History Main / DeaderthanDisco

29th May '17 2:24:42 PM lizaphile
Is there an issue? Send a Message


As the anime boom wore down, [=4Kids=] sold the rights to their biggest CashCowFranchise, ''Pokémon'', to The Pokémon Company International in 2006. Creator/FUNimation [[note]][[{{Irony}} ironically]] 4Kids' home video partner from 2002 to 2009, with exceptions being ''Pokémon'' and ''One Piece''[[/note]] picked up the rights to ''One Piece'' in 2007 and redubbed the whole series far more faithfully to the original. ''Winx Club'' and ''TMNT'' had their licenses cancelled and transferred to Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} (the latter alongside the whole ''Ninja Turtles'' franchise). With only ''Yu-Gi-Oh!'' and a few lesser shows left, 4Kids filed for bankruptcy in 2011 after their longtime CEO stepped down. Creator/TVTokyo and Nihon Ad Systems then filed a lawsuit against 4Kids over ''Yu-Gi-Oh!'', accusing them of underpaying anime licensors and conspiring with Funimation to avoid royalty payments by hiding the income. Creator/{{Konami}} picked up the ''Yu-Gi-Oh!'' franchise and placed it under the 4K Media division, while Creator/SabanBrands acquired the rest of 4Kids' anime and cartoons.\\\

to:

As the anime boom wore down, [=4Kids=] sold the rights to their biggest CashCowFranchise, ''Pokémon'', to The Pokémon Company International in 2006. Creator/FUNimation [[note]][[{{Irony}} ironically]] 4Kids' home video partner from 2002 to 2009, with exceptions being ''Pokémon'' and ''One Piece''[[/note]] picked up the rights to ''One Piece'' in 2007 and redubbed the whole series far more faithfully to the original. ''Winx Club'' and ''TMNT'' had their licenses cancelled and transferred to Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} (the latter alongside the whole ''Ninja Turtles'' franchise). It then lost its slot on Creator/{{Fox}}'s schedule in 2009 in a payment dispute and was unceremoniously replaced with literal {{Infomercial}}s. With only ''Yu-Gi-Oh!'' and a few lesser shows left, 4Kids filed for bankruptcy in 2011 after their longtime CEO stepped down. Creator/TVTokyo and Nihon Ad Systems then filed a lawsuit against 4Kids over ''Yu-Gi-Oh!'', accusing them of underpaying anime licensors and conspiring with Funimation to avoid royalty payments by hiding the income. Creator/{{Konami}} picked up the ''Yu-Gi-Oh!'' franchise and placed it under the 4K Media division, while Creator/SabanBrands acquired the rest of 4Kids' anime and cartoons.\\\
29th May '17 2:21:21 AM SamMax
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The 2000s saw a boom in books about "elite" high school girls. Following the success of the film ''Film/MeanGirls''[[note]]which could be argued, in hindsight, to be an UnbuiltTrope example of the genre due to its examination of the culture of school bullying and deconstruction of the AlphaBitch character type[[/note]], books about the lives of incredibly rich, spoiled teenagers became a big market, with one of the more successful examples, ''Literature/GossipGirl'', being turned into an even more successful TV series. However, due to the AlphaBitch stereotype being so firmly ingrained in pop culture, it is ''very difficult'' to make such characters likable or sympathetic. As youth bullying became a hot topic towards the end of the decade, ValuesDissonance turned the main characters of these books into {{Villain Protagonist}}s, while the Great Recession around the same time made the large displays of wealth that were often featured in them look tacky and tasteless. Many of these series are remembered solely as SnarkBait among the people who grew up reading them nowadays.

to:

* The 2000s saw a boom in books about "elite" high school girls. Following the success of the film ''Film/MeanGirls''[[note]]which could be argued, in hindsight, to be an UnbuiltTrope example of the genre due to its examination of the culture of school bullying and deconstruction of the AlphaBitch character type[[/note]], books about the lives of incredibly rich, spoiled teenagers became a big market, with one of the more successful examples, ''Literature/GossipGirl'', being turned into an even more successful TV series. However, due to the AlphaBitch stereotype being so firmly ingrained in pop culture, it is ''very difficult'' to make such characters likable or sympathetic. As youth bullying became a hot topic towards the end of the decade, ValuesDissonance turned the main characters of these books into {{Villain Protagonist}}s, while the Great Recession around the same time made the large displays of wealth that were often featured in them look tacky and tasteless. Many Nowadays, if many of these series are remembered solely at all, it's mainly as SnarkBait among the people who grew up reading them nowadays.
them.
26th May '17 12:33:12 PM AnonymousBosch
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Today, Ringwald, once a sensation, is now seen as [[AnyoneRememberPogs an '80s punchline]]. She mostly acts in smaller roles on television and DirectToVideo movies for [[MoneyDearBoy a quick paycheck]], such as the protagonist's mother on ''Series/TheSecretLifeOfTheAmericanTeenager'', and Aunt Bailey in the notorious BoxOfficeBomb ''Film/JemAndTheHolograms''. Neither of these roles particularly won any fans back and arguably lent further credence to the already vicious backlash. Nowadays (as of 2017) she can be seen on ''Series/{{Riverdale}}'' as Franchise/{{Archie|Comics}}'s mother Mary; the show was a hit right out of the gate and was renewed for a second season, but Ringwald doesn't seem to be included in the hype, and at this point, it will take a miracle for her to ever regain a fraction of the respect that she has lost.

to:

Today, Ringwald, once a sensation, is now seen as [[AnyoneRememberPogs an '80s punchline]]. She mostly acts in smaller roles on television and DirectToVideo movies for [[MoneyDearBoy a quick paycheck]], such as the protagonist's mother on ''Series/TheSecretLifeOfTheAmericanTeenager'', and Aunt Bailey in the notorious BoxOfficeBomb ''Film/JemAndTheHolograms''. Neither of these roles particularly won any fans back and arguably lent further credence to the already vicious backlash. Nowadays (as of 2017) she can be seen on ''Series/{{Riverdale}}'' as Franchise/{{Archie|Comics}}'s mother Mary; the show was a hit right out of the gate and was renewed for a second season, season... [[MyFriendsAndZoidberg but Ringwald doesn't seem to be included in the hype, and at hype]]. At this point, it will take a miracle for her to ever regain a fraction of the respect that she has lost.
26th May '17 12:27:26 PM AnonymousBosch
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Today, Ringwald, once a sensation, is now seen as an '80s punchline. She mostly acts in smaller roles on television and DirectToVideo movies for [[MoneyDearBoy a quick paycheck]], such as the protagonist's mother on ''Series/TheSecretLifeOfTheAmericanTeenager'', and Aunt Bailey in the notorious BoxOfficeBomb ''Film/JemAndTheHolograms''. Neither of these roles particularly won any fans back and arguably lent further credence to the already vicious backlash. Nowadays (as of 2017) she can be seen on ''Series/{{Riverdale}}'' as Franchise/{{Archie|Comics}}'s mother Mary; the show was a hit right out of the gate and was renewed for a second season, but Ringwald doesn't seem to be included in the hype, and at this point, it will take a miracle for her to ever regain a fraction of the respect that she has lost.

to:

Today, Ringwald, once a sensation, is now seen as [[AnyoneRememberPogs an '80s punchline.punchline]]. She mostly acts in smaller roles on television and DirectToVideo movies for [[MoneyDearBoy a quick paycheck]], such as the protagonist's mother on ''Series/TheSecretLifeOfTheAmericanTeenager'', and Aunt Bailey in the notorious BoxOfficeBomb ''Film/JemAndTheHolograms''. Neither of these roles particularly won any fans back and arguably lent further credence to the already vicious backlash. Nowadays (as of 2017) she can be seen on ''Series/{{Riverdale}}'' as Franchise/{{Archie|Comics}}'s mother Mary; the show was a hit right out of the gate and was renewed for a second season, but Ringwald doesn't seem to be included in the hype, and at this point, it will take a miracle for her to ever regain a fraction of the respect that she has lost.
26th May '17 10:48:31 AM twilicorn
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Today, Ringwald, once a sensation, is now seen as an '80s punchline. She mostly acts in smaller roles on television and DirectToVideo movies for [[MoneyDearBoy a quick paycheck]], such as the protagonist's mother on ''Series/TheSecretLifeOfTheAmericanTeenager'', and Aunt Bailey in the much-reviled ''Film/JemAndTheHolograms'', which was infamously pulled from theatres. Neither of these roles particularly won any fans back and arguably lent further credence to the already vicious backlash. Lately, she's been cast in the 2017 CW drama ''Series/{{Riverdale}}'' as Franchise/{{Archie|Comics}}'s mother Mary, but at this point, it will take a miracle for her to ever regain a fraction of the respect that she has lost.

to:

Today, Ringwald, once a sensation, is now seen as an '80s punchline. She mostly acts in smaller roles on television and DirectToVideo movies for [[MoneyDearBoy a quick paycheck]], such as the protagonist's mother on ''Series/TheSecretLifeOfTheAmericanTeenager'', and Aunt Bailey in the much-reviled ''Film/JemAndTheHolograms'', which was infamously pulled from theatres.notorious BoxOfficeBomb ''Film/JemAndTheHolograms''. Neither of these roles particularly won any fans back and arguably lent further credence to the already vicious backlash. Lately, she's been cast in the 2017 CW drama Nowadays (as of 2017) she can be seen on ''Series/{{Riverdale}}'' as Franchise/{{Archie|Comics}}'s mother Mary, Mary; the show was a hit right out of the gate and was renewed for a second season, but Ringwald doesn't seem to be included in the hype, and at this point, it will take a miracle for her to ever regain a fraction of the respect that she has lost.



However, this was not the case with 2008's ''Disaster Movie'', which more than lived up to its title. ''Disaster'' zoomed to the top of the [=IMDb=]'s Bottom 100 upon release, landed a 1% on Rotten Tomatoes and bombed at the box office. After 2010's ''Film/VampiresSuck'', Seltzer and Friedberg lost major studio backing and went indie. The bottom completely fell out when their first two indie projects, ''The Starving Games'' and ''Best Night Ever'', both got a rare [[ZeroPercentApprovalRating 0%]] on Rotten Tomatoes (and both had horrible box office returns, and it was so bad in the case of ''Best Night Ever'' that its budget has apparently not been made known to the public). Their trend of utter failure has only continued with ''Superfast!'' [[EpicFail only making a]] ''[[EpicFail twentieth]]'' [[EpicFail of its budget in box office profits]]. They're still busy making movies, but the future isn't looking very bright for them, and when you have fellow bad parodist Marlon Wayans announcing he's done with parody movies after ''his'' latest failure with critics, that's saying something.\\

to:

However, this was not the case with 2008's ''Disaster Movie'', which more than lived up to its title. ''Disaster'' zoomed to the top of the [=IMDb=]'s Bottom 100 upon release, landed a 1% on Rotten Tomatoes and bombed at the box office. After 2010's ''Film/VampiresSuck'', Seltzer and Friedberg lost major studio backing and went indie. The bottom completely fell out when their first two indie projects, ''The Starving Games'' and ''Best Night Ever'', both got a rare [[ZeroPercentApprovalRating 0%]] on Rotten Tomatoes (and both had horrible box office returns, and it was so bad in to the case of ''Best Night Ever'' that its point where the latter's budget has apparently not been made known to the public). Their trend of utter failure has only continued with ''Superfast!'' [[EpicFail only making a]] ''[[EpicFail twentieth]]'' [[EpicFail of its budget in box office profits]]. They're still busy making movies, but the future isn't looking very bright for them, and when you have fellow bad parodist Marlon Wayans announcing he's done with parody movies after ''his'' latest failure with critics, that's saying something.\\
25th May '17 7:24:26 AM TheRedRedKroovy
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The JiggleShow. Starting in TheSeventies, there was a surge in the popularity of shows like ''Series/ThreesCompany'', ''Series/CharliesAngels'', and to a lesser extent the ''Series/WonderWoman'' series and ''Series/TheDukesOfHazzard'', which were long on beautiful actresses but (perceived as) a little short on plot. The joke was that they were especially popular among sexually frustrated men, who would be willing to sit through thirty minutes of flimsy dialogue for the chance to see Suzanne Somers in a bikini or Farrah Fawcett run after a bad guy in a tight sweater. The genre received a second wind in TheNineties with ''Series/{{Baywatch}}'' and its assorted copycats, but with the rise of easily accessible pornography on the internet and more liberal views towards sexual matters, shows that once expected to coast solely on the beauty of their casts increasingly found themselves disappointed, especially once more 'respectable' programs began showing more sexually provocative content up to and including (on the premium cable networks) full-on nudity. This was best demonstrated in 2011, when ''Series/ThePlayboyClub'' and a {{revival}} of ''Charlie's Angels'' both got canned after only a few poorly-rated episodes and scathing reviews. Today, the era of "jiggle television" is remembered as fairly quaint and embarrassing, a relic of the days when television had just learned it could start pushing boundaries but not yet really knowing what to do with its newfound freedom.

to:

* The JiggleShow. Starting in TheSeventies, there was a surge in the popularity of shows like ''Series/ThreesCompany'', ''Series/CharliesAngels'', and to a lesser extent the ''Series/WonderWoman'' series and ''Series/TheDukesOfHazzard'', which were long on beautiful actresses who [[{{Gainaxing}} didn't wear bras]] but (perceived as) generally seen as a little short on plot. The joke was that Even at the time, they were especially popular among seen as GuiltyPleasures, the joke being that their fanbases were made up mostly of sexually frustrated men, men who would be willing to sit through thirty minutes of flimsy dialogue for the chance to see Suzanne Somers in [[BeachEpisode a bikini bikini]] or Farrah Fawcett run after a bad guy in a [[SweaterGirl tight sweater.sweater]]. The genre received a second wind in TheNineties with ''Series/{{Baywatch}}'' and its assorted copycats, but with the rise of easily accessible pornography on the internet and more liberal views towards sexual matters, shows that once expected to coast solely on the beauty of their casts increasingly found themselves disappointed, especially once more 'respectable' programs began showing more sexually provocative content up to and including (on the premium cable networks) full-on nudity. This was best demonstrated in 2011, when ''Series/ThePlayboyClub'' and a {{revival}} of ''Charlie's Angels'' both got canned after only a few poorly-rated episodes and scathing reviews. Today, the era of "jiggle television" is remembered as fairly quaint and embarrassing, a relic of the days when television had just learned it could start pushing boundaries but not yet really knowing what to do with its newfound freedom.
24th May '17 11:57:09 PM TheRedRedKroovy
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The JiggleShow. During the Seventies and Eighties, shows like ''Series/ThreesCompany'', ''Series/CharliesAngels'', and, to a lesser extent, the ''Series/WonderWoman'' series and ''Series/TheDukesOfHazzard'', which were long on beautiful actresses but (perceived as) a little short on plot, were incredibly popular. The joke was that they were especially popular amongst sexually frustrated men, who would be willing to sit through thirty minutes of flimsy dialogue for the chance to see Suzanne Somers in a bikini or Farrah Fawcett run after a bad guy in a tight sweater. The genre peaked with ''Series/{{Baywatch}}'', but with the rise of easily accessible pornography on the internet and more liberal views towards sexual matters, shows that are expecting to coast solely on the beauty of their casts are finding themselves disappointed. This was best demonstrated in 2011, when ''Series/ThePlayboyClub'' and a {{revival}} of ''Charlie's Angels'' both got canned after only a few poorly-rated episodes and scathing reviews.

to:

* The JiggleShow. During Starting in TheSeventies, there was a surge in the Seventies and Eighties, popularity of shows like ''Series/ThreesCompany'', ''Series/CharliesAngels'', and, and to a lesser extent, extent the ''Series/WonderWoman'' series and ''Series/TheDukesOfHazzard'', which were long on beautiful actresses but (perceived as) a little short on plot, were incredibly popular. plot. The joke was that they were especially popular amongst among sexually frustrated men, who would be willing to sit through thirty minutes of flimsy dialogue for the chance to see Suzanne Somers in a bikini or Farrah Fawcett run after a bad guy in a tight sweater. The genre peaked received a second wind in TheNineties with ''Series/{{Baywatch}}'', ''Series/{{Baywatch}}'' and its assorted copycats, but with the rise of easily accessible pornography on the internet and more liberal views towards sexual matters, shows that are expecting once expected to coast solely on the beauty of their casts are finding increasingly found themselves disappointed. disappointed, especially once more 'respectable' programs began showing more sexually provocative content up to and including (on the premium cable networks) full-on nudity. This was best demonstrated in 2011, when ''Series/ThePlayboyClub'' and a {{revival}} of ''Charlie's Angels'' both got canned after only a few poorly-rated episodes and scathing reviews.
reviews. Today, the era of "jiggle television" is remembered as fairly quaint and embarrassing, a relic of the days when television had just learned it could start pushing boundaries but not yet really knowing what to do with its newfound freedom.
24th May '17 5:19:05 PM CRE040295
Is there an issue? Send a Message


As the anime boom wore down, 4kids sold the rights to their biggest CashCowFranchise, ''Pokémon'', to The Pokémon Company International in 2006. Creator/FUNimation [[note]][[{{Irony}} ironically]] 4Kids' home video partner from 2002 to 2009, with exceptions being ''Pokémon'' and ''One Piece''[[/note]] picked up the rights to ''One Piece'' in 2007 and redubbed the whole series far more faithfully to the original. ''Winx Club'' and ''TMNT'' had their licenses cancelled and transferred to Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} (the latter alongside the whole ''Ninja Turtles'' franchise). With only ''Yu-Gi-Oh!'' and a few lesser shows left, 4Kids filed for bankruptcy in 2011 after their longtime CEO stepped down. Creator/TVTokyo and Nihon Ad Systems then filed a lawsuit against 4Kids over ''Yu-Gi-Oh!'', accusing them of underpaying anime licensors and conspiring with Funimation to avoid royalty payments by hiding the income. Creator/{{Konami}} picked up the ''Yu-Gi-Oh!'' franchise and placed it under the 4K Media division, while Creator/SabanBrands acquired the rest of 4Kids' anime and cartoons.\\\

to:

As the anime boom wore down, 4kids [=4Kids=] sold the rights to their biggest CashCowFranchise, ''Pokémon'', to The Pokémon Company International in 2006. Creator/FUNimation [[note]][[{{Irony}} ironically]] 4Kids' home video partner from 2002 to 2009, with exceptions being ''Pokémon'' and ''One Piece''[[/note]] picked up the rights to ''One Piece'' in 2007 and redubbed the whole series far more faithfully to the original. ''Winx Club'' and ''TMNT'' had their licenses cancelled and transferred to Creator/{{Nickelodeon}} (the latter alongside the whole ''Ninja Turtles'' franchise). With only ''Yu-Gi-Oh!'' and a few lesser shows left, 4Kids filed for bankruptcy in 2011 after their longtime CEO stepped down. Creator/TVTokyo and Nihon Ad Systems then filed a lawsuit against 4Kids over ''Yu-Gi-Oh!'', accusing them of underpaying anime licensors and conspiring with Funimation to avoid royalty payments by hiding the income. Creator/{{Konami}} picked up the ''Yu-Gi-Oh!'' franchise and placed it under the 4K Media division, while Creator/SabanBrands acquired the rest of 4Kids' anime and cartoons.\\\
14th May '17 1:29:22 PM TheRedRedKroovy
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Of all the members of the Creator/BratPack, none has fallen quite as hard as Creator/MollyRingwald. Back in the 1980s, Ringwald was both the face of the group and a force to be reckoned with. She achieved a Golden Globe nomination for ''Film/{{Tempest}}'' and rose to stardom as a teen actress with her role in ''Film/SixteenCandles'' and her subsequent performances in ''Film/TheBreakfastClub'' and ''Film/PrettyInPink''. Critics, including Creator/RogerEbert, praised her for her charm and down-to-earth everygirl qualities. She even made the cover of Time Magazine around the time of ''Pretty in Pink'' was released, further cementing her meteoric rise to fame.\\

to:

* Of all the members of the Creator/BratPack, none has fallen quite as hard as Creator/MollyRingwald. Back in the 1980s, Ringwald was both the face of the group and a force to be reckoned with. legitimate A-lister. She achieved a Golden Globe nomination for ''Film/{{Tempest}}'' and rose to stardom as a teen actress with her role roles in ''Film/SixteenCandles'' and her subsequent performances in ''Film/TheBreakfastClub'' ''Film/SixteenCandles'', ''Film/TheBreakfastClub'', and ''Film/PrettyInPink''. Critics, including Creator/RogerEbert, praised her for her charm and down-to-earth everygirl qualities. She even made the cover of Time Magazine ''Time'' magazine around the time of ''Pretty in Pink'' was released, further cementing her meteoric rise to fame.\\



However, Ringwald would cut ties with writer/director Creator/JohnHughes in an effort to progress into roles that were more respectable. [[TemptingFate Almost immediately]], things started to go south, and ''fast''. ''The Pick-Up Artist'' and ''Fresh Horses'' were both critical and box office failures, and when Ringwald tried to do damage control by [[OscarBait aiming for the Oscar]] with the teen pregnancy film ''Film/ForKeeps'', the destruction of her reputation was more or less complete. She then turned down the lead roles in the hit movies ''Film/{{Ghost}}'' and ''Film/PrettyWoman''. Critics and fans turned against her in droves, with producer Jeffrey Katzenberg infamously saying he "wouldn't know (her) if she sat on his face." By the time the disastrous ''Betsy's Wedding'' came out, Ringwald's career was already over. Adding insult to injury, Ringwald began to receive scathing criticism for her acting: ironically, the very thing that got her noticed in the first place.\\

to:

However, Ringwald would cut ties with writer/director Creator/JohnHughes in an effort to progress into roles that were more respectable.grown-up roles. [[TemptingFate Almost immediately]], things started to go south, and ''fast''. ''The Pick-Up Artist'' and ''Fresh Horses'' were both critical and box office failures, and when Ringwald tried to do damage control by [[OscarBait aiming for the Oscar]] with the teen pregnancy film ''Film/ForKeeps'', the destruction of her reputation was more or less complete. She then turned down the lead roles in the hit movies ''Film/{{Ghost}}'' and ''Film/PrettyWoman''.''Film/PrettyWoman'', which [[StarMakingRole catapulted]] Creator/DemiMoore (a fellow Brat Packer) and Creator/JuliaRoberts onto the A-list. Critics and fans turned against her in droves, with producer Jeffrey Katzenberg infamously saying he "wouldn't know (her) if she sat on his face." By the time the disastrous ''Betsy's Wedding'' came out, Ringwald's career was already over. Adding insult to injury, Ringwald began to receive scathing criticism for her acting: ironically, the very thing that got her noticed in the first place.\\



While ''The Breakfast Club'' still stands as a classic on its own merits, ''Sixteen Candles'' and ''Pretty in Pink'' have been largely forgotten, solely remembered as [[UnintentionalPeriodPiece '80s time-capsule pieces]] rife with questionable messages. Ringwald's characters, once seen as progressive for the time, are now viewed as {{wangst}}y, [[ItsAllAboutMe egotistical]] {{Jerkass}}es. At best, she's considered a [[OneHitWonder one-trick pony]] for her performance in ''The Breakfast Club'', [[DamnedByFaintPraise which isn't saying much]]; some viewers are quick to admit it's one of the few weaker elements of the movie. At the absolute worst, she's the personification of everything that was wrong with teen actresses of the decade. [[FleetingDemographic Many former fans that idolized her in their youth have outgrown her]], and will [[OldShame vehemently refuse to admit she was even that good to begin with]]; it doesn't help that even saying you like her as an actress is considered by many to be a form of social suicide, her now-miniscule fanbase consisting of [[DiscoDan hardcore eighties enthusiasts]], [[JadedWashout stuck-in-the-past losers]], and [[AmazinglyEmbarrassingParents uncool parents]]. One sign of this hatedom was the ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' episode "[[Recap/FamilyGuyS5E18MeetTheQuagmires Meet the Quagmires]]", where Peter [[EveryoneHasStandards reacts in disgust]] after he finds out he's married Ringwald in another timeline.\\

to:

While ''The Breakfast Club'' still stands as a classic on its own merits, it's now regarded as more of an ensemble piece than anything, and her performance is often seen as one of the few weaker elements of the movie. ''Sixteen Candles'' and ''Pretty in Pink'' have been largely forgotten, solely Pink'', meanwhile, are remembered primarily as [[UnintentionalPeriodPiece '80s time-capsule pieces]] rife with questionable messages. Ringwald's characters, once seen as progressive for the time, are now viewed as {{wangst}}y, [[ItsAllAboutMe egotistical]] {{Jerkass}}es. At best, she's considered a [[OneHitWonder one-trick pony]] OneHitWonder for her performance in ''The Breakfast Club'', [[DamnedByFaintPraise which isn't saying much]]; some viewers are quick to admit it's one of the few weaker elements of the movie. At the absolute Club'' who was only good in her collaborations with John Hughes, and at worst, she's the personification of everything that was wrong with teen actresses of the decade. {{Teen Idol}}s of TheEighties. [[FleetingDemographic Many former fans that idolized her in their youth have outgrown her]], and will [[OldShame vehemently refuse to admit she was even that good to begin with]]; it doesn't help that even saying you like her as an actress is considered by many to be a form of social suicide, her now-miniscule fanbase consisting of [[DiscoDan hardcore eighties enthusiasts]], [[JadedWashout stuck-in-the-past losers]], and [[AmazinglyEmbarrassingParents uncool parents]].with]]. One sign of this hatedom was the ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' episode "[[Recap/FamilyGuyS5E18MeetTheQuagmires Meet the Quagmires]]", where Peter [[EveryoneHasStandards reacts in disgust]] after he finds out he's married Ringwald in another timeline.\\



Today, Ringwald, once a sensation, is now virtually uninsurable. She mostly acts in smaller roles on television and DirectToVideo movies for [[MoneyDearBoy a quick paycheck]], such as the protagonist's mother on ''Series/TheSecretLifeOfTheAmericanTeenager'', and Aunt Bailey in the much-reviled ''Film/JemAndTheHolograms'', which was infamously pulled from theatres. Neither of these roles particularly won any fans back and arguably lent further credence to the already vicious backlash. Lately, she's been cast in the 2017 CW drama ''Series/{{Riverdale}}'' as Franchise/{{Archie|Comics}}'s mother Mary, but at this point, it will take a miracle for her to ever regain a fraction of the respect that she has lost.

to:

Today, Ringwald, once a sensation, is now virtually uninsurable.seen as an '80s punchline. She mostly acts in smaller roles on television and DirectToVideo movies for [[MoneyDearBoy a quick paycheck]], such as the protagonist's mother on ''Series/TheSecretLifeOfTheAmericanTeenager'', and Aunt Bailey in the much-reviled ''Film/JemAndTheHolograms'', which was infamously pulled from theatres. Neither of these roles particularly won any fans back and arguably lent further credence to the already vicious backlash. Lately, she's been cast in the 2017 CW drama ''Series/{{Riverdale}}'' as Franchise/{{Archie|Comics}}'s mother Mary, but at this point, it will take a miracle for her to ever regain a fraction of the respect that she has lost.
11th May '17 11:46:43 AM Coolnut
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* The leisure suit became popular from the [=1960s=] to the [=1970s=] when the abundance of synthetic materials, cheap prices, and a dislike for formality made it the fashion symbol for men. Its height of popularity was during the Seventies, when it was frequently associated with disco culture. But when disco, well, [[TropeNamer became dead]], the leisure suit went with it -- and by the Eighties, it was commonly considered emblematic of [=70s=] kitsch. Today it is little known for anything other than clueless fashion sense, such as the ''VideoGame/LeisureSuitLarry'' video game series.
This list shows the last 10 events of 1272. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.DeaderthanDisco