History Main / DeathIsASlapOnTheWrist

25th Nov '17 3:22:19 PM MyFinalEdits
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* In ''VideoGame/ChampionsOnline'', death is nearly literally a slap on the wrist: You lose nothing from dying except one of your hero stars, which each give you a 15% damage and healing bonus. In instanced dungeons, the enemies you've already defeated don't even respawn, only those who had survived your attacks receive full health again. If you're in a team, they might not even do that unless [[TotalPartyKill the whole team is defeated near-simultaneously]]. This has led to a 'strategy' for defeating some [[ThatOneBoss particularly difficult bosses]] that the developers have referred to as [[ZergRush 'zerging']], where everyone just bolts back to the boss fight room as quickly as they can after death. They claim to be working on ways to prevent this.

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* In ''VideoGame/ChampionsOnline'', death is nearly literally a slap on the wrist: ''VideoGame/ChampionsOnline'':
**
You lose nothing from dying except one of your hero stars, which each give you a 15% damage and healing bonus. In instanced dungeons, the enemies you've already defeated don't even respawn, only those who had survived your attacks receive full health again. If you're in a team, they might not even do that unless [[TotalPartyKill the whole team is defeated near-simultaneously]]. This has led to a 'strategy' for defeating some [[ThatOneBoss particularly difficult bosses]] that the developers have referred to as [[ZergRush 'zerging']], where everyone just bolts back to the boss fight room as quickly as they can after death. They claim to be working on ways to prevent this.



** On top of the above, you also have the option of spending some of your character's money to repurchase your stars. Seeing as you [[MoneyForNothing spend your money on nearly nothing but this and costume changes]], [[DeathIsCheap death literally is]] [[IncrediblyLamePun cheap]].
* In ''VideoGame/CityOfHeroes'', there's no penalty for dying until level 10, save that you return to the nearest hospital if you don't have another way to revive yourself. After level 10, your character receives experience debt for dying; half the experience you earn goes toward "paying off" the debt. In fact, this can have benefits: you level slower, allowing you to gain more influence (the game's currency).

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** On top of the above, you You also have the option of spending some of your character's money to repurchase your stars. Seeing as you [[MoneyForNothing spend your money on nearly nothing but this and costume changes]], [[DeathIsCheap death literally is]] [[IncrediblyLamePun is cheap]].
* In ''VideoGame/CityOfHeroes'', there's ''VideoGame/CityOfHeroes'':
** There's
no penalty for dying until level 10, save that you return to the nearest hospital if you don't have another way to revive yourself. After level 10, your character receives experience debt for dying; half the experience you earn goes toward "paying off" the debt. In fact, this can have benefits: you level slower, allowing you to gain more influence (the game's currency).



* Death in ''VideoGame/EveOnline'' is a slap on the wrist to your character. Being a capsuleer, you have access to death-defying cloning technology, and getting shot down is a mere inconvenience. This quickly becomes a fate worse than death, however, if you fail to keep your clone up to date with your skills. If you don't, you can lose literally years of game play by dying.

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* Death in ''VideoGame/EveOnline'' is a slap on the wrist to your character. character.
**
Being a capsuleer, you have access to death-defying cloning technology, and getting shot down is a mere inconvenience. This quickly becomes a fate worse than death, however, if you fail to keep your clone up to date with your skills. If you don't, you can lose literally years of game play by dying.



* The death penalty in ''VideoGame/GuildWars'' is so slight it makes some rather frustrating GamePlayAndStorySegregation when a major NPC is killed in the Prophecies campaign. Characters take -15% penalty to their HP and Energy for each death, to a maximum of 60%. This penalty decreases as the character earns XP and is completely erased the moment he sets foot in a town or outpost (which are typically every 1-3 zones). The only annoying thing is that a dead character has to be resurrected manually by a living party member using a resurrection spell--but even that is ignored if the entire party dies, at which point they'll be resurrected and teleported to the nearest "resurrection shrine" they passed (typically at the entrance to the zone or just outside a major checkpoint). There is no gold cost or damage to the progress in the current instance in any case.
** Somewhat less true in Hard Mode though. If every party member reaches the 60% penalty during a wipe, the party is considered defeated and forced to return to their starting outpost. For certain activities like vanquishing, this can mean losing entire ''hours'' of work.
** In ''VideoGame/GuildWars2'', you don't even immediately get "really" dead when your health drops to zero. First, you enter a "downed state", which has a separate health bar that decreases on its own, and you can still try to slowly heal yourself over time or attack in the hope of killing an enemy, which revives you if you manage to do it before your downed health bar is depleted to. If you do manage to fully die ("defeated state" in game terminology), you can still immediately revive at any waypoint for a small monetary cost. And in the personal story, death is even more of a slap on the wrist: you just get thrown back to the instance entrance and can run back and continue fighting. The enemies don't even heal.

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* The death penalty in ''VideoGame/GuildWars'' is so slight it makes some rather frustrating GamePlayAndStorySegregation when a major NPC is killed in the Prophecies campaign. Characters take -15% penalty to their HP and Energy for each death, to a maximum of 60%. This penalty decreases as the character earns XP and is completely erased the moment he sets foot in a town or outpost (which are typically every 1-3 zones). The only annoying thing is that a dead character has to be resurrected manually by a living party member using a resurrection spell--but even that is ignored if the entire party dies, at which point they'll be resurrected and teleported to the nearest "resurrection shrine" they passed (typically at the entrance to the zone or just outside a major checkpoint). There is no gold cost or damage to the progress in the current instance in any case.
** Somewhat less true
case. But in Hard Mode though. If Mode, if every party member reaches the 60% penalty during a wipe, the party is considered defeated and forced to return to their starting outpost. For certain activities like vanquishing, this can mean losing entire ''hours'' of work.
** * In ''VideoGame/GuildWars2'', you don't even immediately get "really" dead when your health drops to zero. First, you enter a "downed state", which has a separate health bar that decreases on its own, and you can still try to slowly heal yourself over time or attack in the hope of killing an enemy, which revives you if you manage to do it before your downed health bar is depleted to. If you do manage to fully die ("defeated state" in game terminology), you can still immediately revive at any waypoint for a small monetary cost. And in the personal story, death is even more of a slap on the wrist: you just get thrown back to the instance entrance and can run back and continue fighting. The enemies don't even heal.



** Dying ''used to'' increase your "dread" level for some time, slightly lowering your maximum morale. Certain classes had ways of removing dread from themselves or their companions, and the penalty didn't usually apply anyway if someone else resurrected you. As of update 10, the penalty was removed completely, probably because it hit some classes harder than others during solo play.



* In ''Richard Garriott's VideoGame/TabulaRasa'', the death that Receptives (that is, player characters) experience on the battlefield is more like clinical death (the heart stops beating) rather than biological death (the brain ceases functioning), which helps [[{{Justification}} explain why]] it's a slap on the wrist. Receptives can either get an emergency teleport off the battlefield to their last spawn point or get revived by squadmates. ''Tabula Rasa'' specifically refers to this as Resuscitation (keeping in line with death being merely clinical death), but players don't get away ''entirely'' scot-free as they have to deal with Resuscitation Trauma: 10% equipment damage and all attributes reduced by 20% for 5 minutes. This condition gets worse with subsequent deaths, reducing stats by 60% for 15 minutes.
** One of the joke announcements at Foreas Base made reference to this:

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* In ''Richard Garriott's VideoGame/TabulaRasa'', the death that Receptives (that is, player characters) experience on the battlefield is more like clinical death (the heart stops beating) rather than biological death (the brain ceases functioning), which helps [[{{Justification}} explain why]] it's a slap on the wrist. Receptives can either get an emergency teleport off the battlefield to their last spawn point or get revived by squadmates. ''Tabula Rasa'' specifically refers to this as Resuscitation (keeping in line with death being merely clinical death), but players don't get away ''entirely'' scot-free as they have to deal with Resuscitation Trauma: 10% equipment damage and all attributes reduced by 20% for 5 minutes. This condition gets worse with subsequent deaths, reducing stats by 60% for 15 minutes.
**
minutes. One of the joke announcements at Foreas Base made reference to this:



* Should you die in ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'', you take a 10% equipment durability penalty and have to reclaim your corpse with your spirit, starting from that zone's graveyard. (If you die from a player killing you, only the latter.) Under optimal conditions, neither penalty sets a player back more than a few minutes (unless players from the opposing faction start camping your corpse). But sometimes the graveyard is far, far away from your corpse (e.g. in the Badlands) and/or the durability penalty makes a huge hit on your virtual wallet. Nevertheless, unlike other [=MMORPGs=], you ''never'' lose experience points or levels and you ''never'' lose any equipment.

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* ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'':
**
Should you die in ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'', die, you take a 10% equipment durability penalty and have to reclaim your corpse with your spirit, starting from that zone's graveyard. (If you die from a player killing you, only the latter.) Under optimal conditions, neither penalty sets a player back more than a few minutes (unless players from the opposing faction start camping your corpse). But sometimes the graveyard is far, far away from your corpse (e.g. in the Badlands) and/or the durability penalty makes a huge hit on your virtual wallet. Nevertheless, unlike other [=MMORPGs=], you ''never'' lose experience points or levels and you ''never'' lose any equipment.



** Death is such a minor penalty that in some situations it is a viable strategy to die in the middle of enemies, run back from the graveyard as a ghost, reclaim your corpse as close to your goal as possible and then get killed again, repeatedly until you're where you want to be. This is called a "corpse run". If you do this naked, your gear takes no damage. It's rarely worth the effort, but there are a few places, such as the capital cities of the opposing faction or a cave required for a level 60 quest chain, where shortcuts aren't possible and a corpse run is quicker than fighting your way through.
*** In addition to the above, some classes have abilities (as well as some items) that can actually be used for suicide. Killing yourself doesn't cause durability damage to your gear so in raids, some players might kill themselves rather than die in a clearly losing fight. There are also resurrection spells, which effectively leave the durability damage as the only penalty. However, this still requires a friendly not-dead character of a class with the appropriate spell nearby, and most resurrection spells cannot be cast when the caster is in combat (druids being a rare exception, and even their combat resurrection spell has limits). Unless, that is, you’re a Shaman, who ''can'' resurrect themselves.
*** Though rarely useful, death can be used offensively. When encountering a [[http://www.wowpedia.org/Shadow_Labyrinth particularly dense]] group of enemies, the main party stands back. A priest takes off all his clothes (to negate the durability loss) and {{Mind Control}}s one enemy. The other enemies kill it, then kill the priest, then walk back to their spawn points. A party member resurrects the priest, who repeats the process until there are few enough enemies left that they can be attacked directly.

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** Death is such a minor penalty that in some situations it is a viable strategy to die in the middle of enemies, run back from the graveyard as a ghost, reclaim your corpse as close to your goal as possible and then get killed again, repeatedly until you're where you want to be. This is called a "corpse run". If you do this naked, your gear takes no damage. It's rarely worth the effort, but there are a few places, such as the capital cities of the opposing faction or a cave required for a level 60 quest chain, where shortcuts aren't possible and a corpse run is quicker than fighting your way through.
*** In addition to the above, some
through. Some classes also have abilities (as well as some items) that can actually be used for suicide. Killing yourself doesn't cause durability damage to your gear so in raids, some players might kill themselves rather than die in a clearly losing fight. There are also resurrection spells, which effectively leave the durability damage as the only penalty. However, this still requires a friendly not-dead character of a class with the appropriate spell nearby, and most resurrection spells cannot be cast when the caster is in combat (druids being a rare exception, and even their combat resurrection spell has limits). Unless, that is, you’re a Shaman, who ''can'' resurrect themselves.
*** ** Though rarely useful, death can be used offensively. When encountering a [[http://www.wowpedia.org/Shadow_Labyrinth particularly dense]] group of enemies, the main party stands back. A priest takes off all his clothes (to negate the durability loss) and {{Mind Control}}s one enemy. The other enemies kill it, then kill the priest, then walk back to their spawn points. A party member resurrects the priest, who repeats the process until there are few enough enemies left that they can be attacked directly.



* In ''VideoGame/{{Psychonauts}}'', you have health. ''And'' lives (well, "astral projections"). When you run out of health, you respawn with one life lost. When you run out of lives and you're in someone's mind, you just get kicked out of their mind, and you can go right back in without having to backtrack.
** For some odd reason, the whole astral projections thing carries over the the ''real world''. If you get mauled painfully by a psychic bear, then you'll simply reappear. And if you lose all your lives in the real world, you'll just reappear again.
** Even more so in the case of drowning. When grabbed and dragged under, you reappear nearby with no loss of health, lives, not even a loading screen. Except for in the final level - going back to the checkpoint is seriously painful because of how NintendoHard the level is.

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* In ''VideoGame/{{Psychonauts}}'', you have health. ''And'' lives (well, "astral projections"). When you run out of health, you respawn with one life lost. When you run out of lives and you're in someone's mind, you just get kicked out of their mind, and you can go right back in without having to backtrack.
**
backtrack. For some odd reason, the whole astral projections thing carries over the the ''real world''. If you get mauled painfully by a psychic bear, then you'll simply reappear. And if you lose all your lives in the real world, you'll just reappear again.
**
again. Even more so in the case of drowning. When drowning as, when grabbed and dragged under, you reappear nearby with no loss of health, lives, not even a loading screen. Except for in the final level - going back to the checkpoint is seriously painful because of how NintendoHard the level is.



* The ''[[Franchise/{{SuperMarioBros}} Mario]]''-offshoot VideoGame/SuperPrincessPeach has no lives. The only real penalty for dying is that levels have no checkpoints, so if you die, you have to start the level over again. You also keep whatever items you found before you died.

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* The ''[[Franchise/{{SuperMarioBros}} Mario]]''-offshoot VideoGame/SuperPrincessPeach ''VideoGame/SuperPrincessPeach'' has no lives. The only real penalty for dying is that levels have no checkpoints, so if you die, you have to start the level over again. You also keep whatever items you found before you died.



* In ''VideoGame/BookwormAdventures'', dying in combat only sends Lex back to the beginning of the chapter he died in with no experience or potions lost (other than the ones he used up during the fight). In fact, if Lex dies in a late chapter of a book, he can replay Moxie's minigames to get more potions and gem tiles. Pretty much the only reason to be concerned about dying is that it lowers your final score.

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* In ''VideoGame/BookwormAdventures'', dying in combat only sends Lex back to the beginning of the chapter he died in with no experience or potions lost (other than the ones he used up during the fight). In fact, if Lex dies in a late chapter of a book, he can replay Moxie's minigames to get more potions and gem tiles. Pretty much the The only reason to be concerned about dying is that it lowers your final score.



* In ''VideoGame/{{Braid}}'', death is hardly consequential. Land on burning [[SpikesOfDoom spikes]]? Rewind. Mauled by a meowing KillerRabbit? Rewind. Consumed by a [[ManEatingPlant Carnivorous Plant]]? Rewind. In fact, if you are attempting to get everything, dying is sometimes ''required''.
** Jonathan Blow has stated that he specifically designed the game this way to deconstruct platformers that are NintendoHard. Of course, ''VideoGame/{{Braid}}'' is itself NintendoHard -- its challenges merely come in the form of puzzles, rather than tests of skill.

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* In ''VideoGame/{{Braid}}'', death is hardly consequential. Land on burning [[SpikesOfDoom spikes]]? Rewind. Mauled by a meowing KillerRabbit? Rewind. Consumed by a [[ManEatingPlant Carnivorous Plant]]? Rewind. In fact, if you are attempting to get everything, dying is sometimes ''required''.
**
''required''. Jonathan Blow has stated that he specifically designed the game this way to deconstruct platformers that are NintendoHard. Of course, ''VideoGame/{{Braid}}'' is itself NintendoHard -- its challenges merely come in the form of puzzles, rather than tests of skill.



* ''VideoGame/MageKnight Apocalypse'' revives you at the nearest magestone crystal when your character dies, pretty much without penalty. Letting your allies die is a bit more serious, they respawn, but a glitch resets their AI, so they'll use physical attacks instead of skills.

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* ''VideoGame/MageKnight Apocalypse'' revives you at the nearest magestone crystal when your character dies, pretty much without penalty. Letting your allies die is a bit more serious, they respawn, but a glitch resets their AI, so they'll use physical attacks instead of skills.



* In ''VideoGame/PlanescapeTorment'' the main character is cursed with immortality, so "death" only means that he falls unconscious for a while before [[WakingUpAtTheMorgue waking inside the nearest morgue]]. This is in fact, the entire premise of the game.
** Though they're far and few between, there are instances where you can die permanently and get a game over.

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* In ''VideoGame/PlanescapeTorment'' the main character is cursed with immortality, so "death" only means that he falls unconscious for a while before [[WakingUpAtTheMorgue waking inside the nearest morgue]]. This is in fact, the entire premise of the game.
**
Though they're far and few between, there are instances where you can die permanently and get a game over.



** Then again, it kinda plays with this trope, both in game and in universe. In game you keep your levels, items and bosses dont respawn but you are still sent back to the bonfire and all enemies respawn. Also, since souls are both EXP and money and you need one liquid humanity to revert back to human upon death you possible could lose all your "money" / progress to the next level and certainly lost one liquid humanity if you died and possible all of them if you had more. In-universe death is also relatively short lived since you get reborn at the bonfire but once you have no motivation to move one you begin to hollow and when you then die you end up as one of the many mindless hollow you meet as enemies.



* If one does not care about the [[BraggingRightsReward just-for-fun]] play ranking at the end of the game, the ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' games would qualify. Dying (or otherwise failing the mission) simply takes you back to the beginning of the room/area you're in, with little to no progress lost.
** The exception is during [[spoiler:the torture scene]] in the first game:

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* If one does not care about the [[BraggingRightsReward just-for-fun]] play ranking at the end of the game, the ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'' games would qualify. Dying (or otherwise failing the mission) simply takes you back to the beginning of the room/area you're in, with little to no progress lost.
**
lost. The exception is during [[spoiler:the torture scene]] in the first game:



* Played fairly straight in ''Anime/HalfPrince'' where most of the story takes place in a game world and dying is just penalized with the loss of a level (where previous games in the series would force you to start over from level 1 if you died.) It gets averted in the final arc when [[spoiler:the [=NPCs=] rebel]] and dying will delete your character completely.

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* Played fairly straight in ''Anime/HalfPrince'' where most of the story takes place in a game world and dying is just penalized with the loss of a level (where previous games in the series would force you to start over from level 1 if you died.) It gets averted in the final arc when [[spoiler:the [=NPCs=] rebel]] and dying will delete your character completely.



* ''TabletopGame/{{Paranoia}}'' has characters cloned in packs of six, with the opportunity to create more. [[EverythingTryingToKillYou It's pretty much necessary]] in Alpha Complex.

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* ''TabletopGame/{{Paranoia}}'' has characters cloned in packs of six, with the opportunity to create more. [[EverythingTryingToKillYou It's pretty much necessary]] in Alpha Complex.
25th Nov '17 7:53:41 AM kasperow
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** Subverted for careless players. If your capsule is destroyed, your body is killed, and you awaken in a new body. This means that you lose any implants and hardwirings you may have had inserted into your brain. And considering the value of some of those implants, that can easily amount to several hundred million ISK!
18th Oct '17 5:03:47 PM TheWarioBros
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* ''VideoGame/WarioLandII'' and ''VideoGame/WarioLand3'' take this to its logical extreme; you can't die at all. Anything that would hurt Wario merely knocks him back or transforms him, with the third game not even having you lose any money in the process. There is a NonStandardGameOver which results in death in ''Wario Land 3'' (getting caught by the final boss), but even that merely knocks Wario back to the map screen with no progress lost.
24th Sep '17 3:19:37 PM nombretomado
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* In ''BillyVersusSnakeman'', failing a mission can be described as anything from mild embarrassment to gruesome death. Yet you'll inexplicably spring back up with no complications whatsoever and the only drawback being that you expended ten stamina without getting anything for it. [[spoiler:This is actually the true power of The Loop, allowing ninja to do anything simply by turning back time eleven seconds if they fail.]] When fighting Phases, you can also have multiple lives and only suffer if you lose them all. Even then, the resultant Corruption only block certain activities until dealt with, and can be removed by spending stamina. Also, getting bingo'd (assassinated) by another player only means that you're barred from certain activities for a few hours, and can also be cured with ease.

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* In ''BillyVersusSnakeman'', ''VideoGame/BillyVsSnakeman'', failing a mission can be described as anything from mild embarrassment to gruesome death. Yet you'll inexplicably spring back up with no complications whatsoever and the only drawback being that you expended ten stamina without getting anything for it. [[spoiler:This is actually the true power of The Loop, allowing ninja to do anything simply by turning back time eleven seconds if they fail.]] When fighting Phases, you can also have multiple lives and only suffer if you lose them all. Even then, the resultant Corruption only block certain activities until dealt with, and can be removed by spending stamina. Also, getting bingo'd (assassinated) by another player only means that you're barred from certain activities for a few hours, and can also be cured with ease.
12th Sep '17 8:09:14 AM QuizzicalPieridine
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* In ''VideoGame/SonicForces'', dying simply brings you back to the last checkpoint. To compensate for this, your final RankInflation will be affected by your retries, and taking damage will make you lose all your rings without being able to reclaim them.



* In ''VideoGame/SonicForces'', dying simply brings you back to the last checkpoint. To compensate for this, your final RankInflation will be affected by your retries, and taking damage will make you lose all your rings without being able to reclaim them.
11th Sep '17 8:32:48 AM QuizzicalPieridine
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* In ''VideoGame/SonicForces'', dying simply brings you back to the last checkpoint. To compensate for this, your final RankInflation will be affected by your retries, and taking damage will make you lose all your rings without being able to reclaim them.
6th Sep '17 7:49:59 AM DoubleU
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* Die in ''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersia2008'' and Elika will will use her magic to return you to the last place you were on solid ground or the start of the current battle as appropriate. She saves you even ''[[GameplayAndStorySegregation when she's completly helpless due to a boss' spell]]''.

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* Die in ''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersia2008'' and Elika will will use her magic to return you to the last place you were on solid ground or the start of the current battle as appropriate. She saves you even ''[[GameplayAndStorySegregation when she's completly completely helpless due to a boss' spell]]''.
30th Aug '17 3:50:11 PM HalcyonDayz
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* In ''VideoGame/LostDimension'', if you fail a mission, you can either retry it with no penalty or return to the Lobby to reassess, get new equipment or try a different mission to level up, again with no penalty. Also, regardless of damage taken, skills expended or KOs during battle, all characters are returned to full status following a mission, win or lose.

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* In ''VideoGame/LostDimension'', if you fail a mission, you can either retry it with no penalty or return to the Lobby to reassess, get new equipment or try a different mission to level up, again with no penalty. Also, regardless of damage taken, skills expended or KOs [=KOs=] during battle, all characters are returned to full status following a mission, win or lose.
14th Aug '17 6:24:13 PM SullenFrog
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* In ''VideoGame/{{Sundered}}'', dying just sends you back to the Sanctuary, where your health elixirs and ammunition will be replenished and where you can immediately spend all the [[ExperiencePoints Shards]] you collected on your last run. The layout of the map ''will'' change slightly every time you die and you will need to backtrack, but otherwise all the progress you’ve made is kept.
29th Jul '17 8:12:09 PM RockRaider
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* ''VideoGame/ScrapLand''. Thanks to The Great Database, anyone who dies will immediately be revived (provided their matrix is still listed in The Great Database, that is). That said, if you don't have any extra lives, you will respawn in jail.
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