SpyFiction, portrays a Stale Beer take on the Cold War with nations more than willing to stab each other in the back to get the job done. two leads into antiheroes. The suave, [[SharpDressedMan sharp-dressed]], [[TheCasanova womanizing]] [[TheAce ace]] Napoleon suave sophistication of Solo is also a kleptomaniacal, sex-addicted World War II veteran who turned to [[GentlemanThief high-class crime]], who only works for balanced by the CIA because fact that he's a greedy BoxedCrook riding out what would have been his prison sentence in the field after the government decided his talents could be put to use. His partner, the who is only doing this work because he has to. The action-oriented Kurykin is a brooding, unstoppable GeniusBruiser Illya Kuryakin is in fact severely emotionally damaged after the events ball of his childhood, has difficulties with social interaction, and is prone to episodes of psychotic rage that threaten to compromise even the simplest of undercover missions, who works in the KGB mainly to try and erase the shame of his parents' indiscretions. They spend a good chunk of the movie trying to either kill or spy on one other. The villainess, in turn, while perfectly happy to luxuriate in her power and sadism, is also cunning. rage. However, the same demons that cause Solo and Kuryakin's problems are also what drive them they eventually manage to become the best agents of put aside their respective agencies, which as far as fieldwork goes more than make up for their failings in the end, and their enemy is roped into behaving in more stereotypically villainous fashion - to her downfall - as Solo is skilled enough at finding people's BerserkButton to get her to [[VillainousBreakdown lose her sense of caution.]] In the end, the two, in spite of their initial disdain for one another, learn to respect grievances toward each other enough to TakeAThirdOption rather than kill each other at the behest of their agencies to retrieve a device that might provide an edge in the arms race, and instead join with Alexander Waverly participate in U.N.C.L.E., precipitating the events of [[Series/TheManFromUNCLE the original series.]]
a straight spy action-adventure.
* The first couple of hours of Creator/ClintEastwood's ''{{Film/Unforgiven}}'' are a deconstruction of one of the most popular and versatile deconstructs TheGunslinger tropes of all time: The ActionHero. The movie makes it very clear that if a "badass" [[TheGunslinger gunman]] shoots somebody, the victim was probably already helpless (sitting on the crapper with his pistol out of reach), that even if someone like English Bob is genuinely a good shot with a pistol, when confronted with superior numbers he'll quickly be reduced to a sniveling and beaten man, that so-called "gunslingers" are just drunken and probably cowardly criminals, and that killing in general is just an ugly and stupid business. Stories about mythically badass killers are surely just tall-tales, undoubtedly distorted beyond all semblance Eastwood's career as those types of reality by credulous people repeating and embellishing stories they've heard, just as we see happening right before our eyes in the increasingly grotesquely exaggerated accounts of what happened to the prostitute Delilah. Then characters. Eastwood's Will Munny learns admits that the townsfolk have killed as a gunslinger he was a drunken, damaged monster who survived his friend Ned and have his body on display outside the saloon with a sign on his coffin. He proceeds many shootouts mostly through luck. An author looking for dime-novel biographies of Wild West gunslingers is perpetually disappointed to drink half a bottle of whiskey, marches into a room full of armed men who are planning to go out and hunt him down and kill him in the morning, and (belting out [[PreMortemOneLiner badass one-liners left and right]]) faces down everybody, gunning down more than half a dozen men (''most'' of whom were armed) while remaining unscathed by a hail of bullets, and rides off with a BadassBoast so strong find that men with rifles who plainly have all of the drop on him don't dare even take frontier legends he investigates are lies or gross embellishments. However, Munny's quest for vengeance, both to avenge the prostitutes and his slain friend, ultimately plays out like a shot. Even then, it's [[AntiHero very far from clear if he's any kind of "good guy"]], but Lord knows he's a genuine badass.classic western.
25th Oct '17 12:38:13 AM Theokal3
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''TabletopGames/PrincessTheHopeful'' takes advantage of a darker setting to deconstruct the MagicalGirl genre, by pointing out [[ChildSoldier all the consequences fighting evil would have on young girls]] ([[ShellShockedVeteran trauma from battle]], exhaustion caused by [[WakeUpGoToSchoolSaveTheWorld the workload of a double-life]], confrontation with [[VileVillainSaccharineShow sometimes horrifying opponents]]), acknowledging that not all the problems in the world can be fixed by a speech on friendship, that [[GrayAndGreyMorality good and evil aren't always clear-cut]] and that sometimes, [[TheBadGuyWins evil winning]] and [[TheHeroDies death]] are very real possibilities. It also doesn't shy away from [[BeingGoodSucks how difficult it would be to be a genuinely good person]] in [[CrapsackWorld a place as dangerous and rotted]] as the [[TabletopGame/ChroniclesOfDarkness World of Darkness]]. However, it also justifies a lot of the the abilities Magical Girls have, give them very real power, plays up [[GoodFeelsGood how good it is to bring hope to such a world]], and acknowledges that, [[EarnYourHappyEnding for all the hardship, they can still win]].

to:

* ''TabletopGames/PrincessTheHopeful'' ''TabletopGame/PrincessTheHopeful'' takes advantage of a darker setting to deconstruct the MagicalGirl genre, by pointing out [[ChildSoldier all the consequences fighting evil would have on young girls]] ([[ShellShockedVeteran trauma from battle]], exhaustion caused by [[WakeUpGoToSchoolSaveTheWorld the workload of a double-life]], confrontation with [[VileVillainSaccharineShow sometimes horrifying opponents]]), acknowledging that not all the problems in the world can be fixed by a speech on friendship, that [[GrayAndGreyMorality good and evil aren't always clear-cut]] and that sometimes, [[TheBadGuyWins evil winning]] and [[TheHeroDies death]] are very real possibilities. It also doesn't shy away from [[BeingGoodSucks how difficult it would be to be a genuinely good person]] in [[CrapsackWorld a place as dangerous and rotted]] as the [[TabletopGame/ChroniclesOfDarkness World of Darkness]]. However, it also justifies a lot of the the abilities Magical Girls have, give them very real power, plays up [[GoodFeelsGood how good it is to bring hope to such a world]], and acknowledges that, [[EarnYourHappyEnding for all the hardship, they can still win]].
18th Oct '17 3:11:35 PM Laevatein
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Anime/WakeUpGirls'' show isn't afraid to explore the shady side of the IdolSinger industry and the difficulties idols face, but then shows that pursuing one's dreams is ultimately worthwhile despite that.
14th Oct '17 11:46:06 AM UltramarineAlizarin
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''VideoGame/{{Undertale}}'' is a massive {{Deconstruction}} of the {{Determinator}} trope. [[spoiler: Determination is an actual physical force that allows things to come back to life. Injecting into most monsters turns them into horrifying Amalgamations, but the Determination wielded by the player, Flowey and the First Child gives them the ability to SAVE. Flowey and the First Child, and potentially a Genocide run player, have abused their ability to save to kill everyone, and Flowey in particular makes use of the ability to SAVE in his boss fight to kill you over and over again. And it isn't much better in a Neutral or Pacifist run since Flowey is manipulating the player's Determination to get the GoldenEnding in order to get the power that he wants. However, in the Pacifist Ending, it's ultimately the player's Determination to save everyone, including Asriel, that allows them to hang on until the end and EarnYourHappyEnding.]]

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Undertale}}'' is a massive {{Deconstruction}} of the {{Determinator}} trope. [[spoiler: Determination It all starts with the fact that the player's determination is what allows them to [[JustifiedSavePoint SAVE their game]]. [[spoiler:Determination is an actual physical force that allows things to come back to life. Injecting into most Most monsters turns them have no capacity for this and their bodies will melt into horrifying Amalgamations, but the Determination wielded by the player, abominations if it's forced into them. Flowey and the First Child gives them the ability to SAVE. Flowey could also SAVE, and the First Child, and potentially a Genocide run player, have abused their ability to save this previously to kill everyone, everyone -- and a genocidal player will almost certainly have to do the same. Flowey in particular makes use of the ability to SAVE in his boss fight to kill you over and over again. And it isn't much better in a Neutral or Pacifist run since Flowey is manipulating also manipulates the player's Determination to get towards winning the GoldenEnding in order game to get the power that he wants. However, in wants, and abuses his regained ability to SAVE throughout his boss fight. In the Pacifist Ending, "true pacifist" route, it's ultimately the player's Determination to save everyone, including Asriel, SAVE everyone (including Flowey) that allows them to hang on until the end survive all obstacles and EarnYourHappyEnding.achieve a happy ending.]]
28th Sep '17 9:05:03 AM TwobitMulder
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Meddling Kids'' by Edgar Cantero starts with Scooby Gang expies 13 years after their last case and pretty heavily messed up (alcoholic, on the run from the law, and in Arkham County Mental Hospital respectively). Once they return to their old town to reopen their last case and are confronted with real monsters the novel flips around to show that whatever life threw at them they're still brave, intelligent, and good hearted people who are more than capable of fighting off Lovecraftian Horrors. The book seems determined to take what Scooby Doo looks like through a {{nostalgia filter}} and turn it into a reality.
10th Sep '17 7:55:12 PM JoeMerl
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Likewise, ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsonsMovie'''s first half is a deconstruction of Homer's character: his antics wind up dooming the town, the family are forced to flee Springfield for their lives, and ultimately, [[spoiler:Marge takes the kids leaves him, and makes it clear that she intends this to be permanent]]. ''That'' [[HeroicBSOD finally gets through to him]], and he spends the rest of the movie trying to fix everything that he's destroyed.

to:

* Likewise, ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsonsMovie'''s first half is a deconstruction of Homer's character: his antics wind up dooming the town, the family are forced to flee Springfield for their lives, and ultimately, [[spoiler:Marge takes the kids and leaves him, and makes intending it clear that she intends this to be permanent]]. ''That'' [[HeroicBSOD finally gets through to him]], and he spends the rest of the movie trying to fix everything that he's destroyed.
10th Sep '17 7:54:22 PM JoeMerl
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Likewise, ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsonsMovie'''s first half is a deconstruction of Homer's character: his antics wind up dooming the town, the family are forced to flee Springfield for their lives, and ultimately, [[spoiler:Marge takes the kids leaves him, and makes it clear that she intends this to be permanent]]. ''That'' [[HeroicBSOD finally gets through to him]], and he spends the rest of the movie trying to fix everything that he's destroyed.
4th Sep '17 8:56:47 PM Peteman
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Comicbook/{{Irredeemable}}'' is a brutal deconstruction that asks "What if Superman went bad ''for real?'' That is until the ''very last page'' where [[spoiler:the Plutonian's essence has been scattered to the corners of the multiverse...and some of it ends up in our world and inspires the creation of Superman.]]

to:

* ''Comicbook/{{Irredeemable}}'' is a brutal deconstruction that asks "What if Superman went bad ''for real?'' That is until the ''very last page'' where [[spoiler:the Plutonian's essence has been scattered to the corners of the multiverse...and some of it ends up in our world and inspires the creation of Superman.]]



* The first couple of hours of Creator/ClintEastwood's ''{{Film/Unforgiven}}'' are an absolutely brutal deconstruction of one of the most popular and versatile tropes of all time: The ActionHero. The movie makes it very clear that if a "badass" [[TheGunslinger gunman]] shoots somebody, the victim was probably already helpless (sitting on the crapper with his pistol out of reach), that even if someone like English Bob is genuinely a good shot with a pistol, when confronted with superior numbers he'll quickly be reduced to a sniveling and beaten man, that so-called "gunslingers" are just drunken and probably cowardly criminals, and that killing in general is just an ugly and stupid business. Stories about mythically badass killers are surely just tall-tales, undoubtedly distorted beyond all semblance of reality by credulous people repeating and embellishing stories they've heard, just as we see happening right before our eyes in the increasingly grotesquely exaggerated accounts of what happened to the prostitute Delilah. Then Will Munny learns that the townsfolk have killed his friend Ned and have his body on display outside the saloon with a sign on his coffin. He proceeds to drink half a bottle of whiskey, marches into a room full of armed men who are planning to go out and hunt him down and kill him in the morning, and (belting out [[PreMortemOneLiner badass one-liners left and right]]) faces down everybody, gunning down more than half a dozen men (''most'' of whom were armed) while remaining unscathed by a hail of bullets, and rides off with a BadassBoast so strong that men with rifles who plainly have the drop on him don't dare even take a shot. Even then, it's [[AntiHero very far from clear if he's any kind of "good guy"]], but Lord knows he's a genuine badass.

to:

* The first couple of hours of Creator/ClintEastwood's ''{{Film/Unforgiven}}'' are an absolutely brutal a deconstruction of one of the most popular and versatile tropes of all time: The ActionHero. The movie makes it very clear that if a "badass" [[TheGunslinger gunman]] shoots somebody, the victim was probably already helpless (sitting on the crapper with his pistol out of reach), that even if someone like English Bob is genuinely a good shot with a pistol, when confronted with superior numbers he'll quickly be reduced to a sniveling and beaten man, that so-called "gunslingers" are just drunken and probably cowardly criminals, and that killing in general is just an ugly and stupid business. Stories about mythically badass killers are surely just tall-tales, undoubtedly distorted beyond all semblance of reality by credulous people repeating and embellishing stories they've heard, just as we see happening right before our eyes in the increasingly grotesquely exaggerated accounts of what happened to the prostitute Delilah. Then Will Munny learns that the townsfolk have killed his friend Ned and have his body on display outside the saloon with a sign on his coffin. He proceeds to drink half a bottle of whiskey, marches into a room full of armed men who are planning to go out and hunt him down and kill him in the morning, and (belting out [[PreMortemOneLiner badass one-liners left and right]]) faces down everybody, gunning down more than half a dozen men (''most'' of whom were armed) while remaining unscathed by a hail of bullets, and rides off with a BadassBoast so strong that men with rifles who plainly have the drop on him don't dare even take a shot. Even then, it's [[AntiHero very far from clear if he's any kind of "good guy"]], but Lord knows he's a genuine badass.
6th Aug '17 9:15:38 PM TheJ0ker
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''WebOriginal/{{Blackburn}}'' starts off with a sharply critical view of superheroes, painting them as ineffectual, unstable outcasts who can't do anything to stymie the massive crime wave plaguing Blackburn. The Mavericks have disbanded and been all but forgotten. [[spoiler:By the end the group has reformed, and, knowing they can only do a little to truly change the city, do so anyways because it's better than leaving criminals to do as they please.]]
This list shows the last 10 events of 459. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.DeconReconSwitch