History Main / Decameron

16th Feb '12 5:04:40 AM LordGro
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The ''Decameron'' is a classic work of Italian literature, written c.1350-53 by [[{{Boccaccio}} Giovanni Boccaccio]].

In the midst of TheBlackDeath, ten wealthy Florentines decamp to the countryside with their retinue, and pass their days in storytelling, an attempt to reclaim a world that everywhere is dying.

Over the course of ten days, the three men and seven women tell a hundred stories, full of generous aristocrats, clever tricks, toilet humor, lustful women, wicked churchmen and lots of illicit sex.

Famous stories include:
* Day 1, story 1: Ciapelletto, a notoriously wicked AmoralAttorney and scoundrel (he's a murder, forger, perjurer and DepravedBisexual among many other things) on business to a region he is unknown in and falls terminally ill. His slightly less evil companions bring a monk from a nearby convent to confess him and give him last rites. Ciappelletto proceeds to tell him the most ridiculous lies about his life and how holy he's been the whole time, while pretending to cringe over venial sins. [[spoiler: He is completely believed by the friar, who preaches a sermon on his life and ends with everyone there believing him a [[VillainWithGoodPublicity genuine saint and attributing miracles to him.]]]]
* Day 1, story 2: A Jew converts to Catholicism after seeing the corruption of Rome, reasoning that if Christianity can still spread even when its hierarchy is so sinful, it has to have something else going for it
* Day 3, story 1: Masetto da Lamporecchio feigns to be dumb to win a seat as gardener in a convent. He ends up having sex with all of the nuns.
* Day 3, story 10: Long considered the most obscene and was censored or removed in translations for a significant period. Might be a codifier of IsThatWhatTheyAreCallingItNow.

Tropes in ''Decameron'' include:

* AnAesop: All the stories end with some kind of lesson. However, some of them fall into other categories:
** CaptainObviousAesop
** SpoofAesop
* ArsonMurderAndJaywalking: Ciapelletto's ListOfTransgressions includes blasphemy, sacrilege, inciting violence, and many felonies such as assault, robbery, and murder, but concludes by noting that he's known to use loaded dice.
* BedTrick: More than once.
* BlasphemousBoast: (Day 1, story 6).
* BrainlessBeauty: Cesca (Day 6, story 8).
* BuriedAlive: (Day 3, story 8).
* CorruptChurch: Very frequently referenced.
* DomesticAbuse: It will lead to your wife stop being so stubborn (Day 9, story 9). You where warned about the FamilyUnfriendlyAesop.
* DownerEnding: Day 4, although the second tale has a comedic tone and the person who suffers is an AssholeVictim.
* DistinguishingMark: Teodoro is recognized by a strawberry shaped birth mark (Day 5, story 7).
* FairForItsDay: Treated women as much more willful and independent than its contemporaries, and Jews as generally greedy but not actually evil.
* FlatCharacter: The ten storytellers.
* HistoricalDomainCharacter: A lot of the people in the stories are historical figures- most of the time, they are merchants/aristocrats who were contemporaries of Boccaccio, but there's also some figures who are well-known today, such as the painter Giotto.
* ICallHimMisterHappy: "The Devil".
* InWhichATropeIsDescribed
* KarmaHoudini: In some stories
* LiteraryAgentHypothesis
* {{Lust}}
* MummiesAtTheDinnerTable: Messer Gentile even has a child with her lover. She has been reanimated by then, of course (Day 10, story 4).
* NationalStereotypes: Several stories note stereotypes associated with various Italian regions. For instance, people from Sienna were supposedly stupid and all Venetians are greedy and corrupt (because Venice was a rival of Boccaccio's city state, Florence).
* NaughtyNuns: In a couple of the stories; also frequent is the SexyPriest and DirtyOldMonk.
* OutGambitted: It happens to some of the characters (e.g., Day 7, story 4).
* RapeAsComedy: (Day 3, story 10).
* RapeIsLove: The sixth tale of the third day.
* StockholmSyndrome: (Day 2, Story 10).
* SympatheticAdulterer: Lots of them, generally involving a woman cheating on a much older husband and it often the case that the woman is an ImpoverishedPatrician and the husband a NouveauRiche.
* ToiletHumour
* UnusualEuphemism: "Putting the Devil back into Hell".
* VillainWithGoodPublicity: [[spoiler: Ciapelletto]]
* VillainProtagonist: (Day 1, story 1), (Day 4, story 2), (Day 5, story 1).
* VirginityMakesYouStupid: Alibech (Day 3, story 10).

to:

The ''Decameron'' is a classic work of Italian literature, written c.1350-53 by [[{{Boccaccio}} Giovanni Boccaccio]].

In the midst of TheBlackDeath, ten wealthy Florentines decamp to the countryside with their retinue, and pass their days in storytelling, an attempt to reclaim a world that everywhere is dying.

Over the course of ten days, the three men and seven women tell a hundred stories, full of generous aristocrats, clever tricks, toilet humor, lustful women, wicked churchmen and lots of illicit sex.

Famous stories include:
* Day 1, story 1: Ciapelletto, a notoriously wicked AmoralAttorney and scoundrel (he's a murder, forger, perjurer and DepravedBisexual among many other things) on business to a region he is unknown in and falls terminally ill. His slightly less evil companions bring a monk from a nearby convent to confess him and give him last rites. Ciappelletto proceeds to tell him the most ridiculous lies about his life and how holy he's been the whole time, while pretending to cringe over venial sins. [[spoiler: He is completely believed by the friar, who preaches a sermon on his life and ends with everyone there believing him a [[VillainWithGoodPublicity genuine saint and attributing miracles to him.]]]]
* Day 1, story 2: A Jew converts to Catholicism after seeing the corruption of Rome, reasoning that if Christianity can still spread even when its hierarchy is so sinful, it has to have something else going for it
* Day 3, story 1: Masetto da Lamporecchio feigns to be dumb to win a seat as gardener in a convent. He ends up having sex with all of the nuns.
* Day 3, story 10: Long considered the most obscene and was censored or removed in translations for a significant period. Might be a codifier of IsThatWhatTheyAreCallingItNow.

Tropes in ''Decameron'' include:

* AnAesop: All the stories end with some kind of lesson. However, some of them fall into other categories:
** CaptainObviousAesop
** SpoofAesop
* ArsonMurderAndJaywalking: Ciapelletto's ListOfTransgressions includes blasphemy, sacrilege, inciting violence, and many felonies such as assault, robbery, and murder, but concludes by noting that he's known to use loaded dice.
* BedTrick: More than once.
* BlasphemousBoast: (Day 1, story 6).
* BrainlessBeauty: Cesca (Day 6, story 8).
* BuriedAlive: (Day 3, story 8).
* CorruptChurch: Very frequently referenced.
* DomesticAbuse: It will lead to your wife stop being so stubborn (Day 9, story 9). You where warned about the FamilyUnfriendlyAesop.
* DownerEnding: Day 4, although the second tale has a comedic tone and the person who suffers is an AssholeVictim.
* DistinguishingMark: Teodoro is recognized by a strawberry shaped birth mark (Day 5, story 7).
* FairForItsDay: Treated women as much more willful and independent than its contemporaries, and Jews as generally greedy but not actually evil.
* FlatCharacter: The ten storytellers.
* HistoricalDomainCharacter: A lot of the people in the stories are historical figures- most of the time, they are merchants/aristocrats who were contemporaries of Boccaccio, but there's also some figures who are well-known today, such as the painter Giotto.
* ICallHimMisterHappy: "The Devil".
* InWhichATropeIsDescribed
* KarmaHoudini: In some stories
* LiteraryAgentHypothesis
* {{Lust}}
* MummiesAtTheDinnerTable: Messer Gentile even has a child with her lover. She has been reanimated by then, of course (Day 10, story 4).
* NationalStereotypes: Several stories note stereotypes associated with various Italian regions. For instance, people from Sienna were supposedly stupid and all Venetians are greedy and corrupt (because Venice was a rival of Boccaccio's city state, Florence).
* NaughtyNuns: In a couple of the stories; also frequent is the SexyPriest and DirtyOldMonk.
* OutGambitted: It happens to some of the characters (e.g., Day 7, story 4).
* RapeAsComedy: (Day 3, story 10).
* RapeIsLove: The sixth tale of the third day.
* StockholmSyndrome: (Day 2, Story 10).
* SympatheticAdulterer: Lots of them, generally involving a woman cheating on a much older husband and it often the case that the woman is an ImpoverishedPatrician and the husband a NouveauRiche.
* ToiletHumour
* UnusualEuphemism: "Putting the Devil back into Hell".
* VillainWithGoodPublicity: [[spoiler: Ciapelletto]]
* VillainProtagonist: (Day 1, story 1), (Day 4, story 2), (Day 5, story 1).
* VirginityMakesYouStupid: Alibech (Day 3, story 10).
[[redirect:Literature/TheDecameron]]
30th Dec '11 2:19:05 PM ArcadesSabboth
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** FamilyUnfriendlyAesop



* CorruptChurch: Very frequently referenced.



* DownerEnding: Day 4, although the second tale has a comedic tone and the person who suffers is an AssholeVictim.
* GeniusBonus: The work is subtitled ''Prencipe Galeotto'' (Prince Galehaut), the go-between of Lancelot and Guinevere, a reference to the many go-betweens in ''Decameron'' and also a reference made by [[DivineComedy Dante]] in ''Inferno'' V.
* CorruptChurch: Very frequently referenced.

to:

* DownerEnding: Day 4, although the second tale has a comedic tone and the person who suffers is an AssholeVictim. \n* GeniusBonus: The work is subtitled ''Prencipe Galeotto'' (Prince Galehaut), the go-between of Lancelot and Guinevere, a reference to the many go-betweens in ''Decameron'' and also a reference made by [[DivineComedy Dante]] in ''Inferno'' V.\n* CorruptChurch: Very frequently referenced.



* EsotericHappyEnding: (Day 5, story 1), (Day 5, story 8).



* OlderThanTheyThink: Most of the stories come from sources way older than the book; Bocaccio just brought them to his time.



* ValuesDissonance
27th Oct '11 5:34:42 PM AmusedTroperGuy
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The ''Decameron'' is a classic work of Italian literature, written c.1350-53 by Giovanni Boccaccio.

to:

The ''Decameron'' is a classic work of Italian literature, written c.1350-53 by [[{{Boccaccio}} Giovanni Boccaccio.
Boccaccio]].
7th Oct '11 11:56:57 AM AmusedTroperGuy
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* GeniusBonus: The work is subtitled ''Prencipe Galeotto'' (Prince Galehaut), the go-between of Lancelot and Guinevere, a reference to the many go-betweens in ''Decameron'' and also a reference made by {{Dante}} in ''Inferno'' V.

to:

* GeniusBonus: The work is subtitled ''Prencipe Galeotto'' (Prince Galehaut), the go-between of Lancelot and Guinevere, a reference to the many go-betweens in ''Decameron'' and also a reference made by {{Dante}} [[DivineComedy Dante]] in ''Inferno'' V.
2nd Oct '11 6:26:23 PM BooleanEarth
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* InnocenceVirginOnStupidity: Alibech (Day 3, story 10).



* VillainProtagonist: (Day 1, story 1), (Day 4, story 2), (Day 5, story 1).

to:

* VillainProtagonist: (Day 1, story 1), (Day 4, story 2), (Day 5, story 1).1).
* VirginityMakesYouStupid: Alibech (Day 3, story 10).
18th Sep '11 3:59:22 AM VampireBuddha
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Added DiffLines:

* ToiletHumour
17th Sep '11 2:10:31 PM vindemiatrix
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* FairForItsDay: Treated women as much more willful and independent than its contemporaries, and Jews as much less evil.

to:

* FairForItsDay: Treated women as much more willful and independent than its contemporaries, and Jews as much less generally greedy but not actually evil.
17th Sep '11 2:10:11 PM vindemiatrix
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* FairForItsDay: Treated women as much more willful and independent than its contemporaries.

to:

* FairForItsDay: Treated women as much more willful and independent than its contemporaries.contemporaries, and Jews as much less evil.
17th Sep '11 2:09:50 PM vindemiatrix
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Added DiffLines:

* FairForItsDay: Treated women as much more willful and independent than its contemporaries.
1st Sep '11 9:18:15 AM AmusedTroperGuy
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Added DiffLines:

* InWhichATropeIsDescribed
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.Decameron