History Main / DeconReconSwitch

6th Aug '17 9:15:38 PM TheJ0ker
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* ''WebOriginal/{{Blackburn}}'' starts off with a sharply critical view of superheroes, painting them as ineffectual, unstable outcasts who can't do anything to stymie the massive crime wave plaguing Blackburn. The Mavericks have disbanded and been all but forgotten. [[spoiler:By the end the group has reformed, and, knowing they can only do a little to truly change the city, do so anyways because it's better than leaving criminals to do as they please.]]
6th Aug '17 4:31:52 PM infernape612
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** The Krogan are your stereotypical ProudWarriorRaceGuys. However, Mass Effect shows how such a race would function in an actual galactic civilization. Because they once threatened to conquer the galaxy, the rest of the galaxy teamed up against them and hit them with a SterilityPlague that reduced their natural explosive birth rate drastically. They could still hold a stable population if they stayed home and helped rebuild, but instead they've become a race of DeathSeekers, hiring themselves out as mercenaries and dooming their race to slow extinction. However, provided you play your cards right, [[spoiler: your Krogan teammate in the first game is inspired by Shepard to return to his home planet and assumes leadership by fighting his way to the top, essentially becoming the leader of his entire race by the time you meet up with him again in the second, and using his position, he's slowly restoring both the "Proud" part of the trope, but also the "Race" part, especially if you cure the SterilityPlague in the third game]]

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** The Krogan are your stereotypical ProudWarriorRaceGuys. However, Mass Effect shows how such a race would function in an actual galactic civilization. Because they once threatened to conquer the galaxy, the rest of the galaxy teamed up against them and hit them with a SterilityPlague that reduced their natural explosive birth rate drastically. They could still hold a stable population if they stayed home and helped rebuild, but instead they've become a race of DeathSeekers, {{Death Seeker}}s, hiring themselves out as mercenaries and dooming their race to slow extinction. However, provided you play your cards right, [[spoiler: your Krogan teammate in the first game is inspired by Shepard to return to his home planet and assumes leadership by fighting his way to the top, essentially becoming the leader of his entire race by the time you meet up with him again in the second, and using his position, he's slowly restoring both the "Proud" part of the trope, but also the "Race" part, especially if you cure the SterilityPlague in the third game]]
2nd Aug '17 5:31:32 PM MagiMecha
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* ''ComicBook/SecretEmpire'' deconstructs Marvel's love for DarkerAndEdgier and LetsYouAndHimFight by making [[ComicBook/CaptainAmerica Steve Rogers]] a super villain whom everyone loves as he uses HYDRA to take over the United States, forcing the usual heroes to restore to more and more darker actions and being called out for it and when things reach their darkest, the heroes realized they messed up and begin reconstructing the idea of LighterAndSofter by rejecting the ideals that got them there in the first place and Steve becomes the comic book super villain he should be in theses stories.
1st Aug '17 3:52:06 PM explodyboompow
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* ''Film/DemolitionMan'' does this to the CowboyCop. LAPD cop John Spartan is so bold and reckless in stopping criminals that his superiors hate him (bestowing him with the titular nickname). As he finally takes down psychotic criminal Simon Phoenix in such a destructive manner that led to the deaths of hundreds of hostages, he gets a life sentence in prison alongside Phoenix. Decades later, Phoenix is released into a violence-free society where police officers are so by-the-book that they are absolutely unable to think for themselves, and Phoenix easily overtakes them. The police decide to release Spartan to stop Phoenix, accepting that a less by-the-book, more intuitive policeman would do better in bringing down an AxeCrazy criminal like Phoenix. Spartan, however, eventually does acknowledge that the world of impossibly low crime that ''created'' such inept cops is far more peaceful than his own time, which produced a CowboyCop like him.

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* ''Film/DemolitionMan'' does this to the CowboyCop. LAPD cop John Spartan is so bold and reckless in stopping criminals that his superiors hate him (bestowing upon him with the titular nickname). As he finally takes down psychotic criminal Simon Phoenix in such a destructive manner that led to the deaths of hundreds of hostages, he gets a life sentence in prison alongside Phoenix. Decades later, Phoenix is released into a violence-free society where police officers are so by-the-book that they are absolutely unable to think for themselves, and Phoenix easily overtakes them. The police decide to release Spartan to stop Phoenix, accepting that a less by-the-book, more intuitive policeman would do better in bringing down an AxeCrazy criminal like Phoenix. Spartan, however, eventually does acknowledge that the world of impossibly low crime that ''created'' such inept cops is far more peaceful than his own time, which produced a CowboyCop like him.
1st Aug '17 3:50:48 PM explodyboompow
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* ''Film/DemolitionMan'' does this to the CowboyCop. LAPD cop John Spartan is so bold and reckless in stopping criminals that his superiors hate him so much (earning him the titular nickname). As he finally takes down psychotic criminal Simon Phoenix in such a destructive manner that led to the deaths of hundreds of hostages, he gets a life sentence in prison alongside Phoenix. Decades later, Phoenix is released into a violence-free society where police officers are so by-the-book that they are absolutely unable to think for themselves, and Phoenix easily overtakes them. The police decide to release Spartan to stop Phoenix, accepting that a less by-the-book, more intuitive policeman would do better in bringing down an AxeCrazy criminal like Phoenix. Spartan, however, eventually does acknowledge that the world of impossibly low crime that ''created'' such inept cops is far more peaceful than his own time, which produced a CowboyCop like him.

to:

* ''Film/DemolitionMan'' does this to the CowboyCop. LAPD cop John Spartan is so bold and reckless in stopping criminals that his superiors hate him so much (earning (bestowing him with the titular nickname). As he finally takes down psychotic criminal Simon Phoenix in such a destructive manner that led to the deaths of hundreds of hostages, he gets a life sentence in prison alongside Phoenix. Decades later, Phoenix is released into a violence-free society where police officers are so by-the-book that they are absolutely unable to think for themselves, and Phoenix easily overtakes them. The police decide to release Spartan to stop Phoenix, accepting that a less by-the-book, more intuitive policeman would do better in bringing down an AxeCrazy criminal like Phoenix. Spartan, however, eventually does acknowledge that the world of impossibly low crime that ''created'' such inept cops is far more peaceful than his own time, which produced a CowboyCop like him.
25th Jul '17 4:10:45 PM ImpudentInfidel
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** A similar process, but taken several steps further occurs in the finale, this time with ThouShaltNotKill. Aang refuses to kill Ozai despite the guy's BigBad status but leaving him alive means he can continue his EvilPlan: [[spoiler: Aang takes a third option by removing Ozai's bending and placing the reformed Zuko on his throne. This way Aang can neutralize the threat without killing anyone.]]

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** A similar process, but taken several steps further occurs in the finale, this time with ThouShaltNotKill. Aang refuses to kill Ozai despite the guy's BigBad status but leaving him alive means he can continue his EvilPlan: [[spoiler: Aang takes a third option by removing Ozai's bending and placing the reformed Zuko on his throne. This way Aang can neutralize the threat without killing anyone.anyone (other than the crew of his airship, but [[WhatMeasureIsAMook they don't count]].]]
25th Jul '17 4:04:28 PM ImpudentInfidel
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* ''Anime/PuellaMagiMadokaMagica''. Specifically, this series deconstructs the [[PowerOfLove "Power of the Heart"]] often used in Magical Girl anime. The show does this by drawing attention to the fact that when the characters get to MakeAWish in exchange for assuming the duty of magical girls, these wishes usually have an underlying motive, and their purpose is never as pure and noble as many shows often assume it would be (these are young girls after all). Tragedy ensues not because these wishes had a selfish motive, however: rather, because they were simply ''badly thought out'' and the characters were unable to accept their outcome. While initially it seems like AnAesop about the futility of a DealWithTheDevil, the ending, however, reconstructs the wish as an embodiment of hope by demonstrating that [[spoiler:a wish made for all the right reasons, that benefits many people ''including'' the one who made it, essentially becomes the most powerful force to ever exist. It rewrites the laws of reality and recreates the world without the hopeless fate Magical Girls had been previously forced into, even if it, too, comes with a caveat.]]

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* ''Anime/PuellaMagiMadokaMagica''. Specifically, this series deconstructs the [[PowerOfLove "Power of the Heart"]] often used in Magical Girl anime. The show does this by drawing attention to the fact that when the characters get to MakeAWish in exchange for assuming the duty of magical girls, these wishes usually have an underlying motive, and their purpose is never as pure and noble as many shows often assume it would be (these are young girls after all). Tragedy ensues not because these wishes had a selfish motive, however: rather, because they were simply ''badly thought out'' and the characters were unable to accept their outcome. While initially it seems like AnAesop about the futility of a DealWithTheDevil, the ending, however, reconstructs the wish as an embodiment of hope by demonstrating that [[spoiler:a wish made for all the right reasons, that benefits many people ''including'' the one who made it, essentially becomes the most powerful force to ever exist. It rewrites the laws of reality and recreates the world without the hopeless fate Magical Girls had been previously forced into, even if it, too, comes with a caveat. There's also a decon-recon of the SetRightWhatOnceWentWrong plot; Homura has tried and failed to find a good ending so many times that it's moved her from the most naive member of the team to a cold-blooded killer, and the repeated failures are gradually eroding her will. However, the sheer karmic buildup this creates is what allows Madoka to win in the end.]]
21st Jul '17 3:22:18 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* Ever since [[VideoGame/Fallout1 Fallout 1]], the ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' series has slowly deconstructed (on a meta level, at least) the tragedy of the [[AtomicHate Great War]] by showcasing it through BlackComedy and displaying that the [[CrapsackWorld Pre-War United States]] had transitioned into a jingoistic, sociopathic, and Orwellian state that [[AssholeVictim practically]] ''deserved'' [[NukeEm a nuclear war]]. However, starting with [[VideoGame/Fallout3 Fallout 3]] and continuing through both [[VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas New Vegas]] and [[VideoGame/Fallout4 Fallout 4]], the games have generally reconstructed the Great War as an actual tragedy. [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement Of course, this isn't meant to imply that all of the games have their Black Comedy moments and the first few Fallout games didn't portray the War with actual tragedy.]] Still, ''3'', ''New Vegas'', and ''4'' devote noticeable amounts of effort into showing the misery the Great War caused, and how just because the world probably ''did'' need to [[ArcWords begin again]], the deaths of ''billions'' wasn't something good - like the [[NightmareFuel Keller family]] [[ApocalypticLog holotapes]] in ''3'' and the [[TearJerker "Sorry, My Darling"]] holotape from ''Broken Steel'', the [[YankTheDogsChain failure]] of the Sierra Madre in ''Dead Money'' and the tale of [[TheWoobie Randall]] [[TraumaCongaLine Clark]] from ''Honest Hearts''. This is further cemented in ''4'' with the [[ForegoneConclusion Pre-War Sanctuary Hills sequence,]] which shows how the main player characters were [[HappilyMarried Happily Married]] and living a idyllic life with their son Shaun before the Great War destroyed everything.

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* Ever since [[VideoGame/Fallout1 Fallout 1]], ''VideoGame/Fallout1'', the ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' series has slowly deconstructed (on a meta level, at least) the tragedy of the [[AtomicHate Great War]] by showcasing it through BlackComedy and displaying that the [[CrapsackWorld Pre-War United States]] had transitioned into a jingoistic, sociopathic, and Orwellian state that [[AssholeVictim practically]] ''deserved'' [[NukeEm a nuclear war]]. However, starting with [[VideoGame/Fallout3 Fallout 3]] ''VideoGame/Fallout3'' and continuing through both [[VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas ''[[VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas New Vegas]] Vegas]]'' and [[VideoGame/Fallout4 Fallout 4]], ''VideoGame/Fallout4'', the games have generally reconstructed the Great War as an actual tragedy. [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement Of course, this isn't meant to imply that all of the games have their Black Comedy moments and the first few Fallout games didn't portray the War with actual tragedy.]] Still, ''3'', ''New Vegas'', and ''4'' devote noticeable amounts of effort into showing the misery the Great War caused, and how just because the world probably ''did'' need to [[ArcWords begin again]], the deaths of ''billions'' wasn't something good - like the [[NightmareFuel Keller family]] [[ApocalypticLog family holotapes]] in ''3'' and the [[TearJerker "Sorry, My Darling"]] holotape from ''Broken Steel'', the [[YankTheDogsChain failure]] of the Sierra Madre in ''Dead Money'' and the tale of [[TheWoobie Randall]] [[TraumaCongaLine Randall Clark]] from ''Honest Hearts''. This is further cemented in ''4'' with the [[ForegoneConclusion Pre-War Sanctuary Hills sequence,]] which shows how the main player characters were [[HappilyMarried Happily Married]] HappilyMarried and living a idyllic life with their son Shaun before the Great War destroyed everything.
21st Jul '17 3:19:06 PM Samothrace42
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* Ever since [[VideoGame/Fallout1 Fallout 1]], the ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' series has slowly deconstructed (on a meta level, at least) the tragedy of the [[AtomicHate Great War]] by showcasing it through BlackComedy and displaying that the [[CrapsackWorld Pre-War United States]] had transitioned into a jingoistic, sociopathic, and Orwellian state that [[AssholeVictim practically]] ''deserved'' [[NukeEm a nuclear war]]. However, starting with [[VideoGame/Fallout3 Fallout 3]] and continuing through both [[VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas New Vegas]] and [[VideoGame/Fallout4 Fallout 4]], the games have generally reconstructed the Great War as an actual tragedy. [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgement Of course, this isn't meant to imply that all of the games have their Black Comedy moments and the first few Fallout games didn't portray the War with actual tragedy.]] Still, ''3'', ''New Vegas'', and ''4'' devote noticeable amounts of effort into showing the misery the Great War caused, and how just because the world probably ''did'' need to [[ArcWords begin again]], the deaths of ''billions'' wasn't something good - like the [[NightmareFuel Keller family]] [[ApocalypticLog holotapes]] in ''3'' and the [[TearJerker "Sorry, My Darling"]] holotape from ''Broken Steel'', the [[YankTheDogsChain failure]] of the Sierra Madre in ''Dead Money'' and the tale of [[TheWoobie Randall]] [[TraumaCongaLine Clark]] from ''Honest Hearts''. This is further cemented in ''4'' with the [[ForegoneConclusion Pre-War Sanctuary Hills sequence,]] which shows how the main player characters were [[HappilyMarried Happily Married]] and living a idyllic life with their son Shaun before the Great War destroyed everything.



** In a similar manner, The Blood Gulch Chronicles seasons of the series deconstructed a number of multiplayer tropes and (fittingly enough) the Reconstruction chapter put them back together.

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** In a similar manner, The Blood Gulch Chronicles seasons of the series deconstructed a number of multiplayer tropes (i.e., the ) and (fittingly enough) the Reconstruction chapter put them back together.
20th Jul '17 8:58:03 PM 64SuperNintendo
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[[folder:{{Anime}} & {{Manga}}]]

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[[folder:{{Anime}} & {{Manga}}]][[folder:Anime and Manga]]



* ''Webcomic/OnePunchMan'' may be a DeconstructorFleet of superhero tropes, but as it goes on many of them get played straight again.
** The main character is an InvincibleHero whose lack of challenges leaves him completely disillusioned with life. On top of that, his literally unbelievable feats of strength lead the general public to decry him as a fraud. Nonetheless he still keeps on being a hero, because it's what he wants to, [[ZeroApprovalGambit public opinion be damned]], and the people who know him personally respect him a great deal for it.
** The Hero Association is a send-up of [[HeroesRUs superhero organisations]]; the higher-ups are [[PointyHairedBoss affluent morons]], many heroes are more interested in their rankings than doing anything heroic (to the point of forming cliques and bullying lower-ranked members), the S-class heroes are dysfunctional ''at best'', and the CListFodder is not only severely outclassed by any actual threat, they also have to meet weekly quotas or they lose their membership. And yet it's also a powerful force for good: when a threat that can defeat even S-class heroes emerges, several heroes from across the board rise up to fight it. They stand absolutely no chance, yet by keeping the MonsterOfTheWeek occupied they buy enough time for Saitama to arrive and kill it before anybody dies. As Saitama puts it:
---> "If the heroes run and hide, who will stay and fight?"



* In the ''Franchise/KamenRider'' crossover film of OOO and W movie :Kamen Rider x Kamen Rider OOO & W feat. Skull: Movie Wars CORE, Akiko thinks that the people who became Kamen Riders ruined their own personal lives including the happiness of their loved ones, however during the climax of the film as the BigBad received all the memories of every Kamen Rider thinking himself as the rider, W and OOO reject his belief because even though the riders give up their own personal lives, they will always protect everyone, even their beloved ones .

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* In the ''Franchise/KamenRider'' crossover film of OOO and W movie :Kamen ''Kamen Rider x Kamen Rider OOO & W feat. Featuring Skull: Movie Wars CORE, CORE'', Akiko thinks that the people who became Kamen Riders ruined their own personal lives including the happiness of their loved ones, however during the climax of the film as the BigBad received all the memories of every Kamen Rider thinking himself as the rider, W and OOO reject his belief because even though the riders give up their own personal lives, they will always protect everyone, even their beloved ones .



* ''Webcomic/OnePunchMan'' may be a DeconstructorFleet of superhero tropes, but as it goes on many of them get played straight again.
** The main character is an InvincibleHero whose lack of challenges leaves him completely disillusioned with life. On top of that, his literally unbelievable feats of strength lead the general public to decry him as a fraud. Nonetheless he still keeps on being a hero, because it's what he wants to, [[ZeroApprovalGambit public opinion be damned]], and the people who know him personally respect him a great deal for it.
** The Hero Association is a send-up of [[HeroesRUs superhero organisations]]; the higher-ups are [[PointyHairedBoss affluent morons]], many heroes are more interested in their rankings than doing anything heroic (to the point of forming cliques and bullying lower-ranked members), the S-class heroes are dysfunctional ''at best'', and the CListFodder is not only severely outclassed by any actual threat, they also have to meet weekly quotas or they lose their membership. And yet it's also a powerful force for good: when a threat that can defeat even S-class heroes emerges, several heroes from across the board rise up to fight it. They stand absolutely no chance, yet by keeping the MonsterOfTheWeek occupied they buy enough time for Saitama to arrive and kill it before anybody dies. As Saitama puts it:
---> "If the heroes run and hide, who will stay and fight?"
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