History Main / DancingBear

12th Nov '16 5:02:25 PM TheGreenHerring
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** Season 20 Episode 7, involving the 2016 United States presidential election, is of particular note because it was rewritten and remade ''less than a day before it aired'', as the election results that day turned out to be the opposite of what the creators predicted.
24th Oct '16 4:35:30 AM Kitchen90
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* ''Film/CarryOnCamping'' is mostly remembered for Barbara Windor's character's bikini top flying off and hitting Creator/KennethWilliams in the face. [[SarcasmMode It's a wonder why it's the most successful movie in the film series...]]



* ''Film/CarryOnCamping'' is mostly remembered for Barbara Windor's character's bikini top flying off and hitting Creator/KennethWilliams in the face. [[SarcasmMode It's a wonder why it's the most successful movie in the film series...]]
24th Oct '16 4:33:57 AM Kitchen90
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* ''Film/CarryOnCamping'' is mostly remembered for Barbara Windor's character's bikini top flying off and hitting Creator/KennethWilliams in the face. [[SarcasmMode It's a wonder why it's the most successful movie in the film series...]]
4th Sep '16 4:40:37 AM erforce
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-->--'''Russian proverb'''

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-->--'''Russian -->-- '''Russian proverb'''



* For ''[[Franchise/ThePinkPanther Trail of the Pink Panther]]'' (1982), Creator/BlakeEdwards and MGM/UA used mostly-unused scenes from ''The Pink Panther Strikes Again'' (1976) of the late Peter Sellers as Inspector Clouseau for the film's first half by putting them into a different storyline via new scenes with the series regulars. The second half, after Clouseau "goes missing", is a ClipShow of his greatest hits tied together with a reporter investigating the matter. Pitted against a number of production obstacles, Edwards' new film became a dancing bear that spiked the audience's curiosity to come out and judge if he could make it funny. The fact that Edwards couldn't became clear when Sellers's widow successfully sued him and the studio for tarnishing her late husband's image. This proved a bad omen for the next film, 1983's ''Curse of...'', which picked up where this left off to introduce Clouseau's ReplacementScrappy.

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* For ''[[Franchise/ThePinkPanther Trail of the Pink Panther]]'' ''Film/TrailOfThePinkPanther'' (1982), Creator/BlakeEdwards and MGM/UA used mostly-unused scenes from ''The Pink Panther Strikes Again'' ''Film/ThePinkPantherStrikesAgain'' (1976) of the late Peter Sellers Creator/PeterSellers as Inspector Clouseau for the film's first half by putting them into a different storyline via new scenes with the series regulars. The second half, after Clouseau "goes missing", is a ClipShow of his greatest hits tied together with a reporter investigating the matter. Pitted against a number of production obstacles, Edwards' new film became a dancing bear that spiked the audience's curiosity to come out and judge if he could make it funny. The fact that Edwards couldn't became clear when Sellers's widow successfully sued him and the studio for tarnishing her late husband's image. This proved a bad omen for the next film, 1983's ''Curse of...'', ''Film/CurseOfThePinkPanther'', which picked up where this left off to introduce Clouseau's ReplacementScrappy.
1st Sep '16 8:27:00 PM rjd1922
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* {{Webcomic/Homestuck}} has a gimmick which it grew into - its use of MediumAwareness combined with the InfiniteCanvas of a webcomic.
* Many ''{{Webcomic/XKCD}}''-comic-inspired {{Defictionalization}}s are only recognized because of their inspirational source. The [[http://www.geekosystem.com/xkcd-tetris-hell-game/ "Tetris in hell"]] game, for example, is interesting entirely because someone actually bothered to make it even though it doesn't really add anything to [[http://xkcd.com/724/ the original joke.]]
* ''Webcomic/{{Sonichu}}'' is a webcomic with terrible artwork, incoherent stories and a cast of bland Mary Sue characters. The comic's main draw is the fact that it provides a window into its creator's bizarre life.

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* {{Webcomic/Homestuck}} ''{{Webcomic/Homestuck}}'' has a gimmick which it grew into - its use of MediumAwareness combined with the InfiniteCanvas of a webcomic.
* Many ''{{Webcomic/XKCD}}''-comic-inspired ''{{Webcomic/xkcd}}''-comic-inspired {{Defictionalization}}s are only recognized because of their inspirational source. The [[http://www.geekosystem.com/xkcd-tetris-hell-game/ "Tetris in hell"]] game, for example, is interesting entirely because someone actually bothered to make it even though it doesn't really add anything to [[http://xkcd.com/724/ the original joke.]]
* ''Webcomic/{{Sonichu}}'' is a webcomic with terrible artwork, incoherent stories and a cast of bland Mary Sue MarySue characters. The comic's main draw is the fact that it provides a window into its creator's bizarre life.
18th Aug '16 10:20:45 AM ZombieAladdin
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In general, as pinball machines were originally marketed to operators, who would put them out in public for people to play, advertising for them tended to be more about unique gimmicks and other novelties than about the gameplay itself, as operators were not necessarily players and thus were more likely persuaded on gimmicks and novelties than how good the game actually played.

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In general, as pinball machines were originally marketed to operators, who would put them out in public for people to play, advertising for them tended to be more about unique gimmicks and other novelties than about the gameplay itself, as operators were not necessarily players and thus were more likely persuaded on gimmicks and novelties than how good the game actually played. Rather than talk about, say, ''Pinball/TheAddamsFamily'''s intricate depth, its challenging yet fair difficulty, or its scoring oriented around CompetitiveBalance, it was easier to convince operators to buy the game because Thing comes out of a box and grabs the ball! Or hidden magnets swing the ball around in unpredictable directions!


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* ''Pinball/BlackKnight'' had a related concept: The split-level playfield, where the top half is elevated compared to the bottom half. This proved popular enough to inspire FollowTheLeader for its competitors, at least for a brief while. Its sequel, ''Black Knight 2000'', had the same gimmick, only now it was advertised to have a full-length song with vocals playing in the background.
* ''Pinball/{{Xenon}}'''s gimmick was that it was the first large-scale release of a pinball machine to have pre-recorded voice clips. As it was released in 1980, right when computer technology became small enough to fit in a pinball machine, it took a lot of work to produce the equipment to get the several seconds' worth of those recordings. The designers and engineers sure as heck weren't going to let that go by unnoticed.
* In turn, the marketing for ''Pinball/{{Gorgar}}'' was completely about how the various voice clips for the titular creature could be spliced together to form other phrases.
* ''Pinball/TXSector'' proudly advertised its so-called "teleporting balls": Two pinballs were kept in reserve at various spots, ready to be released under certain conditions, creating the illusion that a single ball teleported elsewhere.
17th Aug '16 5:59:43 PM ZombieAladdin
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[[folder:Pinball]]
In general, as pinball machines were originally marketed to operators, who would put them out in public for people to play, advertising for them tended to be more about unique gimmicks and other novelties than about the gameplay itself, as operators were not necessarily players and thus were more likely persuaded on gimmicks and novelties than how good the game actually played.
* ''Pinball/{{Orbitor 1}}'''s appeal is solely that its playfield is not entirely flat, but is instead warped transparent plastic, causing the ball to travel unusual paths. Sometimes, a point would be made that the machine was designed by a NASA astrophysicist. Aside from that, the playfield itself was pretty empty, making the games incredibly boring.
* ''Pinball/{{Centigrade 37}}'' integrated a thermometer into the artwork whose mercury would rise as the game is played. The game itself is well-liked up to the present, but the thermometer was such a big part of the artwork that it would've been the first thing most people would see, especially to onlookers watching it rise as someone plays it.
* ''Pinball/BlackHole'' was the first machine to popularize multi-level playfields--in this case, a smaller one beneath the main one, seen through a window. The artwork on the backglass up top also has a large spinning mirrored disk, creating a DrosteImage of a rampaging black hole.
[[/folder]]
7th Aug '16 7:40:43 PM Quanyails
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* ''VieoGame/AlphaWaves'' is pretty much known only for the fact that it was a 3D platformer made in the 16-bit era.

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* ''VieoGame/AlphaWaves'' ''VideoGame/AlphaWaves'' is pretty much known only for the fact that it was a 3D platformer made in the 16-bit era.
1st Aug '16 5:13:56 AM Morgenthaler
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* To many people, ''WarAndPeace'' is remembered because it's one of the longest classic narratives ever written.

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* To many people, ''WarAndPeace'' ''Literature/WarAndPeace'' is remembered because it's one of the longest classic narratives ever written.
31st Jul '16 10:09:56 AM nombretomado
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* The DCComics series ''ComicBook/FiftyTwo'' was sold not on its content but on the fact that it was a 52-issue miniseries that would publish an issue a week (for a year) in "real time" (i.e., the events of each issue took place over the course of the week following the week during which the events of the previous issue took place). It also filled in the year of time skipped during DC's "One Year Later" event, during which Superman, Batman, and Wonder Woman were missing. It was generally well-received, but led to a brief trend of weekly miniseries for DC, some of which were ... [[ComicBook/CountdownToFinalCrisis less good]].

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* The DCComics Creator/DCComics series ''ComicBook/FiftyTwo'' was sold not on its content but on the fact that it was a 52-issue miniseries that would publish an issue a week (for a year) in "real time" (i.e., the events of each issue took place over the course of the week following the week during which the events of the previous issue took place). It also filled in the year of time skipped during DC's "One Year Later" event, during which Superman, Batman, and Wonder Woman were missing. It was generally well-received, but led to a brief trend of weekly miniseries for DC, some of which were ... [[ComicBook/CountdownToFinalCrisis less good]].
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.DancingBear