History Main / DeaderthanDisco

22nd Apr '18 8:57:08 AM Midna
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* "Endgame", the famous 4-part supposed-to-have-been GrandFinale for ''ComicBook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog'', at one time was a popular storyline, with how the stakes seem to rise, culminating in a one-on-one NoHoldsBarredBeatdown between Sonic and Robotnik. However, due to a combination of time passing and the bad publicity garnered towards writer Ken Penders in the wake of his lawsuit that led to the comic being forced into a ContinuityReboot, many fans have begun to call it nothing more than an IdiotPlot.

to:

* "Endgame", the famous 4-part supposed-to-have-been GrandFinale for ''ComicBook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog'', at one time was a popular storyline, with how the stakes seem to rise, culminating in a one-on-one NoHoldsBarredBeatdown between Sonic and Robotnik. However, due to a combination of time passing and the bad publicity garnered towards writer Ken Penders in the wake of his lawsuit that led to the comic Archie series first undergoing a ContinuityReboot and then being forced into a ContinuityReboot, canceled entirely, many fans have begun to call it nothing more than an IdiotPlot.



* Dreamwave's ''ComicBook/TransformersGenerationOne'' comics went though this ''hard.'' When they were first announced, they had 'superstar manga-like artist' Pat Lee doing both all the promotions and a whole lot of art. The cast was straight from the old cartoon, coming during a period of 80s revival that ate those characters up like popcorn. It was advertised as a superb comeback, and sure enough, Dreamwave's entire original miniseries cracked the top ten in sales charts, with most issues even making it to #1. The success spread to the ''Anime/TransformersArmada'' comic as well, making it one of the only non-G1 comics to achieve mainstream success. They followed up with ''Transformers: The War Within'', probably the most influential series to ever have Optimus Prime on the cover. Packaging art and merchandise of the time switched to a Dreamwave-esque style, and many of the designs of the various series (particularly ''War Within'') would be incorporated into the following ''Anime/TransformersCybertron.''\\\

to:

* Dreamwave's ''ComicBook/TransformersGenerationOne'' comics went though this ''hard.'' When they were first announced, they had 'superstar manga-like artist' Pat Lee doing both all the promotions and a whole lot of art. The cast was straight from the old original ''WesternAnimation/TheTransformers'' cartoon, coming during a period of 80s revival that ate those characters up like popcorn. It was advertised as a superb comeback, and sure enough, Dreamwave's entire original miniseries cracked the top ten in sales charts, with most issues even making it to #1. The success spread to the ''Anime/TransformersArmada'' comic as well, making it one of the only non-G1 comics to achieve mainstream success. They followed up with ''Transformers: The War Within'', probably the most influential series to ever have Optimus Prime on the cover. Packaging art and merchandise of the time switched to a Dreamwave-esque style, and many of the designs of the various series (particularly ''War Within'') would be incorporated into the following ''Anime/TransformersCybertron.''\\\
20th Apr '18 1:19:02 PM SSJMagus
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Creator/RobLiefeld, while never a critical favourite, [[CriticalDissonance was nevertheless considered one of the most successful writers/artists during]] UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks. He created several famous characters, such as ComicBook/{{Deadpool}} and ComicBook/{{Cable}}. He also helped start Creator/ImageComics and was influential through his work on ''Comicbook/YoungBlood''. However, after the Dark Age ended, he became a laughingstock for being a LazyArtist (not drawing feet, creating unrealistic/generic character designs, and overusing pouches), and for copying other people (for example, Deadpool started of as an {{Expy}} of {{ComicBook/Deathstroke}}). Today ''Youngblood'' is usually seen as SoBadItsGood (though the later revivals of the series in 1998, 2008 and 2012 were better received) and even Liefeld himself considers the first few issues of the series to be an OldShame (though many have praised the ''Youngblood'' trade paperback for fixing many of the problems the original issues had) which is generally considered a poor rip-off of the ''Comicbook/TeenTitans'', and Image has moved away from superhero comics like it. Cable and Deadpool are still popular, but that's [[MyRealDaddy thanks to other writers]] who developed them in different ways than Liefeld and are generally considered their ''true'' creators by fans. What little goodwill Liefeld still had by the 2000s dried up after a much-publicized feud with Creator/PeterDavid after the latter revealed that the character Shatterstar, who had been created by Liefeld for ''ComicBook/XForce'' and was at the time being used by David in ''ComicBook/XFactor'', was bisexual. This move was very well-received by fans, but Liefeld was incensed that the move had been made without consulting him and many felt his comments on the subject were worryingly close to biphobic (though WebVideo/AtopTheFourthWall's numerous reviews of his comics didn't help). Nowadays, the only times you hear about Liefeld is mockery of his art-style or his lackluster characters, and comic book fans consider him to be the ultimate embodiment of everything wrong with The Dark Age Of Comics.

to:

* Creator/RobLiefeld, while never a critical favourite, [[CriticalDissonance was nevertheless considered one of the most successful writers/artists during]] UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks. He created several famous characters, such as ComicBook/{{Deadpool}} and ComicBook/{{Cable}}. He also helped start Creator/ImageComics and was influential through his work on ''Comicbook/YoungBlood''. However, after the Dark Age ended, he became a laughingstock for being a LazyArtist (not drawing feet, creating unrealistic/generic character designs, and overusing pouches), and for copying other people (for example, Deadpool started of as an {{Expy}} of {{ComicBook/Deathstroke}}). Today ''Youngblood'' is usually seen as SoBadItsGood (though the later revivals of the series in 1998, 2008 and 2012 were better received) and even Liefeld himself considers the first few issues of the series to be an OldShame (though many have praised the ''Youngblood'' trade paperback for fixing many of the problems the original issues had) which is generally considered a poor rip-off of the ''Comicbook/TeenTitans'', and Image has moved away from superhero comics like it. Cable and Deadpool are still popular, but that's [[MyRealDaddy thanks to other writers]] who developed them in different ways than Liefeld and are generally considered their ''true'' creators by fans. What little goodwill Liefeld still had by the 2000s dried up after a much-publicized feud with Creator/PeterDavid after the latter revealed that the character Shatterstar, who had been created by Liefeld for ''ComicBook/XForce'' and was at the time being used by David in ''ComicBook/XFactor'', was bisexual. This move was very well-received by fans, fans (and given Shatterstar's origins, seems fairly obvious in hindsight), but Liefeld was incensed that the move had been made without consulting him and many felt his comments on the subject were worryingly close to biphobic (though WebVideo/AtopTheFourthWall's numerous reviews of his comics didn't help). Nowadays, the only times you hear about Liefeld is mockery of his art-style or his lackluster characters, and comic book fans consider him to be the ultimate embodiment of everything wrong with The Dark Age Of Comics.
19th Apr '18 7:26:47 AM HighCrate
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[folder:Arts]]
* ModernArt and ContemporaryArt styles tend to be particularly prone to this phenomenon. Once a certain stylistic phenomenon dies down or goes off vogue, it more or less becomes DeaderThanDisco. There has been very little, to say, new works of art in Cubism after 1921.
[[/folder]]
19th Apr '18 7:09:25 AM morane
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Arts]]
* ModernArt and ContemporaryArt styles tend to be particularly prone to this phenomenon. Once a certain stylistic phenomenon dies down or goes off vogue, it more or less becomes DeaderThanDisco. There has been very little, to say, new works of art in Cubism after 1921.
[[/folder]]
15th Apr '18 11:27:18 AM Chasem
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Creator/FourKidsEntertainment was once a powerhouse in importing anime like ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'' and ''Anime/YuGiOh'' and dubbing them for American audiences. By censoring and editing these shows for children's television, 4Kids gained a minor, perhaps unfair, {{hatedom}} among anime purists, but these translations were nevertheless commercially successful enough for the company to import and produce more titles like ''[[Manga/OjamajoDoremi Magical Doremi]]'', ''WesternAnimation/WinxClub'', ''Anime/SonicX'' and ''WesternAnimation/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles2003''.\\\

to:

* Creator/FourKidsEntertainment was once a powerhouse in importing anime like ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'' and ''Anime/YuGiOh'' and dubbing them for American audiences. By censoring and editing these shows for children's television, 4Kids gained a minor, perhaps unfair, {{hatedom}} among anime purists, but these translations were nevertheless commercially successful enough for the company to import and produce more titles like ''[[Manga/OjamajoDoremi Magical Doremi]]'', ''WesternAnimation/WinxClub'', ''Anime/SonicX'' ''WesternAnimation/WinxClub'' and ''WesternAnimation/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles2003''.''Anime/SonicX''. This also gave them leave to produce in-house titles such as ''WesternAnimation/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles2003'', which, in a stark contrast to their anime dubs, was well-received among older viewers.\\\
13th Apr '18 9:59:38 AM 64SuperNintendo
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[folder: Theater]]

to:

[[folder: Theater]]
Theatre]]
12th Apr '18 6:09:12 AM HighCrate
Is there an issue? Send a Message


This is something -- an individual work, a creator/performer/artist, an entire genre -- that was very, very popular in its day. But at some point, it somehow just got too popular. It was talked about on ''every'' radio station, on ''every'' TV network, on ''every'' chat room (not that they'd been invented then...). It was [[WolverinePublicity overexposed until people got bored with it]], and it got so much publicity and [[SturgeonsLaw so many bad]] [[FollowTheLeader imitators]] that there was plenty of time to notice each and every flaw and dissect them under a microscope. Soon, small insignificant flaws become regarded as [[FranchiseOriginalSin unavoidable and unforgivable sins]]. The final tell-tale sign is when ridicule, or even hatred, comes not just for [[{{Hatedom}} the thing itself]], but for [[FanHater its fans]]. [[AcceptableTargets They become the subject of nasty, highly-specific stereotypes]], and [[SugarWiki/GushingAboutShowsYouLike gushing about how you like it]] online is considered {{troll}}ing.

to:

This is something -- an individual work, the body of work of a particular creator/performer/artist, an entire genre -- that was very, very popular in its day. But at some point, it somehow just got too popular. It was talked about on ''every'' radio station, on ''every'' TV network, on ''every'' chat room (not that they'd been invented then...). It was [[WolverinePublicity overexposed until people got bored with it]], and it got so much publicity and [[SturgeonsLaw so many bad]] [[FollowTheLeader imitators]] that there was plenty of time to notice each and every flaw and dissect them under a microscope. Soon, small insignificant flaws become regarded as [[FranchiseOriginalSin unavoidable and unforgivable sins]]. The final tell-tale sign is when ridicule, or even hatred, comes not just for [[{{Hatedom}} the thing itself]], but for [[FanHater its fans]]. [[AcceptableTargets They become the subject of nasty, highly-specific stereotypes]], and [[SugarWiki/GushingAboutShowsYouLike gushing about how you like it]] online is considered {{troll}}ing.
11th Apr '18 8:07:44 PM HighCrate
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[AC: Animators]]
* JohnKricfalusi was one of the most successful animators of the 1990s. His breakthrough hit "Ren and Stimpy" was such a success, that it revived the idea of creator driven cartoons and put an end to the mentality that surrounded the 1980s of only producing animated shows to sell toys. The momentum propelled other cartoons to take influence from it's formula and structure and despite being fired from his own show for failing to meet deadlines, it did little to slow him down. It only bolstered his reputation, and made him enjoy a living legend stature. He pioneered the first Web cartoons on his company Spumco's website ("Weekend Pussy Hunt", "The Goddamn George Liquor Program"), animated music videos for musicians (Bjork and TenaciousD) and was asked to produce some Yogi Bear cartoons for Cartoon Network. By the end of the 1990s, Kricfalusi was considered to be the most respected animator of the modern age and an inspiration to aspiring animators.
** By the 2000s, his popularity had begun to sunk. He had finally gotten around to pitching "The Ripping Friends", a concept he had thought up since the 1980s to FOX Kids, but was critically panned. He was then recruited by The Paramount Network (Known then as TNN, and later Spike TV) to produce new episodes of Ren and Stimpy under the name of Ren and Stimpy Adult Party Cartoon. Fans were excited initially, but then when it arrived, it proved to be a failure both critically and finanically. People were turned away by the depiction of Ren and Stimpy being a gay couple and how vulgar the content was, that they started to feel that John was ironically better off under Nickelodeon's censorship. It ended as soon as it started, because of low ratings and John's failure to meet deadlines once again. His repertiore was ruined further when he started up an online blog in 2006 and criticized modern cartoons. Adult Party Cartoon had bombed so hard, that John was blacklisted from the industry for a while and had to live off of making bumpers for AdultSwim and music videos for WeirdAl and MileyCyrus through the rest of the late 2000s and early 2010s. In 2012, he attempted a comeback by starting a Kickstarter to fund a new cartoon entitled CansWithoutLabels, which made than more enough to meet it's goal by August of that year, but he did very little work on it and only managed to complete it by 2017, which turned some of his most loyal fans away from him. In 2013, author Thad Komorowski released a book entitled "Sick Little Monkeys" with interviews from his former colleagues, showing a different side to John's accounts of things and explaining what really happened, which put a kibosh on John. He was in the process of opening a new studio and pitching a show called "Roxy and The Heartaches" to Adult Swim with ex girlfriend April March, but in 2018, it was revealed that he had groomed teenage girls in the 1990s, and sexually harassed them, even being in a relationship with one of them for 7 years and had child pornography on his computer. This was enough to kill his career for good, and lose all of his fans, even the few he still had left. When it comes down to it, JohnKricfalusi went from being considered an animation legend to being one of the most hated people in animation in the span of three decades.

to:

[[AC: Animators]]
* JohnKricfalusi was one of the most successful animators of the 1990s. His breakthrough hit "Ren and Stimpy" was such a success, that it revived the idea of creator driven cartoons and put an end to the mentality that surrounded the 1980s of only producing animated shows to sell toys. The momentum propelled other cartoons to take influence from it's formula and structure and despite being fired from his own show for failing to meet deadlines, it did little to slow him down. It only bolstered his reputation, and made him enjoy a living legend stature. He pioneered the first Web cartoons on his company Spumco's website ("Weekend Pussy Hunt", "The Goddamn George Liquor Program"), animated music videos for musicians (Bjork and TenaciousD) and was asked to produce some Yogi Bear cartoons for Cartoon Network. By the end of the 1990s, Kricfalusi was considered to be the most respected animator of the modern age and an inspiration to aspiring animators.
** By the 2000s, his popularity had begun to sunk. He had finally gotten around to pitching "The Ripping Friends", a concept he had thought up since the 1980s to FOX Kids, but was critically panned. He was then recruited by The Paramount Network (Known then as TNN, and later Spike TV) to produce new episodes of Ren and Stimpy under the name of Ren and Stimpy Adult Party Cartoon. Fans were excited initially, but then when it arrived, it proved to be a failure both critically and finanically. People were turned away by the depiction of Ren and Stimpy being a gay couple and how vulgar the content was, that they started to feel that John was ironically better off under Nickelodeon's censorship. It ended as soon as it started, because of low ratings and John's failure to meet deadlines once again. His repertiore was ruined further when he started up an online blog in 2006 and criticized modern cartoons. Adult Party Cartoon had bombed so hard, that John was blacklisted from the industry for a while and had to live off of making bumpers for AdultSwim and music videos for WeirdAl and MileyCyrus through the rest of the late 2000s and early 2010s. In 2012, he attempted a comeback by starting a Kickstarter to fund a new cartoon entitled CansWithoutLabels, which made than more enough to meet it's goal by August of that year, but he did very little work on it and only managed to complete it by 2017, which turned some of his most loyal fans away from him. In 2013, author Thad Komorowski released a book entitled "Sick Little Monkeys" with interviews from his former colleagues, showing a different side to John's accounts of things and explaining what really happened, which put a kibosh on John. He was in the process of opening a new studio and pitching a show called "Roxy and The Heartaches" to Adult Swim with ex girlfriend April March, but in 2018, it was revealed that he had groomed teenage girls in the 1990s, and sexually harassed them, even being in a relationship with one of them for 7 years and had child pornography on his computer. This was enough to kill his career for good, and lose all of his fans, even the few he still had left. When it comes down to it, JohnKricfalusi went from being considered an animation legend to being one of the most hated people in animation in the span of three decades.
11th Apr '18 6:18:48 PM BerkJoe4
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

[[AC: Animators]]
* JohnKricfalusi was one of the most successful animators of the 1990s. His breakthrough hit "Ren and Stimpy" was such a success, that it revived the idea of creator driven cartoons and put an end to the mentality that surrounded the 1980s of only producing animated shows to sell toys. The momentum propelled other cartoons to take influence from it's formula and structure and despite being fired from his own show for failing to meet deadlines, it did little to slow him down. It only bolstered his reputation, and made him enjoy a living legend stature. He pioneered the first Web cartoons on his company Spumco's website ("Weekend Pussy Hunt", "The Goddamn George Liquor Program"), animated music videos for musicians (Bjork and TenaciousD) and was asked to produce some Yogi Bear cartoons for Cartoon Network. By the end of the 1990s, Kricfalusi was considered to be the most respected animator of the modern age and an inspiration to aspiring animators.
** By the 2000s, his popularity had begun to sunk. He had finally gotten around to pitching "The Ripping Friends", a concept he had thought up since the 1980s to FOX Kids, but was critically panned. He was then recruited by The Paramount Network (Known then as TNN, and later Spike TV) to produce new episodes of Ren and Stimpy under the name of Ren and Stimpy Adult Party Cartoon. Fans were excited initially, but then when it arrived, it proved to be a failure both critically and finanically. People were turned away by the depiction of Ren and Stimpy being a gay couple and how vulgar the content was, that they started to feel that John was ironically better off under Nickelodeon's censorship. It ended as soon as it started, because of low ratings and John's failure to meet deadlines once again. His repertiore was ruined further when he started up an online blog in 2006 and criticized modern cartoons. Adult Party Cartoon had bombed so hard, that John was blacklisted from the industry for a while and had to live off of making bumpers for AdultSwim and music videos for WeirdAl and MileyCyrus through the rest of the late 2000s and early 2010s. In 2012, he attempted a comeback by starting a Kickstarter to fund a new cartoon entitled CansWithoutLabels, which made than more enough to meet it's goal by August of that year, but he did very little work on it and only managed to complete it by 2017, which turned some of his most loyal fans away from him. In 2013, author Thad Komorowski released a book entitled "Sick Little Monkeys" with interviews from his former colleagues, showing a different side to John's accounts of things and explaining what really happened, which put a kibosh on John. He was in the process of opening a new studio and pitching a show called "Roxy and The Heartaches" to Adult Swim with ex girlfriend April March, but in 2018, it was revealed that he had groomed teenage girls in the 1990s, and sexually harassed them, even being in a relationship with one of them for 7 years and had child pornography on his computer. This was enough to kill his career for good, and lose all of his fans, even the few he still had left. When it comes down to it, JohnKricfalusi went from being considered an animation legend to being one of the most hated people in animation in the span of three decades.
26th Mar '18 11:27:21 AM KizunaTallis
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Series/AmericanIdol'' was a massive cultural juggernaut when it premiered in 2002, shooting to the top of the ratings and giving Creator/{{Fox}} enough power to compete with Creator/{{ABC}}, Creator/{{CBS}} and Creator/{{NBC}}. However, a series of problems that plagued the show would come to a head as the years went by. First, the winners (who were supposed to be the most popular contestants from the most popular show in the country) failed to establish successful careers (Music/KellyClarkson and Music/CarrieUnderwood are the only ones who've achieved long-lasting success), often being [[TheRunnerUpTakesItAll overshadowed by the runners-up]]. Second, the PowerTrio of judges Simon Cowell, Music/PaulaAbdul and Randy Jackson eventually broke up, being replaced with a revolving door of panelists who either didn't [[ReplacementScrappy have the same appeal]] with the viewers or were just ill-suited for the job. The show's increasing emphasis on the HopelessAuditionees and strong competition from NBC's ''Series/TheVoice'' further accelerated the show's freefall in the ratings, and a general backlash against {{reality TV}} as a whole didn't help either. Furthermore, the show's voting system became less credible, coming under fire especially with Music/AdamLambert's shocking loss to Kris Allen in Season 8[[note]]Short version: AT&T stores in Arkansas, Allen's home state, were accused of helping his fans cast massive numbers of votes for him by providing instructions on how to "power-text", or send hundreds of text messages at a time. It just so happens that AT&T was one of the show's sponsors...[[/note]]. The final nail in the coffin came in 2014, when CBS moved the ''Series/{{Survivor}}'' season finale to Wednesday to coincide with ''Idol'' and solidly beat it in the ratings; when this happened again the following year, Fox decided to put the show out of its misery. The fifteenth and final season aired in 2016, ending a month earlier than usual, possibly to let the series end on a relatively high note and avoid another repeat of the ''Survivor'' fiasco. While several former contestants have achieved varying levels of success in the years since, ''American Idol'''s cultural impact is clearly over, being viewed solely as a symbol of all the worst aspects of the reality TV craze of the 2000s. That said, Creator/{{ABC}} [[http://www.billboard.com/biz/articles/news/tv-film/7791773/american-idol-officially-returning-at-abc would revive the show]] for the 2017-18 season (NBC had first intended reviving it), and it remains to be seen if they can help ''Idol'' escape this trap.

to:

* ''Series/AmericanIdol'' was a massive cultural juggernaut when it premiered in 2002, shooting to the top of the ratings and giving Creator/{{Fox}} enough power to compete with Creator/{{ABC}}, Creator/{{CBS}} and Creator/{{NBC}}. However, a series of problems that plagued the show would come to a head as the years went by. First, the winners (who were supposed to be the most popular contestants from the most popular show in the country) failed to establish successful careers (Music/KellyClarkson and Music/CarrieUnderwood are the only ones who've achieved long-lasting success), often being [[TheRunnerUpTakesItAll overshadowed by the runners-up]]. Second, the PowerTrio of judges Simon Cowell, Music/PaulaAbdul and Randy Jackson eventually broke up, being replaced with a revolving door of panelists who either didn't [[ReplacementScrappy have the same appeal]] with the viewers or were just ill-suited for the job. The show's increasing emphasis on the HopelessAuditionees and strong competition from NBC's ''Series/TheVoice'' further accelerated the show's freefall in the ratings, and a general backlash brewing against {{reality TV}} as a whole didn't help either. Furthermore, the show's voting system became less credible, coming under fire especially with the circumstances surrounding Music/AdamLambert's shocking loss to Kris Allen in Season 8[[note]]Short version: AT&T stores in Arkansas, Allen's home state, were accused of helping his fans cast massive numbers of votes for him by providing instructions on how to "power-text", or send hundreds of text messages at a time. It just so happens that AT&T was one of the show's sponsors...[[/note]]. The final nail in the coffin came in 2014, when CBS moved the ''Series/{{Survivor}}'' season finale to Wednesday to coincide with ''Idol'' and solidly beat it in the ratings; when this happened again the following year, Fox decided to put the show out of its misery. The fifteenth and final season aired in 2016, ending a month earlier than usual, possibly to let the series end on a relatively high note and avoid another repeat of the ''Survivor'' fiasco. While several former contestants have achieved varying levels of success in the years since, ''American Idol'''s cultural impact is clearly over, being viewed solely as a symbol of all the worst aspects of the reality TV craze of the 2000s. That said, Creator/{{ABC}} [[http://www.billboard.com/biz/articles/news/tv-film/7791773/american-idol-officially-returning-at-abc would revive revived the show]] for the 2017-18 in 2018 season (NBC had first intended reviving it), and it remains to be seen if they can help ''Idol'' escape this trap.
This list shows the last 10 events of 1480. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.DeaderthanDisco